Information about Trove user: ratty

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,456,392
2 NeilHamilton 3,059,991
3 noelwoodhouse 2,920,168
4 annmanley 2,239,305
5 John.F.Hall 2,146,139
...
106 AngelaDay 319,260
107 Jeff.Noble 318,435
108 Ian.Pettet 313,753
109 ratty 313,249
110 birdwing 308,277
111 Paul.McGrath 303,534

313,249 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

May 2017 13,871
April 2017 23,024
March 2017 14,901
February 2017 19,206
January 2017 25,279
December 2016 20,395
November 2016 16,158
October 2016 18,243
September 2016 18,419
August 2016 12,002
July 2016 12,698
June 2016 17,086
May 2016 16,817
April 2016 19,728
March 2016 13,235
February 2016 18,895
January 2016 14,279
December 2015 1
November 2015 1,250
October 2015 578
September 2015 4,772
August 2015 6,799
July 2015 5,613

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,456,361
2 NeilHamilton 3,059,991
3 noelwoodhouse 2,920,168
4 annmanley 2,239,235
5 John.F.Hall 2,146,134
...
106 Jeff.Noble 318,435
107 AngelaDay 317,027
108 Ian.Pettet 313,753
109 ratty 313,249
110 birdwing 308,236
111 Paul.McGrath 303,534

313,249 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

May 2017 13,871
April 2017 23,024
March 2017 14,901
February 2017 19,206
January 2017 25,279
December 2016 20,395
November 2016 16,158
October 2016 18,243
September 2016 18,419
August 2016 12,002
July 2016 12,698
June 2016 17,086
May 2016 16,817
April 2016 19,728
March 2016 13,235
February 2016 18,895
January 2016 14,279
December 2015 1
November 2015 1,250
October 2015 578
September 2015 4,772
August 2015 6,799
July 2015 5,613

No text corrections for 'Government Gazettes'


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
THE BENDIGO ADVERTISER (PUBLISHED DAILY.) PROGRESSION, OUR RIGHTS AND OUR RESOURCES BENDIGO, WEDNESDAY, MAY 25, 1904. ELECTION BY CAUCUS. (Article), Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 - 1918), Wednesday 25 May 1904 [Issue No.15,231] page 4 2017-05-21 17:39 (published dailt.)
progression', our rights and our resources
BRNDICO. "WEDNESDAY, MAY 25, 1904.
Caucus is an American word, and mean;
fit first a secret politic;'! meeting. The
meaning has broadened. An election by
caucus may now be taken as meaning cen
tral committees choosing a candidate an.I
carrying through his election by local com
mittees. The word does not yet sound well
in Englishmen's ears. They are exceeding
ly fond of liberty. They detest anything
like driving. They object to another
for that choice. They may fall in for a time
—but it goes against the grain. Sooner
This love of liberty is valuable. But used
liberty. Men don't get their own way in
public life. There must he tiive and take
all round. Ordinary social business is
managed by committees. Subscribers.,
shareholders nmy, if they will, bring forward
an impossible candidate, and lling away
thoir votes. But there is no wisdom in
tkat. They have had their say, if that con
tents them. They have probably hurt their
do. In small committees managing small
evident. In rural districts it is very trou
blesome. It makes experienced men shy at
trying co-operation. Thoy have borne the
burden before. Thoy hare been uuhelpod,
nuisance have sold out at, a loss. Such ex
periences indicate the ditliculty of political
organisations throughout the State. The
difficulty is simply enormous. It arises
from the spatseness of the population. It
Kyabram movement. It is another thing
tho best menus of conducting it. Be it
for a shiro council or a .school board, or ;i
local' library, possible candidates are known
and desirablo ones may be chosen. Or
may be widened considerably, and still per
lie enough. But State elections exclude this
I'ocal mail contests, he is likely so local
little about liim. And. when two or throe
unknown candidates are in the field-, giving
selecting .those candidates. Thoy came for
Of two evils lie must' choose the least, if
ho can. And that evil choice may work
l\;;nies could be discussed by the various
locals oil their own account. More nami'5
body, not a dictating one. Ss> would the
parties goes on, local committees will cer
tainly be formed, perhaps nvo or three.
A nd they will havo their own centres. That
every man ti> his bearings, and to make hi*,
Tiiej- would truly represent the locals, per
Ioc-d voice be heard, and that the local
on conditions, not 011 a theory. The local
Many are not loyal' to their part}-. They
are swayed by personal and private con
siderations. To get them loyal' will be to
read circulars or .pamphlets; rarely do some
look at newspapers. They must bo touched
electors. That should be impossible, and
it would be imp<>s:-ible under proper manage
ment. Tv.-o candidates for one vacancy
representative of each party is enough. And
each candidate should feel fairly sutv that
party. Cranks there are, and will be. And
future. The majority are, not so. If the
issue of the struggle bo made clear, and
as a whole follow its own path. It is not
minority rule Nor is it good for the
State that men 11'cver give a thought
for its welfare. Broad views are healthy.
Selfishness narrow® the mind, lessens one's
energy, and twists the judgment. Give and
take is a good line: and if the electors will"
Eight Pages.—Our issue this morning
consists of eight pages. On page 8 will lie
found an extended report of the Austral com
•Coi.TBAN Sui-ply.—The water iu the Up
and there is now some lift, of water in it.
With the winter still before us, there are
good prospects of tlie basin being filled. The
Malmsbuvy reservoir contains o.'tft. of
Stock Maiiket.—Yesterday, there was a
bidding was very brisk. As sales proceeded
there was an. easing tendency, and the mar
ket closed at about last week's rates. Slieep
were firmer 111 price on Monday, and stores
sold at satisfactory rates, owing to the im
Natives' Seciiktakysiiip. — To-morrow
Sandhurst branch of the A.N.A. the election
of officers will take place. Special interest
is imparted by the contcst for the position of
secretary, Mr. .J. H. Curnow and Mr. T.
Glass. There is likely to be a large atten
Vehicular Accident.—ShorMy before "5
o'clock last evening a bnggy, in which were
! seated Mrs. Cuthbert, an elderly lady, who
Flett, was proceeding along Mount Korong
road, just above the Co-operative Bakery es
tablishment, at 1 ronbark. when the pony
shied at ail approaching tram, and slewed
sharply round across the rails. The sudden
jerk threw- Mrs. Cuthbert out of the vehicle.
The driver of the tram quicEly applied the
proceeded to the assistance of Mis. Cuth
by her fall. Di. Hugh Boyd was amongst
an examination he found that the lady liad
sustained a fracture to the left wrist, and
her nose and forehead were also badly con
tused, blood flowing flreely from the wound.
After the doctor liad temporarily dressed the
injuries, Mrs. Cuthbert was placed in the
was taken in a cab to tho hospital bv Con
stable Tvays. Dr. Fowler, the resident sur
who is GO years of age, passed through Lon
don on Iter way to the colonies w lit 11 it was!
King and Queen of England, -and" this in
teresting reminiscence was imparted to Con
stable Kavs on the way to the hospital.
Bkndioo Hospital.—Messrs. Angus Mac
The resident surgeon (Dr. Walter Fowler)
reported that during the past week five pa
tients had d?ed, 20 were discharged cured,
treatment. The usual weekly inspection was
everyllunsr was found to be in good working
order The report of the collector for the
past week was received and noted
'Matriculation.—The May examination
wliich has been in progress at the School of
Mines under the supervision of the TJev. J.
C. Johnstone, M.A., was concluded yes
terday, when there was 0110 candidate for
Crushed Foot.—Robert Crippin, a
middle-aged man, residing at White Hillfe,
of tho dray passed over liis right foot, injur
ing it somewhat severely. He was removed
Asylum.—Tlio committee met vesterdav.
Present:—Messrs. J. S. Stewart (vice-presi
dent, in the chair), E. W. Kirhv, W. Davis,
J. D. Crofts. C. G. Akins, and II. 35xrc.i
(lion, sec.) Twelve applicants were grante'l
aid in kind and by orders on stores, all-*
two men and one woman were admitted. JVC
ports were received from the medical ofti
cer (Dr. J. D. Boyd), superintendent (Mr.
J. S. M'llroy), and collector (Miss F. A.
Sibley). Nhieiy-thice wen: made outdoor
during; tlic week to families consisting of 10(5
adults and 92 childrui, and there are 111
the institution 161 males, 43 females, ami
two lying-in patients; total, 206.
(PUBLISHED DAILY.)
PROGRESSION, OUR RIGHTS AND OUR RESOURCES
BENDIGO, WEDNESDAY, MAY 25, 1904.
Caucus is an American word, and meant
at first a secret politcal meeting. The
meaning has broadened. An election by
caucus may now be taken as meaning cen-
tral committees choosing a candidate and
carrying through his election by local com-
mittees. The word does not yet sound well
in Englishmen's ears. They are exceeding-
ly fond of liberty. They detest anything
like driving. They object to another
for that choice. They may fall in for a time
— but it goes against the grain. Sooner
This love of liberty is valuable. But used
liberty. Men don't get their own way in
public life. There must be give and take
all round. Ordinary social business is
managed by committees. Subscribers,
shareholders may, if they will, bring forward
an impossible candidate, and fling away
their votes. But there is no wisdom in
that. They have had their say, if that con-
tents them. They have probably hurt their
do. In small committees managing small
evident . In rural districts it is very trou-
blesome. It makes experienced men shy at
trying co-operation. They have borne the
burden before. They hare been unhelped,
nuisance have sold out at a loss. Such ex-
periences indicate the difficulty of political
organisations throughout the State. The
difficulty is simply enormous. It arises
from the sparseness of the population. It
Kyabram movement. It is another thing
the best means of conducting it. Be it
for a shire council or a school board, or a
local library, possible candidates are known
and desirable ones may be chosen. Or-
may be widened considerably, and still per-
be enough. But State elections exclude this
local mail contests, he is likely so local
little about him. And when two or three
unknown candidates are in the field, giving
selecting those candidates. They came for-
Of two evils he must choose the least, if
he can. And that evil choice may work
Names could be discussed by the various
locals oil their own account. More names
body, not a dictating one. So would the
parties goes on, local committees will cer-
tainly be formed, perhaps two or three.
And they will have their own centres. That
every man to his bearings, and to make his
They would truly represent the locals, per-
local voice be heard, and that the local
on conditions, not on a theory. The local
Many are not loyal to their party. They
are swayed by personal and private con-
siderations. To get them loyal will be to
read circulars or pamphlets; rarely do some
look at newspapers. They must be touched
electors. That should be impossible, and
it would be impossible under proper manage-
ment. Two candidates for one vacancy
representative of each party is enough. And
each candidate should feel fairly sure that
party. Cranks there are, and will be. And
future. The majority are, not so. If the
issue of the struggle be made clear, and
as a whole follow its own path. It is not
minority rule nor is it good for the
State that men never give a thought
for its welfare. Broad views are healthy.
Selfishness narrows the mind, lessens one's
energy, and twists the judgment. Give and
take is a good line: and if the electors will
EIGHT PAGES.— Our issue this morning
consists of eight pages. On page 8 will be
found an extended report of the Austral com-
COLIBAN SUPPLY.— The water in the Up-
and there is now some lift, of water in it.
With the winter still before us, there are
good prospects of the basin being filled. The
Malmsbury reservoir contains 33ft. of
STOCK MARKET.— Yesterday, there was a
bidding was very brisk. As sales proceeded
there was an easing tendency, and the mar-
ket closed at about last week's rates. Sheep
were firmer in price on Monday, and stores
sold at satisfactory rates, owing to the im-
NATIVES SECRETARYSHIP.— To-morrow
Sandhurst branch of the A.N.A. the election
of officers will take place. Special interest
is imparted by the contest for the position of
secretary. Mr. J. H. Curnow and Mr. T.
Glass. There is likely to be a large atten-
VEHICULAR ACCIDENT.— Shortly before 6
o'clock last evening a buggy, in which were
seated Mrs. Cuthbert, an elderly lady, who
Flett, was proceeding along Mount Korong
road, just above the Co-operative Bakery es-
tablishment, at Ironbark when the pony
shied at an approaching tram, and slewed
sharply round across the rails. The sudden
jerk threw Mrs. Cuthbert out of the vehicle.
The driver of the tram quickly applied the
proceeded to the assistance of Mrs. Cuth-
by her fall. Dr. Hugh Boyd was amongst
an examination he found that the lady had
sustained a fracture to the left wrist, and
her nose and forehead were also badly con-
tused, blood flowing freely from the wound.
After the doctor had temporarily dressed the
injuries, Mrs. Cuthbert was placed in the
was taken in a cab to the hospital by Con-
stable Kays. Dr. Fowler, the resident sur-
who is 60 years of age, passed through Lon-
don on her way to the colonies when it was
King and Queen of England, an this in-
teresting reminiscence was imparted to Con-
stable Kays on the way to the hospital.
BENDIGO HOSPITAL.— Messrs. Angus Mac-
The resident surgeon (Dr. Walter Fowler)
reported that during the past week five pa-
tients had died, 20 were discharged cured,
treatment. The usual weekly inspection was
everything was found to be in good working
order. The report of the collector for the
past week was received and noted.
MATRICULATION.— The May examination
which has been in progress at the School of
Mines under the supervision of the Rev. J.
C. Johnstone, M.A., was concluded yes-
terday, when there was one candidate for
CRUSHED FOOT.— Robert Crippin, a
middle-aged man, residing at White Hills,
of the dray passed over his right foot, injur-
ing it somewhat severely. He was removed
ASYLUM.— The committee met yesterday.
Present:— Messrs. J. S. Stewart (vice-presi-
dent, in the chair), E. W. Kirby, W. Davis,
J. D. Crofts, C. G. Akins , and H. Birch
(hon. sec.) Twelve applicants were granted
aid in kind and by orders on stores, and
two men and one woman were admitted. Re-
ports were received from the medical offi-
cer (Dr. J. D. Boyd), superintendent (Mr.
J. S. Mcllroy), and collector (Miss F. A.
Sibley). Ninety-three were made outdoor
during the week to families consisting of 106
adults and 92 children, and there are in
the institution 161 males, 43 females, and
two lying-in patients; total, 206.
THE BENDIGO ADVERTISER (PUBLISHED DAILY.) PROGRESSION, OUR RIGHTS AND OUR RESOURCES. BENDIGO, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 1, 1903. THE INCOME TAX. (Article), Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 - 1918), Wednesday 1 April 1903 [Issue No.14874] page 2 2017-05-21 16:50 EA.oiBm.WK CojiPEi'iTTONs.-LThe Eatfie
hawk branch, of the A.N.A. is spariugv)io
which open to-day, - attractive s and enjoyable.
Arrangements TEava boon: completed -for the
appearanco o£. Master JftuiesiCoxT of-'Dayles
fprd,: whose soprano voice during the (recent
A.jSt.A.. Qoiiference attracted so much atten
tion, fit].'will; be remembered that Mr. T.
Gla^.and, the,., .board:,of directors .of the
A.JJ,A'.<:made-,^enthusiastic .reference: to the
quality of the young, lad's voice, and besides
tlie "yam.-,of ^lO^being at oiice.raised, it'was.
announced that further sVeps ;would be taken
for his future;'.education. .-iHerr de Chaneet,
tii'o'musicai judge, will arrive to-day, and the
judging^of the.:olociitior.; is. in the hands of
the B,. Telfer.. - :Thp > competitions will
be. (continued on Thursday, and on Friday
a final concert and distribution'of prizes will
taka place.; ''
, Att;eiiptisi>; Housebreaking.-—On Sundav
evening' an- attempt was made by would-be
burglars to enter the house'of'Mr. William
Fraser., of Frederick-street north. Jlr. and
Mrs. Fraser were absent, loaving. only two
of. the members of the family at home. About
7.30 they were startled iiy the noise of wood
also present, proceeded to investigate. He
was. astonished to find that the front door
was b.oing prized open. He went out fror.i the
baektentrancc,' and found'that two men were
tampering .with the.door. The two miscreants
were apparently surprised.at being disturbed,
and fled .precipitately..
' The W-eathee.—Th'e barometer was again
low last evening, presaging a- change. The
wind blew somewhat strongly and'principal
ly from the south and. south-west." At Mr.
J. B. Edwards's the - readings'were:—Baro
meter—-9.'-.a.m., 29.44; noon, 29.26; 3 p.m.,
29.7; 6 p.m., 28.98 Thermometer—9 a.m.,
6t; noon, 76; 3 p.m., 85; G p.m., 79; mini
mum, 53; maximum, 87. The official forecast
to 6 p.m. to-dayis:—Cool, cloudy, unsettled,
later thunderstorms;" some rain, squally,
showery, south-west windB, strong in Straits;
Masonic Installation.—The annual in
stallation. of officers of- the ■ Mark Master
last night. The Grand Lodge officers pre
sent were:—Bro. W. ■ J. Parry, P.G.J.W.;
Bro, A. G. Dunlop, .T.G.W.; and1 Bro. T.
Anderson, P.G.S.O. . -There.were also visitors
from the Maryborough and Slrjpparton
Lodges.'.a ®ro. Parry installed the foUowinf
•<jfRcorB.:.-te-W?M.:'-... Bro. J. B. Edwards*
• Br'o. J. :.He£fill; S.W.,' Bro; F. W.
Lasdolles; \F.\V;,VBro.. A. Roberts: chaplain,
Br0i: E'.J A.--Slocombe; treasurer, Bro. J. M.
Kilfader •''secretary,(Bro. Parry; M.O., Bro.
W. Tinklerii.'S.O., Bro. W. A. Lane; J.O.,
Bros ,J., Milburn;; conductor, Bro. IT. II.
Wilson;'D'.C., Br0i- M. Hamburger; S.D.,
Brol B. W. Norton; Bro. J. Q. Sta-n
ilelcL;_orgaQist^ Bro. A. G. Finster; J.G.,
Bro. H. Lee; stewards, Bros. S.A.!Clock, ii.
Taylor, and A. L. Boltor; tyler, Bro. Walter.
held, the newly-iustalled W.M., Bro. Kd
watdsubfrinfr in the cliair. Incidental toasti
by Uros. -W. Tinkler, Payne, Griffiths, 'and
Bad Language.—At a late hour tost night
a young man named Joseph Whiteside. 18
years of sgo, was arrested in-M'Crae-street by
Constable Currie on a charge of using ob
Military Exauii'ire^T.—A notification of ]
interest to Rangers and other mounted (sec
tions of tlic military forces attending the
Easter.encn-nipnient at,S_iiubury- lias been is-"
sued at headquarters. It is to' the effect that
ico'upeusatiou will be granted in the event of
,'a Jf.pree;—bE'ng-..;-.,i])jure.d..;: during^, pcamp;
niaij^ijuvr^rn.;.
cced ,i>L5, but it will ba sulKcient to guaran
tee owners of -boKes against any '<r'rtat pe
cuniary loss. , =
Municipal. Refomi.—Crl Carolin intends
'to; .iddross- tlnvratepayers, at tlie Manchester
Arias hotel, Long'Gully,"to-morrow evening,
and will speak on-the hocessityof municipal
reform. ..... , '
' Mebop CEr.TiPiaA.TEs.—-Tlds.'evening, -in'thp.
Town..Hall,..the. distribution- of- inerit- certifi
cafes in connection with the Children's'.Ward.
;Fund will take place. A concert will also be t
gifen, at which-Mrs. Crookstou, Missps Hose
Q'Mahoney and Addie Keating, Messrs.
-P^ituliard, Avavron. Treiulmfch and Bookcl
mann will assist, also -thci Central and Violet
street Stale school children..- Hi= Worship,
.the Mayor will preside, and Sir John Quick;
MjP.. will distribute the awards. During the
'evening a collection will be. takeu up- in aid
ofjthe Children's "Ward Fund.
r jivin:n:G F italities.—Two girls died on
^0lv South Wales throuo-h their
clothing having caught fire. Annie M'Go
)CF"' agod 15, was fastening a doormat her
clothes ignited, and she was badly burned,
filizabeth- Sr-Hanleyr aged 12, living "at "Eur
'fij Station, Moree, was lighting a firo -when
the ilanies- caught''her' clotlieir,' Aiid"fatally
burnt lier.'. ; -- ;
..ParadIj.—The usual parade of. tht>
1'ilth Battalion took place. last; nio-h't . a? the
Oi.ieily iioom. .The C.Q.,, Cajj.t. Thomson.,
was m ;charge,-:land there -was a good'muster
of the battalion. -■■■:■■' ' ■■ ■■ . |
: AstLWir-.'i—The ■ committed of 'the. Benevo
ApyI urn met yesterday.1'' * Preseiit~
^lessrsi- J> D. Crofts {president), G. Q. p.
Clandge,'A. Harness, J. SV Stewart, E.~*W.
Kirby, and H. Birch (lion. sec.). Apologies
were received from Messrs: Davis and Goodis
son. Seven applicants were granted aid
by orders on. stores, and four in: kind from
tlio institution. Four men were admitted
Keports were received from the medical offi
o"r J; -1?..Bpyd), superintondent (Mr. J.
b. .ij'tlrov), ami-collector (Miss F. A. Sibley).
One hundred and thirteen- distributions wore
made, outdoor during the week to families
.'(insisting of 113 adults and 7-1 children, and
there aro in the institution 158 mates, 0,j
iemalo%:;two 'lying-in-patients,-two infants:
total, 21o.
Popular EntertainmWtt.—Great interest
is being manifested in the forthcoming opera
tie, elocutionary and orchestral performance
Bendigo Musical Society on.Wednesday next
m ihe Masonic Hall: Tlio society has es
tablished quite a reputation for a-unniuo- suc
the services of two such distinguished per
(oilucrs as J.lr. Clia's. Kenniugham, the popu
oli»2?pilser: ,,;eii01'' ?nd Miss Eos^
rSll^'W101,1 elocutionist, -whose reci1
!.n?:^ai3yA0 fy3 ;a.roveTation,,have been; re
taincc], another aueees*! scorns assiircd. Th~
price -of. -admission -will :'be oiao shilling to
..11 parts, and seats -may'be fee'rved at Sut
fon.-i without extra fee.
Boild,m SoriETY.^vSn^U,1g-bf1thn'BaK
digo and Faglc-hawk Starr-^owkq(t- BuiUlin*
oiToi iy7^,re zoning, and was well:
..llendcd, Mr. G. Sweeney, chairman of
direc ors, presided. The .principal .j3usijl0s3
u.i,s the sale, of',£'500;:-.The secrqt.'iry: called
. Cm-Coui!T^Mcssr.V,iIi: B!■ A-swi; r soii'.and
l. ... Gibson, Js.P., presided vcstcrdayrSeve
ral cases ^cre^dealt with-,is ;elsewhere-' re
ported, and (he court adjourned.>--V -
Bazaar,—This afiernooii, at 3.30 o'clock -*
Scho^ 't?'" h° f'Sld« afc^bo Moonta Sunday
Stjiool, Booth-street north:Tlio Mayor will
perform the opening caucjnpnv. -
Unitkd Picxrc.—The - ' Suna'ay schools
united amnia! picnic wiil be held at ,\xcdul0
oil Good Friday. Special trains will lnuve
?§rt' ^ rL9-30-a,,d -1? a;m- "turning at
i -..0 and 6.30 p.m.. .Fares-and further parti-'
(.ujaib are aaverused. -
Axxivi:!:s,ii;y.—^-Tliis' e'vehihe'^'the' --ForoQl i
ilQS"d-ist?.s«nday .School' wilKfui-tli^t
celobrate its anmverasry by a tea and nublif'
meeting. At the. latter the .chair wiu l?eVc
-ilTton^', -fl' i P;-J?«»e8,-and special'musi
iroms will be provided. . . ^ .
^oPBBTr., Sams.—Mr. .William P. Bent
•ISlinV'TH' hayln£-'sol(i ty auction. on: ac-:
la " Vr '°f,'tho ^tat«' •>«•' the'
•' ? r. ner' 100 acris of land
,t.Nornng, at £6 peracrc; cash,' Mr. James
Dal«y. being;, th^pwclifeer';: also i„ , the cS
tate of the-late Mrs. Flood, a small blocl
JT,j 'V? ia-n5l. .fopr-ropinetl dwelling..honso to
crJii,- '# ■ a''-.s^'fefacH^ -for
n,tei^dlrd d^' Scnoml produce
' lores u-in = ,v°Idf n's9Mal'o.. ^nnounoo - that their
winter nliA- ' > "■ -6 - 9 flock - during tho
inj? nexiT ' QOmmeucins. q„ . Monday "oven
,At - the 'Coliseum.C'^row-Mroet, -. ifiere-is on
\vaK 'V i"560?'1"0"4' of glass and cliuia
tihi. i« •">0^.'®-P-wttTe; etc., - and inspec
i;0» inyitecl. ^ In 'oonnection with" the estab
nsnment there is a lending1- library.
.Messrs. Jas. Andrew and Co., auctioneers,
win conduct, a cleanup.' sal'o : of superior houEo
j Ulrluturo and elTccta, on the premises of
l'liji. Carne, Keviere-street, Ironbark, to-day, at
11 a.m. Full particulars aro advertised.
~To*day;~a6'-ir a.jn'.T 'on' the" promises, Ilodg
Jdnson-slreet, ..Sailor's Gully, Musers. Cr. H.
Hlob^'dn 'and''Co.', will, sell a frtoho'd allotment
and °wjb<-'aVrelKijjr, together with the v. hole of
the''<g'dnerftl: household furniture and effects,
etc., wider-instructions from Mrs. Kemvorthy.
:0a Wednesday, 8th April, at 1 p.m., Mr. J.
Hji-CJurnow will sell, undor . instructions from
Mr, F. Haybull, on the premises, .'"Warleigh,",
\Vattle-stieet, uuar Boundary-street., tho. whole
of Jlis'. superior household furniture andreifects,
including piano and seiving. maohine3, ,
On Saturday next, at 2 p.m., at their Ex
change?. Messrs., Alf. E.. ^Wollis .and'G0.7 will
sell, on' Account of Mr. W.' E. Scfatc, Kisawel-'
ling : and-;lnrid,' situateil.iri Hill-street, Quarry
Hill.. , .
■ On Tucadoy ' ;a.:nv.,v'at:ii)is.':robinf,
Mitchell-stroety; • Mr,- sW. Hamilton; acting
under instructionstorn r.Mr.^Ty: Strode, will
sell(_ ^o, j'osidoucpS: :ot' AJbert-str<k>t., each con
taining "four xaoms'^nd ,,bath: '..j:'
EAGLEHAWK COMPETITIONS.— The Eagle-
hawk branch, of the A.N.A. is sparing no
which open to-day, attractive and enjoyable.
Arangements have been completed for the
appearance of Master James Cox of Dayles-
ford, whose soprano voice during the recent
A.N.A. Conference attracted so much atten-
tion. It will be remembered that Mr. T.
Glass, and the board of directors of the
A.N.A. made enthusiatic reference to the
quality of the young lad's voice, and besides
the sum of £10 being at once raised, it was
announced that further steps would be taken
for his future education. Herr de Chaneet,
the musical judge, will arrive to-day, and the
judging of the elocution is in the hand of
the Rev. D. Telfer. The competitions will
be continued on Thursday, and on Friday
a final concert and distrbution of prizes will
take place.
ATTEMPTED HOUSBREAKING.-— On Sunday
evening an attempt was made by would be
burglars to enter the house of' Mr. William
Fraser, of Frederick-street north. Mr. and
Mrs. Fraser were absent, leaving only two
of the members of the family at home. About
7.30 they were startled by the noise of wood
also present, proceeded to investigate. He
was astonished to find that the front door
was being prized open. He went out from the
back entrance, and found that two men were
tampering with the door. The two miscreants
were apparently surprised at being disturbed,
and fled precipitately.
THE WEATHER.— The barometer was again
low last evening, presaging a change. The
wind blew somewhat strongly and principal-
ly from the south and south-west. At Mr.
J. B. Edwards's the readings were:— Baro-
meter —- 9 a.m., 29.44; noon, 29.26; 3 p.m.,
29.7; 6 p.m., 28.98 Thermometer — 9 a.m.,
64; noon, 76; 3 p.m., 85; 6 p.m., 79; mini-
mum, 53; maximum, 87. The official forecast
to 6 p.m. to-days:— Cool, cloudy, unsettled,
later thunderstorms; some rain, squally,
showery, south-west winds, strong in Straits;
MASONIC INSTALLATION.— The annual in-
stallation. of officers of the Mark Master
last night. The Grand Lodge officers pre-
sent were:— Bro. W. J. Parry, P.G.J. W.;
Bro. A. G. Dunlop, T.G.W.; and Bro. J.
Anderson, P.G.S.O. There were also visitors
from the Maryborough and Shepparton
Lodges. Bro. Parry installed the following
officers:— Bro. J.B. Edwards,
J.P.M., Bro. J. Heffill; S.W., Bro. F.W.
Lascelles; J.W. Bro. A. Roberts; chaplain,
Bro. R.A. Slocombe; treasurer, Bro. J.M.
Kilfeder; secretary, Bro. Parry; M.O., Bro.
W. Tinkler; S.O., Bro. W.A. Lane; J.O.
Bro. J. Milburn; conductor, Bro. H. H.
Wilson; D.C., Bro. M. Hamburger; S.D.,
Bro. R. W. Norton; J.D. Bro. J. G. Star-
field; organist Bro. A.G. Finser; J.G.,
Bro. H. Lee; stewards, Bros. S.A.Cock, ???
Taylor, and A. L. Bolton; tyler, Bro. Walter.
held, the newly-installed W.M., Bro. Ed-
wards, being in the chair. Incidental toasts
by Bros. W. Tinkler, Payne, Griffiths, and
BAD LANGUAGE.— At a late hour last night
a young man named Joseph Whiteside, 18
years of age, was arrested in McCrae-street by
Constable Currie on a charge of using ob-
MILITARY ENCAMPMENT.— A notification of
interest to Rangers and other mounted sec-
tions of the military forces attending the
Easter encampment at Sunbury has been is-
sued at headquarters. It is to the effect that
compensation will be granted in the event of
a horse being injured during camp
manœuvre. The compensation will not ex-
ceed £25, but it will be sufficient to guaran-
tee owners of horses against any great pe-
cuniary loss.
MUNICIPAL REFORM.— Cr. Carolin intends
to address the ratepayers at the Manchester
Argus hotel, Long Gully, to-morrow evening,
and will speak on the necessity of municipal
reform.
MERIT CERTIFICATE.— This evening, in the
Town Hall, the distribution of merit certifi-
cates in connection with the Children's Ward
Fund will take place. A concert will also be
given, at which Mr. Cfookston, Misses Rose
O'Mahorey and Addie Keating, Messrs.
Pritchard, Warren, Trembath and Brockel-
mann will assist, also the Central and Violet
street Stale school children. His Worship
the Mayor will preside, and Sir John Quick,
M.P. will distribute the awards. During the
evening a collection will be taken up in aid
of the Children Ward Fund.
BURNING FATALITIES.— Two girls died on
Sunday in New South Wales through their
clothing having caught fire. Annie McGo-
vern, aged 15, was fastening a doormat her
clothes ignited, and she was badly burned.
Elizabeth S. Hanley, aged 12, living at Eur-
ley Station, Moree, was lighting a fire which
the flames caught her clothes, and fatally
burnt her.
MILITIA PARADE.— The usual parade of the
Fifth Battalion took place last night att the
Orderly Room. The C.O., Capt. Thomson,
was in charge, and there was a good muster
ASYLUM.— The committee of the Benevo-
lent Asylum met yesterday. Present —
Messrs. J.D. Crofts (president), G.G.P.
Claridge, A. Harkness, J.S. Stewart, E.W.
Kirby and H. Birch (hon. sec). Apologies
were received from Messrs. Davis and Goodis-
son. Seven applicants were granted aid
by orders on stores, and four in kind from
the instiution. Four men were admitted.
Reports were received from the medical off-
icer (Dr. J. D. Boyd, superintendent (Mr. J.
S. McIllroy), and collector (Miss G.A. Sibley).
One hundred and thirteen distributions were
made outdoor during the week to families
consisting of 113 adults and 71 children, and
there are in the institution 158 males, 53
females, two lying in patients, two infants;
total 215.
POPULAR ENTERTAINMENT.— Great interest
is being manifested in the forthcoming opera-
tic, elocutionary and orchestral performance
Bendigo Musical Society on Wednesday next
at the Masonic Hall. The society has es-
tablished quite a reputation for running suc-
the services of two such distinguished per-
formers as Mr. Chas Kenningham the popu-
lar composer and tenor, and Miss Rose
Quong, champion elocutionist, whose recit-
ing is said to be a revolation, have been re-
tained, another success seems assures. The
price of admission will be one shilling to
all parts, and seats may be reserved at Sut-
tons without extra fee.
BUILDING SOCIETY.— A meeting of the Ben-
digo and Eaglehawk Star-Howkett Building
Society was held last evening, and was well
attended. Mr. G. J. Sweeney, chairman of
directors, presided. The principal business
was the sale of £500. The secretary called
for offers, and the amount was sold in three
sums, the premiums realised averaging £43/
15/ per £100.
CITY COURT.— Messrs. R .B. Anderson and
T. S. Gibson, Js P., presided yesterday. Seve-
ral cases were dealt with as elsewhere re-
ported, and the court adjourned.
BAZAAR.— This afternoon, at 3.30 o'clock, a
bazaar will be held at the Moonta Sunday
School, Booth-street north. The Mayor will
perform the opening ceremony.
UNITED PICNIC.— The Sunday schools
united annual picnic will be held at Axedale
on Good Friday. Special trains will leave
Bendigo at 9.30 and 10 a.m., returning at
5.30 and 6.30 p.m. Fares and further parti-
culars are advertised.
ANNIVERSARY.— This evening the Forest-
street Methodist Sunday School will further
celebrate its anniversary by a tea and public
meeting. At the latter the chair will be oc-
cupied by Mr. C.F. James, and special musi-
cial items will be provided.
PROPERTY SALES.— Mr. William P. Bent-
ley reports having sold by auction on ac-
count of the executors of the estate of the
late Mr. Hugh Turner, 100 acre of land
at Neering, at £6 per acre, cash, Mr. James
Daley being the purchaser; also in the es-
tate of the late Mr. Flood, a small block
of land and four-roomed dwelling house to
Mr. Mulqueen, at a satisfactory price, for
cash.
Messrs. Edwards and Crump, general produce
merchants, Golden-square announce that their
store will be closed at 6 o'clock during the
winter months, commencing on Monday even-
ing next.
At the Coliseum, View-street there is on
view a splendid assortment of glass and china-
ware, fancy goods e.p. ware, etc., and inspec-
tion is invited. In connection with the estab-
lishment there is a lending library.
Messrs. Jas. Andrew and Co., auctioneers,
will conduct a clearing sale of superior house-
hold furniture and effects, on the premises of
Mrs. Carne, Reviere-street, Ironbark, to-day, at
11 a.m. Full particulars are advertised.
To-day, at 11 a.m. on the premises, Hodg-
kinson-street, Sailor's Gully, Messrs. G. H.
Hobson and Co., will sell a freehold allotment
and w.b. dwelling, together with the whole of
the general household furniture and effects,
etc., under instructions from Mrs. Kenworthy.
On Wednesday, 8th April, at 1 p.m., Mr. J.
H. Curnow will sell, under instructions from
Mr. F. Hayball, on the premises "Warleigh."
Wattle-street, near Boundary-street, the whole
of his superior household furniture and effects,
including piano and sewing machines.
On Saturday next, at 2 p.m., at their Ex-
change, Messrs. Alf. E. Wallis and Co. will
sell on account of Mr.W.E. Scott, his dwel-
ling and land, situated in Hill-street, Quarry
Hill.
On Tuesday next at 11 a.m., at his rooms
Mitchell-street, Mr. W. A. Hamilton
under instructions from Mr. T. Strode, will
sell two residences at Albert-street, each con-
taining four rooms and bath.
THE BENDIGO ADVERTISER (PUBLISHED DAILY.) PROGRESSION, OUR RIGHTS AND OUR RESOURCES. BENDIGO, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 1, 1903. THE INCOME TAX. (Article), Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 - 1918), Wednesday 1 April 1903 [Issue No.14874] page 2 2017-05-21 11:41 munity for the first time. Many of these
. Drought Fund.—The executive committee
of the Drought Belief Fund met at tile Town
Hall, Melbourne, yesterday. Mr. H. Butler
presided. The treasurer "reported that out
of the total of .£17;'835/14/0' collected "tiieiv
still remained a balance ot .£6800/11/. Tiio'
eh ail mail drew attention to the fuel- thai1
the mallee storekeeper.-; were williug. to sup
ply mallee loots vat the rate of" ,21 per ton
delivered in Jfelbouriie."'1 These, roots wore
vqry useful, and''as. Oic previous price was
38/ per ton? 'purchasers; as well as affording
great assistance to thfi malice people, would
bo getting a cheap' article. . . :
Aleegiajcce Oath.—The members of the
Bt'ndigo Rifle Club h.ftv.o just- completed the
defence force. At the Beehive Exchange
: last, night Mr. AV. AVcbb, J.P., attended; a"d
administered the oath' of allegiance to about
20 old members of the club, and also to a
few Who/are..just joining the ranks. Capt
Bro\yn\welcomed.M?. Webb on behalf of-the
dub, and referred to tlie.f.-iet' that that- gen>
tlcman liad sworn in oiie of the largest batches
of local'.'riflemen! 'After the ee'rSmony;1 -Jclr. ■
Webb thanked the club f6r the honor it' had
conferred: oil-him ■ iir asking iiini'to ' attend. !
He, considered'rifle- shooting deserved'siipport,
.and-iegTetted'thait'liis health prevented Jiim
fr^Vjtaking""^ ' niQire .'active interest, in; tile
wclfaiv, "1 . the club.,; Mr. Webb promised to
give a' tropliy. for, competition amongst the
mei.)1be;ls.;,-; j>Itsn.ib.er4 who did. not attend last
ni^i.t a ceremony may. be.sworn in at -any con
veniens.! cms. . • • . ■■ i .- ■
:F-'D^"i;iiiL.—The funeral of' the. late Mrs.
Geo j-Milito, sour., took place' yesterday morn
ing- -to.Sthe 'Kangaroo Flat Cemetery, a large
number of citizens attending' to pay their
'last,tribute of respbet: to .the meiuory of; the
deceased.lady.- Tho pall-bearers, were Messrs.
,,C. Sterry.; M.L.A., <R.. Stevenson, -:T.
Gunn,. \V. i), Sterry, AV. ^Hattain,' and -'- P.
Jacobson. ...Amongst: a number- of beautiful
offerings was a handsome artificial' wreath
under-a-giass 'dome' from the" officers of the
Bendigo City Council. Among those present
were Messrs.' D. C. Sterry, M.L.A., AV.
Honeyijone (town clerk of Bendigo), Smith
(city overseer), and Reed (city 'inspector), Cr.
Allan and Mr. -J'. Stewart (secretary of the
Marong Shire), Messrs. AA'. 1). C. Denovan,
C. Cohen, II. B. R. Curiiow, J. Ii. Goodis
son, J. fierce, Redpath, Xorris, H. Ferguson,
Davis, Stevenson, AV'augli, Petherielc^ An
derson, Free, Jamieson, Mossman. Pittaway,
p'cey-and others. The' Rev; J. Staveley of
ficiated at the grave. The funeral arrange
ments'were carried out by Mr. F.. Taylor.
Most of tli'e business places in Kangaroo Flat
cortege'passed throughitlie township. : .'
Bboicen" Arm.—A severe accident befel a
girl named Rene Sleeman, three years of
age, yesterday. The child was playing at her
parents' residence at Spocimen Hill, when
she ,fell and broke her right arm at the.elbow.
The; little sufferer was attended to bv Dr.
I'eniold. .. ■!. . : ;
, ;Austuai, CoMPETiTiONS.—The attention of
the lEtlncation depiU'tinent has (writes our
Melbourne -reporter) been directed to the' ad
vertasement of the Bendigo Austral Society's
competitions, in which'it is'stated that "by
the kind consent of the lion. R. Reid, Minis;
ter _:of"Pttblic Instruction, "a -public schools
holulav will be'granted-' on the juvenile day.
It is pointed put by the Secretary that no
sncli authority has been given, but that the
promoters wev£. iiiforincd". tliat"■ the special
holiday could not be granted. Thev were,
liav6 power to 'graiit a day oitt ,of their al
lowance for such "local~fesl ivitius"."., TeacluTs, ■
theiefore, should be careful to note that no
will'be sanctioned by the departmeut.
' VAgrancy.—An old woman.-' a^ed • 70,
■nanied/Emnia Clark, was charged at'the-City
Court yesterday with vagrancy. "Constables.
CuulBcld ,and Taylor gave evidence that: the
accused- was in .the..habit, of loafing about,
tne city,, and was 'ncMpable, of-looking af':er
herself. The bench asked: her if "she -Iliad
anything-to-say, and slic at-cnee insinuated
.that the police were .telling lies., ,. The sen
tence of.tlie court was .six months' iinurisonr
nient," and when the, accused. heard i( . slut;
evinced profound surprise, i'he bench, how
ever, reassured her, and then die departed
io tlie cells. Her figure has been familiar in
the; oifcy for nearly, half a cc.utuuy, but of
late she has been rapidly, descending into a
state of'helplessness which . is accentuated
by the fact tliat- iiow and again . she lapses
;into a condition of iiiebriety.
IIosi'iTAr,..—Mr.. Barkly.flye.tt.--.. attended
yesterday, and passed 18^patients, for out".
door treatmcut, ,...The!resident surgeon (Dr.:
; reported, rjthat-.';,during, the
past week fiv6' patients .had . died,-41 were
.disclinrgBd ' ciired;: and, th,at ,91: remained,-in
tlie hospital under treatment. . The usual
weokly inspection waa made, the ,patien,ts
■werti.r:all.:iiitervicwcd, :'and;^everyt,hing 'wa^
soon to be in good working' order. ° •
. DEATHS-Af ulia;,Moyla!i,"i!gcd..7pi a. np,tivn
of ; Ireland,- died , in the Benevolent,,Asylum
on tli£"25th insfc, from senile, debility,
.bere'a',;--Williaiii6i;'aged<'-8Dj:;';a iiative "of Eng
iand, difed firi the same institution oil the
28th ihst., from senile .debility. , Another;
inmate named Donald M^waii;.; aged 82,. a'
Native of11 Scotland, also '.died on the. 28tli
inst: front senile debility.','V
SmTOTAHsors MiS-sibx.—ijt- has" book ' ar
ranged in connection with • t lie;simultaneous,
missum. to be hold'in Bendigo tliat open-air
services be -lield 'from 'the ''2<ith •insti"t6'*2H<I
May :u various, parts of the"city;"Conducted
A fortnight's mission'from the ore! ro' 16th
May will then be conducted in, some central
building. Tho Bpeeiid missioner "se'eured tor
this purpose is tlie. Rev. James Lyail', who
-rccontly conduatcd a very iuecessful mission
in Dtinedin, New Zealand.
^ City Band.—'Hie aiinual meeting of
Flight's Bendigo City Baud was held last'even
ing. The resignation of Drum-major V. Byrne
was received with regret. Several members spoke,
in eulogistic tent's of Mr. Byrne's lengthy
and valuable services, and it was unanimous
ly decided to mnke him an honorary life
member. Tho treasurer's report showed tlie
band to be in a sound and prosperous condi
., Stock. Markets.—The local stock market -
was easier this week for. betlisheep and .cattle.]
The' supply on" botli!'days was f'erj?-'good;'" But;
prices-' for -: boSt- descriptions1 - of-"ciittlfe'• '\v4r6;
10/ 'lower;' and foiv medium'sorts' 'tli Jde'clin'e
was greater. Sheep foil from 6d! to 1/'per
head." At •* owniarkefc: ycstorafty1 the :suWy
of slieop was large; and as t-lie; demand was
irregular, a fall in prices occurred ; for -^a'l
grades of sheep, thougl^ the demlhid for
lambs was brisk. .-•-■-•• -' ■.■
munity for the first time. Many of these
DROUGHT FUND.— The executive committee
of the Drought Relief Fund met at the Town
Hall, Melbourne, yesterday. Mr. H. Butler
presided. The treasurer reported that out
of the total of £17,835/14/6 collected there
still remained a balance of £6800/11/. The
chairman drew mail drew attention to the fact
the mallee storekeepers were willing to sup-
ply mallee roots at the rate of £1 per ton
delivered in Melbourne. These roots were
very useful, and as the previous price was
38/ per ton, purchasers, as well as affording
great assistance to the malice people, would
bo getting a cheap article.
ALLEGIANCE OATH.— The members of the
Bendigo Rifle Club have just completed the
defence force. At the Beehive Exchange
last night Mr. W. Webb, J.P., attended, and
administered the oath of allegiance to about
20 old members of the club, and also to a
few who are just joining the ranks. Capt.
Brown welcomed Mr. Webb on behalf of the
club, and referred to the fact that that gen-
teleman had sworn in one of the largest batches
of riflemen. After the ceremonny, Mr.
Webb thanked the club for the honor it had
conferred on him in asking him to attend.
He considered rifle shooting deserved support,
and regretted that his health prevented him
from taking a more active interest in the
welfare of the club. Mr. Webb promised to
give a trophy for completion amongst the
members. Members who did not attend last
night's ceremony may be sworn in at any con-
venient time.
FUNERAL.— The funeral of the late Mrs.
Geo. Minto, took place yesterday morn-
ing to the Kangaroo Flat Cemetery, a large
number of citizens attending to pay their
last tribute of respect to the memory of the
deceased lady. The pall-bearers, were Messrs.
D.C. Sterry, M.L.A., R. Stevenson, T.
Gunn, W. D. Sterry, W. Hattam, and P.
Jacobson. Amongst a number of beautiful
offerings was a handsome artificial wreath
under a glass dome from the officers of the
Bendigo City Council. Among those present
were Messrs. D. C. Sterry, M.L.A., W.
Honeybone (town clerk of Bendigo), Smith
(city overseer), and Reed (city inspector), Cr.
Allan and Mr. J. Stewart (secretary of the
Marong Shire), Messrs. W .D. C. Denovan,
C. Cohen, H. B. R. Curnow, J. R. Goodis-
son, J. Pierce, Redpath, Norris, H. Ferguson,
Davis, Stevenson, Waugh, Petherick, An-
derson, Free, Jamieson, Mossman, Pittaway,
Okey and others. The Rev. J. Staveley of-
ficiated at the grave. The funeral arrange-
ments were carried out by Mr. F.. Taylor.
Most of the business places in Kangaroo Flat
cortege passed through the township.
BROKEN ARM.— A severe accident befel a
girl named Rene Sleeman, three years of
age, yesterday. The child was playing at her
parents' residence at Specimen Hill, when
she fell and broke her right arm at the elbow.
The little sufferer was attended to by Dr.
Penfold.
AUSTRAL COMPETITIONS.— The attention of
the Education department has (writes our
Melbourne reporter) been directed to the ad-
vertisement of the Bendigo Austral Society's
competitions, in which it is stated that "by
the kind consent of the Hon. R, Reid, Minis-
ter of Public Instruction, a public shcools
holiday will be granted" on the juvenile day.
It is pointed out by the Secretary that no
such authority has been given, but that the
promoters were informed that the special
holiday could not be granted. They were,
have power to grant a day out of their al-
lowance for such local festivities. Teachers,
therefore, should be careful to note that no
will be sanctioned by the department.
VAGRANCY.— An old woman aged 70,
named Emma Clark, was charged at the City
Court yesterday with vagrancy. Constables
Caufield, and Taylor gave evidence that the
accused was in the habit, of loafing about,
the city, and was incapable of looking after
herself. The bench asked her if she had
anything to say, and she at once insinuated
that the police were telling lies. The sen-
tence of the court was six months' imprison-
ment, and when the accused heard it she
evinced profound surprise. The bench, how-
ever, reassured her, and then she departed
to the cells. Her figure has been familiar in
the city for nearly half a centrury, but of
late she has been rapidly decending into
state of helplessness which is accentuated
by the fact that now and again she lapses
into a condition of inebriety.
HOSPITAL.— Mr. Bakely Hyett attended
yesterday, and passed 18 patients, for out-
door treatment. The resident surgeon (Dr.
Walter Fowler) reported that during the
past week five patients had died, 41 were
discharged cured, and 91 remained in
the hospital under treatment. The usual
weekly inspection was made, and the patients
were all intervied, and everything was
seen to be in good working order.
DEATHS.— Julia Moylan, aged 70, a native
of ireland,died in the Benevolent Asylum
on the 25th inst. from senile debility. Re-
becca Williams, aged 89, a native of Eng-
land, died in the same institution on the
28th inst., from senile debility. Another
inmate named Donald McSwan, aged 82, a
native of Scotland, also died on the 28th
inst. from senile debility.
SIMULTANEOUS MISSION.— It has been ar-
ranged in connection with the simulaneous
mission to be held in Bendigo that open-air
services be held from the 26th inst. to 2nd
May in various parts of the city, conducted
A fortnight's mission from the 3rd to 16th
May will then be conducted in some central
building. The special missioner secured for
this purpose is the Rev. James Lyall, who
recently conducted a very successful mission
in Dunedin, New Zealand.
CITY BAND.— The annual meeting of
Flight's Bendigo City Band was held last even-
ing. The resignation of Drum-major V. Byrne
was received with regret. Several members spoke,
in eulogistic terms of Mr. Byrne's lengthy
and valuable services, and it was unanimous-
ly decided to make him an honorary life
member. The treasurer's report showed the
band to be in a sound and prosperous condi-
STOCK MARKETS.— The local stock market
was easier this week for sheep and cattle.
The supply on both days was very good, but
prices for best descriptions of cattle were
10/ lower, and for medium sorts the decline
was greater. Sheep fell from 6d to 1/ per
head. At Newmarket yesterday the supply
of sheep was large, and as the demand was
irregular, a fall in prices occurred for all
grades of sheep, though the demand for
lambs was brisk.
THE BENDIGO ADVERTISER (PUBLISHED DAILY.) PROGRESSION, OUR RIGHTS AND OUR RESOURCES. BENDIGO, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 1, 1903. THE INCOME TAX. (Article), Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 - 1918), Wednesday 1 April 1903 [Issue No.14874] page 2 2017-05-21 08:55 Sri Pages.—Our issue this'moriiing con
| gists of six pages.
Co ran an Sotplt.—The supply in the
Malmsbury reservoir fell oiio inch during the
24 hours ended 9, a.m. yesterday, tlie depth
of water being llftv 3in." The heavy fall of
:raia 'at Tre'ntham ou Saturday has not, the
departmental officials state, ■ tjcncfited the
Fire.—Last evening a comfortable six
roomed weatherboard cottage, owned ty a
miner named Edward Radford,-situated near
•property, Kangaroo Gully, was totally de
stroyed by fire. So rapidly did the flames
spread,j owing to the inability;to .procure' a
"supply 'of water, thtit it wa£'impossible, to,
have any of the contents., It is stated, that
he fire was caused through Mrs. Thuli'onl
tripping over a cat while carrying' a lighted
Revenue 'The State Tevoivue re
turns for the third quarter of . the current
financial year were made available in "the
State Parliament last night. The officers
of i.lie Treasury, as una)/ worked overtime.
435,059;,502, as against 435,208,073 for?the cor
of 45)48,571. The details 'showed:—Excise,'
£'204.443, as against 43267,343, a, decrease ;}!:
4362,500; .: territorial revenue, -43251,967,-" as
aeuiust 4324.2,660, an increase-of ".£9301': rail
ways, ,£2,354,012, as against ,£2,488,525, a de
-ercaso of X'1321513; I:ind;:tax; ^£73,742. as
against 4374,138, a'decrease of J3&6; income
tax returns, 4227,'560, as against :4331,696,"n
decrease ;:of::43413<> iT prcbr.te';i'.75,296;;:. as
against-j£182,G32, a (Increase of,.£"57,32(5"pro
gress ..rents, 43155,750, as against .£150,113,
ail increase of '<£56:57; ..stamps, 43117,982, as
against,:.£.110,,623, a decrease of; illC>42. . The
revenuo received from the Conimouwenlth
w.is ,£'1,61)8,494, as against 421,616,S85j an in
crease of 4351,609. <••
Satisfactory Finances.—The financial
statement submitted at the meeting of; the
local branch of the Reform Eeague last -iiigh'?
showed that "after nil accounts'had bc-en mot
;• credit balance of about 4330 remained. .The
chairman (the Mayor'i congratulated th-:
league-on the {satisfactory state' of'its financed
Two candidates hftd been run in thc interescs
of reform, and' yet' the league had 'a. good
credit- balance. Such"it thing'was, lie thought,
unique- in-.the history oi political- campaigns.
He was very .pleased to occupy-the position
of chairman of sucli a well and ecuiiomieally
Dairying Industry.—The Di.ref.lor of
in i he country districts for!.teaching.".applied
bacteriology to man; gt-rs and employes of
dairy factories is now being held at Filutca.
Nineteen men STe in attendanre, and it is
evident that these local classes arc-going to
be well attended. •Arrangements have been
made - for ' classcs to bo' formed at Ivynoton
from the 14th-to 25th April, at Ivoroit from
27tli April to 9th May, and at Terang from
the 11th to the 31st M"ay. There will be a
break of- a few days during folic course at
Terang to enablo dairy managers to attend
their conference'in' Melbourne. Dr. Cherry,
to give lectures under the auspices of agri
cultural. societies on dairying, forage crops,
oi- ensilage. These lectures will be delivered
iu the evening. Agricultural societies in the
vicinity of Kyneton, Korpit and Terang ought
(saya our Melbourne reporter) to make
early application" to the Secretary. for Agri
culture if'they desire to'' htivc lectures de
livered. • ^ '.
:Eikctokai< llKGisTB-iii.—Mr.' D. Ajidrow
complained . at the- meeting- oi" the" KeXom
League last night the lack of facilities af
forded those dei.irous of obtaining electDrs'
■rights.. He said that'a resident of Quarry
Hill, in. the South Sandhurst electorate, had
been compelled to go to the electoral recis
tcar'n office at WliitccHills.- • • Sucli> aii''arrange
liient caused a great deal of inconvenience
-The, Mayor: "Cannot we get a registrar ap
pointed in the c:ly?"'Mv.- Andrew: "It" would
be much more convenient." • After further
discussion it was decidc-d to draw the at
tention of the Government^ to Iho : hocessiiy
for a city registrar forMhe South .?aii(lh«K:t
•electorate beino- appointed;'• • ■ ■ : .
EiftHT-Hnuia.—Messrs. W. A. Hamiicoii,
A. S. Dados, and'Hay Kirkwood, 'Ms.L.A.;
:.tho Victorian Eaibvays for the purpose of
securing the ruuning of a special train; from
Maldon to Bendig'o 'oii the occasion of the
local Eight-HouTr :• demonstration'. Mr.
(Lochhead promised-that the train'should, ruii
-providing the necessary guarantee was. forth
coming. ' '■ .•'■':••■
. IJkfoUNDKn EumOi:.—rnquirics regarding
a rumor that the Fourth Battalion I.B. (Cas
tlcmaine).and tliG-Piftlr•BatUi'liait"(BendigoV
fart; -bkoly: to be am'algamiited," iti(vo;'elicited
that there is on foundation 'whatever'for' the
statement. . At a conference' b'etweeh i-e
and;the State,commandant, hold soriie weeks
ago; it was; at is understood; decided- not
to combine forccs.' -In'the ovent of ainalga
mation : the two-battalion;* would'- be iindei'
the ;one offiQer,,-but .there seems 'little - likeli
hood .of .that, change talcing place.,, ' What
lias been ddfae'wSB stated/in the: "Advertiser"
«0£'.erw«eks-ngo;r::-i!Uader *tlio^"iifew system "of'
the - Collinionwealtli Government -.lJiti.rijiiaij
try forces j?f Victoria have bueu divided into'
four regiments of 509 men each. ■ Thb first,
•sccond and.', third fcattahoiirj-have boon iiiiidc
; regiments;' wh'crcas"the: Bcudigo and Castlo
maiii»-! battalions comprise the fourth rai
ment. The only effect of tho alteration'"is
that ..the'-Fifth BiithUion'a strengtH has been
Teduced to .255 men, and thc'-Fourth to 254,
tiie total 11)118 being flic strcngtii-of a regi
wcin—509-officers and ineii. The battalions,
however, are not, :n any way connected with
teach' other, arid,no notification has been re
ceived" from headquarters which would -war
rant., the assumptiou that tho batlalions aie
to. bo amalgamated, or, in other wordsj
plnced; uiider .(lie. command of one officer.
- Mtjtuat/ Isn-noVKiiitNT:—The usual mect
ng of St. Mark's Mutual Improvement So
>ii'£y was lield in the schoolroom on Monday
'vening, when the vice-president (Mr. A. IIol
and) was in tlie cliair. After the.business of
.lie evening, prepared and..'.impromptu
snetfe'ios iverc contributed by the" members.
.U J.GiV UA i..'r i.l\i fj-if'
Disputed ITeases.—A,. couple, .oiLgold-iiuu.-...
ing leases near the corner of Mackenzie and
Wade* stv'ect.s .'havc^ibeeu ''promineiibj -iiv ■ the
Witiden'B iGoiurt-weeutly. ufFhcytmxe situated
on,-what isofumiliarly; known- as,the old -Mot
ropplitau, lep.EC.'; Ou;-.the,;23rd February last
Mr.-.,Thps.- B.urke.-JIolden,' of A\ralhalla, made
applicationQbefore Mr. Warden Moore to
have one^of ;tlie. .leases-—No- 6552— eontain
ing Ga. lr.24p.,-forfeitcd, on the ground of
non-compliar.co with the labor covenants.
The, lease -was originally hold in the name
ofllarrison, .but during the hearing it trau
S])ii-ed ,J:liaj it had been transferred to J( C.
Thomson.' .,Mr,. C'.- J,. Currie, solicitor, for
tli» defence,, jpraQtjcaily, admitted that ; no
work, lind. been!'done' on the ' lease for some
time,, but s,t;a ted'.that-., his . client. .bad spent
'£BOO on machinery! whicli. wa-valnipst- .ready
■ to be pjaceil in position. The warden re
commended .that the lease bo forfeited,; and ;
igiven' 'jo Ijjie," applicant' On the 16th ,March •'
•Mr. Holdenniade a similar application-con- ,
ccniing / the: adjoining lease—No. 25p.-t^coii
.taining; 2a. Or. 15p. In this case the, .War
;den, Captain Biirrowes, also recommended [
forfeiture, and that the lease,.be granted'.to '<
the applicant. £n; appeal' in.'both instances
.is-'being lodged, by the; transferee., and. will
come on for hearing before the Minister 'of
Mines at the Mines department, Melbourne,
at U a.m. to-morrow. Mr. Murphy will at
tend on -bfalialf of Mr. Holden to support
both recommendations. .
JujiiLEK.—A.unique event was 'celebrated
yesterday/ the occasion being ths jubilee of
tlie late Mr. AV. Gunn, who obtained the first
31st March, 1853. The late Mr. Gunn and
lengthy voyage from the old country' by the
ship Rip Yan Winkle in November; 1852;.and
having made a short stay in canvas town, siib-'.
se'quently known as Emoraldr•Hill; and now
South Melbourne, they arrived on the Bon
(ligo diggings'during the same month'.-They
diggers required, including water and tem
perance beverages. Mr. Gunn was not- long
before, his increasing business compelled him
to enlarge Iris premises, which were at that
time probably tho largest on Bendigo, and
talent available. Later on, the premises were
again enlarged. Mr. Gunn was amongst the
goldfield in 1851 or 1855. Mr. Gunn, who was
the father of the present licensee (Mi-. :T.
Gunn) will /be well remembered by many- old:
Bcndigonians. He died 17A years ago, aged
57 years. His widow is still living with her
sons in Gippslund in the best of health, and
There was a family of eight children—six
soils and two daughters—Mr. AAr. Gunn, now
of Raywood, being tho eldest, and the first
boy born on Bendigo. Mr. T. Gunn, the.se
cond son, lias been ill occupation of the hotel
since his father's death. The only break in
time when the I! ay wood rush broke out, when
Mr. Gunn visited Haywood and built, the
is still carried on by -Mr. AV. Gunn. The
olj Mr. Gunn's family lived on the premises
during the whole of the time. The present
licensee, Mr. T. Gunn. has on the promises
an oil painting of the buildings in 1853, and
he also has in his possession the original re
freshment license, dated 31st. Mai;ch,., 1853
(No. 1), in manuscript ; gold digger's license
No. 74, No. 1 storekeeper's license, No. 1 mi
ner's right, a receipt for ,£37/10/ for half a
ton of Hour purchased from Mr. E. N.
Emmett in 1S53, and several other interesting
SIX PAGES.— Our issue this morning con-
sists of six pages.
COLIBAN SUPPLY.— The supply in the
Malmsbury reservoir fell one inch during the
24 hours ended 9 a.m. yesterday, the depth
of water being 11ft. 3in. The heavy fall of
rain at Trentham on Saturday has not, the
departmental officials state, benefed the
FIRE.— Last evening a comfortable six
roomed weatherboard cottage, owned by a
miner named Edward Radford, situated near
property, Kangaroo Gully, was totally de-
stroyed by fire. So rapidly did the flames
spread, owing to the inability to procure a
supply of water, that it was impossible to
have any of the contents. It is stated that
the fire was caused through Mrs. Radford
tripping over a cat while carrying a lighted
REVENUE RETURNS.— The State revenue re-
turns for the third quarter of the current
financial hear were made available in the
State parliament last night. The officers
of the Treasury, as usual, worked overtime.
£5,058,502, as against £5,208,073 for the cor-
of £148,871. The details showed:— Excise
£204,443, as against £267,343, a decrease of
£62,900; territorial revenue, £251,967, as
against £24,2,666, an increase of £9301; rail-
ways, £2,354,012, as against £2,488,525, a de-
crease of £132,513; land tax, £73,742, as
against £74,138, a decrease of £396; income
tax returns, as against £27,560, as against £51,696, a
decrease of £4136; probate, £75,296, as
against £132,632, a decrease of £57,356; pro-
gress rents, £155,750, as against £450,143,
increase of £5637; stamps, £117,982, as
against £119,623, a decrease of £1642. The
revenue received from the Commonwealth
was £1,668,494 as against £1,616,885, an in-
crease of £51,609.
SATISFACTORY FINANCES.— The financial
statement submitted at the meeting of the
local branch of the Reform League last night
showed that after all accounts had been met
credit balance of about £30 remained. The
chairman (the Mayor congratulated the
league on the satisfactory state of its finances.
Two candidates had been run in the interests
of reform, and yet the league had a good
credit balance. Such a thing was, he thought,
unique in the history of political campaigns.
He was very pleased to occupy the position
of chairman of such a well and economically
DIARYING INDUSTRY.— The Director of
in the country districts for teaching applied
bacteriology to managers and employes on
dairy factories is now being held at Echuca.
Nineteen men are in attendance and it is
evident that these local classes are going to
be well attended. Arrangements have been
made for classes to be formed at Kyneton
from the 14th to 25th April, at Koroit from
27th April to 9th May, and at Terang from
the 11th to the 31st May. There will be a
break of a few days during the course at
Terang to enable dairy managers to attend
their conference in Melbourne. Dr. Cherry,
to give lectures under the auspices of agri-
cultural societies on dairying, forage crops,
or ensilage. These lectures will be delivered
in the evening. Agricultural societies in the
vicinity of Kyneton, Korpit and Terang ought
(says our Melbourne reporter) to make
early application to the Secretary for Agri-
culture if they desire to have lectures de-
livered.
ELECTORAL REGISTRAR.— Mr. D. Andrew
complained at the meeting of the Reform
League last night the lack of facilities af-
forded those desirous of obtaining electors'
rights. He said that a resident of Quarry
Hill, in the South Sandhurst electorate, had
been compelled to go to the electoral regis-
trar's ofice at White Hills. Such an arrange-
ment caused a great deal of inconvenience.
The Mayor: "Cannot we get a registrar ap-
pointed in the city?" Mr. Andrew: "It would
be much more convenient." After further
discussion it was decided to draw the at-
tention of the Government to the necessity
for a city registrar for the South Sandhurst
electorate being appointed.
EIGHT HOURS.— Messrs. W. A. Hamilton
A. S. Bailes, and Hay Kirkwood, Ms. L. A.,
the Victorian Rai;ways for the purpose of
securing the running of a special train from
Maldon to Bendigo on the occasion of the
local Eight Hours demonstration. Mr.
Lochhead promised that the train should run
providing the necessary guarantee was forth-
coming.
UNFOUNDED RUMOR.— Inquiries regarding
a rumor that the Fourth Battalion I. B. (Cas-
tlemaine) and the Fifth Battalion (Bendigo)
are likely to be amalgamated, and have elicited
that there is on foundation whatever for the
statement. At a conference beween re-
and the State commandant, held some weeks
ago, it was at is understood, decided not
to combine forces. In the event of amalga-
mation to the two battalions would be under
the one officer, but there seems little likeli-
hood of that change taking place. What
has been done was stated in the "Advertiser"
some weeks ago. Under the new system of
the Commonwealth Government the infan-
try forces of Victoria have been divided into
four regiments of 509 men each. The first,
second and third battalion have been made
regiments whereas the Bendigo and Castle-
main battalions comprise the fourth regi-
ment. The only effect of the alteration is
that the Fifth Battalion's strength has been
reduced to 244 men, and the Fourth to 254,
the total thus being the strength of a regi-
ment — 500 officers and men. The battalions.
however, are not in any way connected with
each officer, and no notification has been re-
ceived from headquarters which would war-
rant the assumption that the battalions are
to be amalgamated, or in other words,
played under the command of one officer.
MUTUAL IMPROVEMENT.— The usual meet-
ing St. Mark's Mutual Improvement So-
ciety was held in the schoolroom on Monday
evening, when the vice-president (Mr. A. Hol-
and) was in the chair. After the business of
the evening, prepared and impromptu
speeches were contributed by the members.
DISPUTED LEASES.— A couple of gold min-
ing leases near the corner of Mackenie and
Wade streets have been prominent in the
Warden's Court recently. They are situated
on what is familiarly know as the old Met-
ropolitan lease. On the 23rd February last
Mr. Thos. Burke Holden, of Walhalla, made
application before Mr. Waren Moore to
have one of the leases — No. 6552 — contain-
ing 6a. 1r. 24p., forfeited, on the ground of
non-compliance with the labor convenants.
The lease was originally held in the name
of Harrison, but during the hearing it trans-
pired that it had been transferred to J.C.
Thomson. Mr. C.J. Currie, solicitor for
the defence, pratically admitted that no
work had been done on the lease for some
time, but stated that his client had spent
£500 on machinery, which was almost ready
to be placed in position. The warden re-
commended that the lease be forfeited, and
given to the applicant. On the 16th March
Mr. Holden made a similar application con-
cerning the adjoining lease — No. 225 — con-
taining 2a. 0r. 15p. In this case the War-
den, Captain Burrows, also recommended
forfeiture, and that the lease be granted to
the applicant. An appeal in both instances
is being lodged by the transferee, and will
come on for hearing before the Minister of
Mines at the Mines department, Melbourne
at 11 a.m. to-morrow. Mr. Murphy will at-
tend on behalf of Mr. Holden to support
both recommendations.
JUBILEE.— A unique event was celebrated
yesterday the occasion being the jubilee of
the late Mr. W. Gunn, who obtained the first
31st March, 1853. The late Mr. Gunn and
lengthy voyage from the old country by the
ship Rip Yan Winkle in November, 1852, and
having made a short stay in canvas town, sub-
sequently known as Emerald Hill, and now
South Melbourne, they arrived on the Ben-
digo diggings during the same month. They
diggers required, including water and tem-
perance beverages. Mr. Gunn was not long
before his increasing business compelled him
to enlarge his premises, which were at that
time probably the largest on Bendigo, and
talent available. Later on, the premises were
again enlarged. Mr. Gunn was amongst the
goldfield in 1851 or 1855. Mr. Gunn, who was
the father of the present licensee (Mr. T.
Gunn) will be well remembered by many old
Bendigonians. He died 17 ½ years ago, aged
57 years. His widow is still living with her
sons in Gippsland in the best of health, and
There was a family of eight children — six
sons and two daughters — Mr. W. Gunn, now
of Raywood, being the eldest, and the first
boy born on Bendigo. Mr. T. Gunn, the se-
cond son, has been in occupation of the hotel
since his father's death. The only break in
time when the the Raywood rush broke out, when
Mr. Gunn visited Haywood and built the
is still carried on by Mr. W. Gunn. The
of Mr. Gunn's family lived on the premises
during the whole of the time. The present
licensee, Mr. T. Gunn has on the premises
an oil painting of the buildings in 1853, and
he also has in his possession the original re-
freshment license, dated 31st. March, 1853
(No. 1), in manuscript ; gold digger's license
No. 74, No. 1 storekeeper's license, No. 1 mi-
ner's right, a receipt for £37/10/ for half a
ton of flour purchased from Mr. E. N.
Emmett in 1853, and several other interesting
THE BENDIGO ADVERTISER (PUBLISHED DAILY.) PROGRESSION, OUR RIGHTS AND OUR RESOURCES. BENDIGO, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 1, 1903. THE INCOME TAX. (Article), Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 - 1918), Wednesday 1 April 1903 [Issue No.14874] page 2 2017-05-20 17:13 jTHE BEND1G0 ADVERTISER
(published daily.)
feogbeastos, otfb ItlGHTB and ocr kesouboes.
[BE^DIGO, WEDNESDAY, APRIL' 1, 1903.
Yesterday the rustic""of pink paper was
heard throughout the 'land; as those liable to
pay income lax struggled, in many cases,
intelligible explanation of tlieir earnings fcr
1902, for the information of Mr. Prost Webb
and his minions'of the Income Tax Office.
This year the Act'has been so altered that
thousands of persons who were hitherto ob
livious., of. the complexities of tli's special
legislative enactment, and also, we hope, in
lioebntPbf nib sulphUiwio.-danguage and- <:b
jiu'gatioiiS which had for their object; the 1-i
;voted heads of .those.in the Income Tax'Office;
and the legislators; who helped ..to pass the
Acifc, have been caught .ill its extended
meslie'j.' ."'Not r.niiatmv.lly; they hw,i> been
ptrplexed with regard .to what is income frtim
. property, 'what is" iiieoiiiV frpni.;personarexer
tiouv- what' deductions may be/■allowed, and
a thousand and one prpbleins which have pre
sented 'heiusc-lvpi for olut-idrttioirih' il»* cwr
vaiyiiifr cu'crtiniita'iices -of men and women in'
all .ranks and em,ployir-ents; .iii nj
• cr.untry, professional -nien and,business men,
employers aiid eir.ployed','as they-haVo striven'
,.to the best of their? ability to''suphly The
•acquired information: Tut the-Am-ndcd Act
lias.not 'oiily; caught in ite-meshes thousands
;6i' newjaxpayers, :it ha(i added to tin:, Vurdem
of those .who. were taxed ,before, an-1 has very
:. greatly adjled the:clerical tabors, of- em
plhvers.'of' la'bor. rand 'csrieeiall'v riiose wh.»
-carry on a large business. The legal niaiia
ugcrs have jiutly complained of the very aevelo
-burden of work which-the amende! Act has
. tfasfcupon tacin, and- U is easy.to understand
.'ithat • only ^vitli : great , difficulty ' "mil
I l]iey;,j!e.J,^,Jia'bttd. Ju ,gufe..tlic uamcs.^aud
j/i'ddrbsseft' of," and amounts re^Cu-ed" by," meii
' ijX' the employment of particular fiyiip^m<.s
, during. tl|e,past_year.!g|-,.indeed,itHcy will bi'
I able to completely satiafy,;
'Jiicome Tax Office in -this"felp'e££v^'bI"c^rSfe:
(he GpvernniraJ;:ig^quitc justified iu.:malcicg
qt-iery effort to^pr-e^ent persons cfiping
^ahe^.jiKfc^b^dijiBi under the Act, lilr .froriv
jiurnishiTig'-incftfMff1: -'ftf'tnttis.-" "'"It Tin's bVen'
rsbid that in the past diRhpncst.persons (hay;.:
'evaded the tax, aiid therefore tTiatthe Go\v
,;emment is bound to^iidojit.such measures, as
i.j.viU ensure itj: payiiion!, j;l>y. cyeryy peraoii in'
-ihe Shite..who - is iKrrble;.Tlie' wages Jists
i';jnade out'by the managers of firms a lid cow-'
iipaiiics v.-ill enable the officials of (lie 1'nooiiij
.'foix' Office to ascertain v/hethcr wvry indi
vidual who should do so has fHl.;d. in a
Schedule."mid; forwarded .it to' headquai.i <?rs..
. The inquisitorial character of I-I12 Act has
been revealed to many thousands in the com
niuuity. for tlie first i;i;no. '-Many of thesi
have laughed .at the woes of the income tax
payers in. the past, and have failed to iinder
... stand 'iiliCi'tr objections to the. manner in
which 1 lie income tax officers were in (he
Jiabit of -ferreting out their private business
transactions, and information:rcgar<liiig.their
,i v. Lj.iJl'iA , { <■ '/■ i (•'»!
J^i^cial.p'ositiQ^^8ad^ob.«gat)LQfts..,6f smirso
this has_always been an objection to tlie in
l.conie'xasjn_alLeoiUitrie3.\vh<~re..Lt..has..existad
as a means of revenue, and now i,t is being:
! felt by many thousands; in Victoria; who pre
viously regarded it,an a matter of .small
moment. The esteM^oiV.of' tlje operation .if
the Apt- cannot Mil to do good, how-over, i'ot
it1 will'bring tlie necessity for tliei economi
cal administration of the afiay-s ofUhe .State
home to the people, which indirect; taxes
terty.^faiL,to.d9.,f. ^Taxation ihrouglt the Cus
toms is"boriie in the main without complaint,
because the extent of !t in every household
not realised. Under an extensive and com
piehensive system of taxation such as that
which- exists-in protectionist count tie?, tliere
are few articles in everyday, use ..which have
not^aid'duty:' From the-era die to the grave
^meii-may^:u* tsatd to have paid t»s.cs from
day v to.'■.'day.-t.on ^their food, clothing, tools
"etc.V^vitliaiit/jeafisingr thevriiqiTnujis''- contri
bMion they have made to the revenue.. But
the direct tax brings iho truth home to every
::^Inithjs.distiict:the ci±f/.(inahave had to pay
since.J.uue Jivst Lan .increased water, rate. Now
a* further-tiutdeii is adcied {o ttip. increasing
load-. iiV the sJiepe of the income Jat. If it
will only rouseithc-nj; into activity with re
gard to 'the. necessity 'of putting ,an end to
extra vagaucs and rash borrowing,' good wil 1
-eventuate; The extended operation of. the
3^.come..iax.iaku6ii.;on'y. likely to do this; it
iis likely to direct "at fentj on to oursystem-of
taxation,- atitl lead jt6 a -consideration of the
question as to whether some inore equitable
wetliod of raising revenue cannot be^dovised.
%h is questionable' whether the thousands of
landowners and farmers ,i\ow harassed over
HIjoc filling in. of the income tax. ..cr heduh's
Svould .not welcome a, lani' tax; which, while
.deriving an adequate revenue from the laud
! o if the whole State, would not cast any undue
'burden upon tlioso who, depended inK.ri.Uhii
products of (be soil and their oiv.'i labor i'or
their subsistence. Perhaps the tax. which has
lately sorely..exercised (b : patience oudtgbo.il
-temper of many thousands of estimable citi
zens was imposed with~th'c object of acquaint
ing the public with its-objectionable charac
teristics, and tlriis1 to prepare the: way for
spme more. scientific, but; less objectionable,
system, and simpler land -more effective . -in
worlcingi such as all equitable land" tax
lip claimed, to be. . . .
THE BENDIGO ADVERTISER
(PUBLISHED DAILY.)
PROGRESSION, OUR RIGHTS AND OUR RESOURCES.
BENDIGO, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 1, 1903.
Yesterday the rustle of pink paper was
heard throughout the land, as those liable to
pay income tax struggled, in many cases,
intelligible explanation of their earnings for
1902, for the information of Mr. Prost Webb
and his minions of the Income Tax Office.
This year the Act has been so altered that
thousands of persons who were hitherto ob-
livious of the complexities of this special
legislative enactment, and also, we hope, in-
nocent of all sulphurous language and ob-
junctions which had for their object the de-
voted heads of those in the Income Tax Office
and the legislators who helped to pass the
Act have been caught in its extended
meshes. Not unnaturally they have been
perplexed with regard to what is income from
property, what is income from personal exer-
tion, what deductions may be allowed, and
a thousand and one problems which have pre-
sented themselves for elucidation in the ever
varying circumstances of men and women in
all ranks and employments in town and
country, professional men and business men,
employers and employed, as they have striven
to the best of their ability to supply the
required information. But the Amended Act
has not only caught in its meshes thousands
of new taxpayers, it has added to the burden
of those who were taxed before and has very
greatly added to the clerical labors of the em-
ployers of labor, and especially those who
carry on a large business. The legal mana-
gers have justly complained of the very severe
burden of work which the amended Act has
cast upon them, and it is easy to understand
that only with great difficulty will
they be enabled to give the names and
addresses of, and amounts received by men
in employment of particular companies
during the past year, if indeed, they will be
able to completely satisfy the wants of the
Income Tax Office in this respect. Of course,
the Government is quite justified in making
every effort to prevent persons from escaping
their just burdens under the Act, or from
furnishing incorrect returns. It has been
said that in the past dishonest persons have
evaded the tax, and therefore that the Gov-
ernment is bound to adopt such measures as
will ensure its payment by every person in
the State who is employed. The wages list
made out by the managers of firms and com-
panies will enable the officials of the Income
Tax Office to ascertain whether every indi-
vidual who should do so has filled in a
Schedule and forwarded it to headquarters.
The inquistorial character of the act has
been revealed to many thousands in the com-
munity for the first time. Many of these
have laughed at the woes of the income tax
payers for the past, and have failed to under-
stand their objections to the manner in
which the income tax officers were in the
habit of ferreting out their private business
tansactions, and information regarding their
financial position and obligations. Of course
this has always been an objection to the in-
come tax in all countries where it has existed
as a means of revenue, and now it is being
felt by many thousands in Victoria who pre-
viously regarded it as a matter of small
moment. The extension of the operation of
the Act cannot fail to do good, however, for
it will bring the necessity for the economi-
cal administration of the affairs of the State
home to the people, which indirect taxes ut-
terly fail to do. Taxation through the Cus-
toms is borne in the main without complaint,
because the extent of it in every houshold is
not realised. Under an extensive and com-
prehensive system of taxation such as that
which exists in protectionist countries, there
are few articles in everyday use which have
not paid duty. From the cradle to the grave
men may be said to have paid taxes from
day to day on their food, clothing, tools,
etc., without realising the enormous contri-
buton they have made to the revenue. But
the direct tax brings the truth home to every
In this district the citizens have had to pay
since June last an increased water rate. Now
a further burden is added to the increasing
load in the shape of the income tax. If it
will only rouse them into activity with re-
gard to the necessity of putting an end to
extravagance and rash borrowing, good will
eventuate. The extended operation of the
income tax is not only likely to do this; it
it is likely to direct attention to our system of
taxation, and lead to a consideration of the
question as to whether some more equitable
method of raising revenue cannot be devised.
It is questionable whether the thousands of
landowners and farmers now harassed over
the filling in of the income tax schedules
should not welcome a, land tax, which, while
deriving an adequate revenue from the land
of the whole State, would not cast any undue
burden upon those who, depended upon the
products of the soil and their own labor for
their subsistence. Perhaps the tax which has
lately sorely exercised the patience and good
temper of many thousands of estimable citi-
sens was imposed with the object of acqaint-
ing the public with its objectionable charac-
teristics, and thus to prepare the way for
some more scientific, but less objectionable,
system, and simpler land more effective in
its working, such as an equitable land tax
is claimed to be.
THE BENDIGO ADVERTISER. (PUBLISHED DAILY.) PROGRESSION, OUR RIGHTS AND OUR RESOURCES. BENDIGO, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1901, INTELLIGENCE. (Article), Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 - 1918), Friday 11 October 1901 [Issue No.14,417] page 2 2017-05-20 16:35 The attention of members of the
rate of 5 per cent, per annum.
SUSPECTED CHARACTERS.—Detectives Wil
son and Freycr, and Plainclothes-constable
Long, on a charge of. vagrancy. They were
a felony. They were arrested in Bridge
homo a criino recently committed.
AT THE LOCKUP.-Constable Woodyard
Potter on a charge of behaving in an insult
RECITAL AT ALL SAINTS' CHURCH.-In this
this evening for the first time in this city.'
It is a musical composition of great beauty,'
dignity and solemnity. A lovely melodious
garden of Gethscmane is followed by an im
pressive chorus, "Fling Wide the Gates," re
presenting the procession to Calvary. The
which is powerfully treated, and is followed by
"Verily, I say unto thee," the cry from the
theme is entirely changed,- and leads with
marked effect intod a maestoso movement.
The closing scene, "It is Finished," is followed
simplicity would be difficult to surpass. The'
names of tho ladies and gentlemen who are.
assisting the'choir in the production of this
CITY COUHT.-Messrs. W. Webb and T.
Somerville, Js.P., presided yesterday. Three
inebriates were dealt with, two being dis
charged, and one fined 2/6. Several parents
were fined for neglecting to send their chil
dren to school. Two other cases were dealt
THE SHOW LUNCHEONS.--The catering for
the show luncheons on Wednesday and yes
terday was carried out - in a very thorough
maimer by' Messrs. Milbu'm Bros.,- of -tnff
Sandhurst Coffee' Palace. The firm has ac
an extensive scale, and it was upheld'on the,
occasion under notice. :
BKXDIGO ATHLETIC CLUB.-The adjourned;
annua! meeting of the Bendigo Athletic Club
A.N.A.— The attention of members of the
rate of 5 per cent. per annum.
SUSPECTED CHARACTERS.— Detectives Wil-
son and Freyer, and Plainclothes-constable
Long, on a charge of. vagrancy. They were
a felony. They were arrested in Bridge-
home a crime recently committed.
AT THE LOCKUP.— Constable Woodyard
Potter on a charge of behaving in an insult-
RECITAL AT ALL SAINTS' CHURCH.— In this
this evening for the first time in this city.
It is a musical composition of great beauty,
dignity and solemnity. A lovely melodious
garden of Gethsemane is followed by an im-
pressive chorus, "Fling Wide the Gates," re-
presenting the procession to Calvary. The
which is powerfully treated, and is followed by
"Verily, I say unto thee," the cry from the
theme is entirely changed, and leads with
marked effect intod (sic) a maestoso movement.
The closing scene, "It is Finished," is followed
simplicity would be difficult to surpass. The
names of the ladies and gentlemen who are
assisting the choir in the production of this
CITY COUTRT.— Messrs. W. Webb and T.
Somerville, Js.P., presided yesterday. Three
inebriates were dealt with, two being dis-
charged, and one fined 2/6. Several parents
were fined for neglecting to send their chil-
dren to school. Two other cases were dealt
THE SHOW LUNCHEONS.— The catering for
the show luncheons on Wednesday and yes-
terday was carried out in a very thorough
manner by Messrs. Milburn Bros., of the
Sandhurst Coffee' Palace. The firm has ac-
an extensive scale, and it was upheld on the,
occasion under notice.
BENDIGO ATHLETIC CLUB.—The adjourned
annuaL meeting of the Bendigo Athletic Club
THE BENDIGO ADVERTISER (PUBLISHED DAILY) PROGRESSION, OUR RIGHTS, AND OUR RESOURCES. BENDIGO, MONDAY, SEPT. 28, 1896. THE TAVERNER UKASE. (Article), Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 - 1918), Monday 28 September 1896 [Issue No.12,901] page 2 2017-05-20 15:25 THE CHINESE LITIGATION".?-?! ho hearing of
the cha:ge of conspiracy against four Cl.inamen
abrupt termination during the afternoon. The
Coast room, and as the limited space was closely
pucked by Chinamen, the atrno-pliers was most
oppressive. When the time for lunch arrived,
tho P.M. suggested that during the adj ,urn
open and the roof taken off if possible. A
held in the larger room used =»s~ the Police
Court, which was then available, was
quickly endorsed by everybody present. The
strangely worded document whiih Lee
Samj one of the aefcused, and ''grand
joine slight sensation when being translated in
the. eoiirt ,oh Thursday: was, Air. Kirhy ex
plained, only a pri^iir to' Oluang O'i, a Chinee
gad, asking him to extinguish the /oar men
whose names were mentioned iu it. Mr. Kirby
aeries of prosecutions by discharging the ac
Ouaed, Mtv Kennedy contended that the only !
way to no tiint wds t$ commit the accused and
let them stand their trial before a jury. The
BEIOGGED SHAREHOLDERS, -The troubles of i
the shareholders iu the Daley and Weston's
Gold Mining Company at Lllesmere, which
have resulted iu abortive mcolings being held
from timo to time recently, have by no means
ended, judging by the outcome of an extraor
the Beehive. With a lawyer on each side of
( him, leading rival fac'.ions of shareholders,
it was little wonder that the chairman expressed j
a desire at the start to be relieved of lus posi
tion. With the view of clearing the way a
little, a shareholder nominated one ot the legal
another nomination an election becamo neees- !
sary. Then the second legal gentleman de- j
without an adjournment, there was a fullstop.
Several Shareholders expressed disgustat the turn
things had taken, and gventtially the matter was
his seat. A start was then made tfjtfe the
business, which was a proposal for the re
had come about over a desire on the part of cer
which it was ascertained could not ba effected
summarily under the present rules. After a
legal gentleman Baid the present rules ware un
workable, while the other expressed tho
opinion that they were "as right as the
bank," thfe motion for the rescission of the rules
wag put. A ballot was again demanded, and
more wrangling enstied. An adjournment to
enabls the ballot to be tfllien was proposed, and
a number of tho 25 shareholders who were r>re
ssnt. A show of hands of those remaining being
in favor of t.ho motion, 16 was declared carried.
A VISITOR -Mr. J. Hingston, whose enter
taining articles wiitten under the nom di plume
of " J.H." have appeared from time to time in
the Argus, and some of which have been pub
lished^ iu book form, is at present on a visit to
this city._ Mr. Hingston was on the Bendigo
gohUi'ji'd in 1S53, arid he has in his possession
this field in tho shape of a digger's license,
which was taken out by him when he, like
m my others who had been attracted to the
colony by the gold ftver, was engaged searching
for the precious metal here. He expressed
after tho lapse of some time,- and to note the
marvellous change in its appearancc.
^ FIIIE AT HAITI- VALLEY.- About half-past 7
o'clock on Saturday night a fire occurred nt
Wappy Valley, resulting in the total destruc
store belonging to Mrs. Elizabeth Grant. One
of her daughters, about 5 years old, was iu the
moment the place was in fUmos. The alarm
was given, and the Long Gully-and Temperance
Fire. Brigades were quickly on the scene. Their
building and'its contents were totally consumed.
that Mrs. Grant is a lie ivy loser. She is the
widow oi the late Mr. J. Grant, who -\vas killed
aud for whom a charitr.hle entertainment was
got up afterwards. Mrs. Grant has a family of
seven children. Much sympathy is f«lt"f-.r
liar, which was stalled yesterday, met with
liberal response. .Ye shall be pleated lo re
ceive aud acknowledge subscriptions in aid of
thi3 deserving case.
TIIB WEATHER.-Delightfully fine weather
was expeiieneed yesterday. Tho niyht was
THE NEXT Esor.isu CIUCKET TEAM.-Aus
tralian cricketers (writes the Loudon corres
pondent of Lhe A?-jus) will be interested to
«.rn thr.fc tho team which Mv. A. IS. Stoddarfc
will lend one to tU? coloci.-r. iioxt- y«-.r \>iu I
probably include I'riuce Ban jicsini.iji and JMv. \
.Mason, ; '
THE ENGLISH MAIL.-The R M.S. Orotava,
with English mails to ^ 23th August, reached
Albany on SViday morning. "The mails may be
expected m Bbndigb to-thbrrow.
DEATH OF AN OLD SOLDIER.-On Saturday
Mr. Joseph Booth, an old and respected resi
dent of Golden-Fquare, died at his place of
residence, M.'Kenzie-street, after an illness of
was an old soldier, was 77 years of age. In
chest, from which he never thoroughly re
covered. Deceased at one time belonged to the
13tl Light Dragoons and also the Yorkshire
Yeomanry Cavalry. On his severing his con
with a pUrse of sovereigns and a silver watch
bearing the following inscription-" Presented
to Joseph Sooth by the non-commissioned
officers and privates and friends of the A
Troop of the 2ad, West Yorkshire Yeomanry
Cavalry, as a iriark of reipebt. HalifuX, 12th
August, 1857." On leaving the army, the de
ceased came out to the colony and shortly after
wards settled down on this goldfield. The
funeral will take place this afternoon, at 2
o'clock, at the Bendigo Cemetery. His wife
ARREST OF A SUSPECT.-Of iate a number of
complaints have been made to the police in re
ago Constable Moncrief noticed a young mao
walking along one of the streets c-irrying a
suspicious looking parcel. Themon 9eeiog that
he could go. The constable followed, but was
unable to overtake the fel'ow, who in his flight
of vagrancy. He gave the natae of James
Onurlay.
SUDDEN DEATH.-On Friday afternoon on old
Arms hotel, by Mr. Potter. The deceased,
who was iv very old resident of the district, had
apparently been dead for several hours. Mr.
T. Somerville, J.P., conducted an inquiry, and
a verdict of death from natural causes was re
LATE TRAIN.-The last train from Korong
an hour and 25 minutes late, the c=u3e being
necessitating ahother engine, being obtained
from Bendigo. In consequence, the depai ture of
three quarters 'of OJJ, hoi\r. .?
BROKEN WINDOW.—On Saturday evening a
couple of VouDg girls were indulging in som°
rather rough plav or----'- " -
boot - -cr--«> Mr- A. G. James'
-...porlum, Golden-square, when one of
through the window of the establishment. The
damage amounted to between 10) and 15a.
VAGRANCY.-Mary Gordon, better known
about town under the sobriquet of '. Cranky
Mary," was arrested on Saturday evening by
Constable J. Riley. The unfortunate old
During the past week she liaa been wandering
about the streets without boots of hilt.
EN.diSEDRivjps' ASSOCIATION.-The weekly
meeting of the Jendigo branch was held at the
Trades Hail on Saturday night. Mr. Ryan
(president) occupied the chair. One nomina
tion for membership was received. A levy of
sixpence per member was struck oh account of
the death of the late member*Williams), of Eger
ton. The meeting then closedi
TUE " TRIP TO CHINATOWN" EXCURSION.
Considerable interest haB been manifested in
the special eheip excursion to Melbourne on
Wednesday, as arranged ,by Messrs. William
son and Mu?grove, to enable residents of Ben
digo to witness "A Trip to Chinatown." The
fares are aa Follow :-First-class return, 13s;
second-class return, 8s 8d. Tickets are available
on the return trip-. It is announced that
tickets will b& on sale at the local railway
station till 9 p.m. to-morrow (Tuesday) even
UADET PARADE -The monthly parade of the
held on Friday at Rochester, when thefc was a
muster of i40 of all ranks. The following
corps were represented :-Central State School,
Gravel Hill, Golden-square, Eaglehiwk, Castle
m&ine and Echuca. The battalion was marched
to the. Recreation Grounds, where they were
put; through .the manual and firine exercises,
past, etc., by the officer commanding, Lieu
tenant Daley. Other officers present were
Lieutenants Reed, M'llroy, Sabeston, Taylor
OPERATIVE BAKERS' SOCIETY.-On Saturday
of forming a society. Mr. W. Kelly presided,
and there was a good attendance. It was re
solved that the name of the society should ba
the Operative Bakers' Society of Bendigo. The
election of officers resulted President, Mr.
W. Bur re 11; vice-president, Mr. J. R ismussen ;
secretary, Mr. 0. Fonlsham ; treasurer. Mr. G
M'Gregor; trustees, Messrs,' W; Rubertsor j
W. Nolan and O. M'Gregor. It was decided
bakers with regard to the half-holiday queitioii.
those who had not attended the meeting, in
viting them to become members. The meeting
THE CHINESE LITIGATION.— The hearing of
the charge of conspiracy against four Chinamen
abrupt termination during the afternoon. The
Court room, and as the limited space was closely
packed by Chinamen, the atmosphere was most
oppressive. When the time for lunch arrived,
tho P.M. suggested that during the adjourn-
open and the roof taken off if possible. A
held in the larger room used as the Police
Court, which was then available, was
quickly endorsed by everybody present. The
strangely worded document which Lee
Sam, one of the accused, and ''grand-
some slight sensation when being translated in
the court on Thursday, was, Mr. Kirby ex-
plained, only a prayer to Quang Oi, a Chinese
god, asking him to extinguish the four men
whose names were mentioned in it. Mr.KIrby
series of prosecution by discharging the ac-
cused. Mr. Kennedy contended that the only
way to do that was to commit the accused and
let them stand their trial before a jury. The
BEFOGGED SHAREHOLDERS.— The troubles of
the shareholders in the Daley and Weston's
Gold Mining Company at Ellesmere, which
have resulted in abortive meetings being held
from time to time recently, have by no means
ended, judging by the outcome of an extraor-
the Beehive. With a lawyer on each side of
him, leading rival factions of shareholders,
it was little wonder that the chairman expressed
a desire at the start to be relieved of his posi-
tion. With the view of clearing the way a
little, a shareholder nominated one of the legal
another nomination an election became neces-
sary. Then the second legal gentleman de-
without an adjournment, there was a full stop.
Several shareholders expressed disgust at the turn
things had taken, and eventually the matter was
his seat. A start was then made the the
business, which was a proposal for the re-
had come about over a desire on the part of cer-
which it was ascertained could not be effected
summarily under the present rules. After a
legal gentleman said the present rules were un-
workable, while the other expressed the
opinion that they were "as right as the
bank," the motion for the rescission of the rules
was put. A ballot was again demanded, and
more wrangling ensued. An adjournment to
enable the ballot to be taken was proposed, and
a number of the 25 shareholders who were pre-
sent. A show of hands of those remaining being
in favor of the motion, it was declared carried.
A VISITOR .— Mr. J. Hingston, whose enter-
taining articles wiitten under the non dé plume
of "J.H." have appeared from time to time in
the Argus, and some of which have been pub-
lished in book form, is at present on a visit to
this city. Mr. Hingston was on the Bendigo
goldfield in 1853, and he has in his possession
this field in the shape of a digger's license,
which was taken out by him when he, like
many others who had been attracted to the
colony by the gold fever, was engaged searching
for the precious metal here. He expressed
after the lapse of some time, and to note the
marvellous change in its appearance.
FIRE AT HAPPY VALLEY.— About half-past 7
o'clock on Saturday night a fire occurred at
Happy Valley, resulting in the total destruc-
store belonging to Mrs. Elizabeth Grant. One
of her daughters, about 5 years old, was in the
moment the place was in flames. The alarm
was given, and the Long Gully and Temperance
Fire Brigades were quickly on the scene. Their
building and its contents were totally consumed.
that Mrs. Grant is a a heavy loser. She is the
widow oi the late Mr. J. Grant, who was killed
and for whom a charitable entertainment was
got up afterwards. Mrs. Grant has a family of
seven children. Much sympathy is felt for
list, which was started yesterday, met with
liberal response. We shall be pleased to re-
ceive and acknowledge subsciptions in aid of
this deserving case.
THE WEATHER.— Delightfully fine weather
was experienced yesterday. The night was
THE NEXT ENGLISH CRICKET TEAM.— Aus-
tralian cricketers (writes the London corres-
pondent of the Argus) will be interested to
learn that the team which Mr. A. E. Stoddart
will lead out to the colonies next year will
probably include Prince Ranjitainhji and Mr.
Mason.
THE ENGLISH MAIL.— The R.M.S. Orotava,
with English mails to 28th August, reached
Albany on Friday morning. The mails may be
expected in Bendigo to-morrow.
DEATH OF AN OLD SOLDIER.— On Saturday
Mr. Joseph Booth, an old and respected resi-
dent of Golden-Square, died at his place of
residence, McKenzie-street, after an illness of
was an old soldier, was 77 years of age. In
chest, from which he never thoroughly re-
covered. Deceased at one time belonged to the
13th Light Dragoons and also the Yorkshire
Yeomanry Cavalry. On his severing his con-
with a purse of sovereigns and a silver watch
bearing the following inscription — "Presented
to Joseph Booth by the non-commissioned
officers and privates and friends of the A
Troop of the 2nd, West Yorkshire Yeomanry
Cavalry, as a mark of respect. Halifax, 12th
August, 1857." On leaving the army, the de-
ceased came out to the colony and shortly after-
wards settled down on this goldfield. The
funeral will take place this afternoon, at 2
o'clock, at the Bendigo Cemetery. His wife
ARREST OF A SUSPECT.— Of late a number of
complaints have been made to the police in re-
ago Constable Moncrief noticed a young man
walking along one of the streets carrying a
suspicious looking parcel. The man seeing that
he could go. The constable followed, but was
unable to overtake the fellow, who in his flight
of vagrancy. He gave the name of James
Gourlay.
SUDDEN DEATH.— On Friday afternoon on old
Arms hotel, by Mr. Potter. The deceased,
who was a very old resident of the district, had
apparently been dead for several hours. Mr.
T. Somerville, J.P., conducted an inquiry, and
a verdict of death from natural causes was re-
LATE TRAIN.— The last train from Korong
an hour and 25 minutes late, the cause being
necessitating another engine, being obtained
from Bendigo. In consequence, the departure of
three quarters of an hour.
BROKEN WINDOW.— On Saturday evening a
couple of young girls were indulging in some
rather rough play opposite Mr. A.G. James'
boot Emporium, Golden-square, when one of
through the window of the establishment. The
damage amounted to between 10s and 15.
VAGRANCY.— Mary Gordon, better known
about town under the sobriquet of "Cranky
Mary," was arrested on Saturday evening by
Constable J. Riley. The unfortunate old
During the past week she has been wandering
about the streets without boots of hat,
ENGINEDRIVER' ASSOCIATION.— The weekly
meeting of the Bendigo branch was held at the
Trades Hail on Saturday night. Mr. Ryan
(president) occupied the chair. One nomina-
tion for membership was received. A levy of
sixpence per member was struck on account of
the death of the late member, Williams, of Eger-
ton. The meeting then closed.
THE "TRIP TO CHINATOWN" EXCURSION.—
Considerable interest has been manifested in
the special cheap excursion to Melbourne on
Wednesday, as arranged by Messrs. William
son and Musgrove, to enable residents of Ben-
digo to witness "A Trip to Chinatown." The
fares are as follow :— First-class return, 13s;
second-class return, 8s 8d. Tickets are available
on the return trip. It is announced that
tickets will be on sale at the local railway
station till 9 p.m. to-morrow (Tuesday) even-
CADET PARADE .— The monthly parade of the
held on Friday at Rochester, when there was a
muster of 140 of all ranks. The following
corps were represented :— Central State School,
Gravel Hill, Golden-square, Eaglehawk, Castle-
maine and Echuca. The battalion was marched
to the Recreation Grounds, where they were
put through the manual and firing exercises,
past, etc., by the officer commanding, Lieu-
tenant Daley. Other officers present were
Lieutenants Reed, Mcllroy, Sabeston, Taylor
OPERATIVE BAKERS' SOCIETY.— On Saturday
of forming a society. Mr. W. Kelly presided,
and there was a good attendance. It was re-
solved that the name of the society should be
the Operative Bakers' Society of Bendigo. The
election of officers resulted:— President, Mr.
W. Burrell; vice-president, Mr. J. Rasmussen ;
secretary, Mr. S. Fonlsham ; treasurer. Mr. G.
McGregor; trustees, Messrs, W. Robertson,
W. Nolan and O. McGregor. It was decided
bakers with regard to the half-holiday question.
those who had not attended the meeting, in
viting them to become members. The meeting
THE BENDIGO ADVERTISER. (PUBLISHED DAILY.) PROGRESSION, OUR RIGHTS AND OUR RESOURCES. BENDIGO, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1901, INTELLIGENCE. (Article), Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 - 1918), Friday 11 October 1901 [Issue No.14,417] page 2 2017-05-20 11:19 THI: AGHICUI.TCP.AI. Ofrr.ooK.-The con
marked effect 011 the crops and cereals" to
the north oi Bendigo. 'j lie crops between
Myers' Flat and Campbell's Fo-vst Slate
School are not too piomising. Mauv 01
them are out in car. and only about 12 inches
in height. so that it' good rain does not i'all
shortly, they wiil hardly be worth stripping.
Others again, especially"those in tin; loose .
jrauud, are a fair height, but not sufiinc-nt
y high to prove profitable if tut for j
h:<y. I hey arc also thin, owing to insuf
ficient moisture. A night's steady rain at
the present juncture would do an incalcu
lable amount of good, both to ihe crops
/ii-CTL-r:;-: pr"Mr.. 11. J. KIXG.-The Tem
perance 11 ail was again crowded to its ut
most capacity last evening, when Mr. H- J.
lectures 011 music. The subject last night ;
was "The Romantic School oi' Music." The
quenfcly, without notes of any kind, showed
how the formal school of-the classics, and
the romantic ideals of the nineteenth: cen
Beethoven, Schubert, Weber, Chopin, Schu
.was the passionate utterance of idealism
self abnegation. The lecturer's remarks
were, repeatedly greeted with applause. Miss
great brilliancy, and' was thrice recalled.
with tho great Aria, from Weber's "Frcis
chutz," which she sang'in an impassioned
manner that was repeatedly demanded. The
and the great Aria for the -1-th string by
Bacli. They proved to be most delightful
items. MiSs Abercrombio has keen artis
I11 a sonata for violin and pianoforte, Miss
Abercrombie was associated with Mr. II. J.
King, and tho result was a most refined in
terpretation of a beautiful work. Mr. King
afterwards publicly thanked Miss Abercrom
bie- for lier artistic performances, and the
house endorsed his remarks. Tlie last lec
OVERWINDING ACCIDENT.-A case of over
180 mine, -Iroubark. Bailing operations were
being carried on, when the tank was accident
ally drawn up to the top of the poppett legs.
Tho appliances' fortunately acted,"and little
or;no damage-was done: Only a short-time
CjuAUTzopoLis honoE.- The usual meeting
of thc Quartzopolis Lodge of Druids was held
last evening. Bio. W. G. Williams (Arch
Druid) presiding.Tile, district president
(Mr. J. Bloldccerus) -was appointed represen
tative of the lQdgo' on the committee to ar
range the'procession on the opening day of
the Victorian Gold Jubilee- Exhibition. Sick
pay amounting to-,£2/l:!/-t was passed- There
SocrAL.-The fourth of the sociitla in con
nection with the ;Golde:i-square .Working
Men's Club took place last, evening.. Cr.
J. II. Curnow ^ presided..'A comic duet,
"The Upper 'Teni'''by:'Messrs. Payne "and
Thomas; Twns; much 'Tiijoyed,f autt' capitally
rendered. VTli^Mife6s:''vicWg(s-:v8dng,.':-: "I
Won't I5layrin Your Yard,.''^Kijii^vcre Varraly
applauded. ' ' Mi'.' .\V.' 'Bcccliiirii aicl "Bertie
gave musical selections on, various jdbmestic
utensils in an amusing manlier.'"Master
Bolitlio and:Miss::Bolitho were: highly suc
cessful iii their recitations, and the song,
"An Englishman," by Mr. Norman, was well
received. Songs were also contributed bv
Misses Martin and A.'Campbell, and Mr.
II. Nicholas. Mr. 11. Harkness acted as
pianist. ,
DKATU IN THE HOSPITAL.-David .Smith,
PUBLIC AND Bank Hodidats.-Tlio follow
ing holidays have been gazetted:-Tuesday,
Shires of Birchip and Wyclieproof. Wed
Dunolly and Maryborough; and a public holi
The WEATHER.-Superb weather _ was ex
perienced yesterday, a warm sun being tem
pered by a refreshing southerly breeze. The
official forecast for to-day is:-At first fine
and warm, with,northerly winds; cloudy and
the westward' later'; sea, slight to rnbderlite.
jeweller, were:-Barometer^);rf-.m:, 29.95;
noon, '29.74; :3'p:in., 29.51; 6 p.m., 29.47.
Thermometer-9 a.m.j 55; noon; 67^ 3. p.m.,
76; 6 p;m., 70.- :
- PiTzGSEATrD's-CrECirs".-Last evening Fit?.-'
gerald Bros.' Circus completed a very succfss-^
ful season in Bendigo. Each night of-the'
performance the spacious tents were crowded.'
STATE SCHOOL VACANCIES.--The following!
State school vacancies are gazetted:-Head;
teacher, school No. 1473, Drummartiil;;
head teacher No. 3351, We'dderburn Jimc-i
jtion.; school J No/ 119; Castlemaine, - 8thi
class, assistant female teacher; schoot No.j
120,' Campbell's' Forest, 8tli class, assistant.'
female teacher. ' : . . \"7 j !' f A " '
. _ ^.Accident . WHILE ;BinbsxESTiNO.-Yes'ter-j
day a lad named Coleman, 11 years of : age,
son of Mr. Coleman, blacksmith, of Tandara,'
met with a painful accident while birdnest
on suddenly broke off, and lie foil, breaking
Ins right arm near the wrist.. The sufferer
was brought to Eagleliawk by the afternoon
train, where the limb, was set by Dr. H. O.
Cornell.; The doctor also discovered that
back, 'i - . : . ? :
Tho attention of members of the
Sandhurst branch A.N.A. is. drawn to the
a medical officer, aiid mejnbers desiring to
be placed on his list must notify tho secre
KEUTER'S TELF.GKAM COIIPANY.-The direc
have declared the.usual interim dividend for
SUSPECTED CHARACTERS.-Detectives Wil
THE AGRICULTURAL OUTLOOK.— The con-
marked effect on the crops and cereals to
the north of Bendigo. The crops between
Myers' Flat and Campbell's Forest State
School are not too promising. Many of
them are out in ear and only about 12 inches
in height, so that it good rain does not fall
shortly, they will hardly be worth stripping.
Others again, especially those in the loose
ground, are a fair height, but not sufficient-
ly high to prove profitable if cut for
hay. They are also thin, owing to insuf-
ficient moisture. A night's steady rain at
the present juncture would do an incalcu-
lable amount of good, both to the crops
LECTURE BY MR. H.J. KING.— The Tem-
perance Hall was again crowded to its ut-
most capacity last evening, when Mr. H. J.
lectures on music. The subject last night
was "The Romantic School of Music." The
speaker, who discoursed fluently and elo-
quently, without notes of any kind, showed
how the formal school of the classics, and
the romantic ideals of the nineteenth cen-
Beethoven, Schubert, Weber, Chopin, Schu-
was the passionate utterance of idealism
self abnegation. The lecturer's remarks
were repeatedly greeted with applause. Miss
great brilliancy, and was thrice recalled.
with the great Aria, from Weber's "Freis-
chutz," which she sang in an impassioned
manner that was repeatedly demanded. The
and the great Aria for the 14th string by
Bach. T hey proved to be most delightful
items. Miss Abercrombie has keen artis-
In a sonata for violin and pianoforte, Miss
Abercrombie was associated with Mr. H. J.
King, and the result was a most refined in-
terpretation of a beautiful work. Mr. King
afterwards publicly thanked Miss Abercrom-
bie for her artistic performances, and the
house endorsed his remarks. The last lec-
OVERWINDING ACCIDENT. — A case of over-
180 mine, Ironbark. Bailing operations were
being carried on, when the tank was accident-
ally drawn up to the top of the poppett legs.
The appliances fortunately acted, and little
or no damage was done. Only a short-time
QUARTOPOLIS LODGE.— The usual meeting
of the Quartzopolis Lodge of Druids was held
last evening. Bro. W. G. Williams (Arch
Druid) presiding. The district president
(Mr. J. Blokkeeerus) was appointed represen-
tative of the lodge on the committee to ar-
range the procession on the opening day of
the Victorian Gold Jubilee Exhibition. Sick
pay amounting to £2/13/4 was passed. There
SOCIAL.— The fourth of the socials in con-
nection with the Golden-square Working
Men's Club took place last, evening. Cr.
J. H. Curnow presided. A comic duet,
"The Upper 'Ten'' by Messrs. Payne and
Thomas, was much enjoyed, and capitially
rendered. The Misses George sang, "I
Won't Play in Your Yard," and were warmly
applauded. Mr. W. Beecham and Bertie
gave musical selections on, various domestic
utensils in an amusing manner. Master
Bolitlio and Miss Bolitho were highly suc-
cessful in their recitations, and the song,
"An Englishman," by Mr. Norman, was well
received. Songs were also contributed by
Misses Martin and A.Campbell, and Mr.
H. Nicholas. Mr. R. Harkness acted as
pianist.
DEATH IN THE HOSPITAL.— David Smith,
PUBLIC AND BANK HOLIDAYS.— The follow-
ing holidays have been gazetted: — Tuesday,
Shires of Birchip and Wycheproof. Wed-
Dunolly and Maryborough; and a public holi-
THE WEATHER.— Superb weather was ex-
perienced yesterday a warm sun being tem-
pered by a refreshing southerly breeze. The
official forecast for to-day is:— At first fine
and warm, with northerly winds; cloudy and
the westward later; sea, slight to moderate.
jeweller, were:— Barometer — 29.95;
noon, 29.74; 3 p.m., 29.54; 6 p.m., 29.47.
Thermometer — 9 a.m. 55; noon; 67; 3. p.m.,
76; 6 p;m., 70.
FITZFERALD'S CIRCUS.— Last evening Fitz-
gerald Bros,' Circus completed a very success-
ful season in Bendigo. Each night of the
performance the spacious tents were crowded.
STATE SCHOOL VACANCIES.— The following
State school vacancies are gazetted:— Head
teacher, school No. 1473, Drummartin;
head teacher No. 3351, Wedderburn Junc-
tion; school No. 119; Castlemaine, 8th
class, assistant female teacher; school No.
120, Campbell's' Forest, 8th class, assistant.
female teacher.
ACCIDENT WHILE BIRDNESTING.— Yester-
day a lad named Coleman, 11 years o age,
son of Mr. Coleman, blacksmith, of Tandara,
met with a painful accident while birdnest-
on suddenly broke off, and he fell, breaking
his right arm near the wrist. The sufferer
was brought to Eaglhawk by the afternoon
train, where the limb was set by Dr. H. O.
Comen. The doctor also discovered that
back.
The attention of members of the
Sandhurst branch A.N.A. is drawn to the
a medical officer, and members desiring to
be placed on his list must notify the secre-
REUTER'S TELEGRAM COMPANY.— The direc-
have declared the usual interim dividend for
SUSPECTED CHARACTERS.—Detectives Wil
THE BENDIGO ADVERTISER. (PUBLISHED DAILY.) PROGRESSION, OUR RIGHTS AND OUR RESOURCES. BENDIGO, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1901, INTELLIGENCE. (Article), Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 - 1918), Friday 11 October 1901 [Issue No.14,417] page 2 2017-05-20 10:20 ICOMMO^WEALTJI ' PAijl.tAMEXTl-'Tlie .blip-'"
ply: Bill was circulated in the Iipuse :of He-,
preventatives ? last night, .the schedule .".pro
viding for a total of ,£928,322 up to the end
was occupied the whole of yesterday with the.
second reading of the Kanaka Blil, tlie long,!
wearisome discussion lasting from :i o'clock!
in the afternoon until past 11 o'clock. The
sprak, most of them repeating the same facts
and figures. At 10 o'clock Mr. Groom, ros;.
with, a.11 enormous written speech, and pin
ereiied to read it to about a dozen members,
inflicting needless suffering 011 them, which
lis might have o'oviahd by handing over the
mani-.-jeript to the "iiansard" staff. Tiie
.Senate finally finished with the House of,Re
presentatives' amendment 011 the Post and
with the .Public .Service Bill, adjourned at
o'clock-.
THE Clarknce Miners' CASE:-Mr. J. Be
gan referred at the Minors'. Association
meeting last evening to tlie fact that the
Enginedrivers' Association , had held it'i
hand in regard to according a vote of th:n:ks
it> Mr. 11. II. Williams, M.L.A., for his action
in bringing the matter of the searching JC
miners at the Clarence mine.before the Stace
Parliament in order.that the Miners''Asso
ciation might-first, move in tho matter. He
moved that the secretary of. the Bendigo
branch lie instructed to convey to Mr. II; ji..
Williams the sincere thanks ol' the branch
for bringing the: Clarence miners' case be
fore the State Parliament. . Mr. W. Smith
seconded: the motion, which was supported
by Mr. E. EL : Laity . .(viecrpresident) and
agreed to. : . ,
WARNING to ' MINEKS:-A communication
froni the. secretary o£ -the Kalgdorlie and
Boulder No.. 1 branch A.M.A. was read at the
those goidfields in search of employment.
'"The labor market here is thoroughly glut
ted," the letter continued; ''hundreds of men
aro daily walking about the mines unable to
procure work of. any kind. The evil of this
state of affairs is-already being made appar
to reduce wages. Tliis is being done in such
an insidious.Planner- that -.the majority of
men do not'realise it. Men aro being placed
of .10/ per week on; ordinary rates. : Every
new man who is sent on the machine is con
sidered a leafner,-irrespective of what past
experience -he may- have .had at the work, go
tlfafc' eventually we shall" have all learners.
will do ail possible to warn miners against
...DEATH OF.MB. PETER Pixel I.E.-Another
old resident of Bendigo, Mr.' Peter Fizelle,
the well-known cab proprietor and under
taker, died at- his residence, -Bridge-street,
tho age of (51 years/ after an illness extending
over about three months. The deceased
gentleman was a native of Limerick, Ireland,
and came to Bendigo about 41 years ago. On
a.rrival here ho.engaged in alluvial mining,
and some years later I10 entered into business
as a cab proprietor, with which lie also com
bined the'business of undertaking in con
junction .with Mr. Mulqucen. Tlie deceased
Mrs. Fizcllo having died some six years ago.
He was a ^prominent member of the
II.A.C.B.S:, and also of the Oddfellows'
Lodge. . Tho funeral will take place to-mor
row, tho place of interment being the White
Hi lb Cemetery.
Gold'BUYEHS BILL.-A copy of the Gold
Buyers Licensing'Bill was laid 011 the table
at tho fortnightly meeting of the committee
of tho Bendigo branch A.M.A. last evening.
bo deferred for a fortnight, remarking that
, members of the committee: had had 110 chance
of perusing the bill. He noticed that one
through tho clauses of the bill, and forward
ed to'tlie Minister of Mines certain altera
tions that it desired should be made. Mr.
,T. lU'Efan seconded the motion, which was
SENSATIONAL YEHICCLAU ACCIDENT.-A
somewhat sensational vehicular accident hap
pened oil the Mount Ivorong road, yesterday.
Hill, near Danalicr's hotel, the backhand of
the harness broke. Tlip horse at. once be- .
Tfiir at a furious race, with the result that
tlvg UK.bole." of the occupants were thrown out.
The-brother ._of. ,tlie_driver_ ree.eived_.some _se
vero cuts and bruises, and was rendered par
sustained >aliglit injuries to the back. The
ladyrwas somewhat prostrated by shock, but
tlio infant, who is only a month old, was
quite uninjured. After some time the party
. was able to. .return home.. The names of,
the occupants; of the vehicles were not as-j
certained at the time of the accident. The]
-runaway.horse .was.secured before it had gone
; auy<;great distance. , j
; 'OLD,GIIABGE REVIVED.-A miner named!
Hdwards'Richards. was arrested in Melbourne;
on-Wcdncsday by Detectives Dalton and Tog-j
of stealing a ;w-atch :ai^d chain-from James.
Howitt, at Sendigo^ on, ilth. July,-1900. : Tlipi
,ivatoli ;«'ijs.- s_tolpn:;iu: the :informant'a;.iiotei,
and the accused and another man .were
?chasgediwitk:jtlic:offeiico'and'acquitted;'-as It
.was believed'that .the affair <was the- outcome!
of a. drunken frolic... The CJrowirstibseqtiently!
filed another' presentment4' against Richards,'
who disappeared; from Victoria, 'and :did4 not'
return tilt Wednesday., '
A ESCAPE.-A' narrow escaj3& from;
a serious accident .wi3; .witnessed just opno-i
.site the'.White llorse jiotel, Califpriiiii- Gnliy,:
shortly after 8 o'clock last oveni-ntf. ; - ,\Ir.'
,A.. Johnson, .of - Eaywbod,--:\vas retSrhin»: t'o:
his home from the - Bendigo -Shottv'in- com-4
.pany: with two-gentlemen'friends;'and when
they had reached-t-ho- spot- indicated;: tlie'
.horse took fright at/ari. approaching tram .
and turned; sharply on to" the4 tram linc'j
throwing4 one of -the1 -occupants on to the'
?rails,-where oiio of-,the" wheels .of the bun-try
passed over him. , . Driver Harris, who was
in charge' of- the motor/'immediately ^-re
versed las-engine, and applied the . brakes,
aim brought the motor to a standstill within:
a few inches of; the niauvlying on. the around.
Tho hind wheel "of* the. vthicie'-wa'3 . oil the1
outer rail, -and the motor just "touched it.
for the promptitude of Driver' Harris, a
very serious accident must have happened1
.The man was. merely bruised through' tlie
_ A lioTEr, "fiARBii;;"-'The licensee of- the
Law- Courts hotel observed -at closing time
on Wednesday a big, portlj'-Iooking stran gCL'
.descending tlre-.stiuvs: of the hotel somewhat:
.li.urn.6dly.. On closer inspection,: it ap
peared that the man was somewhat peculiar-:
ly dressed. ? Mr. Conolan was curious enough'
to make an examination, and found that'the
stranger was wearing two pairs'of trousers,
a couple of sac coats, a' Chesterfield, and a
mackintosh. When some of these garments
were removed,' it whs found4 that 'ilie.'indi
vidual -belied his appearance, and was, .after
all, only., a slightly-built man.. He. admitted
that he had4 taken the clothes out- of a- bed
room, and had left his own shabby-coat lying
on-tho bed. . He requested Mr. Couolan to
/'hammer him;" but not-to-give him-. in
charge. Joseph Montgomery, for such his;
.name is, ,wa3 charged in4 the City Court:yes-:
tordav morning, on two counts, with the'
theft of the article's nanied, which, it' rip-'
paaretl,' belonged to two G'eelong residents
who were visiting, the show. 4 Accused, who
appeared to .be -a -somewhat- cccentric indi
did not care what they, did with'him; they
could hang him if tliev liked; he was not'
only guilty, but "too guilty." "I am a hard
working man,-' he said, showing the palm of
a-horny hand. "I have nothing to say at:
all." He was sentenced to one month's im-'
prissnmcnt on each charge, the bench stat
ing that' the S"ntence would have been
AET GALLERY.-This popular resort has
visitors expressing the opinion that the col
lection of pictures is worth coni-inn- a Ion"
way to see. ° "
MOTKI. ROWDYISM.-Throe vonng men,
named Walter Gardner, Richard 'WcDrnc.
and John Grant, were charged at tlie City
of glass, of the value of £2/81, the prooertv'
of Elizabeth Jane Truseott. licensee of' rV
"Fileshire Arms hotel. Iroiibark. The evi
.jden.fce. of .-informant was to the effect that4
ybotVt4-2 o'clock on the morning of Saturday,
thQ'-ith September,, she was awakejied by a
noise in the yard,; and 'looking; out of the
window, saw ;the: three, defendants kickin".
tins about the yard. They then asked to
-b'9 ^admitted; threatening t«j- break the win
dows if ;they -were. not..-'Immediately after-'
wards threp pnn.es of glass were.siunilfuueo,,.,.
ly broken. Constable Rosenbrook stated
tfcat: AVoarno, -when questioned.. bv witness,:
? -admitted- that tlie accused broke "the win
dows. ' Mr. Kirl.y, for the defence, stated
- that-the ec-nsiable's evidence would be von
-tradicted.. ..Ho called Walter Gardner, who
' emphbtmdly- denied' that he- was- near the
"Ji.7tel.at the time in question, or was in cum
?puny-'with the other two accused. John
Grant, also denied that .he vets at the hotel
after midnight on the date specified. Richard
;\ycar«e-, stated^ -that he was present when
Mrs.. Tiu?cott interviewed her brother about
the.-incident, and she stated that she could
-ivit .see the'men who broke the windows, but
knew witness by. his voice.. He never ad
mitted to tho constable that the accused duul
broken the windows. Rhoda Weuriie stated
that her son was m bed at midnight-on the
night in question. Richard Collins stated
that he wis in Gardner's company until 1
COMMONWEALTH PARLIAMENT.— The Sup-
ply Bill was circulated in the House of Re-
presentatives last night, the shedule pro-
viding for a total of £928,322 up to the end
was occupied the whole of yesterday with the
second reading of the Kanaka Bill, the long,
wearisome discussion lasting from 3 o'clock
in the afternoon until past 11 o'clock. The
speak, most of them repeating the same facts
and figures. At 10 o'clock Mr. Groom, rose
with an enormous written speech, and pro-
ceeded to read it to about a dozen members,
inflicting needless suffering on them, which
he might have obviated by handing over the
manuscript to the "Hansard staff. The
Senate finally finished with the House of Re-
presentatives' amendment on the Post and
with the Public Service Bill, adjourned at
o'clock.
THE CLARENCE MINERS' CASE.— Mr. J. Re-
gan referred at the Miners' Association
meeting last evening to the fact that the
Enginedrivers' Association, had held its
hand in regard to according a vote of thanks
to Mr. H.R. Williams, M.L.A., for his action
in bringing the matter of the searching of
miners at the Clarence mine before the State
Parliament in order that the Miners' Asso-
ciation might first, move in the matter. He
moved that the secretary of the Bendigo
branch be instructed to convey to Mr. H. R.
Williams the sincere thanks of the branch
for bringing the Clarence miners' case be-
fore the State Parliament. Mr. W. Smith
seconded the motion, which was supported
by Mr. E.H. Laity (vice president) and
agreed to.
WARNING TO MINERS' — A communication
from the secretary of the Kalgoorlie and
Boulder No. 1 branch A.M.A. was read at the
those goldfields in search of employment.
'"The labor market here is thoroughly glut-
ted," the letter continued; ''hundreds of men
are daily walking about the mines unable to
procure work of any kind. The evil of this
state of affairs is already being made appar-
to reduce wages. This is being done in such
an insidious manner that the majority of
men do not realise it. Men are being placed
of 10/ per week on ordinary rates. Every
new man who is sent on the machine is con-
sidered a learner, irrespective of what past
experience he may have had at the work, so
that eventually we shall have all learners.
will do all possible to warn miners against
DRATH OF MR. PETER FIZELLE.— Another
old resident of Bendigo, Mr. Peter Fizelle,
the well-known cab proprietor and under-
taker, died at his residence, Bridge-street,
the age of 61 years after an illness extending
over about three months. The deceased
gentleman was a native of Limerick, Ireland,
and came to Bendigo about 41 years ago. On
arrival here he engaged in alluvial mining,
and some years later he entered into business
as a cab proprietor, with which he also com-
bined the business of undertaking in con-
junction with Mr. Mulqueen. The deceased
Mrs. Fizelle having died some six years ago.
He was a prominent member of the
H.A.C.B.S., and also of the Oddfellows'
Lodge. The funeral will take place to-mor-
row, the place of interment being the White
Hills Cemetery.
GOLD BUYERS BILL.— A copy of the Gold
Buyers Licensing Bill was laid on the table
at the fortnightly meeting of the committee
of the Bendigo branch A.M.A. last evening.
be deferred for a fortnight, remarking that
members of the committee had had no chance
of perusing the bill. He noticed that one
through the clauses of the bill, and forward-
ed to the Minister of Mines certain altera-
tions that it desired should be made. Mr.
J. Regan seconded the motion, which was
SENSATIONAL VEHICULAR ACCIDENT.— A
somewhat sensational vehicular accident hap-
pened oil the Mount Korong road, yesterday.
Hill, near Danaher's hotel, the backband of
the harness broke. The horse at once be-
hill at a furious race, with the result that
the whole of the occupants were thrown out.
The brother of the driver received some se-
vere cuts and bruises, and was rendered par-
sustained slight injuries to the back. The
lady was somewhat prostrated by shock, but
the infant, who is only a month old, was
quite uninjured. After some time the party
was able to return home. The names of
the occupants of the vehicles were not as-
certained at the time of the accident. The
runaway horse was secured before it had gone
any great distance.
AN OLD CHARGE REVIDED.— A miner named
Edwards Richards was arrested in Melbourne
on Wednesday by Detectives Dalton and Tog-
of stealing a watch and chain from James
Howitt, at Bendigo, on 11th July, 1900. The
watch was stolen in the informant's hotel,
and the accused and another man were
charged with the offence and acquitted, as it
was believed that the affair was the outcome
of a drunken frolic. The Crown subsequently
filed another presentment against Richards,
who disappeared from Victoria, and did not
return till Wednesday.
A NARROW ESCAPE.— A narrow escape from
a serious accident was witnessed just oppo-
site the White Horse Hotel, California Gully,
shortly after 8 o'clock last evening. Mr.
A. Johnson, of Raywood, was returning to
his home from the Bendigo Show, in com-
pany with two gentlemen friends, and when
they had reached the spot indicated, the
horse took fright at an approaching tram
and turned sharply on to the tram line,
throwing one of the occupants on the
rails, where one of the wheels of the buggy
passed over him. Driver Harris, who was
in charge of the motor, immediately re-
versed his engine, and applied the brakes,
and brought the motor to a standstill within
a few inches of the man lying on the ground.
The hind wheel of the vehicle was on the
outer rail, and the motor just touched it.
But for the promptitude of Driver Harris, a
very serious accident must have happened.
The man was merely brused through the
A HOTEL "BARBER." — The licensee of the
Law Courts hotel observed at closing time
on Wednesday a big, portly-looking stranger
decending the stairs of the hotel somewhat
hurriedly. On closer inspection, it ap-
peared that the man was somewhat peculiar-
ly dressed. Mr. Conolan was curious enough
to make an examination, and found that the
stranger was wearing two pairs of trousers,
a couple of sac coats, a Chesterfield, and a
mackintosh. When some of these garments
were removed, it was found that the indi-
vidual belied his appearance, and was after
all, only a slightly-built man. He admitted
that he had taken the clothes out of a bed-
room, and had left his own shabby coat lying
on the bed. He requested Mr. Conolan to
"hammer him," but not to give him in
charge. Joseph Montgomery, for such his
name is, was charged in the City Court yes-
terday morning, on two counts, with the
theft of the articles named, which, it ap-
peared, belonged to two Geelong residents
who were visiting the show. Accused, who
appeared to be a somewhat eccentric indi-
did not care what they did with him; they
could hang him if they liked; he was not
only guilty, but "too guilty." "I am a hard
working man," he said, showing the palm of
a horny hand. "I have nothing to say at
all." He was sentenced to one month's im-
prisonment on each charge, the bench stat-
ing that the sentence would have been
ART GALLERY.— This popular resort has
visitors expressing the opinion that the col-
lection of pictures is worth coming a long
way to see.
HOTEL ROWDYISM.— Three young men,
named Walter Gardner, Richard Wearne,
and John Grant, were charged at the City
of glass, of the value of £2/8/1, the property
of Elizabeth Jane Truscott, licensee of the
Fifeshire Arms hotel, Ironbark. The evi-
about 2 o'clock on the morning of Saturday,
the 4th September, she was awakened by a
noise in the yard, and looking out of the
window, saw the three defendants kicking
tins about the yard. They then asked to
be admitted, threatening to break the win-
dows if they were not. Immediately after-
wards three pane of glass were simulttaneous-
ly broken. Constable Rosenbrook stated
that Wearne, when qestioned by witness
admitted that the accused broke the win-
dows. Mr. Kirby, for the defence, stated
that the constable's evidence would be con-
tadicted. He called Walter Gardner, who
emphatically denied that he was near the
hotel at the time in question, or was in com-
pany with the other two accused. John
Grant, also denied that he was at the hotel
after midnight on the date specified. Richard
Warne, stated that he was present when
Mrs. Truscott interviewed her brother about
the incident, and she stated that she could
not see the men who broke the windows, but
knew witness by his voice. He never ad-
mitted to the constable that the accused had
broken the windows. Rhoda Wearne stated
that her son was in bed at midnight on the
night in question. Richard Collins stated
that he was in Gardner's company until 1
THE BENDIGO ADVERTISER. (PUBLISHED DAILY.) PROGRESSION, OUR RIGHTS AND OUR RESOURCES. BENDIGO, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1901, INTELLIGENCE. (Article), Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 - 1918), Friday 11 October 1901 [Issue No.14,417] page 2 2017-05-20 08:39 {PFBtlSHSD BAILY.)
rnocitEssiON", ocn EIGHTS and OUR eesotlrces.
JiE.YDifW. FBI DA OCTOBER 11, 19C-1,
Competition is spreading among the na
tions. It will .soon bo as keen as between
rival stores in the same street. And there
<? ;n he no pooling, no agreement as to prices
and qualities and quantities. That is im
Tho. weakest will go to the wall. There is
only one salvation, some sav, and that is
education. We are inclined to agree with
them.' But much depends on what is
meant by education. Some nations have
natural advantages that others have not-.
as America, .with its immense fields of
coal and iron-its innumerable- openings;
for' enterprise' of all kinds. ''But history;
.doos not say that such .advantages have
been made the most of generally. . Rather
tho opposite. A big ' diScmmt risj to be
made-from America's advantages. There
persistent, insistent, continued, and in
telligence and honesty. These have in
times past prevailed over natural advan
tages, and will likely do so again. Which of
theso three should rank first is disputed
by some. We have no doubts about the.
question. It is honesty-doing the best
one can-and honesty will grow in an indi
advantage. Yet it may he helped by
healthy living. Intelligence is like it. It
is largely a natural gift, yot- it may be
sharpened and strengthened. And it is
this sharpening and strengthening of lads'
It may -be done by the much despised
classics, by the dreary .mathematics, just
as well as by science or literature. Or by
each of these a lad's intelligences may bo
benumbed and sent, asleep. Some, men
had every advantage of scholastic train
Hooker. But many had no advantage what
ever. Metcalf, the . roadmaknr, was blind
from sis years of age; Brindley, the engi
neer, to the end of his life, could writo only
with difficulty. .Sir H. Davy was tho son
of ? a wood-e'arver. :Arkwrighit' was' a' -ha'r
ber till thirty, years of age. Edison was a
newspaper boy. The lives of such men
should be on every lad's shelf. 'They .say
plainly what should bo aimed at. It is a
strengthening of it to grasp. It is not book
leaning in any shape or form. It is not
manual training-this may well come later
on. Somo men arc unlinndy, and ever,;will
bo unhandy. They may be improved. Tho
through the intellect:
Manual training may be so used, aiul
should be so usod for the training of the
head. Some lads, many indeed, will be
. benofite'd more by "such than by any other
training.' But hand training of lads should
always keep the head in view. Whatever
tho training may be, it is tho head that is
io be developed. Facts arc valtiablc. A widtS
lniowledge of faets plays into the liands
of an able man. But more valuable aro
"the power to attend to one's work, and tho
on that work. And those may bo acquired
more or less: Not everyone can become a
! really good workman. That is 110 more
good musician. There is an average at
tainment. Some riso above it, somo fall
below it. ? A nation in the midst of com
It- will do this by looking veil after the
weaker and the stronger. In actual work
the' abilities of an artisan' may Tje grouped
Tinder three head'sT"He"Sceds" quiclmessTto"
see what is intended. New tools,, new., wart;
should be quickly " comprehended. - Tha
standing) by to tfell tvhat- t<S' do' next. Man;'
men need specific, clear, pointed instruc
tions at every move in a job. They are
like lads that have'never seen -wbrki never
stand by usoless. Do the next"-iMngr
says the old saw. But! men1 have'.first' to,'
seo the next thing. To .have this readiness,
they need a head clear and quick." They
should be. independent of orders. Tommyi
s4y?-i Buti'tJift: Boer; Vs'p* t-ho!
point that independent^ action is desirable.j
:AlljHvoVkTgiyos-Ji'ho;s!iiiie Ilesscftv " Pfoiifptl-i
"itide" idlps'^t1 every 4uJn;;iu'',lifei; [
;c-A-.-gqcoud,nepd,:is the, qbiliby'Ap*:make-jthej
best/bathings; .Tools' Are; convenient.<>And;
'nilfeg iiro useful' guide's. 1' Bub. '';'wprk' ha3l
,ofl;enr;t6Tberd&i«7withymperfect:J:oors,'jand';
?with .lit*guidance from -ruleS.; .'.?Men have,j
oftea.-t^boJike Robinsoiv.Crusoe,. wlio' lirul|
itti.'m&ko a^sawihndakune: qut of I ail . eld Jjit ;
of hoop-iroii; The 'liimdiuoss of'! the colo-|
nial Soldier 'is-"'all"in^stet'feioa.1-:He';couldi
.jimkevJhiiieelf faiHy, ? cpmfortablo r cm. - the!
. veldtf , when 'others' J who' - haH bo'en alfenys;
'tlXon^ifc^jfof/^lot^a %)i^selvey/vsjranded-.j
It,r|iir aUvaluable, ^c'complisluneiit,-; aiid . rcn
idtirs, one; free- aiuh easy in theunost trying:
circumstances. He. \vill . get through' soine-!
"lVowl ' Kouthie is good^ancl '{ill the- means;
? for-plodding-along. 'in: t)id nt6 ^'are to be;
prized jbut . the -rut' ceases, . the helps - fail,;
'and the man ha$,$Q rely-up'oii himself. Toll-:
. mg < examples /dre'-:;tb,' be -'found1'in every
s.treqti Money-,daii..{16' .many-things, .but
baiuliness can do more..,: Mill's .homes,: as;
well-as their-usual work,-show it.- The:
tlijrd ppint-iS-lidap^ab.ility; 1 Spochl train
ing is'.'.exeelleut. , : ,Ak oculist . or: aurist is
prbbablyrbette'rr1tt"his'snbject than the! or
dinary practitioner,I,\'iill£ tc.'get. iiis ability:
lie ..had first. toi golthrojigh the common
wide" training. ' Wlien' i speaking of a na
tion's workers, .ther \vJclfcH' 'of their training,
.or. nvther its; ; narrowness,- Is -sometimes
overlooked. They are taught one line of
:w;6rk; they are not taught all-about it.
.Thoy -are unable to adapt- themselves - to
circumstances. They cannot" drop. " their
work -and-'take up;another with .readiness
and- clearness.: ? It- is"rwell" to': ? hove the
special training to^kiiow^'one : li'rie of a
business.."' But ifc' .'is :,ii'ot'"v/dll to bo . con
fined to ifc. "' A: thorough traiiiiiig in bne.
kind of labor -will enable 'that worker I to'
jiidgo ether' works, to; see' the 'condition;-:,
"aiid the difficulties, and to gauge the com
pleteness or incompleteness of it.
mako his living may be too narrow to give
breadth' of vidw arid grasp of SehalL ft is
upon. He is a specialist with 110 field 01*
and to apply old principles to new condi
liens gives a man power over himself and
hit! tools. It is what is aimed at by know
thing of something. The-limitation of one's
attention and faculties ' to . a particular
groove' furthers that work, but hinders na
tional advance. Conditions- are con
stantly- - changing.- - --Manufacturers and
. wbrkmea miist bo-alive and *. Well/'trained,.
and thus they will adapt, themselves W,
events as they come.. 'Tlie " quality and'
quantity of intellect; iii a' ladfjis'probably,
as v.e have said, a natural endowment."
Rut the lad that wishes to1-eiijov it,' kiid '
the nation- that-' wishes 'fche!usc':of it, -should,
in youth make the best of it.' "So then,!'!
s.iul Dr. John Brown,. :'.cu!tiv4ite. obs'erva-:
(ion, energy, handicraft,' . ingenuity; "in'
boys, so as to give"tlieiii a pursuit as Well"
as a study. Look after tlie " blaclo, and!
don't coaiibr. .crUsh-the ue;ir out too soohj
ear is not due till the harvest, when the
great school breaks up, and we must- all.
dismiss and go our several . ways." ',: .- ''
(PUBLISHED DAILY.)
PROGRESSION, OUR RIGHTS AND OUR RESOURCES.
BENDIGO, FRIDAY, OCTOBER, 11, 1901.
Competition is spreading among the na-
tions. It will soon be as keen as between
rival stores in the same street. And there
can be no pooling, no agreement as to prices
and qualities and quantities. That is im-
The weakest will go to the wall. There is
only one salvation, some say, and that is
education. We are inclined to agree with
them. But much depends on what is
meant by education Some nations have
natural advantages that others have not —
as America, with its immense fields of
coal and iron — its innumerable openings
for enterprise of all kinds. But history
does not say that such advantages have
been made the most of generally. Rather
the opposite. A big discount is to be
made from America's advantages. There
persistent, insistent, continued, and in-
telligence and honesty. These have in
times past prevailed over natural advan-
tages, and will likely do so again. Which of
these three should rank first is disputed
by some. We have no doubts about the
question. It is honesty doing the best
one can and honesty will grow in an indi-
advantage. Yet it may he helped by
healthy living. Intelligence is like it. It
is largely a natural gift, yet it may be
sharpened and strengthened. And it is
this sharpening and strengthening of lads
It may be done by the much despised
classics, by the dreary mathematics, just
as well as by science or literature. Or by
each of these a lad's intelligence may be
benumbed and sent asleep. Some, men
had every advantage of scholastic train-
Hooker. But many had no advantage what
ever Metcalf, the roadmaker, was blind
from six years of age; Brindley, the engi-
neer, to the end of his life, could write only
with difficulty. Sir H. Davy was the son
of a wood-carver. Arkwrighit was a bar-
ber till thirty, years of age. Edison was a
newspaper boy. The lives of such men
should be on every lad's shelf. They say
plainly what should be aimed at. It is a
strengthening of it to grasp. It is not book
leaning in any shape or form. It is not
manual training — this may well come later
on. Some men are unhandy, and ever will
be unhandy. They may be improved. The
through the intellect.
Manual training may be so used, and
should be so used for the training of the
head. Some lads, many indeed, will be
benefited more by such than by any other
training. But hand training of lads should
always keep the head in view. Whatever
the training may be, it is the head that is
to be developed. Facts arc valuable. A wide
kniowledge of facts plays into the hands
of an able man. But more valuable are
the power to attend to one's work, and the
on that work. And those may be acquired
more or less. Not everyone can become a
really good workman. That is no more
good musician. There is an average at-
tainment. Some rise above it, some fall
below it. A nation in the midst of com-
It will do this by looking veil after the
weaker and the stronger. In actual work
the abilities of an artisan may be grouped
under three heads. He needs quickness to
see what is intended. New tools, new work
should be quickly comprehended. The
standing by to tell what to do next. Many
men need specific, clear, pointed instruc-
tions at every move in a job. They are
like lads that have never seen work, never
stand by useless. Do the next thing
says the old saw. But men have first to
see the next thing. To have this readiness,
they need a head clear and quick. They
should be independent of orders. Tommy
Atkins makes a splendid machine, critics
say. But the Boer war has emphasised the
point that independent action is desirable.
All work gives the same lesson. Propti-
tude helps at every turn in life.
A second need is the ability to make the
best of things. Tools are convenient. And
rules are useful guides. But work has
often to be done with the imperfect tools, and
with no guidance from rules. Men have
often to be like Robinson Crusoe, who had
to make a saw and a knife out of an old bit
of hoop-iron. The handiness of the col-
onial soldier is an illustration. He could
make himself fairly comfortable on the
veldt when others, who had been always
thought for found themselves stranded.
It is a valuable accomplishment, and ren-
ders, one free and easy in the most trying
circumstances. He will get through some-
how. Routine is good and all the means
for plodding along in the rut are to be
prized; but the rut ceases, the helps fail,
and the man has to rely upon hmself. Tell-
ing examples are to be found in every
street. Money can do many things but
handiness can do more. Men's homes as
well as their usual work, show it. The
third point is adaptability. Special train-
ining is excellent. An ocultist or aurist is
probably better at his subject than the or-
dinary practitioner. But to get his ability
he had first to go through the common
wide training. When speaking of a na-
tion's workers, the width of their training,
or rather its narrowness, is sometimes
overlooked. They are taught one line of
work, they are not taught all about it.
They are unable to adapt themselves to
circumstances. They cannot drop their
work and take up another with readiness
and clearness. It is well to have the
special training to know one line of a
business.. But it is not well to be con-
fined to it. A thorough training in one
kind of labor will enable that worker to
judge other works, to see the conditions,
and difficulties, and to gauge the com-
pletness or incompleteness of it.
make his living may be too narrow to give
breadth of view arid grasp of detail. It is
upon. He is a specialist with no field of
and to apply old principles to new condi-
tions gives a man power over himself and
his tools. It is what is aimed at by know
thing of something. The limitation of one's
attention and faculties to a particular
groove furthers that work, but hinders na-
tional advance. Conditions are con-
stantly changing. Manufacturers and
workmen must be alive and well trained,
and thus they will adapt themselves to
events as they come. The quality and
quantity of intellect in a lad is probably
as we have said, a natural endowment.
But the lad that wishes to enjoy it, and
the nation that wishes the use of it, should
in youth make the best of it. "So then,"
said Dr. John Brown, "cultivate observation,
energy, handicraft, ingenuity, in
boys, so as to give them a pursuit as well
as a study. Look after the blade, and
don't coax or crush the car out too soon
car is not due till the harvest, when the
great school breaks up, and we must all
dismiss and go our several ways."

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.