English, Article edition: The Impact of Treatment for Gastro-Oesophageal Reflux Disease on Health-Related Quality of Life: A Literature Review Manishi Prasad; Anne M. Rentz; Dennis A. Revicki

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/118634
Physical Description
  • article
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • The Impact of Treatment for Gastro-Oesophageal Reflux Disease on Health-Related Quality of Life: A Literature Review
Author
  • Manishi Prasad
  • Anne M. Rentz
  • Dennis A. Revicki
Physical Description
  • article
Notes
  • Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is common in the general population and is diagnosed based on patient-reported symptoms and clinical tests. Although clinical tests are available, significant percentages of patients report symptoms of heartburn and reflux despite negative endoscopies, and 24-hour pH tests are not often used by primary-care physicians in diagnosis. Consequently, patient-reported symptoms and health-related QOL (HR-QOL) are important in assessing treatment outcome. HR-QOL is significantly impaired in patients with GORD, and HR-QOL is associated with symptom severity and changes in GORD-related symptoms. The objective of this literature review is to examine the impact of pharmacological treatment on HR-QOL in patients with GORD. Generic and disease-specific HR-QOL measures have been used in clinical trials to evaluate the impact of GORD on patient functioning and well-being. The Psychological General Well-Being (PGWB) Index and the 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) have been used in several clinical trials of treatment for GORD and have consistently shown that HR-QOL improves with successful therapy. These trials have been conducted primarily with two pharmacological agents, omeprazole and ranitidine. On the Heartburn-specific Quality of Life questionnaire, patients treated with ranitidine reported better HR-QOL after treatment compared with placebo therapy. In two clinical trials where omeprazole and ranitidine were compared, patients treated with omeprazole reported significantly better HR-QOL (based on the PGWB Index) than those treated with ranitidine; however, 2 other trials did not detect significant differences between the treatments. Results from clinical trials using disease-specific measures (Gastrointestinal Quality of Life Index [GIQLI] and Heartburn-specific Quality of Life questionnaire) demonstrate similar findings, supporting the association between treatment-related symptom resolution and improvements in HR-QOL. The GIQLI was used in a trial comparing pantoprazole and ranitidine, where results favoured pantoprazole therapy. Several studies have demonstrated that resolution of GORD symptoms is associated with improvement in HR-QOL. Although there is evidence that treatment for GORD does improve symptoms and HR-QOL outcomes, further research is needed to more completely understand the value of medical therapy for GORD.
  • Antacids, Gastro-oesophageal-reflux, Gastrokinetics, Histamine-H2-receptor-antagonists, Proton-pump-inhibitors, Quality-of-life, Quality-of-life-rating-scales, Ranitidine
  • RePEc:wkh:phecon:v:21:y:2003:i:11:p:769-790
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment