English, Article, Journal or magazine article edition: Response to Baker and Fugh-Berman's Critique of my Paper, "Why has Longevity Increased more in some States than in others?" Frank Lichtenberg

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/126031
Physical Description
  • preprint
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Response to Baker and Fugh-Berman's Critique of my Paper, "Why has Longevity Increased more in some States than in others?"
Author
  • Frank Lichtenberg
Physical Description
  • preprint
Notes
  • Dean Baker and Adriane Fugh-Berman have published a critique of a study I performed in 2007, entitled “Why has longevity increased more in some states than in others?” One of the conclusions I drew from that study was that medical innovation accounts for a substantial portion of recent increases in U.S. life expectancy. Baker and Fugh-Berman claim that my study was subject to a number of major methodological flaws. Many of their claims pertain to the role of infant mortality; the definition of drug vintage; the issue of age adjustment; and the appropriateness of controlling for AIDS, obesity, and smoking in the analysis of longevity. In this article, I make the case that their claims about my study are largely incorrect. I show that infant mortality was not an important determinant of the growth in U.S. life expectancy during the period that I studied, and that my estimates are completely insensitive to the inclusion or exclusion of infant mortality. Controlling for the age distribution of the population also has essentially no effect on the longevity equation estimates. I argue that my definition of drug vintage, based on the initial FDA approval year of a drug’s active ingredient, is quite reasonable, and it is consistent with the FDA’s evaluation of the therapeutic potential of new drugs. I argue that controlling for AIDS, obesity, and smoking in longevity analysis is entirely appropriate and consistent with the epidemiological literature. Baker and Fugh-Berman express deep skepticism about my study’s conclusion that medical innovation has played a very important role in recent U.S. longevity growth, but they offer no explanation of why life expectancy increased by almost a year during 2000-2006, a period of increasing poverty and obesity and declining health insurance coverage.
  • RePEc:ces:ceswps:_2712
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

Other links

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment