Information about Trove user: rollsey

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

RankCorrectorLines corrected
1 JohnWarren 2,503,160
2 annmanley 1,833,444
3 NeilHamilton 1,501,881
4 John.F.Hall 1,272,813
5 maurielyn 1,180,105
...
94 krutli 192,333
95 BustersMum 192,274
96 interestedreader 188,340
97 rollsey 185,321
98 mullalk 185,233
99 Corio 183,739

185,321 lines corrected.

Corrections by month

April 2014 3,437
March 2014 15,161
February 2014 5,511
January 2014 1,910
December 2013 7,005
November 2013 14,678
October 2013 13,420
September 2013 7,283
August 2013 15,558
July 2013 4,508
June 2013 3,902
May 2013 7,510
April 2013 11,000
March 2013 2,023
February 2013 2,943
January 2013 15,608
December 2012 23,401
November 2012 2,659
October 2012 1,130
September 2012 864
August 2012 1,428
July 2012 9,305
June 2012 6,995
May 2012 2,702
April 2012 735
March 2012 1,106
February 2012 3,539

Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
THE LATE PTE. J. C. MAYO. (Article), Queanbeyan Age and Queanbeyan Observer (NSW : 1915 - 1927), Tuesday 15 January 1918 page Article 2014-04-14 17:13 THE LATE. PTE. J. ,C. MAYO.
writes to Mrs. Roberts as follow3:
"Am very pleased to !bo ble to,
give you any informatioti *in my
power in regard to the death . of
your son-in-law, J. C. :Mayo, ,or
Charlie Mayo, as al the boys 'used
to call him. It was at I3ullecourt,
Qn the 3norning of the .] 5th May,
when the Germans attacked thin
Battalion with a very, strong force.
the attack. Just jibout the time the
attack combenced',a party of men
arrived at the front 'line, with ra
named Bob Grant, who ca'me over
in the sAme reinforcements as Char.
and com'enced to put a bandage
on the ,wound: lie had nearly fin
b'eside the two of thenm. There was
no time, to move, as it expladed
cleared away we discovered fatit
been killed. It 'must have be-nn in
stantaneously, as a piece ,"of the
he could not have ,suffered any pain
at all-it was all )too iudden. 'It ip
much better to hneet *your end sud
aenly Than to linger wvith wounds.
side by Mde in the Noveine military
cemetery, the 'burial service being 1
read by Rev. John Bowran, who.
batfn., *and date of deith. Every
rest assured of that; and the loss ot
Charlie was felt very 'hadly.-by all
Please extend 'my deepest sympathy
to Mrs. Mayo and! tell her from mne
that Charlie died doing leis daity,
and mnore than that, while 'doing all 2
he 'could to help a' wounded mate. )
There is niothing, finer than' that. 1
But "I fancy you atre 'inakin; a mis- t
'take ast egardd Perce .,Norris. Fle
was wvounded 'the same 'day, and,
after the attack Wvais ,over no 'trac3
could 'be found of hi'm. But it has t
since been a$certained. that Perce.
is wounded, and a prisoner *in 'the ]
handb of the Germansl I don't think 1
there is a edbadow of doubt about it. F
He " is alright, not ' badly wounded. ]
1 am 'only sorry :1 could not give
you the same reaasuring news as to I
poor Charlie. I told you in the I
early part of this letter that 'I came i
in the same reinforcements as Char- a
lie. We were great 'friend.;, and
coming ,over from Egypt to Franze
our , bunks oni the ship were side
by aide. I was out 'up when he got E
killed, but it was a marvellous thing t
how any of us escapes) alive that t
morning. 'One df the:e 'day , I sup
pose this terrible war' will end, -and
when it does I 'hope cto be one of o
'the 'lucky ones to 'get hack to 'diar a
old "Australia, when I hope to take )
advantage o'f your invitation to .call I
on you. In .regard to parcels, t
'thanks very much for .your ldind t
offer, bizt' I am not in need of any
thing. ' 'have private _ means, and
am kept well stocked with comfnrts.
Hope you don't mind ine saying this, i
but I don't wish to put' you to any i
trouble !or expense." ' "
THE LATE PTE. J. C. MAYO.
writes to Mrs. Roberts as follows:
"Am very pleased to be able to,
give you any information in my
power in regard to the death of
your son-in-law, J. C. Mayo, or
Charlie Mayo, as all the boys used
to call him. It was at Bullecourt,
on the morning of the 15th May,
when the Germans attacked this
Battalion with a very strong force.
the attack. Just about the time the
attack commenced a party of men
arrived at the front line, with ra-
named Bob Grant, who came over
in the same reinforcements as Char-
and commenced to put a bandage
on the wound. He had nearly fin-
beside the two of them. There was
no time to move, as it exploded
cleared away we discovered that
been killed. It must have been in-
stantaneously, as a piece of the
he could not have suffered any pain
at all - it was all too sudden. It is
much better to meet your end sud-
denly than to linger with wounds.
side by side in the Noveine military
cemetery, the burial service being
read by Rev. John Bowran, who
battn., and date of death. Every-
rest assured of that; and the loss of
Charlie was felt very badly by all
Please extend my deepest sympathy
to Mrs. Mayo and tell her from me
that Charlie died doing his duty,
and more than that, while doing all
he could to help a wounded mate.
There is nothing finer than that.
But I fancy you are making a mis-
take as regards Perce Norris. He
was wounded the same day, and,
after the attack was over no trace
could be found of him. But it has
since been ascertained that Perce
is wounded, and a prisoner in the
hands of the Germans. I don't think
there is a shadow of doubt about it.
He is alright, not badly wounded.
I am 'only sorry I could not give
you the same reaasuring news as to
poor Charlie. I told you in the
early part of this letter that I came
in the same reinforcements as Char-
lie. We were great friends, and
coming over from Egypt to France
our bunks on the ship were side
by side. I was cut up when he got
killed, but it was a marvellous thing
how any of us escaped alive that
morning. One of these days I sup-
pose this terrible war will end, and
when it does I hope to be one of
the lucky ones to get back to dear
old Australia, when I hope to take
advantage of your invitation to call
on you. In regard to parcels,
thanks very much for your kind
offer, but I am not in need of any-
thing. I have private means, and
am kept well stocked with comforts.
Hope you don't mind me saying this,
but I don't wish to put you to any
trouble or expense.
ROWING. INTER-'VARSITY EIGHTS. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Saturday 19 May 1923 page Article 2014-04-13 18:07 On Friday, June 1, the inter-varsity elght
was -rowed in Adelaide, when Queensland
half miles, and the boats used wereo much
son could not accompany the crow to Mel-
bourne. Mr, A. G. Purves, writing in the
tho first lnter-Varslty elght-oared race. A
eight. The Sydney crew, after practising In
returned from Cambridge, and besides rowlug
presented Sydney at Melbourne In 1890, when
presented New South Wales In the interstate
Messrs. G. A. Vivers, N. F. White, and B,
who represented the State, were In this crew.
A. Vivers; and In 1898, stroked by Mr. R. P.
has the best record amongst Inter-VarsIty
Olympic eight, which rowed at Stockholm In
ley Regatta In 1912. Adelaide University
were successful In 1910, Melbourne In 1911,
crew being stroked - by Mr. T. M. Barnett,
1909. but a determined effort is being made
clubhouse In Blackwattle Bay. The ser-
On Friday, June 1, the inter-varsity eight-
was rowed in Adelaide, when Queensland
half miles, and the boats used were much
son could not accompany the crew to Mel-
bourne. Mr. A. G. Purves, writing in the
the first lnter-Varsity eight-oared race. A
eight. The Sydney crew, after practising in
returned from Cambridge, and besides rowing
presented Sydney at Melbourne in 1890, when
presented New South Wales in the interstate
Messrs. G. A. Vivers, N. F. White, and B.
who represented the State, were in this crew.
A. Vivers; and in 1898, stroked by Mr. R. P.
has the best record amongst Inter-Varsity
Olympic eight, which rowed at Stockholm in
ley Regatta in 1912. Adelaide University
were successful in 1910, Melbourne in 1911,
crew being stroked by Mr. T. M. Barnett,
1909, but a determined effort is being made
clubhouse in Blackwattle Bay. The ser-
ROWING NOTES. THE INTERCOLONIAL EIGHT OAR RACE. TWELFTH ANNUAL CONTEST. Victoria again Victorious. (Article), Referee (Sydney, NSW : 1886 - 1939), Tuesday 27 November 1888 page Article 2014-04-13 17:33 THE INTERCOLONIAL EIGH7
Victoria nnd Ne«- tiouth Wa«.s toolc plncoon ?
Pnixamatla cou-so on fialitrilr.v afternoon
day was fearfully opprossivo, all mornine at,J
hnruii g, chokun.- ha/o hart liung ovor tliooitv W
hazo at from SflOtdu to SOOjdB. Tl»» air onebreShtf
?iiigino, and fair j burned t!io nnetritn ao it mil!?
wind would Imv* boen wolcomo to lift: ?h« ' '
Hydney n - to -early ono o'olori: i7|)0n *
our romai-ka It vns about tlio list dav thni rnHs
ROWING NOTES. I
IWEIiFTH ANNIMI, CONTEST.
Tho iwclftli annual eisht-onr content hnt»^
viow aloiiff auv -;lvo:i p.trnot. wan bounded brVmii!
ecomod to havo come diroof from tin furnnoonf
Thoro ^7as a hot v/iud somewhere, hnf *i.«J J.6'
Bivo pall that luinjf over all, wo did not' fool int
hronza stirrrd tho air, nnd as wo i,.ivo sn(w0„tndS2
would havo f elocted ??nt of ho :«5 to row n h?iT?
littlo) rec; upon. ? Sti 11. th, d'j CfiS'
V7119 no KOttinir ,uvc.y -i om it, and na tho dn.v ri
vaneed tho usual l'arramn.M'- tide Rot it. Not i
overy day kind of common or Rirden ordor of K
bnt tho liuinat tido of ei.Tht-fioer? that oo ofv
llor.*s Oladi'Bvilitj ami Abliolsford-wardn.
Tho Kto.tmors Admiral and Hlrlmuhoacl wnroti
nhthorisod boats, and thoy left Circular Qua.,
ti. 10 with a verv sl-ndor p is=oi.i?or ll«t That lie*
pull thnt camo nt I p.m. had diod away a (rain a?
tho heat who nwftil, while no d„n«o ivas the smoki
cloud that pciplo prophesied wo Bbonld s»
littlo of tbo raco. Not a br.at.h dlsturS
tho sullen heal, and everybody fairly eas»
for broatli, Tim sim uliraraorod through E
emolro liko a shield of burnished coppor as u-
Admiral, holiiel by b.id ooal, waB gracafnli
pnpat'd by stoimor aflor steamer on tho run TJ
Thero woro small aroupa on tbo various points a
thoconrpo. but ns for lively pnblio intornst. it *u
utterly absent. Thero wa^ no oxcitcmont wtit.
over. ?
Tho first important event wan an 'order'
from Mortlako for the umpire's. Pros* ud
puouo ooat to c m ) nsuoro und fofoh Mr. Good,
ycar. t.ho N 8.W. crow's coach. Tbifi order vsi
poiitoly refnse.l, find tbo stvumor ho!d on h^r way
Ouco off Eydo tho durK* bluo jorHoyn of thn Vic!
cro* wero diacerniblo a horo Aft-?r a Ion? trat
anothor1' orJer' arrived for tho s-.onmor -o tack
alongsidotho 'fyde Wh»irf aud toko Mr. Gocdyeir
and somn ladies otf. TUu person who oonveied
this message *vas politely t^ld thit tho pnb'ic aai
ofilo uls woro to bn consi'lr.red boforo the N.8.TT
coach, and that tho Adin:rnl w uld not float alonri
sideliydo .Totty r.fc the etato of tho tldo. Mr
| George Up ward, tho Vio coach, had c -mo off iu I
; *k\(! Uko auv oth*-r man, nud at last, after tbo Btart
I ha * beon dolayod haif-an-hour. a volnnteor took &
! boata8horo and fotohud tho indisnenaiblo Good,
yoir. Thonthotwooights, whioh had boen pad
dling about for haU-ati.hour, w-ro at. longthmged
upv Mr. Frank -mith. M L A., hod toBBcd in
Goodyoir'aabience, aud won forN S.W.tboclioJce
of positions. Th«s was no advantago, asthotido
was two hours d! b and thoro was uot a breath of
fi'0 to £10 was offered on Viotoria, and n-
whi^por of a tak-j uh Sir. Blackstouo stood np with
his flair, aud at 4 ;S (t-io raco should havo started
botweou tf45 and 4 pm.) dropjKjd it to a good
start. ThoLiiht. Bluos (N.S. W.) took holdftrst,
and got into th«Mr stroko iustantor. Tho Darks
woro not so good at th« g dug, but in ton strokea
(40 to tho mv.iiito ?,ach)th« y had stoadied,asd
rowed a boiutiful, stoady, carJy- gripping and well
pullod-out btroko. Uhr'«! Point was reached in
one miuuto, b*tt it mn^tbu moutioned that they
stirted quito 200yds down stream. Hore thoy gtiU
struck 4*\ and tho J-ark Hluas wi-ro a longth to tbo
good and rowing well. it'D')nnell was striking »
swot stroko iii tho' T'J, S.W. boat, but he hod at
losst two pna*ciit-cro b L\nd him, Nos. 2 and o
being 'rniior.i,' aud tho litter appoarict
u^oi up before tbo milo was reached.
AU across thv ivach iiowdio set hia mon&nieo,
woj^man^So-^KfroheV cif- bin^ instantor, and
digging tho Wf'ight in at onco It might haio
bci'n b-ttor pu.loi out, but it was goad ononghto
loavo our mou a !- ngth crossiiig to 1ho baaoon.
J»ot boforo tho miJn-po«t was reachod tho Birken
head, evidently K'nored by Homo excitable fellow,
ran ri*h!- alu-adof tho boat, firing upaft
tho namo timo, an ! it was only -ii-proximiteJy
that tho timo -ou'd bo tak»u at that implant
opot. 16 v.as rou^bly vii^wicd at 4 20. hnb wtha
Admiral w s -1h behind, a d could notkwp
up with tlio proa.' ion, and in consequanco of tho
piKKieh ignornnoc of tbo 6kipn-r of tho llirkeuhead,
thii ia not. a3 mumble us tho' Po^t-ofHco clock, and
thnt if* d«:ad off.
The. Liifbt W'uo strolio waj still ro^vin«?in -frand
fifylo afibr loavinic tljo milo b-mci-n. and was ably
seconded by l, 4,0 and 7. but 2 and 5 wore dead
amisj, and 8 v,*.n not rnucb bettor. Th'j boat rollod
a Job ovvifigto tho uustertdy work of tbeao sict
men, and at, Putn-.v tho D.-.rk HJues led threo
lengths, ^and r-eafj'.od tho Klj.irr in 7.17. Nofarther
desoript.ion of a f.oilo'.v ovent is notensary. N.S.W.
uuintiiined its 4) vj»*ht nloiii?,* aud it* i4 a note
worthy fact «h-it though rhe Victorians easeddown
to 36, ihj-y btiil v;«nt aw.\y. till at tho finish thoy
led all of too l.n'tMirt. Tbo timo was taken by Mr.
John Dlackmau 1G 57,' ar.d other watchoa miylo it
tO*t t
On tho last milo two crows of yahooa U ei^lita
crossed N.53.W. watar, :ird tho last noarly foulod
them. A pr-rfoet roar of liootin^ from tbo steamer
grcotcd thoir id-- ic bit of clumsy sbo^ oil.
It is ouly fair to say that, thoanh bcaton, the
Sydnoy Idds rowod quito op to thoir abilities, and
a deal better thau moro cniokedupcrowsbavodono
in tho pa3t. Thoro uot n full fl ddfor selection
clfered, and 2-lr. GDodyvar to bo congratulated
ou doing as woll a » bo did ?:\h tho material at hiB
command. Oiu* strode never fugged, »*nd eot a
real Horncoablo fc^i-rk.) nil tbo way, bnt tbroo men
cau't dvj ovcry^Huig io nn oiyhi, and ouly three1
uaed their bach as thoy should after 1} mile,
Tho Vict-rhn -troko ?et wo»k his nion conld
do, and thoy all did it, clean catch, hard grip, and
well i-ul!cd through, r.oi V^u'/' for in fluiah moro
could be dcoircd. Tho Iota) boat iH much 09ni«
plained of. bnt it di-l i.ot mako more tnan thVio
lengths dlf., and 170 wero whipped by form ton to,
twclvo longthn. T
'Ihe follovrm^ are tho crows * .
H. Oiladi*. ic»t.51h ? ? bow
F. Cx Pfiyn»». ilst . ... ,,, 2
J. WatHon, l%i;*t8'b ... M# tJ, 0
J. o. liauwistor, 18».t 41b ? ; ... 4' -
33. Mopki'is, 12ftGlb ? ? 5
It. li -ieho?Qou MvtlOlb...
A. (Jhamloy, 5:b ? ... 7
P. H, Gowdto, list 4lb ? stroke v
A HotUou, -Ur 1 »lb (oor -
R. S Thompam, I Oat lib bow
'W. Belbridgo, llHt 181b ? ?
J. ? iirieton, 12fitl01b .„ ... ...
J.Collins, list illh -M#f ... 7
M*Dnun«l\ P.»t 101b f,,, ... stroke
A. Chato, ftst 21b (cox.)
Victoria agnln Victorious.
N.S.W. (Liuht DIuo). »
JTookor, I2nfc-lb ... ... r
W c. Al1 Donald, 12st21b... ... 3 f
1\ HolnvidfT^, I'J-t lib ... ... * ^
VicToniA (Dark Blue)* 'i
THE INTERCOLONIAL EIGHT-
Victoria and New south wales took place on the
Parramatta course on Saturday afternoon. The
day was fearfully oppressive, all morning a hot
burning, choking haze had hung over the city. The
haze at from 200yds to 3oo yds. The air one breathed
engine, and fairly burned the nostrils as it passed.
wind would been welcome to lift the oppres-
Sydney unto nearly one o'clock when a light
our remarks it was about the last day that rowers
ROWING NOTES.
TWELFTH ANNUAL CONTEST.
the twelfth annual eoght-oar contest between
view along any given street was bounded by smoke
seemed to have come direct from the furnace of an
There was a hot wind somewhere, but though any
sive pall that hung over all, we did not feel it at
breeze stirred the air,and as we have suggested by
would have selected out of the 365 to row a big (or
little) race upon. Still the day was fixed, there
was no getting away from it, and as the day ad-
vanced the usual Parramatta tide set in. Not an
every day kind of common or garden order of tide
but the human tide of sightseers that so often
flows Gladesville and Abbotsford-wards.
The steamers Admiral and Birkenhead were the
authorised boats, and they left Circular Quay at
3. 10 with a verv slender passenger list. That light
puff that came at 1 p.m. had died away again, and
the heat was awful, while so dense was the smoke-
cloud that people prophesied we should see
little of the race. Not a breath dlsturbed
the sullen heat, and everybody fairly gasped
for breath. The sun glimmered through the
smoke like a shield of burnished copper as the
Admiral, helped by bad coal, was gracefully
passed by steamer after steamer on the run up.
There were small groups on the various points of
the course, but as for lively public interest, it was
utterly absent. There was no excitement what-
ever.
The first important event was an 'order'
from Mortlake for the umpire's,Press and
public boat to come ashore and fetch Mr. Good-
year, the N.S.W. crew's coach. This order was
politely refused, and the steamer held on her way.
Once off Ryde the dark blue jerseys of the Vic.
crew were discernible ashore. After a long wait
another order arrived for the steamer to back
alongside the Ryde Wharf and take Mr.Goodyear
and some ladies off. The person who oonveyed
this message was politely told that the public and
officials were to be considered before the N.S.W.
coach, and that the Admiral would not float along
side Ryde jetty at the slack of the tide. Mr.
George Upward, the Vic coach, had come off in a
skiff like any other man, and at last, after the start
had been delayed half-an-hour, a volunteer took a
boat ashore and fetched the indespensible Good-
year. Then the two eights, which had been pad-
dling about for half-an-hour, wre at length ranged
up. Mr. Frank Smith. M L A., had tossed in
Goodyear's absence, and won for N.S.W. the choice
of positions. This was no advantage, as the tide
was two hours ebb and there was not a breath of
£10 to £10 was offered on Victoria, and no
whisper of a take as Mr.Blackstone stood up with
his flag, and at 4.48 (the race should have started
between 3.45 and 4 pm.) dropped it to a good
start. The Light Blues (N.S.W.) took hold first,
and got into their stroke instanter. The Darks
were not so good at the going, but in ten strokes
(40 to the minute each) they had steadied, and
rowed a beautiful, steady, early gripping and well
pulled-out stroke. Uhr's Point was reached in
one minute, but it must be mentioned that they
started quite 200yds down stream. Here they still
struck 40 and the Dark Blues were a length to the
good and rowing well. McDonnell was striking a
sweet stroke in the N.S.W. boat, but he had at
least two passengers behind him, Nos. 2 and 5
being "rollers" and the latter appearing
used up before the mile was reached.
All across the reach Gowdie set his men a nice,
workmanlike stroke, catching instanter, and
digging the weight in at once. It might have
been better pulled out, but it was good enough to
leave our men a length crossing to the beacon.
Just before the mile post was reached the Birken-
head, evidently steered by some excitable fellow,
ran right ahead of the umpire's boat, firing up at
the same time, and it was only approximately
that the time could be taken at that important
spot. It was roughly guessed at 4 20, but as the
Admiral was 150 yds. behind and could not keep
up with the procession, and, in consequence of the
piggish ignorance of the skipper of the Birkenhead,
this is not as reliable as the post-office clock, and
that is dead off.
The Light Blue stroke was still rowing in grand
style after leaving the mile beacon, and was ably
seconded by 1, 4,6 and 7, but 2 and 5 were dead
amiss, and 3 was not much better. The boat rolled
a lot owing to the unsteady work of these sick
men, and atPutney the dark Blues led three
lengths, and reached the wharf in 7.17. No further
description of a hollow event is necessary. N.S.W.
maintained its 40 right along; and it is a note-
worthy fact that though the Victorians eased down
to 36, they still went away, till at the finish they
led all of ten lengths. The time was taken by Mr.
John Blackman 16. 57, and other watches made it
59½.
On the last mile two crews of yahoos in eights
crossed N.S.W. water, and the last nearly fouled
them. A perfect roar of hooting from the steamer
greeted their idiotic bit of clumsy show off.
It is only fair to say that, though beaten, the
Sydney lads rowed quite up to their abilities, and
a deal better than more cracked up crews have done
in the past. There was not a full field for selection
offered, and Mr.Goodyear is to be congratulated
on doing as well as he did with the material at his
command. Our stroke never fagged, and set a
real serviceable stroke all the way, but three men
can't do everything to an eight, and only three
used their backs as they should after 1 ¾ mile.
The Victorian stroke set work his men could
do, and they all did it, clean catch, hard grip, and
well pulled through, not "cut", for in finish more
could be desired. The local boat is much com-
plained of, but it did not make more than three
lengths dif., and we were whipped by form ten to
twelve lengths.
The following are the crews :--
H. Oxlade, 10st 5lb bow
F.G.Payne, 11st 2
J. Watson, 14st 8lb 3
J. O Bannister, 13st 4lb 4
E.Hopkins, 12st 6lb 5
R.B.Nicholson 14st 10lb 6
A. Chamley, 12st 5lb ... 7
F. H. Gowdie, 11st 4lb stroke
A Hodson 4st.10lb (cox)
R. S Thompson, 10st 1lb bow
W. Belbridge, 11st 13lb 4
J. Carleton, 12st 10lb ... ... 5
J.Collins, 11st 10lb 7
F.McDonnell 11st 10lb ... stroke
A. Chate, 5st 2lb (cox.)
Victoria agnin Victorious.
N.S.W. (Light Blue).
F.Hooker, 12st 2lb 2
W.C. Mc Donald, 12st2lb... ... 3
F.Belbridge, 12st 1lb 6
VICTORIA (Dark Blue).
A CHALLENGE. (Article), Referee (Sydney, NSW : 1886 - 1939), Tuesday 27 November 1888 page Article 2014-04-13 16:12 challenge any third-rate tculler in Sydneyor
the colony for from .C50 to .£100 aside. Raco,
to bo rowed ovor tho Parramatta River,
championship courso. I will put up deposit
in the hands of tho athletio editor of- the
Kefehee on Tuesday (to-day), to prove bona
fiden.— John Lines, Sydney, November 27,
1838. , _ -
challenge any third-rate sculler in Sydney or
the colony for from £50 to £100 aside. Race
to be rowed over the Parramatta River,
championship course. I will put up deposit
in the hands of the athletio editor of the
Referee on Tuesday (to-day), to prove bona-
fidens.— John Lines, Sydney, November 27,
1888.
ROWING NOTES. (Article), Referee (Sydney, NSW : 1886 - 1939), Tuesday 27 November 1888 page Article 2014-04-13 16:09 Althongh tho crushing defeat sustained by
the iSow south Wales orew on Saturday lasfe
miy at first filanco appear humiliating to Jour
amateur oartmen, still it will be admitted
upon loosing cIopoIj- into tho porformanoes o £
the two orewB that after all tho light bluea
must be equal to if not better than most of tho
ciews formed in this oolony for previous con
tests. Without a doDbt Mr. Upward has this
timo excelled all hie former efforts, and pro
duced the taBtcst eight yot seen in Australia.
?,?c' 'f4 elo--e it i« highly probable that
lbinin tor tho whol« ooursa would have been
beaten. jheN.i-'.W. orow were far from dis
graced, and when it ia remembered that
many _ of tho men were, comparatively
surprising that tho course should be covered
by thom in tho titnu, for whon allowance is
made lor starting below tho bridge and the
distance between them and the Viotorians at
the Brothers, it is suiparent that tho Sydney '
boat's time waa w ell within 17min. 30aeo. lha
men all rowed tn extremely plucky raoe, and'
althongh there aro many who now speak
scornfully ot our orew as oarsmen, it must bo
admitted by ull that Mr.- Goodyear haB per
formed wondtrn whan it ia remembered What
orude material J:e hud to begin with; '
To-morrow (Wednesday) will witness tha
amatenr sculling contest on the Parramatto.
received from tho neighbouring colonies, still
our own scullere: have responded in force,
and a. keen race may he expected. The. fol-
lowing gentlemen have entered :^-SiR:C.,
G. J-Kentiedj; list 121b, and J. M^Raeillft;'
3d.R.C., J. 'Thomson, 9at 7ib, and G. .hnwald.
10st 21b; B.KO.,- J. Eraser, 12st . 61b ;
N.S.R.C., J. F. Connolly, lOtt. This is it
very good field, , and the raoo will be worth,
seeing. J;; '( homeon, although the lightest,
is one of the 'bett, and will row in good.
toriS' Pr, 2er is hew to outriggers, but
eouIIs in good Btyle, and may upset the' pot.
'l'ho winner Bhould turn up in G. J. Xennedy.
We learn by cable that the yo^ng Canadian
sculler, O'Connor, haa proved conclusively to
John Ttsemer that he really did want a match*
and also that- his belief that Teemer was loot
suoh a world-beafer as Americans seeineS
prone to tbiiik was well founded. In a match
whioh O'Connor got on after a lot of .fiddling
with Teemer, .and which was i;owed on the
easily. He lias acnoij^c^d his intention -to
come to Australia aijd n^et ijhe champion o£
the world for hw title ' and a big
Btake. Y/e will wolqpmc.— and whip— him.
Ampp^GD, AltnoDfi}i-l*»i-,-^i''1'17r
tralia. For this event, whioh it may be men-,
tioned waB pi omoted at the suggestion of Mr.
G. Upward, no'lesa than four -3fllonie3 will
send crews, Viotoria, New Zealand, Tasmania,
follows: — ... v
living at Jordan's, the New Zealand and. homo
crows at Mcrtlake. The 'J asmanians train
from Gladeaville, and house their boat at the
M.R.C. nhun . The N.S W. four will contain
Nos. 2 and 5 ot tbe eight. They both wets
'amongithe first to show signs of exhaustion
will be altered ; in any case it iB more than
likely that the champion raoe will be won by
m (Spcnectiqn with the N.S.W, Rowing
- - ours itaoe will oertainly be tho .
- in interest to the aquatic public of Ans«
and New South Wales, The crews are aa
_ _ , . ' VICTQIHl,
H. Oxlade, liVt 51b ? ? :,.'Ixnr' ?
P. G. Pajne, list * ? No. 3
.1. O. Bai niafer, 18at 41b : ? ... Mo 3 -
G. Upward, 12st 41b ? ? stroke-
A. N. Bo'n)ton..l)aPUb ' ... . .... -tow '
A. fct\.lie, list 21b ... ' -... No: 2'-'- ,
H; F. Nieoli,- 12st81b„, ? ? No.8
A. 1j. SmitL, ldst 71b:.,' ... ' stroke ;
H. P. Hudson, lOst 8lb ... * ? -bow-'' - ?-
I. P. Dean, 12st 81b ? ? No^a
J. tkio6Hii, list 71b ? .... No/3
U.- Cragg, -list 31b - ... ... -... stroke
_ New South Waiei. ' t,i '
P. Hooker. 12at ... ,,, Bo»'-- ' 1 - ;
P. Bellbridgt) 12st 91b ... ... No.- B''
J. Cailetou, 12st9ib ... ... No. 3 - 1
J. Al-DtfunoU, list lllb ... ... stroke ?
Not haying seen all the orewa in - their -
probable result. . Ail the competitors are now
training .on tbe course, the- Melbourne men
This. (Tuesday) afternoon the old rivals^
William Beaoh and Edward Hanlan, mobtfor
the fourth time. The three viotories already
the rniudd of the public, and when he retired :
in November last jearfewwho are acquainted,
with beaoh'B determined nature would have
believed that ho could be induoed. to onoe
more go through a savora oourse of training
oar raoing to his younger colleagues. How
repoated desire to again row Beaoh was
As in previous ooncests, Beaoh has trained
from Jordan's Hotel, Ryde, although, -sines
the arrival of tbe Yiocorian eight he has
housed his boat at Gasooigne's. Chris. -
Neilseu and W. Paul have tended to his wants
and aooempunied him in hia work. During
the earlier part of his training tieaoh-. lost
flesh rather rapidly, and it was- feared the ex
ohampion would not strip as well as oonld be
wished, but during the last weok he haB im
nearly if not quite aa good a man as in former
races. The Canadian has trained from Mort- .
lake, and oertainly looka the pioture of robnac
health. P. Flanagan, and F. Couohe, of Gos
ford, have ustiaitd Hanlan in his work,
beiug determined to make a last grand effort
to defeat hia old opponent. H&nlan has left
nothing undouu io' enable him to. strip a;
thoroughly tr.-viaud man, and will step into 'his
boat iu-d;vy in the vtry pink of condition. Ho
iu crodiu-u with having done a faster milo..
thiiii IierLi:h, but I nm inclined to think. that'
tho Dapto Ecullor will lend from the jump.
In that caBe the winner must assuredly be
11 any iauits noticeable m
ww bripg ua to the lotit
? - — oiuor. wio
Rbw Zealand.' ~
? Tabuabia.
Willi, vm Beach.
Although the crushing defeat sustained by
the New South Wales crew on Saturday last
may at first glance appear humiliating to our
amateur oarsmen, still it will be admitted
upon looking closely into the performances of
the two crews that after all the light blues
must be equal to if not better than most of the
crews formed in this colony for previous con-
tests. Without a doubt Mr. Upward has this
time excelled all his former efforts, and pro-
duced the fastest eight yet seen in Australia.
been at all close it is highly probable that
16min. for the whole course would have been
beaten. The N.S.W. crew were far from dis-
graced, and when it is remembered that
many of the men were, comparatively
surprising that the course should be covered
by them in the time, for when allowance is
made for starting below the bridge and the
distance between them and the Victorians at
the Brothers, it is apparent that the Sydney
boat's time was w ell within 17min. 30sec. The
men all rowed an extremely plucky race, and
although there are many who now speak
scornfully of our crew as oarsmen, it must be
admitted by all that Mr. Goodyear has per-
formed wonders when it is remembered what
crude material he had to begin with.
To-morrow (Wednesday) will witness the
amateur sculling contest on the Parramatta
received from the neighbouring colonies, still
our own scullers have responded in force,
and a keen race may he expected. The fol-
lowing gentlemen have entered : -S.R.C.,
G. J.Kennedy; 11st 12lb, and J. McRae, 11st.
M.R.C., J. 'Thomson, 9st 7lb, and G. Huwald,
10st 2lb; B.R.C.,- J. Fraser, 12st . 6lb ;
N.S.R.C., J. F. Connolly, 10st. This is a
very good field, and the race will be worth,
seeing. J.Thomson, although the lightest,
is one of the best, and will row in good
form. Frazer is new to outriggers, but
scuIIs in good style, and may upset the pot.
The winner should turn up in G. J. Kennedy.
We learn by cable that the young Canadian
sculler, O'Connor, has proved conclusively to
John Teemer that he really did want a match,
and also that his belief that Teemer was not
such a world-beater as Americans seemed
prone to think was well founded. In a match
which O'Connor got on after a lot of fiddling
with Teemer, and which was rowed on the
easily. He has announced his intention to
come to Australia and meet the champion of
the world for his title and a big
stake. We will welcome — and whip— him.
Association. Although last in order the
tralia. For this event, which it may be men-
tioned was promoted at the suggestion of Mr.
G. Upward, no less than four colonies will
send crews, Victoria, New Zealand, Tasmania,
follows: —
living at Jordan's, the New Zealand and home
crews at Mortlake. The Tasmanians train
from Gladesville, and house their boat at the
M.R.C. shed . The N.S W. four will contain
Nos. 2 and 5 of the eight. They both were
'among the first to show signs of exhaustion
will be altered ; in any case it is more than
likely that the champion race will be won by
events in connection with the N.S.W. Rowing

first in interest to the aquatic public of Aus-
and New South Wales, The crews are as
VICTORIA
H. Oxlade, 10st 5lb bow
P. G. Payne, 11st No. 2
J.I.Bannister, 13st 4lb ... No 3 -
G. Upward, 12st 4lb ? ? stroke
A. N. Boulton bow
F.A.Styche, 11st 2lb ... ' No.2
H.F. Nichol,- 12st8lb„, No.3
A. L. Smith, 10st 7lb:.,' ..stroke
H. F. Hudson, 10st 6lb ... bow
I. F. Dean, 12st 8lb No.2
J. Coogan, 11st 7lb ? .... No.3
G. Cragg, 11st 3lb - ... ... -.stroke
NEW SOUTH WALES
P. Hooker. 12St ... ,,, Bow
P. Bellbridge 12st 9lb ... ..No.2
J. Carleton, 12st9lb ... ... No. 3
J. McDonnell, 11st11lb ...stroke
Not having seen all the crews in - their -
probable result. All the competitors are now
training on the course, the Melbourne men
This (Tuesday) afternoon the old rivals,
William Beach and Edward Hanlan, meet for
the fourth time. The three victories already
the minds of the public, and when he retired
in November last year few who are acquainted,
with Beaoh's determined nature would have
believed that he could be induced to once
more go through a severe course of training
oar racing to his younger colleagues. How-
repeated desire to again row Beach was
As in previous contests, Beach has trained
from Jordan's Hotel, Ryde, although, since
the arrival of the Victorian eight he has
housed his boat at Gasooigne's. Chris.
Neilsen and W. Paul have tended to his wants
and accompanied him in his work. During
the earlier part of his training Beach lost
flesh rather rapidly, and it was feared the ex-
champion would not strip as well as oould be
wished, but during the last week he has im-
nearly if not quite as good a man as in former
races. The Canadian has trained from Mort-
lake, and certainly looks the picture of robust
health. P. Flanagan, and F. Couohe, of Gos-
ford, have assisted Hanlan in his work,
being determined to make a last grand effort
to defeat his old opponent. Hanlan has left
nothing undone to enable him to strip a
thoroughly trained man, and will step into his
boat today in the very pink of condition. He
is credited with having done a faster mile
than Beach, but I am inclined to think that
the Dapto sculler will lead from the jump.
In that case the winner must assuredly be
There were few, if any, faults noticeable in
Saturday next will bring us to the last
Champion Fours Race will certainly be the
NEW ZEALAND
TASMANIA
WILLIAM BEACH.
MATCH RETWEEN C. NELSON AND J. STANSBURY. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Saturday 28 May 1887 page Article 2014-04-13 11:13 Match retvveen C. Nelson and J. Stansbury.
an oarsmnn mimed J. Stausbury, who belongs to the Shoal-
haven district, aro matched to row ovor tho championship
course, Parramatta River, for £100,,on the 11th Juno.
Thi3 should provo a good contest.
Match between C. Nelson and J. Stansbury.
an oarsman mimed J. Stansbury, who belongs to the Shoal-
haven district, are matched to row over the championship
course, Parramatta River, for £100, on the 11th June.
This should prove a good contest.
HANLAN V. GAUDAUR. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Saturday 28 May 1887 page Article 2014-04-13 11:12 The match between Edwaid Huulan and Jake Gaudaur
for the championship of Amenca will take place on Ame-
rican lako water on Mondav, 30th instant If Hanlan beats
Gaudaur he will doubtless uiako straight for Australia
somewhat easilv -
The match between Edward Hanlan and Jake Gaudaur
for the championship of America will take place on Ame-
rican lake water on Mondav, 30th instant. If Hanlan beats
Gaudaur he will doubtless make straight for Australia.
somewhat easily.
SCULLING MATCH ON THE PARRAMATTA. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Saturday 28 May 1887 page Article 2014-04-13 11:11 scullor ThL race was lowed in outriggers Davis, who
weighed about 12st 91b , used a boat belongmg to Mr
Georgo Brett and Anderson, who weiehed list, rowed in
a now boat belonging to Mr Gleeson, and built bj Don
nelh The steamer Admiral, Captain Hall, conveyed a
number of press representatives ana sporting men up the
met to the railway bridge, and then followed the
scullers to the finishing point Dnv is, w ho w as the favourite,
w on the choice of positions, und he determined to take the
northern sido of tho shearn A. pretty good start was
elfected bj mutual consent, on nn ebb tide at 4 35 p m ,
the men rowing nt about 3o to the minute Daws toole the
load off Uhrs Point, which was passed in 2 minutes lo
seconds Anderson, w ho is a v dl-made, wiry v oung fellow,
iho best course according to tho tide Davis, who
was rowing at 32 to tho minute, passed the mile
beacon in b minutes, Anderson being o seconds latir
Hearing Putney DaMshad a good lend, but Andeison woke
up a little, incicased his stiol o to 32, and decreased the
distance between his own and his rival's outringer Putney
Whart was passed bj Dims in 9 minutes 30 seconds Oil
lennjson both men rowed at SI to the minute, Davis
ha-, mg the race well in hand On approaching Glades-
pace, with the result that he began to o\ erhaul the Manning
River oaisman The locnl mnu, howevei, was tued,
nnd he did not last Gladesville was reached and
passed bv Davis in 1G minutes lo seconds At One Man
Wharf (19 minutes; Andeison spurted again, and forged
ahead a bit faster Neuring lhe Brothers rocks there wus
not much difference between tho competitors, and both
men, not looking: where thev weio going ktpt straight on
for the reet, a portion of vi hich was high and drv out of
the water For a moment, in the excitement of the finish,
it was thought that thej would smash then boats to pieces
on the rocks, but luckily thej wero warned ot the danger
ahead of them bv tho shouts of friends on tho steamer, and
so avoided a catastiopho just in time A close struggle
onsued at the finish, but Davis shot past the beacon about a
length and a quarter ahead of his opponent tho time for
the contest being 21 minutes 13¿ seconds Davis was not
compelled to row his baldest at anv time during the race
lheie was very little betting, 2 to 1 and 3 to 1 on Davis
being offered, and accepted in a few instances
sculler The race was rowed in outriggers. Davis, who
weighed about 12st 9lb , used a boat belonging to Mr
George Brett and Anderson, who weighed 11st, rowed in
a new boat belonging to Mr Gleeson, and built by Don-
nelly. The steamer Admiral, Captain Hall, conveyed a
number of press representatives and sporting men up the
river to the railway bridge, and then followed the
scullers to the finishing point. Davis, who was the favourite,
won the choice of positions, and he determined to take the
northern side of the stream. A pretty good start was
effected by mutual consent, on an ebb tide at 4 35 p m ,
the men rowing at about 3o to the minute Davis took the
lead off Uhrs Point, which was passed in 2 minutes 15
seconds. Anderson, who is a well-made, wiry young fellow,
the best course according to the tide. Davis, who
was rowing at 32 to the minute, passed the mile
beacon in 6 minutes, Anderson being 5 seconds later.
Nearing Putney Davis had a good lead, but Anderson woke
up a little, increased his stroke to 32, and decreased the
distance between his own and his rival's outrigger Putney
Wharf was passed by Davis in 9 minutes 30 seconds. Off
Tennyson both men rowed at 31 to the minute, Davis
having the race well in hand. On approaching Glades-
pace, with the result that he began to overhaul the Manning
River oarsman The local man, however, was tired,
and he did not last. Gladesville was reached and
passed by Davis in 16 minutes 15 seconds. At One Man
Wharf (19 minutes) Anderson spurted again, and forged
ahead a bit faster. Nearing The Brothers rocks there was
not much difference between the competitors, and both
men, not looking where they were going kept straight on
for the reef, a portion of which was high and dry out of
the water. For a moment, in the excitement of the finish,
it was thought that they would smash their boats to pieces
on the rocks, but luckily they were warned of the danger
ahead of them by the shouts of friends on the steamer, and
so avoided a catastrophe just in time. A close struggle
ensued at the finish, but Davis shot past the beacon about a
length and a quarter ahead of his opponent, the time for
the contest being 21 minutes 13 ¼ seconds. Davis was not
compelled to row his hardest at any time during the race.
There was very little betting, 2 to 1 and 3 to 1 on Davis
being offered, and accepted in a few instances.
AQUATICS. THE INTERCOLONIAL BOAT RACE. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Saturday 28 May 1887 page Article 2014-04-13 10:59 Tho 10th annual Intercolonial Eight-oar Race will take
The raco will be rowed nt 4 o'clock on a strong ebb tide.
The course is from the railway bridge at R3'deto tho beacon
at the Brothers' Point, about 3 miles nnd 330 yards. Ampio
provision for visitors lins been made' by tho New South
Admiral will follow the nice, and tho Invincible will bo
moored in a good position to seo the contest for moro than
half tho distance. Both crews are perfectly fit for a great
over tho whole course. Mr. E. P. Simpson is to bo umpire,
and will follow in a launch set apnrt spocially for him and
time will bo taken by Mr. J. N. Oatley.
The colours of the rival crews mo-"Victoria, dark blue ;
New South Wales, Cambridgo blue.
A largo number of visitors have arrived in Sydney from
the most exciting contests ever rowed in Now South Wales.
The Victorian crow were at Ryde yesterday afternoon as
the Admiral (conveying visitors to see the raco between G.
Davis and W. Anderson) drew up to tho wharf. They
ashore to exchange a few words w ith the dark bluos were
Mr. Edwards, tho boatbuilder of Melbourne, and Mr.
J, Deeblo. The New South Wales crew had an outing to
Sandringham. They aro in splendid condition. The race
weights, and positions of tho men are as follows :
E. R. Ainley (bow) "... 10 13
F. J.Taylor (2). 10 12
C. F. Thomas (3) ... 11 2
S. H. Gowilie (4) ... 11 5
A. Chnmlty (5). 12 J
J. Bannister (B). 12 2
C. A. Moline (7). 12 3
R.D. Booth (stroke) ... 12 4
C. Gant (cox.). 0 0
Aveiage.weight, list. 9Jlb.
The Tvtfrcoiomal Boit Rice
Victobia. , New South 'Waess.
st. lb.
G. Sealo (bow) ;..
V*,'. C. Freeman (2) ... 12
J. G. Kennedy (3) ... 112
VV. Martin (4) . 12
J. Fraser (5) . 12
J. E. Kennedy (C) ... 12 Í
N. Johnson (7). 10
C. A. Brc» (stroke) ... 11
J.Hellirft (cox) ... 5
Average weight, list. 101b.
st. lb.
The 10th annual Intercolonial Eight-oar Race will take
The race will be rowed at 4 o'clock on a strong ebb tide.
The course is from the railway bridge at Ryde to the beacon
at the Brothers' Point, about 3 miles and 330 yards. Ample
provision for visitors has been made by the New South
Admiral will follow the race, and the Invincible will be
moored in a good position to see the contest for more than
half the distance. Both crews are perfectly fit for a great
over the whole course. Mr. E. P. Simpson is to be umpire,
and will follow in a launch set apart specially for him and
time will be taken by Mr. J. N. Oatley.
The colours of the rival crews are -- "Victoria, dark blue ;
New South Wales, Cambridge blue.
A large number of visitors have arrived in Sydney from
the most exciting contests ever rowed in New South Wales.
The Victorian crew were at Ryde yesterday afternoon as
the Admiral (conveying visitors to see the race between G.
Davis and W. Anderson) drew up to the wharf. They
ashore to exchange a few words with the dark blues were
Mr. Edwards, the boatbuilder of Melbourne, and Mr.
J.Deeble. The New South Wales crew had an outing to
Sandringham. They are in splendid condition. The race
weights, and positions of the men are as follows :
E. R. Ainley (bow) "... 10 13 G. Seale (bow) 10 12
F. J.Taylor (2). 10 12 W. C. Freeman (2) ... 12 2
C. F. Thomas (3) ... 11 2 J. G. Kennedy (3) ... 12 0
S. H. Gowdie (4) ... 11 5 W. Martin (4) . 12 4
A. Chamley (5). 12 J J. Fraser (5) . 12 o
J. Bannister (B). 12 2 J. E. Kennedy (6) ... 12 12
C. A. Moline (7). 12 3 N. Johnson (7). 10 6
R.D. Booth (stroke) ... 12 4 C. A. Bros (stroke) ... 11 2
C. Gant (cox.). 6 0 J.Hellings (cox) ... 5 3
Average weight,11st. 9 ¼lb. Average weight,11st. 10lb.
THE INTERCOLONIAL BOAT RACE
Victoria. , New South Wales.
st. lb. st. lb.











Intercolonial Eight-oar Match. (Article), Goulburn Evening Penny Post (NSW : 1881 - 1940), Saturday 28 May 1887 page Article 2014-04-13 10:41 Intorcolonial Eight-oar Match.
Tms race will be rowed at'4 p.m.on Saturday
(to-day) on a strong obb tide. The time should
courso in 17 minutes, or a shade uinder. Myers,
the New South WVales coach, who by-the-bye is
booeen on the river frequently during the week.
At thoatimed trials both crews have done the
Intercolonial Eight-oar Match.
This race will be rowed at 4 p.m. on Saturday
(to-day) on a strong ebb tide. The time should
course in 17 minutes, or a shadeunder. Myers,
the New South Wales coach, who by-the-bye is
been on the river frequently during the week.
At the timed trials both crews have done the

Counts updated hourly

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.