English, Article, Journal or magazine article edition: Public Policy and Health Care Choices of the Elderly: Evidence from the Medicare Buy-In Program A. S. Yelowitz

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/189036
Physical Description
  • preprint
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Public Policy and Health Care Choices of the Elderly: Evidence from the Medicare Buy-In Program
Author
  • A. S. Yelowitz
Physical Description
  • preprint
Notes
  • This study provides evidence on the economic decisions of senior citizens with respect to the largest means-tested program in the United States: the Medicaid program. Virtually all senior citizens have health insurance coverage through Medicare, but poor seniors may also be eligible for Medicaid, which fills in many of the gaps in Medicare coverage. Since 1987, the Medicaid program has undergone a series of changes relating to eligibility. In particular, two new categories of elderly Medicaid recipients, known as Qualified Medicare Beneficiaries (QMBs) and Specified Low-Income Medicare Beneficiaries (SLMBs), were created. This study uses the Survey of Income and Program Participation to explore three issues relating to the expansions. First, how much did the QMB expansions increase Medicaid eligibility? Second, how did increases in Medicaid eligibility affect supplemental insurance coverage? Finally, does increased Medicaid coverage translate into increased health care utilization? There are five principal findings. First, actual Medicaid eligibility increased dramatically, from 8 percent in 1987 to 12.5 percent in 1995. Second, the expansions for the elderly resulted in dramatically higher Medicaid take-up rates than similar expansions for children. For every 100 elderly who became eligible, 49 took it up. Nearly 30 out of 100 elderly dropped private coverage, however, resulting in crowd out of 60 percent. Third, crowd out was concentrated among the youngest of senior citizens. Fourth, crowd out came from individuals dropping privately purchased health insurance rather than dropping employer-provided retiree health insurance. Finally, Medicaid coverage increased the number of hospitalizations, though the findings on health care utilization are generally inconclusive.
  • RePEc:wop:wispod:1136-97
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

Other links

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment