2001, English, Article edition: Effect of feeding on growth hormone response to growth hormone-releasing hormone in polycystic ovarian syndrome: relation with body weight and hyperinsulinism Villa, Paola; Soranna, Liberato; Mancini, Antonio; ...

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/200023
Physical Description
  • text/​html
Published
  • Oxford University Press
  • 2001-03-01 00:00:00.0
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Effect of feeding on growth hormone response to growth hormone-releasing hormone in polycystic ovarian syndrome: relation with body weight and hyperinsulinism
Author
  • Villa, Paola
  • Soranna, Liberato
  • Mancini, Antonio
  • De Marinis, Laura
  • Valle, Domenico
  • Mancuso, Salvatore
  • Lanzone, Antonio
Published
  • Oxford University Press
  • 2001-03-01 00:00:00.0
Physical Description
  • text/​html
Subjects
Notes
  • The plasma growth hormone (GH) response to direct stimulation with growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) before and after a standard meal was investigated in 14 polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) subjects. Data were compared with those obtained from 14 healthy normovulatory matched patients. All women underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) (75 g) and basal plasma hormone concentrations were evaluated. On a different day all subjects had a GHRH test (50 μg GHRH) both before and after lunch randomly. In obese PCOS subjects the GH response to GHRH was blunted after a meal, while in obese control patients there was an enhanced response of GH to GHRH after a meal. Normal control subjects showed an inhibition of the GH response after feeding and lean PCOS subjects showed a trend toward an augmented GHRH related secretion after a meal significantly higher than normal controls ( P < 0.05) but not significantly higher than the pre-prandial response. In conclusion, the data indicate in PCOS a derangement of GH secretion related to food ingestion; in particular obese PCOS patients did not exhibit any change of GH response after a meal compared with the paradoxical response observed in obese controls. Several other factors beyond body mass index and hyperinsulinism could be involved in these pathophysiological events.
Terms of Use
  • Copyright (C) 2001, European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment