1993, English, Article edition: Freezing Tolerance and Alteration of Translatable mRNAs in Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) Hardened at Subzero Temperatures Castonguay, Yves; Nadeau, Paul; Laberge, Serge

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/201755
Physical Description
  • text/​html
Published
  • Oxford University Press
  • 1993-01-01 00:00:00.0
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Freezing Tolerance and Alteration of Translatable mRNAs in Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) Hardened at Subzero Temperatures
Author
  • Castonguay, Yves
  • Nadeau, Paul
  • Laberge, Serge
Published
  • Oxford University Press
  • 1993-01-01 00:00:00.0
Physical Description
  • text/​html
Subjects
Notes
  • We analyzed changes in populations of translatable mRNAs occurring in crowns of the cold-tolerant alfalfa ( Medicago sativa L.) cv. Apica (CT) and the cold-sensitive cv. CUF-101 (CS) after their acclimation at low nonfreezing temperatures and at subzero temperatures. Both cultivars showed very similar translation profiles under all treatments. Low temperatures induced significant changes in the populations of translatable mRNAs. We observed a relationship between the accumulation of cold-regulated (COR) translation products and freezing tolerance within cultivars. Moreover, at least three COR translation products were specific to the CT and might be related to hardiness potential in alfalfa. Whereas extension of the cold acclimation period at 2�C reduced cold tolerance, incubation at subzero temperatures increased or maintained freezing tolerance. This increased hardiness was associated with enhanced translation of COR polypeptides and also with the appearance of new translatable mRNAs. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of altered gene expression in plants incubated at subzero temperatures. Marked changes in populations of translatable mRNAs at temperatures below freezing might be related to previous reports that alfalfa achieves maximum hardiness under snow cover when the soil has frozen. Translation in the presence of [3H]glycine showed that a large proportion of the COR genes encode for glycine-rich proteins (GRPs) and that some of the GRPs are specific to the CT.
Terms of Use
  • Copyright (C) 1993, The Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

With access conditions

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment