1971, English, Article edition: EPIDEMIOLOGIC STUDIES OF PARKINSON'S DISEASE: I. SMOKING AND PARKINSON'S DISEASE: A SURVEY AND EXPLANATORY HYPOTHESIS KESSLER, IRVING I.; DIAMOND, EARL L.

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/207284
Physical Description
  • text/​html
Published
  • Oxford University Press
  • 1971-07-01 00:00:00.0
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • EPIDEMIOLOGIC STUDIES OF PARKINSON'S DISEASE: I. SMOKING AND PARKINSON'S DISEASE: A SURVEY AND EXPLANATORY HYPOTHESIS
Author
  • KESSLER, IRVING I.
  • DIAMOND, EARL L.
Published
  • Oxford University Press
  • 1971-07-01 00:00:00.0
Physical Description
  • text/​html
Subjects
Notes
  • Kessler, 1.1. (Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Hygiene and Public Health, Baltimore, Md. 21205) and E. L. Diamond. Epidemiologic studies of Parkinson's disease. I. Smoking and Parkinson's disease: a survey and explanatory hypothesis. Amer J Epidem 94: 16–25, 1971.—Nicotine has long been known to affect the central and peripheral nervous systems of man. It has variously been regarded as an exacerbating factor or as a therapeutic modality in Parkinson's disease. Three prospective studies have demonstrated a lower risk of death from Parkinson's disease among smokers than nonsmokers. A previous retrospective study confirmed that patients with this condition are less likely to smoke tobacco than other patients, but attributed this to an artifact resulting in the selection of control patients with excessive smoking habits. In the present investigation, the smoking histories of all Baltimore residents discharged with a diagnosis of Parkinson's disease from the hospitals of Baltimore over a 2-year period were ascertained. These patients were less likely to have ever smoked and, if smokers, tended to smoke less than a comparable group of patients without Parkinson's disease. Tremors, rigidity, hypokinesia and alterations in facies and speech were somewhat less prevalent among male parkinsonians who smoked than among those who did not. Relatively few female patients smoked and these did not differ substantially in their neuropathologic symptoms from the nonsmokers. Smokers tended to develop neurologic deficits at an earlier age than nonsmokers, thus suggesting the possibility of two forms of Parkinson's disease—one more refractory than the other to the effects of nicotine. An hypothesis involving known metabolic pathways of the biogenic amines is suggested for further study of the observed relationships between smoking and Parkinson's disease.
Terms of Use
  • Copyright (C) 1971, Oxford University Press
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

With access conditions

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment