English, Article edition: Bedside Rapid Flu Test and Zanamivir Prescription in Healthy Working Adults: A Cost-Benefit Analysis Michael Schwarzinger; Bruno Housset; Fabrice Carrat

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/119305
Physical Description
  • article
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Bedside Rapid Flu Test and Zanamivir Prescription in Healthy Working Adults: A Cost-Benefit Analysis
Author
  • Michael Schwarzinger
  • Bruno Housset
  • Fabrice Carrat
Physical Description
  • article
Notes
  • Background: Zanamivir, a neuraminidase inhibitor, reduces the number of days of illness in influenza-positive patients. New bedside rapid flu tests (RFT) should increase the number of influenza-positive patients whom receive zanamivir appropriately. Objective: To estimate the economic effects of implementing RFT and zanamivir among unvaccinated healthy working adults who consult within 2 days of the onset of influenza-like symptoms. Methods: We constructed a decision tree to perform a cost-benefit analysis from a societal perspective. Clinical outcome, i.e. number of influenza days averted, and societal costs were compared for three strategies: 1. RFT and conditional zanamivir prescription; 2. systematic zanamivir prescription; and 3. no zanamivir. A two-way sensitivity analysis was performed including the proportion of influenza-positive patients. Results: During influenza epidemics, systematic zanamivir prescription provided the best health outcome (0.81 influenza days averted) and minimised societal costs (reduced by $US29.80 per person compared with no zanamivir; 1999 values). RFT with conditional zanamivir averted 0.65 influenza days and saved $US14.40 per person. When the proportion of influenza-positive patients was under 39%, the no zanamivir strategy yielded the greatest societal savings; otherwise, systematic zanamivir was the dominant strategy. Medical costs associated with no zanamivir were $US88.70 per patient consulting with influenza-like illness, and increased to $US125.50 with systematic zanamivir and to $US127.60 with RFT and conditional zanamivir. Conclusions: Due to poor sensitivity of current RFT, systematic zanamivir prescription without RFT for unvaccinated healthy working adults should be recommended during influenza epidemics.
  • Antivirals, Cost benefit, Influenza virus infections, Pharmacoeconomics, Zanamivir
  • RePEc:wkh:phecon:v:21:y:2003:i:3:p:215-224
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment