English, Article, Journal or magazine article edition: The effect of patient shortage on general practitioners’ future income and list of patients Iversen, Tor

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/120403
Physical Description
  • preprint
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • The effect of patient shortage on general practitioners’ future income and list of patients
Author
  • Iversen, Tor
Physical Description
  • preprint
Notes
  • The literature on supplier inducement suffers from inability to distinguish the effect of better access from the effect of patient shortage. Data from the Norwegian capitation trial in general practice give us an opportunity to make this distinction and hence, study whether service provision by physicians is income motivated. In the capitation trial each general practitioner (GP) has a personal list of patients. The payment system is a mix of a capitation fee and a fee for service. The data set has information on patient shortage, i.e. a positive difference between a GP’s preferred and actual list size, at the individual practice level. From a model of a GP’s optimal choice we derive the optimal practice profile contingent on whether a GP experiences a shortage of patients or not. To what extent GPs, who experience a shortage, will undertake measures to attract patients or embark on a service intensive practice style, depends on the costs of the various measures relative to their expected benefit. The model classifies GPs into five types. In the empirical analysis a panel of GPs is followed for five years. Hence, short-term effects due to transition to a new system should have been overcome. We show that even in the longer run, GPs who experience a shortage of patients have a higher income per listed person than their unrationed colleagues. This result is robust with regard to correction for potential selection bias based on observable and unobservable characteristics. We do not find any significant difference in income per listed person dependent on whether a rationed GP obtains an increase in the number of patients or not. A policy implication is that patient shortage is costly to the insurer because of income motivated behavior of unknown benefit to the patient.
  • Economic motives; Capitation; General practice; Patient shortage; Service provision
  • RePEc:hhs:oslohe:2003_001
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

Other links

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment