English, Article edition: Economic Considerations Related to Providing Adequate Pain Relief for Women in Labour: Comparison of Epidural and Intravenous Analgesia Cecil Huang; Alex Macario

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/119372
Physical Description
  • article
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Economic Considerations Related to Providing Adequate Pain Relief for Women in Labour: Comparison of Epidural and Intravenous Analgesia
Author
  • Cecil Huang
  • Alex Macario
Physical Description
  • article
Notes
  • Epidural analgesia and intravenous analgesia with opioids are two techniques for providing pain relief for women in labour. Labour pain is comparable to surgical pain in its severity, and epidural analgesia provides better relief from this pain than intravenous analgesia; a meta-analysis quantified this improvement to be 40mm on a 100mm pain scale during the first stage of labour. Epidural analgesia also has fewer adverse effects. However, providing epidural analgesia for labour pain costs more. The full cost of providing epidural analgesia can be divided into two components: 1. a baseline-cost component, which captures the costs of hospital care to parturients receiving intravenous analgesia for labour pain; and 2. an incremental-cost component, which estimates the costs arising from incremental care specific to epidural analgesia. The baseline component may be constructed using hospital cost-accounting data pertaining to actual obstetric patients. The incremental component is constructed from a set of recognised complications of epidural and intravenous analgesia, associated incidence rates and estimates of the costs involved, from society's perspective. The incremental expected cost per patient to society of providing epidural analgesia was calculated to be approximately $US338 (1998 values). This cost difference results primarily from increased professional costs (and is particularly sensitive to the method used to estimate the cost of anaesthesia professional services) and increased complication costs associated with epidural analgesia. A rational social policy for providing labour analgesia must weigh the value of improved pain relief from epidural analgesia against the increased cost of epidural analgesia.
  • Analgesics, Epidural, Intravenous, Labour, Labour pain, Pharmacoeconomics, Pregnancy
  • RePEc:wkh:phecon:v:20:y:2002:i:5:p:305-318
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment