English, Article, Journal or magazine article edition: How fast has Chinese industry grown? Rawski, Tom

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/116213
Physical Description
  • preprint
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • How fast has Chinese industry grown?
Author
  • Rawski, Tom
Physical Description
  • preprint
Notes
  • Data for recent years indicate an acceleration of Chinese industrial growth, from the annual rates of about 10 percent recorded in the quarter century before economic reform to figures approaching 15 percent in the mid- and late 1980s. Evaluating the statistics underlying these reports requires an appraisal of how economic reform has affected the ability of China's statistical system to measure economic performance. Erroneous information about the rate and pattern of industrial growth could distort measures of productivity change considered to be central indicators of the effectiveness of Chinese industrial reform. The author describes the statistical materials and procedures used to provide information on the growth of industrial output. He investigates sources of bias in the official statistics to indicate, whenever possible, how these biases affected reported output totals, and to appraise the impact of adjustments to reported output growth on measures of industrial productivity. The specific consequences of decentralized decisionmaking, growing price flexibility, inflation, dual pricing systems, the emergence of enterpriseswith few or no ties to the system of state planning, and other emerging features of the industrial system may be unique to China but the broader issues raised are relevant in many countries. The author finds considerable evidence of an upward bias in measures of China's real industrial output in the past decade. The issue is not whether such bias exists but whether its presence substantially alters our perception of the rate and pattern of Chinese industrial growth. To clarify this issue requires investigating the extent of possible upward bias. This in turn calls for an analysis of possible links between upward bias - which is itself difficult to observe - and other economic patterns that may be more readily measurable.
  • Markets and Market Access,Access to Markets,Environmental Economics&​Policies,Water and Industry,Economic Theory&​Research
  • RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:1194
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment