1998, English, Article edition: Does intracytoplasmic sperm injection lead to a rise in the frequency of microdeletions in the AZFc region of the Y chromosome in future generations? Kremer, Jan A.M.; Tuerlings, Joep H.A.M.; Borm, George; ...

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/205654
Physical Description
  • text/​html
Published
  • Oxford University Press
  • 1998-10-01 00:00:00.0
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Does intracytoplasmic sperm injection lead to a rise in the frequency of microdeletions in the AZFc region of the Y chromosome in future generations?
Author
  • Kremer, Jan A.M.
  • Tuerlings, Joep H.A.M.
  • Borm, George
  • Hoefsloot, Lies H.
  • Meuleman, Eric J.H.
  • Braat, Didi D.M.
  • Brunner, Han G.
  • Merkus, Hans M.W.M.
Published
  • Oxford University Press
  • 1998-10-01 00:00:00.0
Physical Description
  • text/​html
Subjects
Notes
  • Microdeletions in the AZFc region of the Y chromosome are found in oligo- and azoospermic men. These mutations were genetically lethal before the intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) era but they can nowadays be transmitted to next generations via ICSI. We have tried to answer the question, ‘Does ICSI lead to a significant rise in the frequency of these microdeletions in future generations?’, by developing a mathematical model for Y-linked mutations with two variables (fitness and mutation frequency). To illustrate this model we have made estimates according to three imaginary scenarios. Using the assumptions described, the model predicted that the frequency of microdeletions in the AZFc region would increase in each generation until a plateau was reached. The higher the fitness, the higher the plateau and the later the plateau would be reached. Taking realistic estimates for fitness (0.5) and spontaneous mutation frequency (0.0001), the maximum increase in men with microdeletions would be twofold. This maximum would be already reached after five generations. However, if the fitness of these men were improved and approached 1.0, the mechanism of selection would disappear and finally all men would have the deletion in the AZFc region. Because of the assumptions in these scenarios, these estimates have limitations. The model presented shows that the rise in the frequency of men with microdeletions in the AZFc region in future generations would be limited as long as the fitness of these men remained limited.
Terms of Use
  • Copyright (C) 1998, European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment