2003, English, Article edition: Exorcizing Molly Malone: Typhoid and Shellfish Consumption in Urban Britain 1860-1960 Hardy, Anne

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/203611
Physical Description
  • text/​html
Published
  • Oxford University Press
  • 2003-03-01 00:00:00.0
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Exorcizing Molly Malone: Typhoid and Shellfish Consumption in Urban Britain 1860-1960
Author
  • Hardy, Anne
Published
  • Oxford University Press
  • 2003-03-01 00:00:00.0
Physical Description
  • text/​html
Subjects
Notes
  • After Dublin shellfish seller Molly Malone died of a fever, according to the ballad, her ghost continued to walk her barrow, crying cockles and mussels. Molly's fever was almost certainly typhoid, contracted by sampling her wares. During the nineteenth century, an extensive urban culture of shellfish eating had become established in urban Britain. Around 1900, however, the link between shellfish consumption and typhoid was established. Dramatic outbreaks of typhoid due to oysters eaten at mayoral banquets had a damaging impact on the shellfish trades. Extensive newspaper publicity helped to disseminate suspicion of shellfish among consumers, and this was reflected in popular food writing and cookery manuals. The steady decline in consumption during the twentieth century has been attributed, for oysters, to ‘social change’ and government failure to support the native industry. This paper argues a different case: that the adverse publicity generated by shellfish&​hyphen;related typhoid outbreaks was compounded by the efforts of the public health organization and local government to sanitize and regulate the shellfish trades. The impact of this campaign was to erode consumer confidence in shellfish, and largely to destroy the culture of shellfish consumption in Britain.
Terms of Use
  • Copyright (C) 2003, Oxford University Press
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

With access conditions

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment