1998, English, Article edition: The phagocytic activity of human first trimester extravillous trophoblast Choy, M.Y.; Manyonda, I.T.

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/205833
Physical Description
  • text/​html
Published
  • Oxford University Press
  • 1998-10-01 00:00:00.0
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • The phagocytic activity of human first trimester extravillous trophoblast
Author
  • Choy, M.Y.
  • Manyonda, I.T.
Published
  • Oxford University Press
  • 1998-10-01 00:00:00.0
Physical Description
  • text/​html
Subjects
Notes
  • It has been suggested previously that phagocytic activity in the human placenta is confined to cells of the macrophage lineage. However, earlier studies were hampered by the paucity and poor viability of cells inherent in primary trophoblast cell cultures, contamination by other cell types which themselves have phagocytic activity, lack of reliable markers of trophoblasts, and by limitations of methods available to demonstrate unequivocally the internalization of particulate material. We have overcome these limitations by using: (i) DNA transfection to provide unlimited supplies of pure trophoblast cell lines; (ii) human placental lactogen as a marker unique to trophoblast; and (iii) confocal microscopy of demonstrate unequivocally the intracellular locality of phagocytosed material. We found that both untransfected primary culture extravillous trophoblast cells, as well as the cell lines, had the capacity to phagocytose sheep red blood cells, Staphylococcus aureus and baker's yeast cells, and that this activity was inhibited by cytochalasin B and by culture at 4°C. Phagocytic activity in trophoblast cells was less avid than that seen in a professional phagocyte. In physiological and pathological situations where tissue remodelling occurs, such as the rapid turnover in the periodontal ligament or during inflammation, epithelial cells and other cells that are not considered professional phagocytes actively phagocytose components of the extracellular matrix. We postulate that phagocytosis by human trophoblasts may play an important role in the extensive tissue remodelling that occurs during trophoblastic invasion of the decidua.
Terms of Use
  • Copyright (C) 1998, European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment