2006, English edition: Summary of Participation in adult schooling and its earnings impact in Canada [electronic resource] / by Xuelin Zhang and Boris Palameta. Zhang, Xuelin.

User activity

Share to:
Summary of Participation in adult schooling and its earnings impact in Canada / by Xuelin Zhang and Boris Palameta
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/197294150
Physical Description
  • electronic text.
  • Electronic monograph in PDF format.
Published
  • Ottawa : Business and Labour Market Analysis, Statistics Canada, 2006.
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Summary of Participation in adult schooling and its earnings impact in Canada /​ by Xuelin Zhang and Boris Palameta.
Also Titled
  • Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) (Survey 3889)
  • Statistics Canada (English)
Creator
  • Zhang, Xuelin.
Other Creators
  • Palameta, Boris.
  • Statistics Canada. Analytical Studies Branch.
  • Statistics Canada. Business and Labour Market Analysis Division.
  • Government of Canada.
Published
  • Ottawa : Business and Labour Market Analysis, Statistics Canada, 2006.
Medium
  • [electronic resource]
Physical Description
  • electronic text.
  • Electronic monograph in PDF format.
Series
Subjects
Summary
  • This article summarizes findings from the research paper entitled: The Participation in Adult Schooling and its Earnings Impact in Canada. Based on a sample drawn from Statistics Canada's Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID: 1993 to 1998 and 1996 to 2001), the study finds that young (17 to 34 years old) and single workers were more likely than older (35 to 59 years old) and married and divorced workers to participate in adult schooling and to obtain a post-secondary certificate. Workers with less than a high school education who might have the greatest need to increase their human capital investment were less likely to participate in adult education than workers with high school or more education. The study shows that male workers who obtained a post-secondary certificate while staying with the same employer generally registered higher wage and earnings gains than their counterparts who did not go back to school, regardless of age and initial level of education. On the other hand, men who obtained a certificate and switched jobs generally realized no significant return to their additional education, with the exception of young men (17 to 34 years old) who would receive significant returns to a certificate, whether they switched employer or stayed with the same employer. Obtaining a certificate generated significant wage and earnings returns for older women (aged 35 to 59) who stayed with the same employer, and significant wage returns for young women who switched employers.
Notes
  • Title from title screen (viewed Mar. 24, 2006).
  • Electronic monograph in PDF format.
  • Available also in French under title: Sommaire de la poursuite des études à l'âge adulte et ses répercussions sur les gains au Canada.
Language
  • English
ISBN
  • 9780662428312
Libraries Australia ID
Contributed by
Libraries Australia

Get this edition

Freely available

Other links

None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment