English, Article edition: INDIVIDUAL AND SOCIAL STRATEGIES TO DEAL WITH IGNORANCE SITUATIONS IN MULTI-PERSON DECISION MAKING S. ALONSO; E. HERRERA-VIEDMA; F. CHICLANA; ...

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/15723
Physical Description
  • article
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • INDIVIDUAL AND SOCIAL STRATEGIES TO DEAL WITH IGNORANCE SITUATIONS IN MULTI-PERSON DECISION MAKING
Author
  • S. ALONSO
  • E. HERRERA-VIEDMA
  • F. CHICLANA
  • F. HERRERA
Physical Description
  • article
Notes
  • Multi-person decision making problems involve the preferences of some experts about a set of alternatives in order to find the best one. However, sometimes experts might not possess a precise or sufficient level of knowledge of part of the problem and as a consequence that expert might not give all the information that is required. Indeed, this may be the case when the number of alternatives is high and experts are using fuzzy preference relations to represent their preferences. In the literature, incomplete information situations have been studied, and as a result, procedures that are able to compute the missing information of a preference relation have been designed. However, these approaches usually need at least a piece of information about every alternative in the problem in order to be successful in estimating all the missing preference values.In this paper, we address situations in which an expert does not provide any information about a particular alternative, which we call situations of total ignorance. We analyze several strategies to deal with these situations. We classify these strategies into: (i) individual strategies that can be applied to each individual preference relation without taking into account any information from the rest of experts and (ii) social strategies, that is, strategies that make use of the information available from the group of experts. Both individual and social strategies use extra assumptions or knowledge, which could not be directly instantiated in the experts preference relations. We also provide an analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of each one of the strategies presented, and the situations where some of them may be more adequate to be applied than the others.
  • Ignorance, decision making, fuzzy preference relations, consistency, consensus
  • RePEc:wsi:ijitdm:v:08:y:2009:i:02:p:313-333
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment