English, Article, Journal or magazine article edition: A FEASIBLE AND OBJECTIVE CONCEPT OF OPTIMALITY: THE QUADRATIC LOSS FUNCTION AND U. S. MONETARY POLICY IN THE 1960's Pedro Garcia Duarte

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/123246
Physical Description
  • preprint
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • A FEASIBLE AND OBJECTIVE CONCEPT OF OPTIMALITY: THE QUADRATIC LOSS FUNCTION AND U. S. MONETARY POLICY IN THE 1960's
Author
  • Pedro Garcia Duarte
Physical Description
  • preprint
Notes
  • The introduction of linear-quadratic methods in monetary economics in the 1960s tinged the intense debate about the optimal monetary policy instrument. These methods were widely used outside monetary economics because they delivered easy solutions to complex stochastic models. This same reason explains the success of quadratic loss functions according to the conventional wisdom among monetary economists. In this traditional narrative, Henri Theil and Herbert Simon are often cited by their proofs that models with quadratic objective functions have the certainty equivalence property. This attribute made the solution of these models feasible for the computers available at that time. This paper shows how the use of a quadratic loss function to characterize the behavior of central banks inaugurated an objective or uniform way of talking about optimality. In this respect, the discourse on optimal monetary policy stabilized. Moreover, a richer account of the quadratic approach to monetary policy debate emerges by analyzing how quadratic loss functions were used in operations research and management problems by groups of scientists that included economists like Modigliani and Simon. I argue that feasibility is only one important factor that explains the wide popularity of quadratic functions in monetary economics.
  • RePEc:anp:en2005:016
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

Other links

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment