English, Article, Journal or magazine article edition: The Relationship Between Firm Size and Firm Growth in the U.S. Manufacturing Sector Bronwyn H. Hall

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/140540
Physical Description
  • preprint
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • The Relationship Between Firm Size and Firm Growth in the U.S. Manufacturing Sector
Author
  • Bronwyn H. Hall
Physical Description
  • preprint
Notes
  • This paper investigates the dynamics of firm growth in the U. S. manufacturing sector in the recent past. I use panel data on the publicly traded firms in the U. S. manufacturing sector: from a universe of approximately 1800 firms in 1976, I am able to follow most of them for at least three years, and over half of them from 1972 until 1983. I consider several problems, both econometric and substantive, which exist in analyzing this kind of data: the choice of size measure, the role of measurement error, and the effect of selection (attrition) on estimates obtained from this sample. Using time series methods, suitably modified for panel data (where the number of time periods per observational unit is small), I analyze the behavior of employment over time and find that most of the change in employment in any given year is permanent in the sense that there is no tendency to return to the previous level. Year-to-year growth rates are largely uncorrelated and there is almost no role for measurement error. I find that Gibrat's Law is weakly rejected for the smaller firms in my sample and accepted for the larger firms; Other measures of size produce essentially the same results. Correction for attrition from the sample changes the results somewhat: I use a simple model in which firms leave the sample because they are small and/​or undervalued (since many exits are acquisitions) and find that Tobin's Q, the raio of market valuation to the value of the underlying assets of the firm, is a much better predictor of exit probability than size alone (firms with low Q are more likely to exit the sample). When I use this estimate of the probability of exit to control for selection bias, Gibrat's Law is weakly rejected for firms of all sizes and there are significant positive effects on firm growth from both investment in physical capital and R&​D expenditures, with R&​D having a somewhat higher net effect.
  • RePEc:nbr:nberwo:1965
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

Other links

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment