2005, English, Article, Report edition: The impact of agroforestry-based soil fertility replenishment practices on the poor in western Kenya / Frank Place ... [et al.].

User activity

Share to:
The impact of agroforestry-based soil fertility replenishment practices on the poor in western Kenya / Frank Place ... [et al.]
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/40043368
Physical Description
  • xii, 166 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Published
  • Washington, D.C. : International Food Policy Research Institute, c2005.
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • The impact of agroforestry-based soil fertility replenishment practices on the poor in western Kenya /​ Frank Place ... [et al.].
Other Authors
  • Place, Frank Dr.
Published
  • Washington, D.C. : International Food Policy Research Institute, c2005.
Physical Description
  • xii, 166 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Series
Subjects
Contents
  • Machine derived contents note: Contents
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • 1. Introduction 1
  • 2. Research Methods 11
  • 3. The Context of the Research 39
  • 4. Poverty in Context 51
  • 5. Household-Level Livelihood Strategies and Their Context 65
  • 6. Processes and Patterns of Adoption 77
  • 7. SFR and Rural Peoples? Livelihood in Western Kenya 117
  • 8. Dissemination of SFR Technologies: Comparing Approaches, Methods,
  • and Experiences 153
  • 9. Human and Social Capital Formation: Dissemination Within the Villages 195
  • 10. Conclusions and Recommendations 235
  • Appendix A: Results and Tests from First-Stage Regressions 251
  • Appendix B: Six Village-Level Case Studies of Dissemination Processes 259
  • Appendix C: Additional Examples of PRA Exercises on Dissemination Comparison
  • of Poor Men and Women?s Groups in Mutsulio 323
  • References 329
  • Tables
  • 1 Phase 1, Wave 1 case studies of impact of agricultural research under the
  • IFPRI/​SPIA Project 2
  • 2 Case study villages 29
  • 3 Villages and dissemination approaches in the dissemination study 33
  • 4 Research design matrix: Assets, vulnerability, and livelihoods 34
  • 5 Research design matrix: Dissemination strategies 36
  • 6 Distribution of poverty in pilot villages (n =​ 104) using alternative
  • classifications 62
  • 7 Distribution of poverty in nonpilot villages (n =​ 360), using alternative
  • classifications 64
  • 8 Livelihood strategies pursued by individuals in pilot villages (130 households) 66
  • 9 Use of agroforestry in the pilot villages over time (in percent of 1,538
  • households) 80
  • 10 Use of agroforestry in nonpilot villages over time (percent of 360 households) 80
  • 11 Patterns of use of improved fallows and biomass transfer in the pilot villages
  • (by percent of 1,598 households) 82
  • 12 Rates of use of improved fallows in early nonpilot area villages 83
  • 13 Size of fallows over time in pilot villages (square meters) 84
  • 14 Planting of tithonia biomass transfer systems on farm over time in pilot
  • villages (percent of households planting) 85
  • 15 Household factors related to adoption of improved fallow in the pilot villages
  • 1997-2001 (n =​ 1,583) 90
  • 16 Household factors related to adoption of biomass transfer in the pilot villages,
  • 1997-2001 (n =​ 1,583) 93
  • 17 Multinomial logit results for adoption of improved fallows in nonpilot
  • villages (n =​ 361) 96
  • 18 Multinomial logit results for adoption of biomass transfer in nonpilot villages
  • (n =​ 361) 97
  • 19 Use rates of soil fertility management options over time in nonpilot project
  • areas 112
  • 20 Soil fertility practices and maize yield impacts 123
  • 21 Description of household liquid assets in pilot and nonpilot villages 134
  • 22 Econometric results from second-stage regression of agroforestry on changes
  • in assets in the pilot villages (n =​ 97) 136
  • 23 Total nonfood expenditures, per capita nonfood expenditures, and changes
  • during the three-month-long rainy season in 2000-02 (in US dollars) 138
  • 24 Econometric results from second-stage regressions of agroforestry on changes
  • in nonfood expenditures and per capita nonfood expenditures in the pilot
  • villages (n =​ 102) 139
  • 25 Percent of daily requirements of nutritional measures at the household level
  • prior to a long-rain harvest 141
  • 26 Econometric results from second-stage regression of agroforestry use on
  • nutritional measurements (n =​ 102) 143
  • 27 Village selection for the dissemination study 155
  • 28 Summary of reach and effectiveness of different sources of information on
  • SFR (in percentage of all households located in relevant villages) 174
  • 29 Percentage of households receiving information on agroforestry from other
  • farmers or any source 177
  • 30 Percent of households with direct contact for SFR information, by source
  • and wealth group 180
  • 31 Knowledge gain for tithonia and improved fallow in the six study villages
  • from focus group discussions 224
  • 32 Knowledge acquisition in agricultural topics from household survey in
  • nonpilot villages (n =​ 361) 227
  • Figures
  • 1 Sustainable livelihoods framework 15
  • 2 Adoption patterns of improved fallows and biomass transfer in the pilot
  • villages over time, 1997-2001 (by percent of 1,630 households) 82
  • 3 Adoption patterns of improved fallows and biomass transfer in the pilot
  • villages by 2001 (percent of 1,630 households) 84
  • 4 Village map of institutions involved with SFR information exchange
  • (Bukhalalire poor men?s focus group) 157
  • 5 Average preferences for dissemination methods used by external
  • organizations in six villages 188
  • 6 Average assessments of relative importance of internal disseminators in poor
  • versus nonpoor focus groups 200
  • 7 Average assessments of relative importance of internal disseminators in men
  • versus women?s focus groups 201
  • 8 Sauri poor women?s group, at least four years of primary education 220
  • 9 Sauri nonpoor women?s group education level: At least four years of
  • primary education 221
  • 10 Average knowledge gain for each technology, by village 222
  • Boxes
  • 1 Relay Type of Strategies 68
  • 2 Types of Farmers and Farming Systems 72
  • 3 Increased Farm Yields 119
  • 4 Mitigating Vulnerability 120.
Notes
  • Includes bibliographical references (p. 165-166)
Language
  • English
ISBN
  • 0896291448 (alk. paper)
Dewey Number
  • 631.4/​22/​096762
Libraries Australia ID
Contributed by
Libraries Australia

Get this edition

Freely available

Related resource

None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment