1971, English, Article edition: COXIELLA BURNETI IN A WILDLIFE-LIVESTOCK ENVIRONMENT: ANTIBODY RESPONSE OF EWES AND LAMBS IN AN ENDEMIC Q FEVER AREA1 ENRIGHT, J. B.; FRANTI, C. E.; LONGHURST, W. M.; ...

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/207338
Physical Description
  • text/​html
Published
  • Oxford University Press
  • 1971-07-01 00:00:00.0
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • COXIELLA BURNETI IN A WILDLIFE-LIVESTOCK ENVIRONMENT: ANTIBODY RESPONSE OF EWES AND LAMBS IN AN ENDEMIC Q FEVER AREA1
Author
  • ENRIGHT, J. B.
  • FRANTI, C. E.
  • LONGHURST, W. M.
  • BEHYMER, D. E.
  • WRIGHT, M. E.
  • DUTSON, V. J.
Published
  • Oxford University Press
  • 1971-07-01 00:00:00.0
Physical Description
  • text/​html
Subjects
Notes
  • Enright J. B. (Dept. of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Univ. of California, Davis, Calif. 95616), C. E. Franti, W. M. Longhurst, D. E. Behymer, M. E. Wright and V. J. Dutson. Coxiella burnefi in a wildlife-livestock environment; antibody response of ewes and lambs in an endemic Q fever area. Amer J Epidem 94: 62–71, 1971.—Two independent cycles of Q fever have been hypothesized: one in wildlife and the other in domestic livestock. We investigated the prevalence of Q fever antibodies in livestock and wildlife sharing the same habitat to determine the ecology of Coxiella burneti under the influence of these two cycles. A serological study of ewes and lambs during a 2-year period indicated a recurring annual cycle of Q fever in sheep. Seasonal changes in the prevalence of phase II complement-fixing ( CF ) antibodies to C. burneti in sheep are believed to reflect their exposure to the rickettsiae. The peak prevalence of CF antibodies in ewes (55%) was in March, 8 to 12 weeks following the December-February lambing period. This peak may be in response to exposure to C. burneti shed during parturition. The prevalence of CF antibodies in ewes was lowest in late September (18%). Lambs born in two consecutive years were tested at birth and on selected dates through their first year of life. The levels of detectable Q fever CF antibodies were similar in these two populations: from 7 to 18% of the lambs were antibody positive on the day of birth and the prevalence of CF antibodies in lambs slowly increased through the summer to a peak of approximately 30% in September. The level of antibodies in these cohorts declined through the fall but reflected an increase in the prevalence of detectable antibodies during the respective succeeding lambing periods. By the end of the first year the prevalence of phase II complement-fixing antibodies to C. burneti in lambs was similar to that in adult sheep in the population. The major source of infection in the sheep popution appears to be C. burneti shed in the placentas of infected ewes during the lambing season. There was no evidence that the prevalence of Q fever in these sheep was influenced by wildlife.
Terms of Use
  • Copyright (C) 1971, Oxford University Press
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

With access conditions

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment