English, Article edition: Approaches to Missing Data Inference Results from CaPSURE: An Observational Study of Patients with Prostate Cancer Deborah P. Lubeck; David J. Pasta; Scott C. Flanders; ...

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/118648
Physical Description
  • article
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Approaches to Missing Data Inference Results from CaPSURE: An Observational Study of Patients with Prostate Cancer
Author
  • Deborah P. Lubeck
  • David J. Pasta
  • Scott C. Flanders
  • James M. Henning
Physical Description
  • article
Notes
  • Objective: There are multiple reasons for missing data in observational studies; excluding patients with missing data can lead to significant bias. In this study, we evaluated several methods for assigning missing values to health service utilisation. Design and setting: Cancer of the Prostate Strategic Urologic Research Endeavor (CaPSURE) is a US national database of men with prostate cancer. Physician visits and diagnostic tests for 342 patients newly diagnosed with prostate cancer were evaluated. Patients and participants: Patients were followed for a full year (observed data, n =​ 228) and patients with incomplete data (predicted data, n =​ 114) were included. Interventions: We used the following approaches for imputing missing data: assigning the group mean, a time-specific mean, a patient-specific mean, a stratified mean (by age, localised disease and insurance status) and carrying the last observation forward and/​or backward. Main outcome measures and results: All prediction strategies resulted in higher estimates (19.3 to 23.1) for annual physician visits than was observed (17.1 +- 15.5), and differences were statistically significant for both the last observation carried forward (23.1 +- 15.5) and the patient's individual mean (22.7 +- 36.1) when predicting physician visits. The same strategies had higher predicted values for x-rays (1.8 +- 5.1 and 1.8 +- 4.4 vs 1.1 +- 1.9 for the observed group), although the last observation carried forward was not statistically different from the observed value. Conclusions: We were unable to identify a single optimal strategy. However, imputation from individual means and the last observation carried forward methods did not perform as well as the other strategies. While the differences observed in this study were small, we anticipate that with increased length of follow-up and more dropouts, there would be greater differences among strategies.
  • Pharmacoeconomics, Prostate-cancer, Resource-use, Clinical-trial-design, Statistics
  • RePEc:wkh:phecon:v:15:y:1999:i:2:p:197-204
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment