English, Article, Journal or magazine article edition: The 1985-94 global real estate cycle : its casues and consequences Renaud, Bertrand

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/116137
Physical Description
  • preprint
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • The 1985-94 global real estate cycle : its casues and consequences
Author
  • Renaud, Bertrand
Physical Description
  • preprint
Notes
  • The peak of the first global real estate boom was reached around 1990 in most Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries. Asset inflation was massive: in office markets across Europe, capital values rose 400 percent between 1980 and 1990, accelerating after 1986 - while average consumer price inflation went up only 150 percent. Property values have declined sharply since 1990, with most property markets losing at least 20 percent in nominal terms the first year of the crash's onset. Cumulative drops in capital value often reached 50 percent by the end of 1993. This pattern of a sustained buildup, usually peaking in 1990, followed by a sharp fall in nominal values, has been encountered in most OECD markets and in several NIE countries. Real estate booms and busts are recurring events, says the author, but real estate volatility on the scale and with the intensity just experience is costly and destructive. Real resources are misallocated, and the impact on the banking system, on households, and on the economy can be lasting. The author surveys the global real estate cycle of 1985-94, trying to identify domestic and international factors that triggered this new phenomenon of global real estate volatility. The authors intent: Assuming that the globalization of financial markets is irreversible, can we separate unique factors from recurring ones in this first global cycle? Can we map generic policy lessons and identify policy priorities and research agendas? Can we identify factors that accentuate real estate price and investment volatility? Four domestic factors lay behind the unusual volatility of this first global cycle, says the author: the liberalization and deregulation of capital markets, a distorted incentive structure that often stimulated the use of debt, new macroeconomic tools and occasional policy errors, and the structure of the real estate sector itself. The wide-ranging survey includes a proposal for research in certain areas, and offers some diagnosis. For example: If the global real estate crash has publicized one thing, it is the poor quality of information on real estate markets.
  • Banks&​Banking Reform,Payment Systems&​Infrastructure,Financial Intermediation,Environmental Economics&​Policies,International Terrorism&​Counterterrorism,Financial Intermediation,Environmental Economics&​Policies,Housing Finance,Economic Theory&​Research,Banks&​Banking Reform
  • RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:1452
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment