1971, English, Article edition: COXIELLA BURNETI IN A WILDLIFE-LIVESTOCK ENVIRONMENT: DISTRIBUTION OF Q FEVER IN WILD MAMMALS1 ENRIGHT, J. B.; FRANTI, C. E.; BEHYMER, D. E.; ...

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/207352
Physical Description
  • text/​html
Published
  • Oxford University Press
  • 1971-07-01 00:00:00.0
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • COXIELLA BURNETI IN A WILDLIFE-LIVESTOCK ENVIRONMENT: DISTRIBUTION OF Q FEVER IN WILD MAMMALS1
Author
  • ENRIGHT, J. B.
  • FRANTI, C. E.
  • BEHYMER, D. E.
  • LONGHURST, W. M.
  • DUTSON, V. J.
  • WRIGHT, M. E.
Published
  • Oxford University Press
  • 1971-07-01 00:00:00.0
Physical Description
  • text/​html
Subjects
Notes
  • Enright, J. B. (Dept. of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Univ. of Calif., Davis, Calif. 95616), C. E. Franti, D. E. Behymer, W. M. Longhurst, V. J. Dutson and M. E. Wright. Coxiella burneti in a wildlife-livestock environment; distribution of Q fever in wild mammals. Amer J Epidem 94: 79–90, 1971—Q fever was studied in the wild mammal fauna of the area on and around the Hopland Field Station in Mendocino County, California. Based on detectable phase II complement-fixing serum antibodies, there was evidence of exposure to Coxiella burneti in 17 of 21 species tested. The highest prevalence was in coyotes (78%), foxes (55%) and brush rabbits (53%). The lowest was in grey squirrels (6%), wood rats (3%) and kangaroo rats (2%). Deer had a prevalence of 22% and the prevalence of antibody in wild mice (peromyscus) ranged from 31% in brush mice to 9% in pinyon mice. Other animal species having antibodies were harvest mice, deer mice, meadow mice, jackrabbits, chipmunks, ground squirrels, raccoons and striped skunks. No phase II CF antibodies to C. burneti were detected in the bobcats and feral cats that were tested. C. burneti was isolated from 9 of the 20 wild mammal species tested (deer, sported skunk, striped skunk, grey fox, coyote, brush rabbit, jackrabbit, deer mouse and ground squirrel) and 2 kinds of ticks ( Dermacentor occidentalis and Ornithodoros coriaceus ). The prevalence of detectable antibodies in wildlife appeared to be related to their association with infected livestock or small mammals. Exposure and possible infection through the respiratory route may have been related to the food habits of wild animals. The kinds of animals (jackrabbits and deer) that feed on the same pastures as infected livestock had a higher prevalence than those from bordering areas (e.g., wood rats). Certain carnivores (coyotes, foxes and skunks) may have become exposed to C. burneti while eating infected sheep or wild animals.
Terms of Use
  • Copyright (C) 1971, Oxford University Press
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

With access conditions

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment