2009, English, Article edition: Maternal Blood Lead Levels and the Risk of Pregnancy Induced Hypertension. The “EDEN” Cohort Study. Yazbeck, Chadi; Thiébaugeorges, Olivier; Moreau, Thierry; ...

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/200933
Physical Description
  • text
Published
  • HAL - CCSD
  • 2009
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Maternal Blood Lead Levels and the Risk of Pregnancy Induced Hypertension. The “EDEN” Cohort Study.
Author
  • Yazbeck, Chadi
  • Thiébaugeorges, Olivier
  • Moreau, Thierry
  • Goua, Valérie
  • Debotte, Ginette
  • Sahuquillo, Josiane
  • Forhan, Anne
  • Foliguet, Bernard
  • Magnin, Guillaume
  • Slama, Rémy
  • Charles, Marie-Aline
  • Huel, Guy
Published
  • HAL - CCSD
  • 2009
Physical Description
  • text
Subjects
Notes
  • Background: Prior studies revealed associations of environmental lead exposure with risks of hypertension and elevated blood pressure. Objectives: To examine the effect of blood lead levels on blood pressure and the incidence of pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy. Methods: One thousand seventeen pregnant women were enrolled in two French municipalities between 2003 and 2005 for the EDEN cohort study. Blood lead concentrations were measured by atomic absorption spectrometry in mothers between 24 and 28 weeks of gestation. Results: PIH was diagnosed in 106 subjects (10.9%). Age, parity, weight gain, alcohol, smoking habits and calcium supplementation were comparable between hypertensive and non hypertensive women. Lead levels were significantly higher in PIH cases (2.2 µg/​dl [0.11 µmol/​l] SD 1.4 µg/​dl) than in normotensive patients (1.9 µg/​dl [0.09 µmol/​l] SD 1.2 µg/​dl); p=​0.02. Adjustment for potential confounders slightly attenuated but did not eliminate the significant association between blood lead levels and the risk of PIH (adjusted OR of PIH=​ 3.3, 95% CI: 1.1 to 9.7). Geographic differences in lead exposure and in the incidence of PIH were also observed. Significant correlations were found between blood lead levels and unadjusted as well as adjusted systolic and diastolic blood pressures after 24 weeks of gestation. Conclusions: These findings confirm the relationship between blood lead levels at mid-pregnancy and blood pressure, and suggest that environmental lead exposure may play an etiologic role in PIH.
  • HAL:inserm-00404271, version 1
  • HAL:http:/​/​www.hal.inserm.fr/​inserm-00404271/​en/​
  • DOI:10.1289/​ehp.0800488
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (2)
  • Unknown (2)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment