English, Article, Journal or magazine article edition: Urban Decline and Durable Housing Edward L. Glaeser; Joseph Gyourko

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/142031
Physical Description
  • preprint
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Urban Decline and Durable Housing
Author
  • Edward L. Glaeser
  • Joseph Gyourko
Physical Description
  • preprint
Notes
  • People continue to live in many big American cities, because in those cities housing costs less than new construction. While cities may lose their productive edge, their houses remain and population falls only when housing depreciates. This paper presents a simple durable housing model of urban decline with several implications which document: (1) urban growth rates are leptokurtotic— cities grow more quickly than they decline, (2) city growth rates are highly persistent, especially amount declining cities, (3) positive shocks increase population more than they increase housing prices, (4) negative shocks decrease housing prices more than they decrease population, (5) the relationship between changes in housing prices and changes in population is strongly concave, and (6) declining cities attract individuals with low levels of human capital.
  • RePEc:fth:harver:1931
  • Most of America’s largest cities in 1950 have declined since then. In these declining areas, most homes cost less than the cost of new construction. In 1990, nearly 60 percent of all owner-occupied single-unit residences in Midwest central cities were valued at less than the cost of construction. Indeed, these declining cities appear to persist because of the durability of housing. We present a durable housing model that explains a number of facts about urban dynamics. Housing durability explains why city growth rates are leptokurtotic, and why cities grow more quickly than they decline. Housing durability can explain the striking persistence of city growth rates among declining cities. Housing durability explains why positive shocks to cities appear to increase population more than prices and why negative shocks appear to reduce price more than population. Finally, and most importantly, durable housing may explain why declining cities appear to attract individuals with low levels of human capital. Both authors gratefully acknowledge financial support from the Research Sponsors Program of the Zell/​Lurie Real Estate Center at Wharton. Glaeser also thanks the National Science Foundation. Jesse Shapiro and Christian Hilber provided excellent research assistance. This paper is dedicated to our teacher, Sherwin Rosen, who taught us all much about housing markets.
  • RePEc:wop:pennzl:382
  • People continue to live in many big American cities, because in those cities housing costs less than new construction. While cities may lose their productive edge, their houses remain and population falls only when housing depreciates. This paper presents a simple durable housing model of urban decline with several implications which document: (1) urban growth rates are leptokurtotic -- cities grow more quickly than they decline, (2) city growth rates are highly persistent, especially amount declining cities, (3) positive shocks increase population more than they increase housing prices, (4) negative shocks decrease housing prices more than they decrease population, (5) the relationship between changes in housing prices and changes in population is strongly concave, and (7) declining cities attract individuals with low levels of human capital.
  • RePEc:nbr:nberwo:8598
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment