English, Article edition: Investing time in health: do socioeconomically disadvantaged patients spend more or less extra time on diabetes self-care? Susan L. Ettner; Betsy L. Cadwell; Louise B. Russell; ...

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/111406
Physical Description
  • article
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Investing time in health: do socioeconomically disadvantaged patients spend more or less extra time on diabetes self-care?
Author
  • Susan L. Ettner
  • Betsy L. Cadwell
  • Louise B. Russell
  • Arleen Brown
  • Andrew J. Karter
  • Monika Safford
  • Carol Mangione
  • Gloria Beckles
  • William H. Herman
  • Theodore J. Thompson
Physical Description
  • article
Notes
  • Background: Research on self-care for chronic disease has not examined time requirements. Translating Research into Action for Diabetes (TRIAD), a multi-site study of managed care patients with diabetes, is among the first to assess self-care time. Objective: To examine associations between socioeconomic position and extra time patients spend on foot care, shopping|cooking, and exercise due to diabetes. Data: Eleven thousand nine hundred and twenty-seven patient surveys from 2000 to 2001. Methods: Bayesian two-part models were used to estimate associations of self-reported extra time spent on self-care with race|ethnicity, education, and income, controlling for demographic and clinical characteristics. Results: Proportions of patients spending no extra time on foot care, shopping|cooking, and exercise were, respectively, 37, 52, and 31%. Extra time spent on foot care and shopping|cooking was greater among racial|ethnic minorities, less-educated and lower-income patients. For example, African-Americans were about 10 percentage points more likely to report spending extra time on foot care than whites and extra time spent was about 3 min more per day. Discussion: Extra time spent on self-care was greater for socioeconomically disadvantaged patients than for advantaged patients, perhaps because their perceived opportunity cost of time is lower or they cannot afford substitutes. Our findings suggest that poorly controlled diabetes risk factors among disadvantaged populations may not be attributable to self-care practices. Copyright © 2008 John Wiley &​ Sons, Ltd.
  • RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:18:y:2009:i:6:p:645-663
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

Other links

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment