English, Article edition: Initial Treatment Choice in Depression: Impact on Medical Expenditures Eric T. Edgell; Timothy R. Hylan; JoLaine R. Draugalis; ...

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/119052
Physical Description
  • article
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Initial Treatment Choice in Depression: Impact on Medical Expenditures
Author
  • Eric T. Edgell
  • Timothy R. Hylan
  • JoLaine R. Draugalis
  • Stephen Joel Coons
Physical Description
  • article
Notes
  • Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the economic outcomes associated with initial treatment choice following a diagnosis of depression. Methods: Insurance claims data were used to classify patients into one of 4 treatment cohorts: no therapy, psychotherapy, drug therapy and combination therapy. Potential sample selection bias was accounted for by using a 2-stage econometric estimation procedure where initial treatment choice was estimated using a multinomial logistic regression model in the first stage, and total and mental healthcare costs were estimated in ordinary least squares regression models in the second stage. Log predicted costs from the second stage were compared to determine the relative costs associated with each cohort. Results: Significant differences (p < 0.008) in total costs were found between the combination therapy (log predicted cost =​ 9.526) and psychotherapy cohorts (log predicted cost =​ 8.120) in the analysis that included all observations (n =​ 9110). In the analysis that included patients who initiated therapy with a non-mental health provider (n =​ 2673), the drug therapy cohort (log predicted cost =​ 8.238) was found to be significantly more costly as compared to the no therapy cohort (log predicted cost =​ 7.788). Conclusions: These results indicate that after controlling for both observed and unobserved factors, total healthcare costs may be higher in patients who initiate therapy with drug therapy and combination therapy as opposed to no therapy or psychotherapy. In addition, the finding that patients initially receiving psychotherapy alone tend to have higher mental healthcare costs but lower total healthcare costs than other patients may indicate that psychotherapy has an impact on comorbid illness and may subsequently reduce total healthcare costs.
  • Antidepressants, Cost analysis, Depression, Pharmacoeconomics, Psychotherapy
  • RePEc:wkh:phecon:v:17:y:2000:i:4:p:371-382
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment