English, Article, Journal or magazine article edition: Why Do Mothers Breastfeed Girls Less Than Boys? Evidence and Implications for Child Health in India Seema Jayachandran; Ilyana Kuziemko

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/141865
Physical Description
  • preprint
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Why Do Mothers Breastfeed Girls Less Than Boys? Evidence and Implications for Child Health in India
Author
  • Seema Jayachandran
  • Ilyana Kuziemko
Physical Description
  • preprint
Notes
  • Medical research indicates that breastfeeding suppresses post-natal fertility. The implications for breastfeeding decisions and test the model's predictions us- ing survey data from India are modelled.
  • female, gender gap, water, food, mothers, environment, birth control, health, medical research, sons, daughters, post natal, fertility, breastfeeding, survey data, girls, India, child mortality,
  • RePEc:ess:wpaper:id:2041
  • Medical research indicates that breastfeeding suppresses post-natal fertility. We model the implications for breastfeeding decisions and test the model's predictions using survey data from India. First, we find that breastfeeding increases with birth order, since mothers near or beyond their desired total fertility are more likely to make use of the contraceptive properties of nursing. Second, given a preference for having sons, mothers with no or few sons want to conceive again and thus limit their breastfeeding. We indeed find that daughters are weaned sooner than sons, and, moreover, for both sons and daughters, having few or no older brothers results in earlier weaning. Third, these gender effects peak as mothers approach their target family size, when their decision about future childbearing (and therefore breastfeeding) is highly marginal and most sensitive to considerations such as ideal sex composition. Because breastfeeding protects against water- and food-borne disease, our model also makes predictions regarding health outcomes. We find that child-mortality patterns mirror those of breastfeeding with respect to gender and its interactions with birth order and ideal family size. Our results suggest that the gender gap in breastfeeding explains 14 percent of excess female child mortality in India, or about 22,000 "missing girls" each year.
  • RePEc:nbr:nberwo:15041
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment