English, Article edition: PREDICTING US 2001 RECESSION, COMPOSITE LEADING ECONOMIC INDICATORS, STRUCTURAL CHANGE AND MONETARY POLICY MEHDI MOSTAGHIMI

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/132016
Physical Description
  • article
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • PREDICTING US 2001 RECESSION, COMPOSITE LEADING ECONOMIC INDICATORS, STRUCTURAL CHANGE AND MONETARY POLICY
Author
  • MEHDI MOSTAGHIMI
Physical Description
  • article
Notes
  • In an attempt to predict a peak in the US economy using a classical statistical decision methodology and a Bayesian methodology and using the 1996 revised composite leading economic indicators (CLI), it is learned that the Bayesian models have generally outperformed the classical statistical ones and, among the Bayesian models, the two using two and three consecutive CLI growth rates are superior in reliability and in accuracy. These two models, however, failed to correctly predict the 2001 recession.In investigating the reasons behind their failures, we learned that: (1) if the concurrent data for the economic structure of 1983â1999 are used for the prediction, they have also been able to predict the 2001 recession correctly, but their overall reliability is not as strong as before; (2) given the overwhelming weight of the monetary policy tools in the CLI-1996 design and the combination of the economic and political events in the year 2000, the less than expected effectiveness of the monetary policy since 2001 has contributed to this failure; and (3) a possible structural change in the US economy since 2000 has also contributed to this prediction failure.
  • US economy, predicting recessions, monetary policy, structural change, composite leading indicators, Bayesian probability forecasting, classical statistical decision theory, information theory
  • RePEc:wsi:serxxx:v:51:y:2006:i:03:p:343-363
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment