English, Article, Journal or magazine article edition: Measuring Ignorance in the Market: A New Method with an Application to Physician Services Martin Gaynor; Solomon Polachek

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/140717
Physical Description
  • preprint
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Measuring Ignorance in the Market: A New Method with an Application to Physician Services
Author
  • Martin Gaynor
  • Solomon Polachek
Physical Description
  • preprint
Notes
  • Ever since Stigler's seninal piece on the econcinics of information, a great deal of research has been done investigatirg equilibrium in markets with imperfect imformation. While most of this research has been concerned with theoretically establishing the conditions under which there exists a distribution of prices in equilibrium, there is a small, but growing, body of empirical research in this area. This work has followed the sestion of Stigler ard utilized the dispersion of prices (usually the variance) as a measure of ignorance about price. There are two disadvantages to using the variance (or another measure of dispersion, such as the range) of prices as a measure of ignorance about price. The first reason, recognized by Stigler ard others, is that price can vary for many reasons other than ignorance. Thus dispersion is not a pure measure of ignorance about prices. The second reason, which has not been commonly considered in the empirical literature, is that price dispersion can due to ignorance on the part of both buyers and of sellers. In this paper we propose a method for measuring ignorance about price in a market which builds on Stigler's original suggestion to use dispersion as a measure of ignorance. The innovation is to use a new frontier estiiation technique containing a three component error term to separate observed price dispersion into purely random variation, variation due to buyer ignorance, and variation due to seller ignorance . We apply the technique to the physicians' service market. This surplies us with quantitative indices of price ignorance for different services and how the level of ignorance varies by buyer, seller, and market area characteristics. The results are striking. Buyer ignorance exceeds seller ignorance by roughly a factor of two in this market, and this gap is greater for services which are less frequently purchased, more heavily insured, or accompanied by greater severity of illness, as predicted by search theory.
  • RePEc:nbr:nberwo:3430
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

Other links

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment