English, Article, Journal or magazine article edition: Globalization, Social Security, and International Transfers. F.L. MacKellar; T.Y. Ermolieva; H. Reisen

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/137908
Physical Description
  • preprint
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Globalization, Social Security, and International Transfers.
Author
  • F.L. MacKellar
  • T.Y. Ermolieva
  • H. Reisen
Physical Description
  • preprint
Notes
  • In this paper, we quantify the impact of globalization (i.e., integration of global capital markets) on intergenerational transfers mediated through Pay As You Go (PAYG) public pension systems in more developed countries (MDCs), as well as impacts on the intergenerational distribution of income and wealth. Our basic finding is that, while globalization is likely to erode the pension income of older persons, it will enhance their wealth, leaving their overall spending power little changed. The working age population, which earns lower wages, is an unambiguous loser from the globalization process, at least to the extent that we limit ourselves to a neoclassical analysis of the phenomenon. The main impact of globalization is unlikely, however, to be captured by economy-wide averages such as those presented in this paper. This is the redistribution from lifetime non-savers, especially the poor, who depend on labor income while young and wage-based intergenerational transfers when old, to lifetime savers, who are able to take advantage of improved capital returns. While we concentrate on MDCs in this paper, we make the point that economic impacts of globalization in less developed countries (LDCs) are opposite in sign and greater in relative magnitude. The latter is the case because reallocation of capital gives rise to a greater proportional change in the capital-output ratio in LDCs than in MDCs.
  • RePEc:wop:iasawp:ir99056
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment