English, Article, Journal or magazine article edition: The Declining Economic Position of Less-Skilled American Males McKinley L. Blackburn; David E. Bloom; Richard B. Freeman

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/140589
Physical Description
  • preprint
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • The Declining Economic Position of Less-Skilled American Males
Author
  • McKinley L. Blackburn
  • David E. Bloom
  • Richard B. Freeman
Physical Description
  • preprint
Notes
  • This paper documents the substantial decline in the economic position of less-skilled American males that has occurred since the early 1970's. The paper also explores a variety of potential explanations for the widening of earnings differentials between more- and less-educated white males. On the basis of these analyses, we draw four main conclusions. First, our analyses indicate that industrial shift and deunionization account for non-negligible portions of the overall increase in educational wage differentials that occurred in the 1980's. Among 25-64 year olds, these effects are offset by changes in the relative supply of college graduates, which acted to reduce differentials. Among 25-34 year olds, in contrast, changes in relative supply add to our ability to explain the widening of wage gaps. As a result, we are modestly successful in explaining the growth of wage differentials between educational groups in the 1980's for males aged 25-34, but are largely unsuccessful in explaining the growth in wage differentials for males aged 25-64. Second, our analysis achieves greater success when we focus our aim on explaining the change in the growth rate of wage differentials between the 1970's and 1980's. Here we find that relative supply movements, which differed sharply between the 1970's and 1980's, can by themselves account for much of the accelerated pace of change in the wage gaps. This factor operates similarly for 25-64 and 25-34 year olds, since the relative supply of college graduates in both age groups decelerated from the 1970's to the 1980's. Third, our analysis suggests that the 1970's and 1980's differed importantly in ways not captured by our analyses. Since we are able to measure labor supply and institutional changes reasonably well, we can infer that outward shifts in the relative demand for college graduates, caused by factors we were unable to measure, accelerated in the 1980's. Fourth, we find little evidence that the recent widening of wage gaps across educational groups is due to (1) the 1980's decline in the real value of the minimum wage, (2) the increased pace of technological change, (3) changes in the labor supply of white males below age 25 and of women in different educational groups, or (4) changes over time in the quality of less-educated workers.
  • RePEc:nbr:nberwo:3186
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

Other links

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment