English, Article edition: The Influence of Hospital-Based Prescribers on Prescribing in General Practice John Feely; Robert Chan; John McManus; ...

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/119756
Physical Description
  • article
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • The Influence of Hospital-Based Prescribers on Prescribing in General Practice
Author
  • John Feely
  • Robert Chan
  • John McManus
  • Brendan O'Shea
Physical Description
  • article
Notes
  • Objective: To document the influence of hospital prescribers on prescribing in general practice. Design and Participants: Five percent of members of the Irish College of General Practitioners (n =​ 92) prospectively recorded 40 consecutive prescriptions. Interventions: The name, dose and amount of medicine prescribed as well as the indication for therapy, details of their practice, distribution of private/​GMS patients, and the number of years since qualification were recorded. The cost of individual prescriptions was calculated based on the ingredient cost and the number of days of treatment. This was subsequently correlated with the origin of the prescription. Each prescription was classified as either new or repeat. Main outcome measures and results: Of 3286 prescriptions, 69% were for the state-supported General Medical Services (GMS) patients and 31% for private patients. Repeat prescriptions constituted 51%; 49% were new prescriptions. While hospital doctors initiated only 8% of private prescriptions, they initiated 38% of GMS prescriptions, particularly repeat prescriptions and those for cardiovascular, hormonal and centrally-acting agents. Prescriptions for anti-infectives, oral contraceptives, dermatological preparations and musculoskeletal drugs were mostly initiated in general practice. The median cost for hospital-initiated GMS prescriptions (Lstg 5.93) was greater than the cost of general practitioner (GP)-initiated prescriptions (Lstg 3.49; p < 0.01). Prescriptions from GPs who were qualified for less than 10 years and those with a mixed urban and rural practice were less costly (p < 0.05) than those issued by doctors qualified for over 10 years or working predominantly in an urban or rural area. These findings may also reflect differences in patient population, morbidity and demography. Conclusions: Our study indicates that hospital-initiated prescriptions are responsible for a significant proportion, both in volume and cost of GP prescribing.
  • Pharmacoeconomics, Cost-analysis, Prescribing, General-practice
  • RePEc:wkh:phecon:v:16:y:1999:i:2:p:175-181
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment