Information about Trove user: rollsey

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

RankCorrectorLines corrected
1 JohnWarren 2,880,720
2 annmanley 2,008,656
3 NeilHamilton 1,866,529
4 noelwoodhouse 1,476,319
5 maurielyn 1,373,581
...
106 shutcheon 195,409
107 Stephen.J.Arnold 192,397
108 Gabrielle.James 191,360
109 rollsey 191,295
110 BobC 190,281
111 Corio 187,161

191,295 lines corrected.

Corrections by month

October 2014 2,539
July 2014 20
June 2014 638
May 2014 1,961
April 2014 4,253
March 2014 15,161
February 2014 5,511
January 2014 1,910
December 2013 7,005
November 2013 14,678
October 2013 13,420
September 2013 7,283
August 2013 15,558
July 2013 4,508
June 2013 3,902
May 2013 7,510
April 2013 11,000
March 2013 2,023
February 2013 2,943
January 2013 15,608
December 2012 23,401
November 2012 2,659
October 2012 1,130
September 2012 864
August 2012 1,428
July 2012 9,305
June 2012 6,995
May 2012 2,702
April 2012 735
March 2012 1,106
February 2012 3,539

Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
ROWING. NOTES AND GOSSIP. FIXTURES. 1900. JANUARY. (Article), Referee (Sydney, NSW : 1886 - 1939), Wednesday 10 January 1900 page Article 2014-10-30 19:36 [?]
'?' ^iiUA'^./^'iFiXTUREs:' .:?;?;?;?'' '?{'*?'.
???'?:? »7K'Vi '? , ; ' !. *!. ilJOO. X::' '?'?'.'''?''?'?? '- '-'?:
?'? ' -/i.-'V' ':. ,.!--..V-'-;:!'JANUAKV.:'!; .?.':!::??' '/'-'}??;?:+
20— Annivei'sary -Kegattol ''., ;;';.! ? ':'. ? : ... '?' .''? (?.':',
.*. /':;'fe','T!-; ?-?. iiARcn;' ;;?' ''.*';? '?'-'.:''{?' ''. '
24— IWmain-iR.C;':Ee8at'ta.''iV: '?'??'?' , . ' '.. -
:::- :'!^'V^iV:^'-;fAPIUL;'.U.''v '! !!.;;': !';Vi'/
S--at:.' :Tgnitius pblicgoy{egat.ta. i!^ ;'!!!! ;j''; ;.'I.'
;''':; :^&M^yi^^^-U^yii'. !?'? '^-}^
; O.i^Friday.iflpy.oifiber'iiT, .-there' .passed-,
away,4after;'a 'severe 'iljness; .William ''A'
'Messenger,' Queea's Afaterinan and ;i)&put'y;
Bargeinas ter,' : son -'of ' James ' Messse'nBer, '.of
. ji euu.iagrcon-, yueeais ;.vy-atQrmaJi aua .liarge- .
inasterJ\',w'Uo':::b'e.ati.Tdm .Colo! for, the ? pro-'
fessiduar!'ciiampiODship ,of 1 the ,,T hainies ?'In.1
iS5-l,':b'Htlcst.ithe. title. to ?Harry.: Kelly,' in;
l!-D7i; .?cyyilllain .?Moss.auger: was.'an , oai'smaii
of. ability,' and ;wpn -.the. foiirs.at' the Thanius
. Kegatui.1- at Putney In l£60''in..the 'Surbitlon
orow,- composed.' of.' Joseph'. Sadler, J. ; Peel-,:
srlft,::Wv 'Mossenser,.' G..-Hammerton (str),':
1 arid '.R^Hammerton '(cox). '. He also:-,von'tho;
-coat' and'badge .of watermen's 'apprentl'e^s'
- at '.thoi Thames,'.; Regatta .in,, the, following;
year, 'but' h'e-npver\Tspired to championship'
lionors.— ? London. .'Field.'.' !?! ? : ''.'.' '??''!':'?'..
.' :Svrprlse'has..been '.expressed that no offl-1
?clal.jlnUroatloii U.yet .to'-'hand from1 'Mel.-'
bourno conoernlns.' foe result of the . Intcr,-
colonial cpriference' hel'd there at. tho 'time'
of thp-.EIsht -par Race.. ''Mr.. Fitzhardirise,
hon/ sec.;;of the New :Soiith .Wales' -Rowing
ABEo'eiatlon, learns prirately: (that the sec
retary !«rf! the ednference has been seriously'
111. ', !?,!.????.?; .;-.';..' ? ??,:.-? ,' ' ??!;. ?. '??-.?
'Towns* has1 challenged; Gaudaur toVsciill;
for thO'Ch'amplorishlp and .£500 aside.' !? ' ;A'
mlitclj' between the , two ^'ould ' be' alioiit
the -only thing . to- liven V up professional
sport at. present. But Jake. ia a.canriy.cus-.
t&jner,: and not easily drawn!' intcr'a niatch .',
unless ovcrythins ' suits 'hiiu.,,:. ;,'., ::-V-V .;
He is getting up , in:!years '??now',1;aiid!.'a!
comparatively ' young rhan'.like, Towns ought
to -h'ave 'aVblt th.6 best of it bn'that score;!
t'hough Stanlbury was young' enougfo.*1 -*7SfcMi;
I can't help .?thinking, that, there .was. some
tliing.of fliiko alb6ut'Jlrn''s 'defeat.,-', ':? ?':?.'.;.
Towns liasyot to'shcvw himself equal!;' to,
such gi-ahts. as, Beach and: Ssarle,. buf!thefe
'Is no doubt ho is real grit.' Wore fio'/'to'
moot and beat Gaudaur, which ho 'has a
good chance' of dolns,'lf'-would: 'probably
lead to a match ^-ithStunBury.jn^Sydney.
The ox-Chaimpion' is riot' thlhlcliig 'of scui'l-'
irtg much. Just now, being on-gaged oh .- a
telegraph lino contrast out-back,, but I be-,
lleve ho'could bo backed ;re'ad'ily; enough;'
good match -were, offered.1., ? ;,v. -:
Towns': friends ivould,' I presume, be'pre
parpd to back their man even vwltirout the*
hall mark of-defeat of Gaudaur/but' if the
Hunter River sculler; did' win the World's
Championship ho would'bo in duty bound
to accept a.reasonable.chalienBe within the
oustomary time;' ' ;'.'V . '?.'??.. -. , ';
I- understand that-tSsdney.;R.C. is mnable
to send 'its crack, senior. fqurjfqr/theAnni
versai^-; Regatta,'- but will 'have'd-'crew. on'
the water, nevertheless.' 'It -will also'-'.hav.e; a*
maiden: four: that willalco go forithe'junjo'r.'
fours'.. '.Balmain R.O.. will . bo .'represented',
in tho Senior, Junior,' and 'Maiden Fours,
and the Globo R.C.^will also have a crew in
each of theso eTents.;.. ':--?..?.?.]
Balnialri'R.C; has flxed.' upon March 24 tor
Us annual regatta. - .' ; ..;.??
ROWING. NOTES AND GOSSIP
FiXTURES
1900
JANUARY
26— Anniversary Regatta
MARCH
24 -- Balmain R.C. Regatta
APRIL
8 -- St Ignatius College Regatta
(By "REX")
On Friday, November 17, there passed
away, after a severe illness, William A.
Messenger, Queen's Waterman and Deputy
Bargemaster, son of James Messsenger, of
Teddington, Queen's Waterman and Barge-
master who beat tom Cole for the pro-'
fessional championship of the Thames in
1854, but lost the title to Harry Kelly in
1857. William Messenger was an oarsman
of ability and won the fours at the Thames
Regatta at Putney in1869 in the Surbiton
crew, composed of Joseph Sadler, J. Ped-
grift, W.Messenger, G. Hammerton (str),
and R.Hammerton '(cox). He also won the
coat and badge of watermen's 'apprentices
at the Thames Regatta in the following
year, but he never aspired to championship
honors.— London "Field."
Surprise has been expressed that no offi-
cial intimation is yet to hand from Mel-
bourne concerning the result of the Inter-
colonial conference' held there at the time
of the Eight-oar Race. Mr. Fitzhardinge,
hon/ sec. of the New South Wales Rowing
Association, learns privately that the sec-
retary of the conference has been seriously
ill.
Towns has challenged Gaudaur to scull
for the Championship and £500 aside. A
match between the two would be about
the only thing to liven up professional
sport at present. But Jake is a canny cus-
tomer, and not easily drawn into a match
unless everything suits him.
He is getting up in years now, and a
comparatively young man like Towns ought
to have a bit the best of it on that score,
although Stanbury was young enough. Still
I can't help thinking that there was some-
thing of fluke about Jim's defeat.
Towns has yet to show himself equal to
such giants as Beach and Searle, but there
is no doubt he is real grit. Weer he to
meet and beat Gaudaur, which he has a
good chance of doing, it would probably
lead to a match with Stanbury in Sydney.
The ex-Champion is not thinking of scull-
ing much. Just now, being engaged on a
telegraph line contract out-back, but I be-
lieve he could be backed readily enough,
good match were, offered.
Towns' friends would, I presume, be pre-
pared to back their man even without the
hall mark of defeat of Gaudaur, but if the
Hunter River sculler did win the World's
Championship he would be in duty bound
to accept a reasonable challenge within the
customary time.
I understand that Sydney R.C. is unable
to send its crack senior for for the Anni-
versary Regatta, but will have a crew on
the water, nevertheless. It will also have a
maiden four that will also go for the junior
fours'. Balmain R.C. will be represented ,
in the Senior, Junior, and Maiden Fours,
and the Glebe R.C. will also have a crew in
each of these events.
Balamain 'R.C. has flxed ' upon March 24 for
its annual regatta.
SPORTING. (Article), Table Talk (Melbourne, Vic. : 1885 - 1939), Thursday 4 January 1900 page Article 2014-10-30 19:04 rowed, cavillers have pointed to three or four mon who
would be better ground for objection to tho selection
securing a brilliant win, which, from one point of viow,
does, away with all reason for dissatisfaction. It is
-especially eight-oared rowing-is harder than iu any
other sport, as thore aro no scores, no bowling averages,
know the cxact value of any individual man's work- in a
individual than on tho measure of training, coherence,
get from tho best oarsmen they know an evenly
matched crew witli the necessary watermanship and
result, allowance must be made for the possible over
colony, which no a matter of fact many besides those who
in the zenith of his popularity and was nationally.,
Bubear, tho ex-champion Thames sculler, had lately
reached the public house stage of his career, but un
instincts. Theso led him to swindle bookmakers,
which was remarkably ingenious of him, by having the .
rowed, cavillers have pointed to three or four men who
would be better ground for objection to the selection
securing a brilliant win, which, from one point of view,
does away with all reason for dissatisfaction. It is
-especially eight-oared rowing-is harder than in any
other sport, as there are no scores, no bowling averages,
know the exact value of any individual man's work in a
individual than on the measure of training, coherence,
get from the best oarsmen they know an evenly
matched crew with the necessary watermanship and
result, allowance must be made for the possible over-
colony, which as a matter of fact many besides those who
in the zenith of his popularity and was nationally
Bubear, the ex-champion Thames sculler, had lately
reached the public house stage of his career, but un-
instincts. These led him to swindle bookmakers,
which was remarkably ingenious of him, by having the
PORT ADELAIDE REGATTA A SMALL ATTENDANCE. (Article), The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), Tuesday 2 January 1900 page Article 2014-10-30 18:49 P0RT4p)ELAlDE REGATTA
A SMALL ATTEXDAXCE.
In accordance -with custom the Jievr
Year's holiday at Port Adelaide was cele
brated nith a regatta, which an energetic
against. ror a. long tune puuiic interest
the attendances have not been up to ex
pectations. Last year the crowd of spec
the shade and approaching almost boiiiug
Boats or from the Birkenhead bank of the
river. The rega'ttas of the present day
at Port Adelaide are but shadows 01 what
the sailing craft to a large enent that hao
caused a. loss of interest. Good sport was
satisfaction of knowing 'that it was through
no fault of theirs that greater interesc
in the regatta was not shown by the pub
lii» Mnet nf f.hp Icptrhp*; wprp* mnnr*-d on
the Birkenhead side of the river, but the/
former occasions. A number arc
sot provide a. poor display. With awnings
above their decks, and family groups bask
board looked happy and contented, de
spite the heat. In the new dock the sail
bunting running from her bow to her fore
gaily bedecked with flags; and other ves
fear of being drowned, disported them
selves, and provided amusement for on
lookers. The committee engaged the Ben
larig (Captain Mancke) as flagship st the
admirably, and was well pauonised
throughout the day. The Adelaide Steam
Mayor (Mr. J. W. Caire); several vice
T. E. Gun, E. J. Symonds, K. A.
M. King, T. H- Cooper, A. G. Douglas,
E. C. Movers, W. Russell, E. Cruickshank,
S. Malin, J. C. NeM, C. J. Coleman, E.
Clouston, E. N. Dewnirst, J. Deslandes,
D. Brock, A. Campbell, E. Beare, M. Man
Gate, Canon Samwell, and Rev. P.
keeper, Mr. T. H. Cooper; bandicappers,
Messrs. R. A. Walsh, E. X. Dewhirst, and
hon. secretary, Mr. W. H. Saunders; assis
tant hon. secretory, Sir. F. E. Meleng.
assistants. The Mayor (Mr. J. W.-£airej
The toast was honored vita the sing
The Mayor proposed 'The Ministry am
Holder on his accession to the Premier
fcnep. (Cheers.) It was with regret
that he viewed the downfall of the King
they west out of office lie was afraid thac
of tlie graving-dock, for which they haibi
of the Kingston Cabinet were returned i-'.i
office asai& lie knew that the interests ' \
the leading port of the colony were quite]
a graving-dock Port Adelaide would only,
rank a second-rate place, and the Holder V
South Wales, and Victoria each hail u ,
graving-dock, and West Australia was con- -
templating the construction of one also/
Therefore South Australia should lose n.6
time in going on with the work to enabie
her to cope with the sea traffic. It \vfi-.
said that the estimated original cost, wbitb
was £130,000, had been raised to £300,000,
had good friends in the Ministry, wpo,
would help them. (Cheers.) 1
The Premier (Hon. F. W. Holder), wfeo
was received with cheers, said he had beten
present at the regatta for several yeaira
past, and he was deeply obliged for t-Sie
invitation which he had received on pie
present occasion. They all hoped i/hat
with the advent of tike New Year pleace
would be restored in the world. (Chefbrs.)
They, trusted this would toe largely bnvugbt
the British arms in South Africa. (CHccrs.)
They took more than usual interest ill that
enccess, 'because our Australian boy^ were
to tfhe front — (loud cheers) — and theyy were
to toe reinforced shortly by others alnxious
to prove themselves worthy sons !of old
sires. (Cheers.) British pluck apd pa
triotism had lost none of their 1 vigor
(Cheers.) They all prayed this tejirfljle
?war would speedily come to an end), and
that peace would be restored with (-ionor,
and with due regard to the snprenfacy ot
British power in Soirtfh Africa. (Cibeers.)
He was a great believer in Federatic-p, and
the New Year had in store for there the
speedy realisation of a long cheiHshed
hope. a. hey regretted that so far \\Vest
long they hoped to face the world; as a
trvin# for a long time past to Recqje full
franchise privileges for scores of '? thou
sands of ttieir fellow-colonists, whdi were
as zealous for the welfare of Soutfe Aus
tralia, and as patriotic and worth, y colo
nists as any ot those who eniovred tbe
franchise to-day. (Hear, hear.) TheH- hoped
during the coming year to see a ; renewal
o long. A few weeks ago they were pre
pared 10 take payment on account, so 3s
to enable so many thousand to vote ne«
'May, but that was denied them and only
payment in full now would suffice to me-.'t
Parliament would soon pas= a Bill for
tlie - 'on-truet'ion of the graving deck at
Port Adelaide. (Cheers.) But for an un
la-i 4ays of the session, the will of both
Housed' would have been determined on
this -fue.-tion long ere this. He had a copy
of the 'Bill in tis pocket to submit to Par
to whFch he had already referred prevent
ed hinyi irom taking it out of its receptacle.
He hf»ped S-afr.re a year had passed to see
a Billion the Statute-book authorising the
con-tnut-tion ot a dock, which would en
able l'ort Adelaide to hold her proper
place lamono'st the ports of the colonies.
Cheers.) Reference tad been made to the
Wieni; tiiree or four years ago, this work
was pronosed, the dock was. estimated to
contain 'less than half the cubic space of
the d-jK'k now suggested. They were con
tent ilicn with a dock some 450 ft. lonR,
and ni-rh a corresponding depth and width,
but tljey i'ere not satisfied with those di
men^:iiri» now. Larger vessels were now
wouldTim.ease the trade past our borders.
Th^reA-iiv. thev must have a dock that
would j ac;ommodate the largest vessels
coming\ here. (Cheers.) The extension of
the dir/iensions of the dock had lied to tiie
increasje o-' its cost. The question of the
site hid been settled practically, and he
acknowledged Ws indebtedness to the ex
Ma'rinej Board, and the Engineer-in-Chief,
for the help they had. given him in this
not tue! very best site been decided upon.
Ee hopid the dock would be equal to any
of its kilnd m the Australian colonies, and
thai inareasing trade to Port Adelaide and
South (Australia generally would result.
PORT ADELAIDE REGATTA
A SMALL ATTENDANCE.
In accordance -with custom the New
Year's holiday at Port Adelaide was cele-
brated with a regatta, which an energetic
against. For a long ttime public interest
the attendances have not been up to ex-
pectations. Last year the crowd of spec-
the shade and approaching almost boiling
boats or from the Birkenhead bank of the
river. The regattas of the present day
at Port Adelaide are but shadows of what
the sailing craft to a large extent that has
caused a loss of interest. Good sport was
satisfaction of knowing that it was through
no fault of theirs that greater interest
in the regatta was not shown by the pub-
lic. Most of the ketches were moored on
the Birkenhead side of the river, but they
former occasions. A number are
not provide a poor display. With awnings
above their decks, and family groups bask-
board looked happy and contented, de-
spite the heat. In the new dock the sail-
bunting running from her bow to her fore-
gaily bedecked with flags; and other ves-
fear of being drowned, disported them-
selves, and provided amusement for on-
lookers. The committee engaged the Ben-
larig (Captain Mancke) as flagship at the
admirably, and was well patronised
throughout the day. The Adelaide Steam-
Mayor (Mr. J. W. Caire); several vice-
T. R. Gun, E. J. Symonds, R. A.
M. King, T. H. Cooper, A. G. Douglas,
E. C. Moyers, W. Russell, R. Cruickshank,
S. Malin, J. C. Neill, C. J. Coleman, E.
Clouston, E. N. Dewhirst, J. Deslandes,
D. Brock, A. Campbell, E. Beare, M. Man-
Cate, Canon Samwell, and Rev. P.
keeper, Mr. T. H. Cooper; handicappers,
Messrs. R. A. Walsh, E. N. Dewhirst, and
hon. secretary, Mr. W. H. Saunders; assis-
tant hon. secretary, Mr. F. E. Meleng.
assistants. The Mayor (Mr. J. W. Caire)
The toast was honored with the sing-
The Mayor proposed 'The Ministry and
Holder on his accession to the Premier-
ship. (Cheers.) It was with regret
that he viewed the downfall of the King-
they west out of office he was afraid that
of the graving-dock, for which they had
of the Kingston Cabinet were returned to
office again he knew that the interests of
the leading port of the colony were quite
a graving-dock Port Adelaide would only
rank a second-rate place, and the Holder
South Wales, and Victoria each had a
graving-dock, and West Australia was con-
templating the construction of one also.
Therefore South Australia should lose no
time in going on with the work to enable
her to cope with the sea traffic. It was
said that the estimated original cost, which
was £150,000, had been raised to £300,000,
had good friends in the Ministry, who,
would help them. (Cheers.)
The Premier (Hon. F. W. Holder), who
was received with cheers, said he had been
present at the regatta for several years
past, and he was deeply obliged for the
invitation which he had received on the
present occasion. They all hoped that
with the advent of the New Year peace
would be restored in the world. (Cheers.)
They, trusted this would be largely brought
the British arms in South Africa. (Cheers.)
They took more than usual interest in that
success, 'because our Australian boys were
to the front — (loud cheers) — and they were
to be reinforced shortly by others anxious
to prove themselves worthy sons of old
sires. (Cheers.) British pluck and pa-
triotism had lost none of their vigor
(Cheers.) They all prayed this terrible
war would speedily come to an end, and
that peace would be restored with honor,
and with due regard to the supremacy of
British power in South Africa. (Cheers.)
He was a great believer in Federation, and
the New Year had in store for them the
speedy realisation of a long cherished
hope. They regretted that so far West
long they hoped to face the world as a
trying for a long time past to secure full
franchise privileges for scores of thou-
sands of their fellow-colonists, who were
as zealous for the welfare of South Aus-
tralia, and as patriotic and worthy colo-
nists as any ot those who enjoyed tbe
franchise to-day. (Hear, hear.) They hoped
during the coming year to see a renewal
so long. A few weeks ago they were pre-
pared to take payment on account, so as
to enable so many thousand to vote next
May, but that was denied them and only
payment in full now would suffice to meet
Parliament would soon pass a Bill for
the construction of the graving deck at
Port Adelaide. (Cheers.) But for an un-
last days of the session, the will of both
Houses' would have been determined on
this question long ere this. He had a copy
of the 'Bill in his pocket to submit to Par-
to which he had already referred prevent-
ed him from taking it out of its receptacle.
He hoped ere a year had passed to see
a Bill on the Statute-book authorising the
construction ot a dock, which would en-
able Port Adelaide to hold her proper
place amongst the ports of the colonies.
Cheers.) Reference had been made to the
When, three or four years ago, this work
was proposed, the dock was estimated to
contain less than half the cubic space of
the dock now suggested. They were con-
tent then with a dock some 450 ft. long,
and with a corresponding depth and width,
but they were not satisfied with those di-
mensions now. Larger vessels were now
would incease the trade past our borders.
Therefore they must have a dock that
would accommodate the largest vessels
coming here. (Cheers.) The extension of
the dimensions of the dock had led to the
increasje of its cost. The question of the
site had been settled practically, and he
acknowledged his indebtedness to the ex-
Marine Board, and the Engineer-in-Chief,
for the help they had given him in this
not the very best site been decided upon.
He hoped the dock would be equal to any
of its kind in the Australian colonies, and
that increasing trade to Port Adelaide and
South Australia generally would result.
The Newcastle Regatta. AN IMMENSE ATTENDANCE. (Article), Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners' Advocate (NSW : 1876 - 1954) , Tuesday 2 January 1900 page Article 2014-10-30 18:18 although: closely pressed at one:stage:llo
mthiagd to win rather corifortably at' the
linish. Kerr made h bold effort opposite
tile steamers" wharf, but his younger oppo
nent carled too many guns; and won a
Wlatrmen's Skiffs, under working sails;
that. have been regularly emraloayed on the
ferry at teoast two months previous to re
gatta. No finas, keel not more than 21n
deep. Twomen only.-First pritze, £8;
No..2, once round. loats in :this event to
provide moorings. '
Nellie, W. Trolevan (2%mln) ........ 1
Brldena, WV. Trelevan (scratch) .
Airlie., R. IM'Cracken (2min) .. 3
Other starters: Nautilus. C. Trclvan (1tl
Inl): Young Ted, M. Jordan (23,mln);'
Champion. W. Tongue (3mrin).
The Nellie was nicely handled by WV.;Tre
levad, who exhibited consoderable sklill"it
the tller, especially, when rounding. Tihe
Briena was also in capable hands, and only
filished 4soc behind the Nellie, the Aihle
being somen distanoe away third. R .
The Jubilee Gift (Wafer"Brlgade' Rdee,;
boats not exceeding 28ft, fotr pair sotills)i.:
First prize. £20 (£5 5s of'which'is presrent
el by Messrs. Arnott and Coy.); secoadt,
£4. It four boats compete in the itnal, a
Saime as No. 3. The first and second' bats
in each heat to start ntnal.
Grafton No. 1 Crew, MIr. Farthing's boat;SL
Zeitch; cox, Brindle; b ...l...;... :
East talsitland No. 1 Crew ?a Ir C"?tionlli:?..
WV. H. Towns; cox; tI'Fadyene 2516.:02
West Maitland No 2 Crow, t.r Aubreys
boat. R." Brown, Pt' Shboemith 'I,'
Morris, Pattison; cox, W. Varleyi
feather ........................
West Maitland No. 1 Crew ,L?,.Leth.?
bridge, F. Dudley, C:' Comptodn jun.i
"'C. LothbrldgelF cov"O? SStepbtis
f`eatherT '(. I -. t.-~ a
weat' Maitlnisa.ird-Not "Crow ttatr. FIiart-"~
. thtlig's .bo oat;,,. Fulfora.` 9Webbeh
C. Bussell, WV. BOgan; coatSharp
251bs" '" ;..'.; ; '.. ; .
Graftonu-No. s2.Crowitir Callene .bodtai."
J. Oreonaway, H3. 'Sulllan, .i;:
Chasemen. IH. "Voetstn con One:*?Cil'h"
' (ton;. t 25bsL:.); ::': .~ 2;.. ''J' -.'.": ...¢.?.? 4r ''
Orafton No. 1 Crew ,... ,..:.,. ,.... .;, ,1
West Maitland No. 3 Crow:... .. . 4
We~st M~attluod No.' 3 Crone;;'~.;..~ ;;r 4'
Mr. Hannell lost noatime gettalhg the
boats away, Grifton being theo first to show
hot pursuit, East Maitland coming .next
first hundred yards wite:negotiated Wests'
No. 1 closed on' Grafton and the two
waS passnd. Easts were strOgglitg pluctk
IIy in third position, but Wests' No. 3 could
boats were disontling every inch of the
course, and excitement ran high along 'the
positloa. Passing No. 5i crane there was no
alteration in thile postitfons, each crew pull
plucklier effort wihos never befdre witnessed
on the Hunter. Before the next ifty yards
lhad been covered the Grafton boat woas lust
fn front of WVests' No. 1, the latter pulling
a trifle erratiec,.caused no doubt' by the
choppy water and the strong wind bloWing.
The Grafton. strokel was also elightly at
fault, but considering the unfavourable con
dtltions this Is not to be wondered lat.. Biut
there, was a worse strokle of luck In store.
for. the GOraftonlias. When a clear bnoat's
lIngth In front of their olponents one 6f
the crew dropped his scull through tlhe row
lock piving way. and the lourney had to be
continued under this jig disadvantage. The
Wcsts made a bold and simlultaneous bid
to avail thnemselves of the opportunity of
sculls at their command thie northern
hlappened. Coming to tile rounding buoy
it was anybody's raco, and the loss of the
scull was makling itself felt at eovery stroke
the Grafton men put In.' When well oppp
site the shoots the Wests made a final ef
fort to-overtake their opponeats, but they
did not succeed. Tihe excitement along
the 'whanrve's at this time was intense, and
from thoulsands of throats. As the two
leadihlg boats passed the steamers' wharf
and just as they were within hailing dlst
aneo of the nligship, the Orafton men re
sponded gallantly to tig call of tlheir clecver
three lengths to the good; The. Easts, who
sulled a game race, weno half a dozen
struggllng hopelessly it the rear. The win
of the Orafton crow was a very popular
one, and deservedly so, for it wirs generally
under which they nlaboured that their per
forlaance could not have been excelled not
count:y.
T'oe lbhilee Commemoration Prize: boats
lift. under canvas (handlcap).-li-First priaze,
.20'; second. £3; third, £2 (pirescnted by
Meosrs. Wasthitgton H. Soal and Co.).
Catirs"-Slmllle as No. 2. Flying start.
Fodral,. F. HIerbort (Imln) ......... 1
Stella It. WV. Reatl (scratch) ........ 2
Australlan, D. Webb (Ilmln) .......... 3
SOther starters: "Arld, A. Holmes (3%'"
ainn); Myall, W. Rutkln (7mln).
The Federal soon overhauled 'the limit
boals, and giving the Australia'n a ettide
berth at the starting point, sodn establlshi:
,First' Hieat..? '.* ,) ': ...
Second Heat. • ? ,;
by half a rinute from Stella II., tile Ans
tralihn beilin some jdistance away third.
allllhough tha( position would have hben oc
cupied by th nAriel llad sile not illled when
oppolsite the dyke. The Myall did not com
:doler tile course. Til wirrvlnng boat was :"
wmell hbandlid 'b Fibed hIerbert, who bad
with him a competent crew, who were loud
couneas. " -
Iy elaeaed when the victory was- all
Fishermen's Skiffs. under working sailso
thallt have been employed regularly in net.
fishing on the HIuntor River; no fins; deptli
ofkeiel not to exceed 2in; unlimited crows:
irslt prize, £8; second, £2; 'third £1
Colrse--Same as No. 2; onceoround. Boats"
hI! this event to pirovide moorings.
although closely pressed at one stage he
managed to win rather comfortably at the
finish. Kerr made a bold effort opposite
the steamers' wharf, but his younger oppo-
nent carried too many guns, and won a
Watermen's Skiffs, under working sails;
that have been regularly employed on the
ferry at least two months previous to re-
gatta. No fins, keel not more than 21in
deep. Two men only.-First prize, £8;
No..2, once round. Boats in his event to
provide moorings.
Nellie, W. Trelevan (2 ½min) ........ 1
Bridena, W. Trelevan (scratch) .......2
Airlie., R. M'Cracken (2min) .. 3
Other starters: Nautilus. C. Trelevan (1 ½
min): Young Ted, M. Jordan (2½min);'
Champion. W. Tongue (3min).
The Nellie was nicely handled by W.Tre-
levan, who exhibited considerable skkill at
the tiller, especially when rounding. The
Bridena was also in capable hands, and only
finished 4sec behind the Nellie, the Airlie
being some distance away third.
The Jubilee Gift (Water Brigade Race,
boats not exceeding 28ft, four pair sculls).--
First prize. £20 (£5 5s of which is present-
el by Messrs. Arnott and Coy.); second,
£4. If four boats compete in the final, a
Same as No. 3. The first and second boats
in each heat to start in the final.
Grafton No. 1 Crew, Mr. Farthing's boat,
Zeitch; cox, Brindle; 25lb ...l...;... : 1
East Maitland No. 1 Crew . Mr.Callen's
W. H. Towns; cox; McFadyen 25lb. .:02
West Maitland No 2 Crew, Mr Aubrey's
boat. R. Brown, H. Shoesmith, H.
Morris, Pattison; cox, W. Varley;
feather ........................3
West Maitland No. 1 Crew ,L. Leth-
bridge, F. Dudley, C. Compton jun.
C. Lethbridge cox, G.Stephens;
featherT ......................... 1
West Maitland No.3 crew, Mr. Far-
thing's boat, J.Fulford, J.Webb,
C. Bussell, W. BOgan; cox; Sharp
25lbs" ............................ 2
Grafton-No. 2.Crew Mr Callen's boat,
J.Greenaway, j O'Sullivan, K.
Chasemen. H.Voetun,; cox, Crigh-
ton; 25lbs........................................3
Grafton No. 1 Crew ,... ,..:.,. ,....... 1
West Maitland No. 1 Crew:... .. . 2 east Maitland........................ 3
West Maitland No.' 3 Crew.............. 4
Mr. Hannell lost no time getting the
boats away, Grafton being the first to show
hot pursuit, East Maitland coming next
first hundred yards were negotiated Wests'
No. 1 closed on Grafton and the two
was passed. Easts were struggling pluck-
iIy in third position, but Wests' No. 3 could
boats were disputing every inch of the
course, and excitement ran high along the
position. Passing No. 5 crane there was no
alteration in the positions, each crew pull-
pluckier effort was never before witnessed
on the Hunter. Before the next fifty yards
had been covered the Grafton boat was just
in front of Wests' No. 1, the latter pulling
a trifle erratic,.caused no doubt by the
choppy water and the strong wind blowing.
The Grafton stroke was also slightly at
fault, but considering the unfavourable con-
ditions this Is not to be wondered at. But
there, was a worse stroke of luck in store
for the Graftonians. When a clear boat's
length in front of their opponents one of
the crew dropped his scull through the row-
lock giving way, and the journey had to be
continued under this big disadvantage. The
Wests made a bold and simultaneous bid
to avail themselves of the opportunity of
sculls at their command the northern
happened. Coming to the rounding buoy
it was anybody's race, and the loss of the
scull was making itself felt at every stroke
the Grafton men put in. When well oppo-
site the shoots the Wests made a final ef-
fort to overtake their opponents, but they
did not succeed. The excitement along
the wharves at this time was intense, and
from thousands of throats. As the two
leading boats passed the steamers' wharf
and just as they were within hailing dist-
anco of the flagship, the Grafton men re-
sponded gallantly to the call of their clever
three lengths to the good. The Easts, who
sculled a game race, were half a dozen
struggling hopelessly in the rear. The win
of the Grafton crew was a very popular
one, and deservedly so, for it was generally
under which they laboured that their per-
formance could not have been excelled not
country.
T'he Jubilee Commemoration Prize: boats
18ft. under canvas (handicap).- -First prize,
£20'; second. £3; third, £2 (presented by
Messrs. Washington H. Soul and Co.).
Course -- Same as No. 2. Flying start.
Federal,. F. Herbert (1min) ......... 1
Stella H. W. Read (scratch) ........ 2
Australlan, C. Webb (1min) .......... 3
Other starters: "Ariel, A. Holmes (3 ½
min); Myall, W. Rutkin (7min).
The Federal soon overhauled the limit
boats, and giving the Australian a wide
berth at the starting point, soon establish-
First Heat..
Second Heat. •
by half a minute from Stella II., the Aus-
tralian being some distance away third,
although that position would have been oc-
cupied by the Ariel had she not filled when
opposite the dyke. The Myall did not com-
plete the course. The winning boat was
well handled by Fred Herbert, who had
with him a competent crew, who were loud-
nounced.
Iy cheered when the victory was an-
Fishermen's Skiffs. under working sails ;
that have been employed regularly in net
fishing on the Hunter River; no fins; depth
of keel not to exceed 2in; unlimited crews:
First prize, £8; second, £2; 'third £1
Course--Same as No. 2; once round. Boats
in this event to provide moorings.
The Newcastle Regatta. AN IMMENSE ATTENDANCE. (Article), Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners' Advocate (NSW : 1876 - 1954) , Tuesday 2 January 1900 page Article 2014-10-30 08:59 regatta. An almost cloudless sky: a freshl
harbouif', were elements calculated to please
the most ,enthusinstle lover of aocuatics.
There can be no doubt as to the popularit.y
the record attendance yesterday, which ex
haveohosts of supporters aosl friends who
love to see a well-contested rame under
canvas, or otherwise. From early mornilg
the crowd commsenccd gathering In the city,
each tra.mn and train adding Its quota to the
already immense assemblage. Loolking at
the wharves from the flagship it was impos
sible to finld a vacant spot, the entire length
front the timber wharf to the pllot boat
dock beilng one mass of sightseers. The
overhead bridges spanning tl railway line,
Dulrlng' the afternoon hundreds left the
wharf and streamed up the hill towards th?
gathering crowd covbred the beach and sea
Walkting among the crowd one noticed the
large proportion of strangers tb the city.
Thousands were In attendance from New
castle and its suburbs, but In addition tliere
Dpoints along the northern line and sur
rounding districts. Country people mak
tll and apparently enJlpying the outing to
the fullest losshible extent.
There was a lack of shipping, It is true, but
what there was sported an abtndance of.
flags. and the bunting, which sreamcd out
in the breeze, the crowded excursiont stea
launches, together with fleets of nrivte
picnic parties, made a most pleasing pano
ramna. full of moving life and colour. Tlhe
roaring business. A trip around the har
enable the excursionists to sea Nobbys and
for hundreds, and each successiveo:trip the
steamers carried their full complPement of
thie acommodation offered the patronage
was in every way as.sultable a vessel as
could be fotutd for the purpose, khldlyplacedl
Henddrson. No pains were sparedl by the
flag, was formerly a well-klnown British
never contained a tenth of the gaily dressedl.
yesterday. The .ship was spost pictur
seqnely dressed, a ygprk in which Messrs. J.
C. Reld and H..Ssiuels spent many hourso
of hard work with the best possible re
sults. A goodly bread of awning, ex
collent refresliment arrangements, supplied
by Host Pulbrook, of. the Criterion Hotel,
all tended to make the flitgshlp an ideal
place froth 'vhleh to watch the course of the
was a good cie. The strong nor'-easter gave
yachtsmen all they c6uld'do to handle
lieir craft, and eapslizes 'were numerous,
but a sailing regatta withot a few. spills
most peculiar features, and an equally in
'terestlng one to note, is the complete change
which has taken place 'In the class of sall
ing r'acers. In the 10-footers especially this
of an entirely dlffdrent class were used,
differing as widely in model from the pre
sent racing machines as the Amnerica does
tfrGn the Defender. One of the competing
l0-fcoters may be instanced as an example.
Ten feet long, and ten feet beam, she is In
alth ami enormous centreboard, suited only
for: racing, but certainly possessing none
of the lines which we have been necus
craft mnay be described as making splendid
for the suctmse attained thanks are due to
Mr. Q..H."Hannell, whose wide experience
and lonig'acquaintancea o th Newcastle sport
instance, and' the resilts tend to show that
as long as Mr. Hannell "keeps his hand on
thie tiller," and Is ably, supported as at pro
'snlt. Newcastle regatta will always be a
feciture. In the present instance Mr. Hon
committee, has received magnificent sulp
port' from the officers. and committee, who
were as .follow:-Vlce-presldents, Messrs.
Frank Gardner; Charles Uptold, Joseph
Wood, Samiel Arnott, 'Dr. Hester, AI A.
Wall. Hen. J. L. Fegan, M.L.A., W. T. Dcit,
M.LL.Ar.;:judge, Mr. J. C. Reid; starter, Mr.
Esmooid Hannell; cissistant starter, Mr. W'.
Langfcrd; commlttee, Messrs. Do. Goding,
J. C. Reid, E. 1annell, J. ChIarke, T. Dover,
J. A. Pulbrook, WV. J'Ralston, C. Hannell,
IT. Samuels, E. Booth, L. Arnott, G..T.
Edwaids, T. TI. Richardson; E. J.-Flaherty,
J., Byitt. 'J. O'Mara, W. L'. Brown, H. R.'
Smith, J. M. Hyde, WV. S. Gardner, F. B.
Menkaens, A. F: Chapman, G. A. Calnpbell,
J. O'Grady, M. C. Reid, H. Brooks, W\.
Lhngford, R. Blackall, A. C. Hollinshead,
H. J. Cannlngton, I.VW. Hocguard, and Horace
Hannell;.hon. treasurer, Mr. C. H. Hannell;
oan. secretary, Mr. Wm. Hickey.
H ?er. Wim. Hickey proved a most capable
i'norsary secretory, and to his energy and
forethought a good deal of yesterday's suc
cess is due.- He is an enthusiastic sports
man, whose hard Woik during months past,
cwhile arranging details and making the
'lidless. preparation, has been crowned
witsh success. Among' others not eonnect
'ed with the committee who rendesed as
isitance may lie mentioned Captain Hack
ing (deputy harbbur Imaster), who placed'
small schlooners to give a clearer .track.
whole staff, under Senior-Sergeant M'Vane,
being on dut, part afloat and part at the
different landing stages, where theli' unt
form courtesy and attention was noted by I
stiangers-leewcastln people know it to be
their customary mannder.
lortunaitely there were no cnslmltles. As
prelviously mientioned, there were several
capalzes among sailing boats, and-the occu;
pant of one wager boat.came to grief. In
the waterman's skllff race, one boat, in at
tempting to cross another's bows, succeed
cd in knocking a hole through It, No one
was. hurt, and one of the best day's sport
In the rowing events many of the com
yeors to coiae, when some of the young
sters muake a name for themselves in the
satisfaction of saying that he w as Instru
inany other leading lights graduated under
the "father of the Newcastle regattao'" and
needless to say he is proud of the achieve
and no man regretted the death of Creese
more than Mlr. Iannell" did. The Grafton
men were unldoubtedly the heroes yesterday,
They pulled a hard, plucky race in the inal
victory was proclanimed a loud cheer went
men during their brief stay in. Ntewcastle
hlave endeared tlhemselves to the people of
offer for the display of enthusiasm that fol
lowed their wrell-merlted victory. The
vice-president of the brigade, Mlr. C:'San
desr, was the reclplient of scores'of con
srirhtulations from sincere friends, and with'
the exception of Mr. thinnell the brigade's
city yesterday. Tie Grafton menri .return
In the wager boat race young Chitlrlie
a oInt in hand at tile finish. All the eom
pctitors had an extremely rough passage,
but fortunately there were no serious mis
lhaps. Tresslder and Worboys both com
noted, but followers of nnaquatics are no
concerned thert did not appear to be any
"foxhing," but one can never tell these days
when scnllors, like all other athletes, are
always on tOle looltkout for soft snaps. WVor-.
boys. unfortunately for those on the flag
Peter Kemp Is not far oult in lis Judgment,
and the Wallsender are not brought toge
ther. The Hilckoy brothers were clearly
outclassed In tile alheomers' two pair race,
ITannell was surrounded by a number of
that gentleman upon the success of the re
gatta. The band struck ip "For he's a
Jolly good follow,"' and in aclnowledging
the contoliment Mr. Hannell said he was
proud of the success of tile amlrnival. He
was indettetd to Messrs. W. HItckey, J. C.
ReKl, and H. famuels for their assistance,
while thile itn'dness. of Captain Henderson
Followsing are the details of the racling:
Youtts, under t18 years ofnage.-Two pains
oflsdulls, in worlting watermoen's skiffs tliat
ha'e beon regularly employed on the feri~y
at:leost two months previolls to regatta.
presented Py-Mr..Temple WVest. Oourse:
shoots, thence between red buoy and stea
moer's wharf, past filooship, round the red
light beacon, baclk to flagship. All marks
to he kept on the port hand.
Etna, E. .clelkey and S. M'Innes I tcox, .
Huglies) . .... .. 1
Violet, J. Ward andl J. Lindatrum (cox,U
Nautilus, H. Denmer and H. Gordon
(cox,. Brown) ..................... 3
Dempsey (eox, Creese); Lamorna, J. Ross
and J. Jordan (con, Ross):
Nautilus, Violet, and Mokla, with Lamorna
briginglg lip the rear. Passing thile flagship
leading boat, and the pair were almnost on
terms as they passed the buoy. Approach
ing the A.A.Co.'s •shoots the Etna again
while the Nautiltus and Violet were strug
thie Etna had the race well in hand, and
third. The Molthk was fourth, the La
morn failing to finish. Hickltey- and
Dingles, 1Oft, under canvas.-First prize,
'£12; second, £2; third, £1. Course: From
thence round boat off Sulohide Wharf,
thence past flagboat off S.E; end of dylte to
Planet (T. Cuneo), lmlin ......... 1
Columbia (IF. Herbert), 4min ......... 2
Elma (W. York), 3imin ...........:... :3
scratch: Zanlta (J. Smith), lfmin; Orescent
II. (C. Dunn), 1%mln; Ina (A. S. Andrews).
2mil; Procella (H. Prltchard), 21min; Al
ttha (T. Timbrell), 2%min; Australia (O.
Towns), 2%min: Freada (E. Devereux), 3i
min; Karnah (G. A. Campbell), 5mtin.'.
The Karnah got nicely away, and rounded
the flagship In fine style, being.followed by
Elma, Freada, Alpha, Columbia, ABstralikt.
tihe Olga and the Planet being the last to
round. Passing, Stockton the Karuanh. was
still showing the way, with the Elms as
her nearest attendant, the others sdcceed
ing one ansother atshort intervals, the sight
being a most animated' one as the midgets
made their way to the Sulphide Wharf,
Coiing along the dyke the Karnah was
showing.the way to Elme, after which came
the Planet, Columbla, and Australia. ' The
Columbia was In a good position opposite
the sheeoots, but she stood rather far in to
the wharf and thits mistake lost her con
siderable ground. As they passed the flag
ship before roulding the second time, the
positions were: Elma, Planet, Karuah, Co
lumbia, Australia, Freada,' Crescent II., and
Ina, with the Zanita bringing up' tihe rear.
Pnassing Stockton there was no material al
teration in the positions of tile leading
boats, but after roundhig the iuoy off the
Sulphide Wharf and when fairly on the run'
home the Columbia was at the head of af
fairs, with the Planet as her closest at
tehndant, tho next in order being the Elms,
Crescent IIt,. Karunh, Frehda. Inn, and Zn
ntita. Opposite the shoots there was ro
thling to. choose between the Columbia nid
Platiet, but the latter getting round first
eaentually won rather comfortably.' The
others were some distance away. Thie Aus
tralia, when In a fairly good position, cap
sized alongside tho dykte, and the Britannia
having the had luck to lsnap her bumpkin
did not compete. The Isabella ropsized
twice before theigun fired, and consoituently
was unable to put in an tpplearnlce. A
protest whs lodged against the winning boat
Champion Jubilee Cup. allcomers' :slnglec
:Ieulls (bost bheats handicap)--Firsat prize,
C20 5s, with cup valued £3 3s, presented
hvy Messrs. Potter and Co.; second, £ ;
thid, .£2. Coulrt-From Sulphlide Whldr'f,
p:tet 1ltut off SE. end of dyltke, thence palt
rdd buoy opposite steamer's wharf; finishing
stalrboard hland, ' .
C. Towns (.20see behind) .......'.;..
R. Tresslder (40sec'behlnd) .'.,..'..'. 2
Ht. Pcarce (40soee behind) :''...';'..;. .;.' 2
Other satarters: T. Iuncdaster scratch, C.
Croese 15sec behind, N. Pellinnil 20sec be
lhind, E. Mansfield 25see behind, A. .Wor-.
boys 30sei behliid, J. Bishbui 30tsec behind:.
Mr. Hannell got the men away to ahbeau
toful start. Tie water sas very choppy,
tullers. Muncasteir was soeon disposed of,
andl his place at the head of affairs was
tlakentc by Towns, after whomh came Tresli
der, Pearce, MIuncaster, Pollman, and
Ilshop: Mansfield having retired, and Wor
toys lad the'bad'luck to capsize. Once in
a line for hosie, Towns, rowing a nice even
stroke, maintaineiled his lead, and opposite
in front of Trossider, Pearce belig a similar
distonce away thirt'd, When the gun fired
Tresslder. Pearbe being hialf a dozen loulgths
away third;'Croesse was fourth, and Bishop
fifth. Towns' time was 24Smin 30sec.
Amateurn Pair Sculls, in Gladstone sktifof..
--First prize,: £4; secltd, £1; third, iro
phy, presented by Mr. A. D. Roblnsoln.
Course--Sume as No. 1.
R. Munecaster (10se behind) .......... 1
GO Kerr (2asec belhind) ............ 2
A. Proctm' (scratch) .................. 3
These wtere the only starters. Muncaster
was ntot long overtaking the limit man, and
regatta. An almost cloudless sky, a fresh
harbour, were elements calculated to please
the most enthusiastic lover of aquatics.
There can be no doubt as to the popularity
the record attendance yesterday, which ex-
have hosts of supporters and friends who
love to see a well-contested race under
canvas, or otherwise. From early morning
the crowd commenced gathering in the city,
each tram and train adding its quota to the
already immense assemblage. Looking at
the wharves from the flagship it was impos-
sible to find a vacant spot, the entire length
from the timber wharf to the pilot boat
dock being one mass of sightseers. The
overhead bridges spanning the railway line,
During the afternoon hundreds left the
wharf and streamed up the hill towards the
gathering crowd covered the beach and sea
Walking among the crowd one noticed the
large proportion of strangers to the city.
Thousands were in attendance from New-
castle and its suburbs, but in addition there
points along the northern line and sur-
rounding districts. Country people mak-
all and apparently enjoying the outing to
the fullest possible extent.
There was a lack of shipping, it is true, but
what there was sported an abundance of
flags, and the bunting, which streamed out
in the breeze, the crowded excursion stea
launches, together with fleets of private
picnic parties, made a most pleasing pano-
rama, full of moving life and colour. The
roaring business. A trip around the har-
enable the excursionists to see Nobbys and
for hundreds, and each successive trip the
steamers carried their full complement of
the accommodation offered the patronage
was in every way as sultable a vessel as
could be found for the purpose, kindly placed
Henderson. No pains were spared by the
flag, was formerly a well-known British
never contained a tenth of the gaily dressed
yesterday. The ship was most pictur-
esquely dressed, a work in which Messrs. J.
C. Reld and H.Samuels spent many hours
of hard work with the best possible re-
sults. A goodly spread of awning, ex-
cellent refreshment arrangements, supplied
by Host Pulbrook, of the Criterion Hotel,
all tended to make the flagshlp an ideal
place from which to watch the course of the
was a good one. The strong nor'-easter gave
yachtsmen all they could do to handle
their craft, and capsizes were numerous,
but a sailing regatta without a few spills
most peculiar features, and an equally in-
teresting one to note, is the complete change
which has taken place in the class of sail-
ing racers. In the 10-footers especially this
of an entirely dlfferent class were used,
differing as widely in model from the pre-
sent racing machines as the America does
from the Defender. One of the competing
10-footers may be instanced as an example.
Ten feet long, and ten feet beam, she is in
with an enormous centreboard, suited only
for racing, but certainly possessing none
of the lines which we have been accus-
craft may be described as making splendid
for the success attained thanks are due to
Mr. C.H. Hannell, whose wide experience
and long acquaintance with Newcastle sport
instance, and the resilts tend to show that
as long as Mr. Hannell keeps his hand on
the tiller, and Is ably supported as at pre-
sent, Newcastle regatta will always be a
feature. In the present instance Mr. Han-
committee, has received magnificent sup-
port' from the officers and committee, who
were as follow:-Vlce-presldents, Messrs.
Frank Gardner; Charles Upfold, Joseph
Wood, Samuel Arnott, Dr. Hester, A. A.
Wall. Hon. J. L. Fegan, M.L.A., W. T. Dick,
M.L.A. judge, Mr. J. C. Reid; starter, Mr.
Esmond Hannell; assistant starter, Mr. W.
Langford; committee, Messrs. De Goding,
J. C. Reid, E. Hannell, J. CIarke, T. Dover,
J. A. Pulbrook, W. J. Ralston, C. Hannell,
H. Samuels, E. Booth, L. Arnott, G.T.
Edwards, T. H. Richardson; E. J. Flaherty,
J. Byatt. J. O'Mara, W. L . Brown, H. R.
Smith, J. M. Hyde, W. S. Gardner, F. B.
Menkens, A. F. Chapman, G. A. Campbell,
J. O'Grady, M. C. Reid, H. Brooks, W.
Langford, R. Blackall, A. C. Hollinshead,
H. J. Cannington, W. Hocguard, and Horace
Hannell; hon. treasurer, Mr. C. H. Hannell;
hon. secretary, Mr. Wm. Hickey.
Mr. Wim. Hickey proved a most capable
honorary secretary, and to his energy and
forethought a good deal of yesterday's suc-
cess is due. He is an enthusiastic sports-
man, whose hard work during months past,
while arranging details and making the
endless preparation, has been crowned
with success. Among others not connect-
ed with the committee who rendered as-
sistance may be mentioned Captain Mack-
ing (deputy harbour master), who placed
small schooners to give a clearer track.
whole staff, under Senior-Sergeant McVane,
being on duty, part afloat and part at the
different landing stages, where their uni-
form courtesy and attention was noted by
strangers--- Newcastle people know it to be
their customary manner.
Fortunately there were no casualties. As
previously mentioned, there were several
capsizes among sailing boats, and the occu-
pant of one wager boat came to grief. In
the waterman's skiff race, one boat, in at-
tempting to cross another's bows, succeed-
ed in knocking a hole through it. No one
was hurt, and one of the best day's sport
In the rowing events many of the com-
years to come, when some of the young-
sters make a name for themselves in the
satisfaction of saying that he was instru-
many other leading lights graduated under
the "father of the Newcastle regatta'" and
needless to say he is proud of the achieve-
and no man regretted the death of Croese
more than Mr. Hannell did. The Grafton
men were undoubtedly the heroes yesterday,
They pulled a hard, plucky race in the final
victory was proclaimed a loud cheer went
men during their brief stay in Newcastle
have endeared themselves to the people of
offer for the display of enthusiasm that fol-
lowed their well-merlted victory. The
vice-president of the brigade, Mr. C. San-
ders, was the recipient of scores of con-
gratulations from sincere friends, and with
the exception of Mr. Hannell the brigade's
city yesterday. The Grafton men return
In the wager boat race young Charlie
a lot in hand at the finish. All the com-
petitors had an extremely rough passage,
but fortunately there were no serious mis-
haps. Tresslder and Worboys both com-
peted, but followers of aquatics are no
concerned there did not appear to be any
"foxing," but one can never tell these days
when scullers, like all other athletes, are
always on the lookout for soft snaps. Wor-
boys, unfortunately for those on the flag-
Peter Kemp is not far out in his judgment,
and the Wallsender are not brought toge-
ther. The Hickey brothers were clearly
outclassed in the allcomers' two pair race,
Hannell was surrounded by a number of
that gentleman upon the success of the re-
gatta. The band struck up "For he's a
jolly good follow,"' and in acknowledging
the compliment Mr. Hannell said he was
proud of the success of the carnival. He
was indettetd to Messrs. W. Hickey, J. C.
Reid, and H. Samuels for their assistance,
while the kindness of Captain Henderson
Following are the details of the racing:
Youths, under 18 years of age.-Two pairs
of sculls, in working watermen's skiffs that
have beenn regularly employed on the ferry
at least two months previous to regatta.
presented by-Mr.Temple West. Course:
shoots, thence between red buoy and stea-
mer's wharf, past flagship, round the red
light beacon, back to flagship. All marks
to be kept on the port hand.
Etna, E. Hickey and S. M'Innes (cox,
Hughes) . .... .. 1
Violet, J. Ward andl J. Lindstrum (cox,
Nautilus, H. Deamer and H. Gordon
(cox. Brown) ..................... 3
Dempsey (cox, Croese); Lamorna, J. Ross
and J. Jordan (cox, Ross):
Nautilus, Violet, and Mokia, with Lamorna
bringing up the rear. Passing the flagship
leading boat, and the pair were almost on
terms as they passed the buoy. Approach-
ing the A.A. Co.'s shoots the Etna again
while the Nautiltus and Violet were strug-
the Etna had the race well in hand, and
third. The Mokia was fourth, the La-
morna failing to finish. Hicktey and
Dingies, 10ft, under canvas.-First prize,
£12; second, £2; third, £1. Course: From
thence round boat off Sulphide Wharf,
thence past flagboat off S.E. end of dyke to
Planet (T. Cuneo), 1½ min ......... 1
Columbia ( F. Herbert), 4min ......... 2
Elma (W. York), 3 ½min ...........:... :3
scratch: Zanita (J. Smith), 1½min; Crescent
II. (C. Dunn), 1 ½min; Ina (A. S. Andrews).
2min; Procella (H. Pritchard), 2 ½min; Al-
pha (T. Timbrell), 2 ½min; Australia (G.
Towns), 2 ½min: Freada (E. Devereux), 3 ½
min; Karuah (G. A. Campbell), 5min.'.
The Karuah got nicely away, and rounded
the flagship in fine style, being followed by
Elma, Freada, Alpha, Columbia, Australia,
the Olga and the Planet being the last to
round. Passing Stockton the Karuanh was
still showing the way, with the Elma as
her nearest attendant, the others succeed-
ing one ansother at short intervals, the sight
being a most animated one as the midgets
made their way to the Sulphide Wharf.
Coming along the dyke the Karuah was
showing the way to Elma, after which came
the Planet, Columbia, and Australia. The
Columbia was in a good position opposite
the shoots, but she stood rather far in to
the wharf and this mistake lost her con-
siderable ground. As they passed the flag-
ship before rounding the second time, the
positions were: Elma, Planet, Karuah, Co-
lumbia, Australia, Freada, Crescent II, and
Ina, with the Zanita bringing up the rear.
Pnassing Stockton there was no material al-
teration in the positions of the leading
boats, but after rounding the buoy off the
Sulphide Wharf and when fairly on the run
home the Columbia was at the head of af-
fairs, with the Planet as her closest at-
tendant, the next in order being the Elma,
Crescent II, Karuah, Freada, Ina, and Za-
nita. Opposite the shoots there was no-
thing to choose between the Columbia and
Planet, but the latter getting round first
eventually won rather comfortably. The
others were some distance away. The Aus-
tralia, when In a fairly good position, cap-
sized alongside the dyke, and the Britannia
having the bad luck to snap her bumpkin
did not compete. The Isabella capsized
twice before the gun fired, and consequently
was unable to put in an appearance. A
protest was lodged against the winning boat
Champion Jubilee Cup. allcomers' single
sculls (best boats handicap)--First prize,
£26 5s, with cup valued £3 3s, presented
by Messrs. Potter and Co.; second, £ 5
third, .£2. Course; From Sulphide Wharf,
past boat off S.E. end of dyke, thence past
red buoy opposite steamer's wharf; finishing
starboard hand .
C. Towns (.20sec behind) .......'.;..1
R. Tresslder (40sec behlnd) .'.,..'..'. 2
H. Pearce (40soec behind) :''...';'..;. .;.' 3
Other starters: T. Muncaster scratch, C.
Croese 15sec behind, N. Pellman 20sec be-
hind, E. Mansfield 25sec behind, A. Wor-
boys 30sec behind, J. Bishop 30 sec behind:.
Mr. Hannell got the men away to a beau-
tiful start. The water was very choppy,
scullers. Muncaster was soon disposed of,
and his place at the head of affairs was
taken by Towns, after whom came Tressi-
der, Pearce, Muncaster, Pellman, and
Bishop; Mansfield having retired, and Wor-
toys had the bad luck to capsize. Once in
a line for home, Towns, rowing a nice even
stroke, maintained his lead, and opposite
in front of Tressider, Pearce being a similar
distance away third. When the gun fired
Tresslder, Pearbe being half a dozen lengths
away third; 'Croesse was fourth, and Bishop
fifth. Towns' time was 24 min 30sec.
Amateurn Pair Sculls, in Gladstone skiffs,
--First prize,: £4; second, £1; third, tro
phy, presented by Mr. A. D. Robinson.
Course--Same as No. 1.
R. Muncaster (10sec behind) .......... 1
G. Kerr (20sec behind) ............ 2
A. Proctor (scratch) .................. 3
These were the only starters. Muncaster
was not long overtaking the limit man, and
ROWING. SCULLING CHAMPIONSHIP. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Saturday 14 July 1906 page Article 2014-10-28 16:39 »^í.'!.,lbuP- eon'-nurato do exrellent work dally, anil
«Ppoare to go even better than hc did a vear aji.
because he lus ? rather better length of swing it
the ¡hush His boat nins vcrj freely between stroke
«lue to i most vigorous applieition of the sculls uni
a wonderfully stead) recover} It is cerUIn that
the tw o j cars or mure continuous triining has had u
champion He jumps m the beginning ami carries
his blades through with one might} lift, trusting,
lion et cr, to a linish with but little legwork to sun
port it »tanbury should be capaba of even a bctUr
performance than when he beat lovvns a sear ago
Iowna is no» rowing with a most effective Iengtn
and dash, and his boat covcre a great distance as the
result of each stroke Ile is training very hard
ami seems to stand i* right enough so he bhould ne
ibio to hold ti» champion better than he did before
Up to the present Hie public favour the prospects
of the champion, and that is but naturil, for he is
by far the stronger man, and is fcolng bo well It
has leen conclusively proved Hut other things bein,'
equal, wielght and strength will win but with a man
who is neinng the end of his career as Stnnbur) is
undoubted!), defeit must louie some da), and th»
sculler who has passed his best dnj ma) fail at anv
time Still those who 1 now the champion belt
ilrml) believe he is a game and reliable defender of
the title
Towns ¡Ins thorough!) tested himself, and Icels
confident that lie has improved in ever) wiy and
his self reliance 's something in his fal our All a«
agreed that Towns s rowing form and stamina aie
remarknbl) good and that his one thing lacking is
weight The great race will take place in two
weeks' time, and the result will probant) lead lo the
closing of the career of the loser
At a conference held at Perth in May last, and it
which all the Stltes were represented excepting Ne v
South Wales, several resolutions were pissed, but the
association of this Stitc lus declined to
be bound b) them, or lo recognise them
It was agreed that the next race for the eit.li*"
oar championship should be in adelaide next vc it
AS a matter of fact, this race is the last of the pri
sent series that has been agreed upon It is certain
a conference will then l»e held to consider the ord r
pt future races and other conditions At Perth it
was agreed tint all the six Slates should hive the
race In turn, and that with the exception of when
Queensland or Western Austrilia Ins the rice on boin0
witers it shall be optional for citber to be reprc
tented For instance, Western Austnlia need nit
compete in Queenshnd nor shall the latter be com
pelled to row at Perth The other States have . e
xvaters The Southern Ixsmama Rowing *asoeii
lion has airead) written to the other associations
putting forth the elim s of Holart as the place for
the race when it becomes rasmmia's turn No
doubt launceston will be supported bj the Norther ii
Tasmania Assoehtion It Is believed our asiociatioil
is not m favour of continuing the present order if
race« and fivours i return to Hie old order whoi
rices were luid lu ilternate 3ears 011 the } irra lui
I'irrauinlli rivers
Tlie conference also agreed that future rices should
be started from moored boats Tin hist race start
ed from moored marks was at RrlsMne In 11)04 and
proved very unsatisfaitorj It is an obsolete method
are affected by slrong tides Last 3 car on the Parra
matta, tho starting give genenl satisfaction and
was effected bv getting all silt crews Into line It
is out of the question to block the fairvva) on a
river b) a string of moored boats and might well
be objected to bv the steimors using the river
the Lane Cove River Tlie chief event on the pro
gramme will be semor eithls for the Rivery lew gold
challenge cup
The first regitta of (lie season tint of the Row
ing Assoehtion, will be held on the PirnmitU
River, October c The progriinme will be Milden
lours Cnainplon Pours, Maiden 1-ights, lunior lours,
and probably a fifth race
Coraki. Rimini Rcgitta will be held on the Rich
mond River September 12 This is the date of the
I ogwell Mitchell rice for £100 a sido and clnmplon
ship of the northern rivers district Roth I ogwell
and Mitchell arc out dally on the Parramatta the
former with Towns and Mitchell with Stanbury At
the Conl I Regatta will be rowed a sculling bandi
Tlie pnrc money will be £Tj £10, £5 and the
entrance fee £2 Tlie handicinpers arc Messrs A
Conro) and A Turner (Coriki) ard T niackman
(Sydney) There will lie a consolation handicap for
prises of £7, £2, and £1, also several races for
local men
Stanbury continues to do excellent work daily, and
appears to go even better than he did a year ago,
because he has a rather better length of swing at
the finish. His boat runs freely between strokes
due to a most vigorous application of the sculls and
a wonderfully steady recovery. It is certain that
the two years or more continuous training has had a
champion. He jumps in the beginning and carries
his blades through with one mighty lift, trusting,
however, to a finish with but little legwork to sup-
port it. Stanbury should be capable of even a better
performance than when he beat Towns a year ago.
Towns is now rowing with a most effective Iength
and dash, and his boat covers a great distance as the
result of each stroke. He is training very hard
and seems to stand it right enough so he should be
able to hold the champion better than he did before.
Up to the present the public favour the prospects
of the champion, and that is but natural, for he is
by far the stronger man, and is going so well. It
has been conclusively proved that other things being
equal, weight and strength will win but with a man
who is nearing the end of his career as Stanbury is
undoubtedly, defeat must come some day, and the
sculler who has passed his best day may fail at any
time. Still those who know the champion best
firmly believe he is a game and reliable defender of
the title.
Towns has thoroughly tested himself, and feels
confident that he has improved in every way and
his self reliance is something in his favour. All are
agreed that Towns's rowing form and stamina are
remarkably good and that his one thing lacking is
weight. The great race will take place in two
weeks' time, and the result will probably lead to the
closing of the career of the loser.
At a conference held at Perth in May last, and at
which all the States were represented excepting New
South Wales, several resolutions were passed, but the
association of this State has declined to
be bound by them, or to recognise them.
It was agreed that the next race for the eight-
oar championship should be in Adelaide next year.
As a matter of fact, this race is the last of the pre-
sent series that has been agreed upon. It is certain
a conference will then be held to consider the order
of future races and other conditions. At Perth it
was agreed that all the six States should have the
race in turn, and that with the exception of when
Queensland or Western Australia has the race on home
waters it shall be optional for either to be repre-
sented. For instance, Western Australia need not
compete in Queensland nor shall the latter be com-
pelled to row at Perth. The other States have no
waters. The Southern Tasmania Rowing Associa-
tion has already written to the other associations
putting forth the claims of Hobart as the place for
the race when it becomes Tasmania's turn. No
doubt Launceston will be supported by the Northern
Tasmania Association. It is believed our association
is not in favour of continuing the present order if
races, and favours a return to the old order, when
races were held in alternate years on the Yarra and
Parramatta rivers.
The conference also agreed that future races should
be started from moored boats. The last race start-
ed from moored marks was at Brisbane in 1904 and
proved very unsatisfactory. It is an obsolete method
are affected by strong tides. Last year on the Parra-
matta, the starting gave genenl satisfaction and
was effected by getting all six crews into line. It
is out of the question to block the fairway on a
river by a string of moored boats and might well
be objected to by the steamers using the river.
the Lane Cove River. The chief event on the pro-
gramme will be senior eights for the Riverview gold
challenge cup.
The first regatta of the season, that of the Row-
ing Association, will be held on the Parramatta
River, October 6. The programme will be Maiden
Fours Champion Pours, Maiden Eights, Junior fours,
and probably a fifth race.
Coraki Annual Regatta will be held on the Rich-
mond River September 12. This is the date of the
Fogwell - Mitchell race for £100 a side and champion-
ship of the northern rivers district. Both Fogwell
and Mitchell are out daily on the Parramatta the
former with Towns, and Mitchell with Stanbury. At
the Coraki Regatta will be rowed a sculling handi-
The prize money will be £35 £10, £5 and the
entrance fee £2 The handicappers are Messrs A.
Conroy and A Turner (Coraki) and J.Blackman
(Sydney) There will be a consolation handicap for
prizes of £7, £2, and £1, also several races for
local men.
ROWING. SCULLING CHAMPIONSHIP. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Monday 24 August 1908 page Article 2014-10-28 16:09 On Saturday afternoon R. Artist left for New Zea
land gouip; to Wellington first) then for a few days
to Christchurch Afterwards ho will take up his
auarters at YYnnganul nnd will do all his training
icro till the raee against \\ Y"i ebb cn December 15
YVith îery II tie effort he expanded hs chest 10
inches the tot.il expansion then being f¡5 inches
Arnst has taken a boat with him ami another will bo
shipped in ii few «lu\s the new boat being slightly
fuller aft than the one he used against Pearce
Hie final deposit of i,lO0 n sido is due on the lnst
tiny of this month with the btakcholdcr at YYnnganut
Arnst will ha> eli 1 loyd as eomp-inion and Nelson
and Fogwcll ns trainer and coach rcipecthclj log
well howcier will not lea\e for Kew Zealand for
several weeks jet us he ia now cngugtd as trainer to
G Day Mho races S Kemp October 6 on the Rich
mond Rl\ er
YVebb bos for some time been devoting the whole of
his time to a preparation by easy stae.es He has
another Meisen bout and expresses satisfaction with it
lie «ill again bo trained bj Barnett who hns some
peculiar methods something quite different to thoso
«lilch find favour with our professional scullers.
On Saturday afternoon R. Arnst left for New Zea-
land going to Wellington first; then for a few days
to Christchurch. Afterwards he will take up his
quarters at Wanganui and will do all his training
there, till the race against Webb on December 15.
With very little effort he expanded his chest 10
inches, the total expansion then being 55 inches.
Arnst has taken a boat with him and another will be
shipped in a few days, the new boat being slightly
fuller aft than the one he used against Pearce.
The final deposit of £100 a-side is due on the last
day of this month with the stakeholder at Wanganui.
Arnst will have H.Floyd as companion and Nelson
and Fogwell as trainer and coach respectively. Fog-
well however will not leave for New Zealand for
several weeks yet as he is now engaged as trainer to
G. Day who races S Kemp, October 5, on the Rich-
mond River
Webb has for some time been devoting the whole of
his time to a preparation by easy stages. He has
another Nielsen boat and expresses satisfaction with it.
He will again be trained by Barnett, who has some
peculiar methods something quite different to those
which find favour with our professional scullers.
ROWING. Sculling Championship. (Article), The West Australian (Perth, WA : 1879 - 1954), Friday 17 August 1934 page Article 2014-10-28 16:01 England will meet Bobby Pearce of Aus
the draw announced today tor tne world s
two heats of the , championship will be
decided on August 24. The men are under
England will meet Bobby Pearce of Aus-
the draw announced today tor tne world' s
two heats of the championship will be
decided on August 24. The men are under-
ROWING. Sculling Marathon Races. (Article), The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Friday 2 October 1931 page Article 2014-10-28 16:00 didstance races will be held on the Lower Yarra.
boat section will be rowed from prince's Bridge to
the Victoria Dock and
tice boats.
distance races will be held on the Lower Yarra.
boat section will be rowed from Prince's Bridge to
the Victoria Dock and back, approximately five
miles. This will be the first occasion that a long- distance race has been rowed on the Yarra inprac- tice boats.
ROWING. SCULLING CHAMPIONSHIP. (Article), Balmain Observer and Western Suburbs Advertiser (NSW : 1884 - 1907), Saturday 23 June 1906 page Article 2014-10-28 15:56 A correspondOTt writes:—
«eorge towns may be expected t
be a much-improved man when h
finish his training to meet Slanbiiry
Stale scenery on' the Patrama,ttiL—
his homo overlooks .the course — ?.
was not the tiest Inducement to
him to train hard, for since he re
turned from England,' he has : been
con'. ;-.n ally on the river. , Awa
froL- his business; and with half a
dozt soullefs around him at Ray
nion..': Terrace, his heart and sou
are k. h.Is sculling. Stajibury now
has j.:-- his companions Beach an^
Mitciiell, v; th Hancock as trp(ioep
Thi; I ig fellow looks Very well.
A correspondent writes:—
George towns may be expected to
be a much-improved man when he
finish his training to meet Stanbury
Stale scenery on the Parramatta -
his home overlooks the course —
was not the best inducement to
him to train hard, for since he re-
turned from England, he has been
continually on the river. Away
from his business, and with half a
dozen scullers around him at Ray-
mond Terrace, his heart and soul
are in his sculling. Stanbury now
has as his companions Beach and
Mitchell, with Hancock as trainer.
The big fellow looks very well.

Counts updated hourly

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.