1991, English, Article edition: Sexual conflict among polygynous pied flycatchers feeding young Lifjeld, Jan T.; Slagsvold, Tore

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/207200
Physical Description
  • text/​html
Published
  • Oxford University Press
  • 1991-01-01 00:00:00.0
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Sexual conflict among polygynous pied flycatchers feeding young
Author
  • Lifjeld, Jan T.
  • Slagsvold, Tore
Published
  • Oxford University Press
  • 1991-01-01 00:00:00.0
Physical Description
  • text/​html
Subjects
Notes
  • In the polygynous pied flycatcher, Ficedula hypoleuca , reproductive success of females is constrained by male food provisioning during the nestling period. Hence, there will be conflicting interests among the male and each of his mates as to how male feeding effort should be shared among broods. This paper describes three experiments designed to examine the parental behavior of the members of a bigynous trio, i.e., the male and his two mates, in light of these conflicts. In all experiments, primary and secondary broods were manipulated to hatch on the same day to reduce the difference in brood-reproductive value due to age. Males divided their effort equally when the two broods were the same size. However, males did not allocate their investment in proportion to brood size when brood sizes differed, but invested more heavily per young in the larger broods. This finding suggests that males tried to optimize the joint effort of their two mates. Males and females showed similar responses to experimental reduction in brood demands, which indicates no difference in their willingness to invest in offspring. When one of the male’s mates was removed temporarily, the male increased his total feeding rate and provided proportionately more food to the “motherless” brood. Through flexible allocation of parental investment, males seem able to optimize their reproductive interests in the two broods. The only way a polygynously mated female might successfully increase the amount of male assistance at her nest is to make her own brood more valuable for the male, relative to the other broods he might have. We discuss some ways this might be achieved. [Behav Ecol 1991;2:106–115]
Terms of Use
  • Copyright (C) 1991, International Society for Behavioral Ecology
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

With access conditions

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment