Information about Trove user: peter-macinnis

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

RankCorrectorLines corrected
1 JohnWarren 2,512,145
2 annmanley 1,833,444
3 NeilHamilton 1,510,058
4 John.F.Hall 1,273,837
5 maurielyn 1,188,060
...
26 arundel 516,002
27 Scottishlass 515,870
28 tbfrank 471,013
29 peter-macinnis 462,572
30 cmt17 455,155
31 IDM49 439,659

462,572 lines corrected.

Corrections by month

April 2014 18,061
March 2014 21,127
February 2014 22,103
January 2014 10,627
December 2013 26,128
November 2013 1,934
October 2013 1,619
September 2013 1,744
August 2013 1,684
June 2013 5,013
May 2013 15,746
April 2013 14,168
March 2013 20,421
February 2013 30,105
January 2013 9,339
December 2012 737
November 2012 7,316
October 2012 14,568
September 2012 6,009
August 2012 3,269
July 2012 11,562
June 2012 19,091
May 2012 17,682
April 2012 11,011
March 2012 17,788
February 2012 12,215
January 2012 14,195
December 2011 12,429
November 2011 14,432
October 2011 26,085
September 2011 5,912
August 2011 8,313
July 2011 2,074
June 2011 1,593
April 2011 2,846
March 2011 1,558
February 2011 1,673
January 2011 3,508
December 2010 10,600
November 2010 11,524
October 2010 7,900
September 2010 9,529
August 2010 52
July 2010 265
June 2010 49
May 2010 713
April 2010 4,834
March 2010 33
February 2010 167
January 2010 216
December 2009 15
November 2009 154
October 2009 23
September 2009 73
August 2009 94
July 2009 37
June 2009 18
May 2009 15
April 2009 24
March 2009 83
February 2009 17
January 2009 76
December 2008 123
November 2008 99
October 2008 88
September 2008 34
August 2008 32

Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
PIRATICAL SEIZURE OF THE BRIG HARRINGTON. (Article), The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), Sunday 22 May 1808 page Article 2014-04-24 22:08 gency of the case -- The Government artificers and
unfortunately succeeded.- The villains demanded
gency of the case — The Government artificers and
unfortunately succeeded.—The villains demanded
PIRATICAL SEIZURE OF THE BRIG HARRINGTON. (Article), The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), Sunday 22 May 1808 page Article 2014-04-24 22:06 some new enormity, which may tend, in all metar -
some new enormity, which may tend, in all moral
MIDWEEK MAGAZINE Managing the media as the bullets begin to fly Terry O'Connor looks at the defence forces' new censorship policy (Article), The Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 - 1995), Wednesday 12 July 1989 page Article 2014-04-24 21:41 quiet pn pain of instant death.
quiet on pain of instant death.
MIDWEEK MAGAZINE Managing the media as the bullets begin to fly Terry O'Connor looks at the defence forces' new censorship policy (Article), The Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 - 1995), Wednesday 12 July 1989 page Article 2014-04-24 21:37 I
ranging from printing to semicon
they can combine the latest com
models. This commercially valu
able process uses a tank of the liq
source by sending instructions 'via
the computer. Tne beam of light
traces the required computer-de
the liquid, which instantly solidi
light As successive layers are ad
The technique has enormous poten
Professor Led with said light-con
trolled polymers were just one ex
"Chemistry has been a money earn
Apart from the chemical indus
"We chemists should not put our
Ledwith. "We have a duty to publi

ranging from printing to semicon-
they can combine the latest com-
models. This commercially valu-
able process uses a tank of the liq-
source by sending instructions via
the computer. The beam of light
traces the required computer-de-
the liquid, which instantly solidi-
light As successive layers are ad-
The technique has enormous poten-
Professor Led with said light-con-
trolled polymers were just one ex-
"Chemistry has been a money earn-
Apart from the chemical indus-
"We chemists should not put our-
Ledwith. "We have a duty to publi-
MIDWEEK MAGAZINE Managing the media as the bullets begin to fly Terry O'Connor looks at the defence forces' new censorship policy (Article), The Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 - 1995), Wednesday 12 July 1989 page Article 2014-04-24 21:36 WHEN Australia's defence forces con
of kilometres from Western Australia's Pil
(ACCOR in Army language) covering the ex
media review officer (MRO), who will re
move any material that may compromise "op
.Piracy or Scottish plotting
rfed to daring seizure of ship
pistol! to his head and told him,
Fisk was hustled on deck at gun
point by the two men.'To his amaze
convipts, led Ij.y one Robert Stewart,
pirates appeared well-armed and de
> In a bizarre irony the ship Har
' rington, which had herself been
? guilty' of acts of piracy on the high
; seas, had now been seized by con
1 vict pirates led by a well-educated
? ex-forger who claimed to have
' served in the Royal Navy, Robert
I Stewart.
; Stewart's career, which must be
f unique in the annals of convict Aus
f tralia, has been meticulously re
i searched by Marjone
^ Tipping in her book
? Convicts Unbound,
I (1988).
;!? Stewart, alias Mi
V chael or Robert Sey
? mour, was born in
rj Scotland about 1773.
I He was of average
height and dark com
j, plcxion, and was relatively well cdu
iij cated.
| In 1801 he was convicted at Mid
jl dlesex Sessions on charges of forg
p ing and counterfeiting bills of
v exchange. He was lucky to escape
8; the gallows and was sentenced to
i: transportation for life, arriving in
& Australia on the famous ship Cal
ij cuttainl803.
h In Van Diemcn's Land, Stewart
| was constantly in trouble. As Gov
| ernor Bligh later wrote, he was a
R determined man who had frequent
»- ly attempted to escape in open
| boats.
S Finally Stewart found himself in
ti chains in a government gang at Port
| Jackson in the dramatic year of
| 1808, the year of the military upris
| ing against Bligh known as the Rum
gy Rebellion.
1 Still dreaming of getting a boat
' Fisk, the Chief Officer, described
: convict pirates unshipped the lad
| der and cut the two anchors of the
6; ship. Using rowing boats they
fx stealthily towed the ship down the
[Illuminating chemistry of the past
| By CHRISTINE HEWITT
i' mm/ mummies and instant
?? computer-designed plas
* tic engineering models have in com
V Professor Anthony Ledwith, direc
, tor of research at Pilkington, is that
t, the manufacture of both depends on
1 the fact that mere exposure to light
| turns certain liquids into solids.
ft The Egyptians wrapped their de
li parted relatives in linen cloths
J soaked in special oil of lavender,
i\ containing vital ingredients called
< Syrian asphalt and bitumen of Ju
i dea. The swathed bodies were then
| placed in sunlight, which transform
I helping to preserve the corpse;
\ ingredients belong to a range of
? chemicals which turn into solids
I when exposed to photo-initiation.
| The light causes the molecules,
i known as monomers, to link togeth
| cr to form chains of repeating units,
| or polymers, with new properties.
I
do Egyptian
Campbell was a well-known fig
where the Harrington was regis
made poor progress and soon re
harbour? And why had he not no
before ne raised the alarm.
what the colonial authorities sus
given accommodation, clothing, transporta
But Campbell interpreted his let
DMAG would then ask media organisa
major diplomatic row. So the Gov
Spain and Britain he then confiscat
When Bligh took over as govern
his own motives for allowing Stew
in Sydney Harbour the Sydney Ga
Her new Captain, Robert Stew
with a British frigate bound for Ma
In the confusion many of the con
job where his enterprise and navi
notorious Sydney con
taken ashore in Calcut
will evaporate once the novelty of the expedi
Mr Young said that in the event of a con
John Weiland, defended it as the best solu
<<TN peacetime you get the 'guarded over
1 view' of defence and from our point of
WHEN Australia's defence forces con-
of kilometres from Western Australia's Pil-
(ACCOR in Army language) covering the ex-
media review officer (MRO), who will re-
move any material that may compromise "op-
Piracy or Scottish plotting
led to daring seizure of ship
pistol to his head and told him,
Fisk was hustled on deck at gun-
point by the two men.'To his amaze-
convicts, led by one Robert Stewart,
pirates appeared well-armed and de-
In a bizarre irony the ship Har-
rington, which had herself been
guilty of acts of piracy on the high
seas, had now been seized by con-
vict pirates led by a well-educated
ex-forger who claimed to have
served in the Royal Navy, Robert
Stewart.
Stewart's career, which must be
unique in the annals of convict Aus-
tralia, has been meticulously re-
searched by Marjone
Tipping in her book
Convicts Unbound,
(1988).
Stewart, alias Mi-
chael or Robert Sey-
mour, was born in
Scotland about 1773.
He was of average
height and dark com-
plcxion, and was relatively well cdu-
cated.
In 1801 he was convicted at Mid-
dlesex Sessions on charges of forg-
ing and counterfeiting bills of
exchange. He was lucky to escape
the gallows and was sentenced to
transportation for life, arriving in
Australia on the famous ship Cal-
cutta in 1803.
In Van Diemcn's Land, Stewart
was constantly in trouble. As Gov-
ernor Bligh later wrote, he was a
determined man who had frequent-
ly attempted to escape in open
boats.
Finally Stewart found himself in
chains in a government gang at Port
Jackson in the dramatic year of
1808, the year of the military upris-
ing against Bligh known as the Rum
Rebellion.
Still dreaming of getting a boat
Fisk, the Chief Officer, described
convict pirates unshipped the lad-
der and cut the two anchors of the
ship. Using rowing boats they
stealthily towed the ship down the
Illuminating chemistry of the past
By CHRISTINE HEWITT
mummies and instant
computer-designed plas-
tic engineering models have in com-
Professor Anthony Ledwith, dire-c
tor of research at Pilkington, is that
the manufacture of both depends on
the fact that mere exposure to light
turns certain liquids into solids.
The Egyptians wrapped their de-
parted relatives in linen cloths
soaked in special oil of lavender,
containing vital ingredients called
Syrian asphalt and bitumen of Ju-
dea. The swathed bodies were then
placed in sunlight, which transform-
helping to preserve the corpse;
ingredients belong to a range of
chemicals which turn into solids
when exposed to photo-initiation.
The light causes the molecules,
known as monomers, to link togeth-
er to form chains of repeating units,
or polymers, with new properties.

WHAT do Egyptian
Campbell was a well-known fig-
where the Harrington was regis-
made poor progress and soon re-
harbour? And why had he not no-
before he raised the alarm.
what the colonial authorities sus-
given accommodation, clothing, transporta-
But Campbell interpreted his let-
DMAG would then ask media organisa-
major diplomatic row. So the Gov-
Spain and Britain he then confiscat-
When Bligh took over as govern-
his own motives for allowing Stew-
in Sydney Harbour the Sydney Ga-
Her new Captain, Robert Stew-
with a British frigate bound for Ma-
In the confusion many of the con-
job where his enterprise and navi-
notorious Sydney con-
taken ashore in Calcut-
will evaporate once the novelty of the expedi-
Mr Young said that in the event of a con-
John Weiland, defended it as the best solu-
IN peacetime you get the 'guarded over-
view' of defence and from our point of
Thatcher: achievements marred by her corrosive moralism Writers' World (Article), The Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 - 1995), Saturday 15 July 1989 page Article 2014-04-24 21:26 upwardly mobile. The demure, hard-work
contemplating the champion of self-help go
ing through school as just another scholar
at a factory that made spectacle frames be
havelo test the intestinal fortitude of politic
her studies. She belonged to no set of politic
But although she had cast off.her roots she
loathed the low-caste Ted Heath but accept
Slate for Education and Science, the only
She was distrustful of the civil service, com
was good, collectivism evil. She could recog
he would be pessimistic about the past, opti
the world could be mended only by the busi
the role of warrior. She sacked and humiliat
She enjoyed selling state-owned indus
tries, letting other industries die for lack- of
the universities of funds. She saw them.as
anti-merit, anti-business and even anti-Brit
ish. She also rubbished the Church of Eng
inflation, increased production but also in
creased unemployment, made some indus
but wrecked others by exposing them-to
competition. She increased the earnings^of
them and the have-nots. \
Young has written a journalistic biogra
which is better researched and more incisiyc. '
upwardly mobile. The demure, hard-work-
contemplating the champion of self-help go-
ing through school as just another scholar-
at a factory that made spectacle frames be-
have to test the intestinal fortitude of politic
her studies. She belonged to no set of politic-
But although she had cast off her roots she
loathed the low-caste Ted Heath but accept-
Srate for Education and Science, the only
She was distrustful of the civil service, com-
was good, collectivism evil. She could recog-
he would be pessimistic about the past, opti-
the world could be mended only by the busi-
the role of warrior. She sacked and humiliat-
She enjoyed selling state-owned indus-
tries, letting other industries die for lack of
the universities of funds. She saw them as
anti-merit, anti-business and even anti-Brit-
ish. She also rubbished the Church of Eng-
inflation, increased production but also in-
creased unemployment, made some indus-
but wrecked others by exposing them to
competition. She increased the earnings of
them and the have-nots.
Young has written a journalistic biogra-
which is better researched and more incisivc. '
Thatcher: achievements marred by her corrosive moralism Writers' World (Article), The Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 - 1995), Saturday 15 July 1989 page Article 2014-04-24 21:24 ing that almost two out of three voters want
uncaring nature, obstinacy, policies and big
diminished. About 80 per cent believed peo
had relied on a harsh personal style, an un
morahsm which, ate up the poor and under
shows in his biography, One of Us (Macmil
in May the opinion polls were show
This dedicated, hard-working but'
narrow-minded daughter of a grocer in Gran
suburban gentility an sentimental, sacchar
to be biased. What about women? The novel
like a serpent, bays like a hound." And Bar
oness Warnock also detested her "patronis
not exactly vulgar, j ust low".
The Margaret Thatcher Hugo Young pres
ents is rather more complex than the Thatch
an alderman and then mayor. Aldermen Al
ing that almost two out of three voters want-
uncaring nature, obstinacy, policies and big-
diminished. About 80 per cent believed peo-
had relied on a harsh personal style, an un-
morahsm which, ate up the poor and under-
shows in his biography, One of Us (Macmil-
in May the opinion polls were show-
This dedicated, hard-working but
narrow-minded daughter of a grocer in Gran-
suburban gentility an sentimental, sacchar-
to be biased. What about women? The novel-
like a serpent, bays like a hound." And Bar-
oness Warnock also detested her "patronis-
not exactly vulgar, just low".
The Margaret Thatcher Hugo Young pres-
ents is rather more complex than the Thatch-
an alderman and then mayor. Aldermen Al-
IMAGE Surviving that first sexual encounter Susan Aitkin looks at the good, the bad and the ugly experiences of some virgins who made it through their first experience, and provides some tips for first-timers. (Article), The Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 - 1995), Tuesday 25 July 1989 page Article 2014-04-24 21:22 (Simon's experience would seem to be a ?
fairly common one among men. ;
"""James also remembers the relief he felt \
afl'er so many heavy petting sessions where ?
-Y'V\t the age of 18, he made love with a :
tf&rse from the hospital where he worked
"'We made love four or five times that .
afternoon. I got quite sore but kept on going '
:until it was a:cross between agony and
!'James also remembers wanting his part
•ln$r' to leave after he had finished. "I got
again not an uncommon post first-time feel
ing. ... !
before "her partner was awake,' left him a
;\pte and went home on the bus. ...
* "I was 21. I came from a very liberal
background where my parents had, been !
Ygry open about everything. My father had ;
fliven me the Kama Sutra to read.. I didn't
prove myself. ,
• |VI left home at 17 and moved.in with
I feminist and socialist groups. My aunt
Publicly about sex and things like that, but
lii fact her daughter probably did far more
"He was a really nice guy, a good friend. J
thought, 'If it happens, it happens,' but I
1 found it disappointing, and-later I was
bored and I jast wanted to leave;"
Association of NSW, a very common fear is .
that the first time.for a woman will be very -
She . says this isn't necessarily so, espe
in which case: the? hymen may stretch in-. ,
stead of breaking. -
It is also important; that the woman is ;
able to communicate; to her partner, about
how she feels and what she wants.;;?> ,
,: For young women, in particular, it is
what they are doing and are not just , re
sponding to'peer group pressure. 1
"We will talk to them about-their "choices/
do. Family Planning will talk to.anyone,
.'irrespective of their age, about what to ex
pect and what to do, and-will'advise, them
on the most appropriate form of contracep
tion to use." . . ' ,.
. Dr Weisberg warns that a woman can get.
unexpected intercourse, which can be pre
scribed by her doctor or the Family Plan
against sexually transmitted diseases, in
the late, 1950s, thought you became preg
man. .
sacked her and sent for her. parents, a few
; Tina and her boyfriend did decide to use
' some LSD, also for the first time. The sub
beatnik from a small country town, "deter
generous girls I was sure I would meet dur
French letter which had been acquired sur
much sat-upon was, I discovered, well ce
state an>; good. I was going to come, and
damned if I was going to waste the opportu
shaking with nervousness and trying, vain
ly, to keep up. the required motions with a
"1 saw her again 25 years later. We both
scored in Sydney'. And when the opportuni
1
said William. "Wc were both virgins. Nei
However, their first .night was notasuc
"My passage was very narrow, .so it .hurt
been married, I don't think our, relationship
mother a dozen times..
"Poor William had- ardreadful. time. He
didn't want to hurt me and used to lose all'
ening of the muscles around the vagina'
days after their wedding who have been -
unable to consummate their marriage be
Again, the answer is for. the woman to
Weisberg suggests seeing a doctor who spe
man she had ever gone out with. "My par
atuni.
the first time, so 1 didn't enjoy it for the next
The traditional Australian wedding cele
He is still recovering from the*bucks'
the first time does not involve their con
sent. ? ? : ? ? • .
"I was raped by my father when 1 was a
• talk about my first time with a woman, that
AlisonYboyfricnd and his mate decided
the others left the room.;
. "I was really angry with him afterwards;
It was such a horrible thing to do.. .1 didn't
have any control at all. We split up soc(n
after." .1
Some people interviewed did actually eft
joy their first time. '
Paul first made love in the front scat of a
been better in the back scat."
Ellen enjoyed her first time while a teen
was a lusty 14-year-old 10 years ago,""thor
oughly enjoyed" himself. . ,:
hero!" ..
over to her sister's house the following Sat
"1 asked around and found she had a
reputation. 1 told all the fellas; they psyched
When he went there on Saturday, howev
er, they.ended up having an argument about
and according to her, I put up a good per
friend Jock one night when the two. boys
profitable couple of weeks and so,he de
"He'd heard bad things about street walk
"We all shook hands and wished h&n
lounge and talked to some of the girls, n
how well hung he was. He came out after
wards still very excited, still with moncyin
his pocket, so we went to another paridur
•: However, for most people, accordingno
she said. "The' more practice you have, the
better you get." ...
slowly..." •; . • *•
? ? ? ?
(Simon's experience would seem to be a
fairly common one among men.
James also remembers the relief he felt
after so many heavy petting sessions where
At the age of 18, he made love with a
nurse from the hospital where he worked
"'We made love four or five times that
afternoon. I got quite sore but kept on going
until it was a cross between agony and
James also remembers wanting his part-
ner to leave after he had finished. "I got
again not an uncommon post first-time feel-
ing.
before "her partner was awake, left him a
note and went home on the bus.
"I was 21. I came from a very liberal
background where my parents had, been
very open about everything. My father had
fliven me the Kama Sutra to read. I didn't
prove myself.
I left home at 17 and moved in with
feminist and socialist groups. My aunt
publicly about sex and things like that, but
in fact her daughter probably did far more
"He was a really nice guy, a good friend.
thought, 'If it happens, it happens,' but
I found it disappointing, and later I was
bored and I just wanted to leave;"
Association of NSW, a very common fear is
that the first time for a woman will be very
She says this isn't necessarily so, espe-
in which case the hymen may stretch in-
stead of breaking.
It is also important; that the woman is
able to communicate; to her partner about
how she feels and what she wants.
For young women, in particular, it is
what they are doing and are not just re-
sponding to peer group pressure.
"We will talk to them about their choices
do. Family Planning will talk to anyone,
irrespective of their age, about what to ex-
pect and what to do, and will advise, them
on the most appropriate form of contracep-
tion to use."
Dr Weisberg warns that a woman can get
unexpected intercourse, which can be pre-
scribed by her doctor or the Family Plan-
against sexually transmitted diseases, in-
the late, 1950s, thought you became preg-
man.
sacked her and sent for her parents, a few
Tina and her boyfriend did decide to use
some LSD, also for the first time. The sub-
beatnik from a small country town, "deter-
generous girls I was sure I would meet dur-
French letter which had been acquired sur-
much sat-upon was, I discovered, well ce-
state any good. I was going to come, and
damned if I was going to waste the opportu-
shaking with nervousness and trying, vain-
ly, to keep up the required motions with a
"I saw her again 25 years later. We both
scored in Sydney'. And when the opportuni-

said William. "Wc were both virgins. Nei-
However, their first .night was not a suc-
"My passage was very narrow, so it .hurt
been married, I don't think our relationship
mother a dozen times.
"Poor William had a dreadful. time. He
didn't want to hurt me and used to lose all
ening of the muscles around the vagina
days after their wedding who have been
unable to consummate their marriage be-
Again, the answer is for the woman to
Weisberg suggests seeing a doctor who spe-
man she had ever gone out with. "My par-
at uni.
the first time, so I didn't enjoy it for the next
The traditional Australian wedding cele-
He is still recovering from the bucks'
the first time does not involve their con-
sent.
"I was raped by my father when I was a
talk about my first time with a woman, that
Alison's boyfricnd and his mate decided
the others left the room.
"I was really angry with him afterwards;
It was such a horrible thing to do. I didn't
have any control at all. We split up soon
after."
Some people interviewed did actually en-
joy their first time.
Paul first made love in the front seat of a
been better in the back seat."
Ellen enjoyed her first time while a teen-
was a lusty 14-year-old 10 years ago, "thor-
oughly enjoyed" himself.
hero!"
over to her sister's house the following Sat-
"I asked around and found she had a
reputation. I told all the fellas; they psyched
When he went there on Saturday, howev-
er, they ended up having an argument about
and according to her, I put up a good per-
friend Jock one night when the two boys
profitable couple of weeks and so he de-
"He'd heard bad things about street walk-
"We all shook hands and wished him
lounge and talked to some of the girls.
how well hung he was. He came out after-
wards still very excited, still with money in
his pocket, so we went to another parlour
However, for most people, according to
she said. "The more practice you have, the
better you get."
slowly..."

IMAGE Surviving that first sexual encounter Susan Aitkin looks at the good, the bad and the ugly experiences of some virgins who made it through their first experience, and provides some tips for first-timers. (Article), The Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 - 1995), Tuesday 25 July 1989 page Article 2014-04-24 21:12 ?Slic was his and lie was hers, and there
-was no fear, no problems, no dijficulties —
only love... and love... and love..." •
n^DThcse closing words by Barbara Cartland
the path to ecstasy by a knowing man..
• first.timc for the man, however, though he
must have gained. his experience some
"Far from being an experience of unal
foar. problems and difficulties which take
when he was 16 with his equally inexperi
ctffced girlfriend.
"••"It was'disappointing, if anything, more
"like an exploratory exercise finding my way ;
around the A to Z. How can you have mucn
She was his and he was hers, and there
was no fear, no problems, no difficulties —
only love... and love... and love..."
Thcse closing words by Barbara Cartland
the path to ecstasy by a knowing man.
first timc for the man, however, though he
must have gained his experience some-
Far from being an experience of unal-
fear, problems and difficulties which take
when he was 16 with his equally inexperi-
enced girlfriend.
"It was'disappointing, if anything, more
like an exploratory exercise finding my way
around the A to Z. How can you have much
IMAGE Surviving that first sexual encounter Susan Aitkin looks at the good, the bad and the ugly experiences of some virgins who made it through their first experience, and provides some tips for first-timers. (Article), The Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 - 1995), Tuesday 25 July 1989 page Article 2014-04-24 21:10 *' Something wild and wonderful leapt
Jfyhiii Iter to match the ecstasy she had
'arousedin him.
- A/i> precious, perfect, wonderful, little
hps. 1 -
his lips were on hers and lie
•She could feel his heart beatingtumultu
\vliispered. 1 •
wtfer: the Duke murmured against her
Something wild and wonderful leapt
within her to match the ecstasy she had
aroused in him.
"My precious, perfect, wonderful, little
lips. 1 -
his lips were on hers and he
She could feel his heart beating tumultu-
whispered.
wtfe: the Duke murmured against her

Counts updated hourly

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

  1. 00-The Big Book of Australian History
    List
    Public

    These links relate to a book to be released on October 1, 2013. This is a list of lists, and some of those lists may themselves be lists of list of lists. Where necessary, there is duplication, but this is a place to fossick and enrich your mind. This work is close to completed in September, 2013, though I don't imagine it will ever be completely finished, even after the book is released.

    19 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  2. 01-An Ancient Land
    List
    Public

    Chapter 1 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    7 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  3. 02-The Dreaming
    List
    Public

    Chapter 2 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    14 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  4. 03-Voyages of Discovery
    List
    Public

    Chapter 3 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    11 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  5. 04-Founding Colonies
    List
    Public

    Chapter 4 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    29 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  6. 05-The Explorers
    List
    Public

    Chapter 5 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    58 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  7. 06-Gold
    List
    Public

    Chapter 6 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    7 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  8. 07-Settling the land
    List
    Public

    Chapter 7 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    10 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  9. 08-Growth of the Cities
    List
    Public

    Chapter 8 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    10 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  10. 09-Federation
    List
    Public

    Chapter 9 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    21 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  11. 10-Becoming ANZACS
    List
    Public

    Chapter 10 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    36 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  12. 11- the 1920s
    List
    Public

    Chapter 11 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    29 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  13. 12-the Great Depression
    List
    Public

    Chapter 12 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    16 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  14. 13-World War 2
    List
    Public

    Chapter 13 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    37 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  15. 14-Post-war Australia
    List
    Public

    Chapter 14 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    20 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  16. 15-Controversial issues
    List
    Public

    Chapter 15 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    9 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  17. 16-Sporting Life
    List
    Public

    Chapter 16 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    43 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  18. 17-People from everywhere
    List
    Public

    Chapter 17 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    9 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  19. 18-Famous Australians
    List
    Public

    Chapter 18 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    31 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  20. 19-Disasters
    List
    Public

    Chapter 19 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'. The chapter numbers changed a bit during editing, but I have left the names of the last few lists as they were.

    9 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  21. A capital site
    List
    Public

    The search for a site for the new capital of the Commonwealth

    33 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-10-30
    User data
  22. Australia First conspiracy trial
    List
    Public

    In 1942, a small group of individuals in Western Australia planned to seize the reins of government "when the Japanese landed". They moulded themselves on the various European collaborators with the Germans, but were totally pathetic as plotters. The coverage is taken from the 'Kalgoorlie Miner': this is for consistency, because I first encountered it there: I may add other sources later.

    31 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2013-02-13
    User data
  23. Australian inventions
    List
    Public

    A list of curious inventions, mainly those originated in Australia.

    20 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-07-20
    User data
  24. beach sand gold
    List
    Public

    Some of the claims for minerals found in beach sand, mainly but not limited to, gold.

    22 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-11-11
    User data
  25. bubonic plague
    List
    Public

    Details of the bubonic plague in Australia, circa 1900: these are selected articles only, which seem to have high historical value. In the first instance, I am using just one publication, because a quick scan revealed that it had a fairly wide coverage. I plan to add more references later.

    33 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-05-05
    User data
  26. bunyip
    List
    Public

    Early references to the bunyip and other "monsters".

    25 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-07-21
    User data
  27. Calvert's gold
    List
    Public

    I selected John Calvert (1814-1897) as a suitable case for treatment when I came across a reference in an 1850s 'Scientific American' to a London court case against James Wyld in April 1854 (Wyld was, at that point, the subject of my enquiries). Calvert shares his name with one of Leichhardt's 1844-1846 exploration party, but I knew it wasn't the same man, and he sounded sufficiently dubious to be interesting to investigate. The entries are in chronological order. The 'Encyclopaedia of Australian Science' says some thought him a romancer. I am at one with his contemporaries (you will find them in this list) who called him an impostor and a Munchausen.

    41 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-12-23
    User data
  28. coolies in Australia
    List
    Public

    Looking at the various attempts to introduce coolies into Australia. I hope soon to annotate the rest of the entries more usefully. Note that "coolies" at first meant Indian workers only, but was later extended to include Chinese. The systems under which they were employed were similar to the contracts used with Kanakas, late in the 19th century. Note that the language and attitudes of the day were somewhat confronting (or worse!). The order is strictly chronological, so if you know a date, scroll down!

    69 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-05-09
    User data
  29. early use of language
    List
    Public

    This records my searches for the earliest instances in newspapers of a number of apparently Australian terms. The order is alphabetical by term and then by year, with the year of use appearing in each note. My plan is generally to offer three to five of the earliest hits that I find on any given word or phrase. (This parsimonious intention has been ignored, as in "billy", where there is a curious pattern of uptake to be observed and tested more fully.) Note that some of these selections have explanatory comments and references as well. IMPORTANT: please look at the first item, as I have now started assembling these into a rather more accessible web page, which is the first item in the list.

    197 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-01-02
    User data
    Tags:
  30. Georgiana Molloy
    List
    Public

    Possible references to Georgiana Molloy, plant collector

    22 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-03-24
    User data
  31. gold books
    List
    Public

    23 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2013-09-07
    User data
  32. gold history
    List
    Public

    This is a super-list, and some of the links are, in fact, also lists. This is the One List to Rule Them All.

    60 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-11-29
    User data
  33. John and Elizabeth Gould
    List
    Public

    These are the bird Goulds: they visited Australia in 1839 and the early 1840s

    16 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-10-12
    User data
  34. John Lewin
    List
    Public

    This is to help others track down the Lewin material that I have corrected and tagged as "John Lewin". I have also added some external material that others don't seem to know about, all at Macquarie Law, which is a most excellent resource.

    41 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-08-17
    User data
  35. Kokoda track
    List
    Public

    This began as a selection of the best journalism written by those unsung heroes, the Australian journalists who travelled the Owen Stanley Track, and against trenchant censorship from the Brass, told the tale. I have since added a few other useful backgrounders on the early history of the track. The order is chronological, the selector's bias shows in the way items referring to the "Kokoda Trail" have been ignored. Those items were mostly left out because they are more likely than not to be poisoned by McArthur's publicity machine, written by people who had been no closer than Melbourne. Those who actually went there called it a track.

    22 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-11-09
    User data
  36. M'Gregor's gold
    List
    Public

    A Wellington shepherd named Hugh M'Gregor, alias Macgregor or McGregor was widely credited with being the first to find gold. This is an attempt to pull all of the available information on him together: it will certainly assist anybody trying to track down this elusive character. With this aim in mind, I have also flagged the rare items which mention his forename, and attempt to follow his later life.

    43 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-08-04
    User data
  37. migration controls and regulations
    List
    Public

    Accounts having a bearing on the control of entry and exit from ports in Australia.

    5 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-12-22
    User data
  38. Murdoch and the media
    List
    Public

    A collection of comments made over the years about the Murdoch family and media monopolies.

    11 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2014-02-03
    User data
  39. passage times
    List
    Public

    This will be a slow-growing list of articles where reference is made to fast or slow passages to Britain, Europe or the USA (and more recently, within Australia). The items will be in chronological order.

    17 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-01-02
    User data
    Tags:
  40. Royal Commission on Gold Stealing
    List
    Public

    Stories relating to the W.A. Royal Commission which examined the prevalence of gold stealing in the eastern goldfields. It began with a 1906 report on gold theft by an English journalist called Scantlebury, and ended up leading to some changes, aimed at trapping the fences who bought stolen gold. The hero was 33-year-old Detective Sergeant Peter Kavanagh who got the evidence, but died in Sydney in 1908.

    59 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-11-01
    User data
  41. seashores
    List
    Public

    A collection of pieces relating to shore life and coastal and estuarine environments: beaches, rocks, rock pools, tides, waves and more. This list can be expected to grow continually during 2011 and 2012. There are two conscious purposes shaping my selections: my writerly aim is to find material relevant to a writing project that I have in mind, my pedagogical aim is to provide a collection of thought-provoking pieces for use in education at any level. That is to say, I hope that these choices may help learners to think—and to question their assumptions as I did, when I found the marine spiders!

    76 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-10-02
    User data
  42. steam power
    List
    Public

    Material relevant to some future social history of steam in Australia.

    94 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-08-17
    User data
  43. The Pfalz case
    List
    Public

    The incidents leading up to and following the firing of the first shots in the Great War. The S.s. Pfalz, tried to leave Port Phillip at the outbreak of war, and was turned back.

    21 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2013-09-08
    User data
  44. The road to Port Essington
    List
    Public

    Before Ludwig Leichhardt took off to find a route, others were talking about it. This pulls together some of those threads and reveals why people thought finding such a "road" would be a good idea. Personally, I suspect that some of them were thinking of a future railway, but did not dare stick their necks out that far.

    50 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-12-28
    User data
  45. Vignettes of the Great War
    List
    Public

    Snippets offering a sense of the way people faced the war, largely intended as a classroom resource in the tradition of the old Jackdaws. These are random, happened-upon gleanings, where most of my lists are rather more calculated and planned. This list will grow slowly.

    1 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-02-02
    User data
  46. Wicked Grocer
    List
    Public

    G. K. Chesterton, in 'A Song Against Grocers' wrote:
    God made the wicked Grocer
    For a mystery and a sign,
    That men might shun the awful shops
    And go to inns to dine...

    This list is about food adulteration.

    12 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2013-05-06
    User data
  47. Wildman's gold
    List
    Public

    A Dutch or German sailor called Wildman claimed in 1863 to have found gold in Camden Harbour (near the Glenelg River) seven years previously, and claiming to have sold the gold in Liverpool. He offered, for a remission, to lead the way there. The gold was never found, in part because he failed to cooperate, and then tried to steal the ship's two boats and make a run for it.

    12 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-01-16
    User data
  48. William Hay Caldwell
    List
    Public

    Articles relating to the visit to Australia of zoologist William Hay Caldwell who elucidated the reproductive modes of monotremes and marsupials and studied the lungfish, along with some notes on his little-known marriage to a Sydney heiress. There are many more articles tagged with Caldwell's name which may be accessed from any of these. There are also other tags that may help the dedicated scholar: the furore over marsupial reproduction can be identified by the tag "bad science". Just watch the tags, OK?

    59 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2013-05-15
    User data
  49. wireless telegraphy
    List
    Public

    Early days of radio: an occasional list that may not grow much.

    1 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-10-30
    User data
  50. Women in trousers
    List
    Public

    The very idea of women wearing trousers horrified many in the 1930s and 1940s. The war changed a lot of that, but even in the 1950s, there were strong reactions. This is an attempt to landmark some of the events in the slow climb to rationality. This will be a slow-growing collection.

    23 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2013-12-27
    User data

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.