2003, English, Article edition: Rousseauvian Remains Brock, Claire

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/203429
Physical Description
  • text/​html
Published
  • Oxford University Press
  • 2003-03-01 00:00:00.0
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Rousseauvian Remains
Author
  • Brock, Claire
Published
  • Oxford University Press
  • 2003-03-01 00:00:00.0
Physical Description
  • text/​html
Subjects
Notes
  • This article counters the Burkean legacy of contempt and distaste that has dominated recent critical discussions of Rousseau's British reception with an analysis of the incredible response of men to Jean&​hyphen;Jacques Rousseau and his literary and literal remains. Intertwining the man of feeling with the man of virtuous action, writing with the private self, Rousseau put forward models of self&​hyphen;representation that were accommodating to the ordinary man, searching for an accessible hero. Coupled with the democratization and domestication of the hero&​hyphen;figure in the later eighteenth century came the desire for propinquity, if not to the worshipped idol, then with his or her accoutrements. While the Grand Tourists brought back classical works of art, the alternative traveller sought for private objects with a more recent history. This article examines the growth of an industry dealing in objects revered with a startling religiosity by the fervent British admirers of Jean&​hyphen;Jacques, only too eager effectively to own part of their hero in order to be continually inspired by his genius, and, for some, hopefully, to profit from his fame. After revolution, regicide, Terror and war, ordinary readers remained loyal to and intrigued by Jean&​hyphen;Jacques. Far from rejecting Jean&​hyphen;Jacques Rousseau, British men sought him out, embracing his doctrines. Persistently, and in spite of detractors like Burke, Rousseau remained.
Terms of Use
  • Copyright (C) 2003, Oxford University Press
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

With access conditions

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment