English, Article, Journal or magazine article edition: How Do Collective Agents Think? Antonio G. CALAFATI

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/18662
Physical Description
  • preprint
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • How Do Collective Agents Think?
Author
  • Antonio G. CALAFATI
Physical Description
  • preprint
Notes
  • In economics prominence has been given to a peculiar reductionist view according to which ‘collective thinking’ is the straightforward result of the work of a specific algorithm - the social welfare function - by means of which any set of potential collective decisions may be ranked. The mental process is seen as the product of the work of a software. The question of which kind of hardware can support this software has been traditionally regarded as unimportant. In this paper the attempt is made to put forward a framework to explain public decisions which builds upon the hypothesis that ‘collective mind’ should not be analysed by abstracting from the features of collective brain. Indeed, collective mental processes will be interpreted as ‘caused’ by the structure of the collective brain that sustains them. It is suggested that the analysis of the collective brain ought to be the starting point in the search for a theory of public decisions. By defining collective brain as a ‘specialised network of individuals’ it will emerge that collective thinking is based on an ‘institutional base’ which is its fundamental causal factor of public decisions. But addressing the question of the ‘institutional base’ of collective thinking requires a new set of concepts and theoretical statements if one wants to give a meaning to the empirical evidence. A further step in the analysis will be the observation that in modern democracies collective brain is usually ‘partitioned’ and the collective mental process segmented. This segmentation has been historically accompanied by a remarkable increase in the specialised production of knowledge functional to collective decision-making. Collective brains become more differentiated as a result of the fact that they incorporate ‘technical units’ devoted to the production of knowledge. A further consequence of having a segmented mental process is the intrinsic ‘coevolutionary nature’ of collective thinking. Although to various degrees, each decisionmaker is (or ought to be) a system which is open in terms of informational flow. If collective decision-makers want to be up to their moral canons they have to use the relevant knowledge that is dispersed in the environment in their decision process. Coevolutionary collective thinking is both an observed phenomenon and a standard of collective behaviour.
  • RePEc:anc:wpaper:131
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

Other links

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment