1962, English, Article edition: Nitrogen Metabolism of Detached Kalanchoe Leaves in the Dark in Relation to Acidification, Deacidification, and Oxygen Uptake LYNDON, R. F.

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/203674
Physical Description
  • text/​html
Published
  • Oxford University Press
  • 1962-02-01 00:00:00.0
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Nitrogen Metabolism of Detached Kalanchoe Leaves in the Dark in Relation to Acidification, Deacidification, and Oxygen Uptake
Author
  • LYNDON, R. F.
Published
  • Oxford University Press
  • 1962-02-01 00:00:00.0
Physical Description
  • text/​html
Subjects
Notes
  • Detached Kalancho&​ecaron; leaves were placed in the dark and changes in the amounts of total soluble N, asparagine, glutamine, amino N, ammonia, and titratable acid were followed during the periods of acidification and deacidification. Abundant starch was present throughout the experiments. The amount of acid which accumulated in the initial period was increased by placing the leaves in 5 per cent. CO 2 and also by decreasing the temperature from 25 to 10°. In neither case were the nitrogen fractions affected in a similar way to the acid levels. No consistent relationship could be found between the amount or change in amount of acid and the amounts of the nitrogen fractions. Over prolonged periods the drifts in the amounts of the nitrogen fractions were very similar to those known in non-succulent leaves. It is concluded that, despite the large amounts of free acid and starch present, the nitrogen metabolism of detached Kalancho&​ecaron; leaves in the dark is similar to that of non-succulent leaves. A possible explanation is suggested for the incorporation of 14C from 14CO 2 into nitrogenous substances in Kalancho&​ecaron; leaves during dark acidification. Changes in the amounts of glutamine, which seemed to be related to oxygen uptake rather than to acid fluctuations, were measured in comparable leaf samples showing different rates of oxygen uptake. The rate of oxygen uptake of leaves and leaf disks in the dark was controlled by placing them in an atmosphere of nitrogen, or 5, 20, or 100 per cent, oxygen, by the addition of 10–3 M. cyanide, or by varying the temperature. At the end of a given period the amount of glutamine was always greater in the samples which had shown the higher rate of oxygen uptake during this perod. This correlation was found irrespective of whether the amount of glutamine had increased or decreased. With the assumptions that glutamine production and consumption were proceeding simultaneously and that the rate of consumption was unaffected by the rate of oxygen uptake, the experimental values are consistent with the hypothesis that the rate of glutamine production and the rate of oxygen uptake were directly related. The possible significance of these findings is discussed.
Terms of Use
  • Copyright (C) 1962, Society for Experimental Biology
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

With access conditions

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment