2003, English, Article edition: Cape or Cairo? University History on the African Continent Nasson, Bill

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/203461
Physical Description
  • text/​html
Published
  • Oxford University Press
  • 2003-03-01 00:00:00.0
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Cape or Cairo? University History on the African Continent
Author
  • Nasson, Bill
Published
  • Oxford University Press
  • 2003-03-01 00:00:00.0
Physical Description
  • text/​html
Subjects
Notes
  • This commemorative essay marks the 2003 centenary of the Department of History in the University of Cape Town, South Africa. It has the longest&​hyphen;known record of continuous academic history teaching and research in Africa, and has for decades been a leading site in the construction of a South African national history. Its beginnings in the segregationist South Africa of the early 1900s were quintessentially colonial, with Cape Town historians bewitched by a historiography of British imperial achievement and the march of an English settler civilization. While course teaching remained almost exclusively Eurocentric in focus for many decades, this small scholarly world of safe, grey&​hyphen;suited white males (and the occasional female) helped gradually to pioneer the writing of the history of South African society and economy in its own right. Inevitably, earlier concentration was on the political and constitutional history of white society, with professional historians showing little interest in the internal dynamics of majority black societies, or in exploring their role in the shaping of the country's history. Yet, treatment of the past also developed a liberal vision, with historical focus on race relations as a spur to improvement and reform. The period after the Second World War produced further new recognition of the importance of a more Africanist history. In more recent decades, partly as the inevitable result of the crumbling of apartheid and the coming of majority rule, Cape Town history perspectives followed paths into social history, urban history and oral history, inspired by movements like History Workshop.
Terms of Use
  • Copyright (C) 2003, Oxford University Press
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

With access conditions

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment