English, Article, Journal or magazine article edition: Toxic releases by manufacturing : world patterns and trade policies Lucas, Robert E.B.

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/187836
Physical Description
  • preprint
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Toxic releases by manufacturing : world patterns and trade policies
Author
  • Lucas, Robert E.B.
Physical Description
  • preprint
Notes
  • Little evidence exists on the distribution across countries of toxic releases by manufacturing, or on how those patterns change through time. A number of studies have asked whether environmental controls imposed in the industrialized economies are diverting investments in pollution-intensive activities offshore. These studies reach a broad negative conclusion: direct investment does not appear to be stimulated by such regulation, in part because the cost of emission controls is generally a tiny fraction of operating costs. But direct investment reflects only part of what may be happening to world production patterns. Technology transfers may occur with no simultaneous direct investment, and production may readily shift toward a different global distribution without either direct investment or technology transfer. The author presents the evidence on the world distribution of manufacturing production according to pollution density - using data from the World Bank Industrial Pollution Projections Team. He then examines the validity of the claim that free trade would result in greater and more rapid environmental degradation for developing countries. He finds that: (1) The onus is on the higher-income countries to contain the emissions of their increasingly pollution-oriented mix of manufacturing industries. (2) The global trend has been toward an increasingly emission-intensive pattern of production, in relation to both manufacturing and to GDP. This trend has been remarkably constant over three decades and shows no signs of slowing. (3) The upward trend in emission-intensity of manufacturing production has been faster among lower-income nations. If pollution restraints on given industies are progressing more rapidly among the wealthier countries, this disparity would be even sharper than the Bank data suggest. Developing countries that produce coal, crude oil, or natural gas also have more pollution-intensive manufacturing sectors, based on the availability of those raw materials. It may be doubted that fostering such industries always reflects a comparative advantage. Petrochemical industries in the coal-oil-gas-producing countries are often substantially protected or subsidized. Among all developing countries, import protection stimulates a larger chemicals industry and thus more emission-intensive manufacturing. One might guess that less protection of local industrial chemical industries would decrease the pollution-intensity of the developing countries'industry. But merely relocating firms that emit globally damaging toxins clearly misses the point.
  • Environmental Economics&​Policies,Energy and Environment,Economic Theory&​Research,Water and Industry,Carbon Policy and Trading
  • RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:964
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment