Information about Trove user: peter-macinnis

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

RankCorrectorLines corrected
1 JohnWarren 3,266,138
2 NeilHamilton 2,293,376
3 annmanley 2,062,043
4 noelwoodhouse 1,860,757
5 maurielyn 1,499,195
...
35 tbfrank 528,953
36 RobertMorison 525,608
37 cmt17 500,298
38 peter-macinnis 495,410
39 aleon 487,527
40 RonnieLand 486,512

495,410 lines corrected.

Corrections by month

May 2015 3,830
April 2015 5,718
March 2015 5,598
February 2015 3,805
January 2015 538
December 2014 253
November 2014 107
October 2014 49
September 2014 84
August 2014 121
July 2014 399
June 2014 1,048
May 2014 6,333
April 2014 23,016
March 2014 21,127
February 2014 22,103
January 2014 10,627
December 2013 26,128
November 2013 1,934
October 2013 1,619
September 2013 1,744
August 2013 1,684
June 2013 5,013
May 2013 15,746
April 2013 14,168
March 2013 20,421
February 2013 30,105
January 2013 9,339
December 2012 737
November 2012 7,316
October 2012 14,568
September 2012 6,009
August 2012 3,269
July 2012 11,562
June 2012 19,091
May 2012 17,682
April 2012 11,011
March 2012 17,788
February 2012 12,215
January 2012 14,195
December 2011 12,429
November 2011 14,432
October 2011 26,085
September 2011 5,912
August 2011 8,313
July 2011 2,074
June 2011 1,593
April 2011 2,846
March 2011 1,558
February 2011 1,673
January 2011 3,508
December 2010 10,600
November 2010 11,524
October 2010 7,900
September 2010 9,529
August 2010 52
July 2010 265
June 2010 49
May 2010 713
April 2010 4,834
March 2010 33
February 2010 167
January 2010 216
December 2009 15
November 2009 154
October 2009 23
September 2009 73
August 2009 94
July 2009 37
June 2009 18
May 2009 15
April 2009 24
March 2009 83
February 2009 17
January 2009 76
December 2008 123
November 2008 99
October 2008 88
September 2008 34
August 2008 32

Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
BAT AND BALL GORDONS v. MIDDLE HARBOR. (Article), Sydney Sportsman (Surry Hills, NSW : 1900 - 1954), Wednesday 3 March 1909 page Article 2015-05-27 19:44 [?]
GORDONS r. MIDDLE HARBOR.
Gordon minus the services of Hscsitney
end Proud met Middle Harbor en the Manly
Oval. The .wicket .was a -beautiful one from
it right up to the -bat.
Frank Tredale skippered Gordon and won
the toss front Hodgkinson, and foolishly
sent the Ideals in/to bat. Frank, my boy,
opened the batting. They Scored 28 and 27
respectively, aloft, leg-break bowler Basntord
getting both wwcts— Hodgkinson caught
Browdow tied 6ee'a score of 27 and then
dragged a batl from Bennett into hjs wicket.
The score was then' 96. Soott got 21 and
then ShOrtland bowled him, the total be
He at otioe went for the slow bowler
Bamford''and was- not long in landing him
high into a garden, from whence it wat
brought out by a lad, ' ^
with Htddieto'n added 67 for the fifth wick
et, and then MLean caught him at mid
off, the bowler being .Shortland.
the most prolific -partnership of the innings
took place. Middleton laaned the bowlers
all over the place, aixes and fourers com
ing with -the greatest esse and despatch.
He got his three figures in only 60 min
utes, and was ' eventually otited for 174
through mis-hitting a curly one from Bam
ford. He made his runs in 90 minutes, prac
tically at the rate of 2 per minute, and in
fours,'— 124 in boundary strokes. This
score tops his 131 msde ' against Sydney—
Woolcott's - contribution was 42, and he
w-icaet before Shortland struck down his
Broughton played quietly for 43 but Ran
dall followed the ' tactics of Middleton, the
unfortunate bowlers being hit in all direc
taree sixere and five fours.
199. He gets- a good break on, but is so
slow that the batsmen can watch him all'
the way, . though probably, on a faster
159. The fielding -was mediocre.
nil, Gea getting both wickets. Giyhn and
BALMA1N v. CENTRAL CUMBERLAND.
on the Parramatth Oval, and the Balmain
ers will not- forget their 15-mile trip in a
and proceeded. to deal out destruction to
the bowling froth the very start. The runt
7 1 overt— 462 balls— 478 runs were scored.
Shade of Macdobneli ! Massie, Lyons, and
C. Banneftnon oould not have scored much
? ? ? * ?
» * «
« ? * ? ?
* ? * , «
ft -W ft
. w * #
« * ?
* ? W ft '
* ? ?
? * » *
* IT » -
Bat and Ball
GORDONS v. MIDDLE HARBOR.
Gordon minus the services of Macartney
and Proud met Middle Harbor on the Manly
Oval. The .wicket was a beautiful one from
it right up to the bat.
Frank Iredale skippered Gordon and won
the toss from Hodgkinson, and foolishly
sent the locals in to bat. Frank, my boy,
opened the batting. They scored 28 and 27
respectively, slow leg-break bowler Bamford
getting both wickets— Hodgkinson caught
Brownlow tied Gee's score of 27 and then
dragged a ball from Bennett into his wicket.
The score was then 96. Scott got 21 and
then Shortland bowled him, the total be-
He at once went for the slow bowler
Bamford and was not long in landing him
high into a garden, from whence it was
brought out by a lad.
with Mitddleton added 67 for the fifth wick-
et, and then M'Lean caught him at mid-
off, the bowler being Shortland.
the most prolific partnership of the innings
took place. Middleton lashed the bowlers
all over the place, sixes and fourers com-
ing with the greatest ease and despatch. * * *
He got his three figures in only 60 min-
utes, and was eventually outed for 174
through mis-hitting a curly one from Bam-
ford. He made his runs in 90 minutes, prac-
tically at the rate of 2 per minute, and in-
fours,— 124 in boundary strokes. This
score tops his 131 made against Sydney—
Woolcott's contribution was 42, and he
wicket before Shortland struck down his
Broughton played quietly for 43 but Ran-
dall followed the tactics of Middleton, the
unfortunate bowlers being hit in all direc-
taree sixers and five fours.
199. He gets a good break on, but is so
slow that the batsmen can watch him all
the way, though probably, on a faster
159. The fielding was mediocre.
nil, Gee getting both wickets. Glynn and
BALMAIN v. CENTRAL CUMBERLAND.
on the Parramatth Oval, and the Balmain-
ers will not forget their 15-mile trip in a
and proceeded to deal out destruction to
the bowling froth the very start. The runs
?? overs— 462 balls— 478 runs were scored.
Shade of Macdonnell! Massie, Lyons, and
C. Bannerman could not have scored much
* * *
* * *
* * *
C
* * *
* * *
* * *
* * *
* * *
* * *
* * *
No title (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Tuesday 6 May 1851 page Article 2015-05-27 19:33 THE CONVICT QUESTION.-The convict ques-
COURT OF REQUESTS.-The sittings of this
LICENSING MEETING. -The adjourned sit-
terday. Present -The Police Magistrate, in
was granted ; to be heard at noon on Monday
PUBLICANS' RECOGNIZANCES.-An error oc-
DEATH FROM CARELESS DRIVING.- The in-
without lighted lamps, knocked him down ;
driven the party most carefully from Botany ;
George-street ; and there was no evidence to
proved that the carriage lamps were not lit ;
that a severe reprimand be given to the driver ;
SUDDEN DEATH.-An inquest was held, yes-
damages-in default of payment to be im-
COMMITTAL.-Patrick Nugent was yesterday
o'clock--Communicated.
Saddlers. Country Buyers. Livery Stablekeeper»
me., are reminded of the sale of superior saddlery, har-
ness, &c. for aale by auction, by Mr. Sain mon, at bis
room» this day. For further perticulara, «ee advertise
Vttnt.-Çommunieatcd.
ertions by an overflowing house; and the readi
nes» with which he has responded to the calls
WEEDING.-Mr. Woolrabe, who was a pas-
trunks, has made the by no rieans satisfactory
SUDDEN DEATH.-Mr. William Tysen, of
ing himself somewhat indisposed, colled m Mr.
FIREWORKS.-John Templeton, a child of
Mr. 8nmuel Lyon« sells, this day, at the Stores of
Mrisrs Lyal!, S Ott, and Co., at 11 o'clock, Alsopp's
THE CONVICT QUESTION.—The convict ques-
COURT OF REQUESTS.—The sittings of this
LICENSING MEETING. —The adjourned sit-
terday. Present —The Police Magistrate, in
was granted; to be heard at noon on Monday
PUBLICANS' RECOGNIZANCES.—An error oc-
DEATH FROM CARELESS DRIVING.— The in-
without lighted lamps, knocked him down;
driven the party most carefully from Botany;
George-street; and there was no evidence to
proved that the carriage lamps were not lit;
that a severe reprimand be given to the driver;
SUDDEN DEATH.—An inquest was held, yes-
damages—in default of payment to be im-
COMMITTAL.—Patrick Nugent was yesterday
o'clock.—Communicated.
Saddlers. Country Buyers. Livery Stablekeepers
&c., are reminded of the sale of superior saddlery, har-
ness, &c. for sale by auction, by Mr. Salamon, at his
rooms this day. For further perticulars, see advertise-
ment.-Çommunieatcd.
ertions by an overflowing house; and the readi-
ness with which he has responded to the calls
WEEDING.—Mr. Woolrabe, who was a pas-
trunks, has made the by no means satisfactory
SUDDEN DEATH.—Mr. William Tysen, of
ing himself somewhat indisposed, called in Mr.
FIREWORKS.—John Templeton, a child of
Mr. Samuel Lyons sells, this day, at the Stores of
Messrs Lyall, S Ott, and Co., at 11 o'clock, Alsopp's
BAT AND BALL GORDONS v. MIDDLE HARBOR. (Article), Sydney Sportsman (Surry Hills, NSW : 1900 - 1954), Wednesday 3 March 1909 page Article 2015-05-27 09:07 Gordon's chance was, to use 'a colloquialism,
'up to putty.' The dashing ex-Sydney bats
mun, .who looks every inch .a cricketer, and
who is not afraid of - having a go at the
bowling, mutt surely develop into a player
# * *
Gordon's chance was, to use a colloquialism,
'up to putty.' The dashing ex-Sydney bats-
man, who looks every inch a cricketer, and
who is not afraid of having a go at the
bowling, must surely develop into a player
* * *
No title (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Tuesday 6 May 1851 page Article 2015-05-27 08:59 arrangements. The Justices -will not sit to-
DEATH FROM CARELESS DRIVING.- The in
and Dr. Tiernev admitted that the unfortunate
arrangements. The Justices will not sit to-
DEATH FROM CARELESS DRIVING.- The in-
and Dr. Tierney admitted that the unfortunate
LORD CURZON AND HIS CRITICS A VICEROY UBIQUIOTUS BUT WISE. Simla, April 10. (Article), The Daily News (Perth, WA : 1882 - 1950), Saturday 1 June 1901 page Article 2015-05-13 18:06 It also affords an example of how this Vice
roy first rouses opposition and then over-,
' JVheu the Queen diedj almost every sec
tion' \of the .community, in India was pre
pared ' to contribute to some memorial.
Had the*-matter bean left to private initia
greater or less prctensioc,' would have been
and the demonstration would'have ended
there. Local jealousies would have re
mained dormant, aii'd there would have
foen no opposition. Oil- the other h;uit],
we^hould have had no historical museum,
vsu'eli .as t,he antiquarian and the scholar
in Lcrd Curzon had long desired for In
dia, and! -such as will, mow be built. Much,
other place, for its location ; but the mu
seum 'scheme, is. triumphant. Granted ?
undoubtedly livo down the title of 'Cu?-
Pioneer,' and become a real and inimensa
.ly valuable index to India's past.
Lord Curzon has hustled the Indian pub
lic. -That somewhat lethargic body is pro
hustled the. army and tho Punjab Govern
With the army the trouble arose over cer
soldiers had to bfi punished for violence to
?natives. Lord Curzon thought jus-tice
was being evaded, and intervened. Ho
found himself, as the result, bitterly1 ac
It was even suggested that the Govern
ment of India had 'usurped the functions
of a final court of judicial revision.' Some
sharp, but not altogether judicious, pun
British soldiers were revised for the bet
ter, and Lord Curzon thereafter transfer
red all responsibility to his military ad
the Government of India 'would not inter
fere in a disciplinary matter with the su
perior military authority' provokes a smile
by its.adroitnessj but it has served its pur
pose in terminating a distinctly undesir- j
able situation. ? , ? ? * '
The Indian official world is now discuss
ing a supposed slight put upon the' Punjab.
Administration in connection -with tho.
the susceptibilities of the Indian Civil Ser
of seniors in the Punjab Commission in or
-eane. — but eight years ago a captain — at
the head of the charge. Colo'nel Deaneis
the ablest 'political' on tho frontier. He
but is n youngster compared to civilians
hitherto in charge of the principal divi
sions in what is to be tho new province.
Other civilians are, asking what guarantee
question cf the appointment of posts be
tween members of the Political Depart
have occurred, but they have been isolat
ed. The Government of India is a benevo
head, and its members recognise its abso
lute authority. It would not be' fair to
name those whose views have been over
would constitute' an organised opposition.
Francis to Lord Curzon's Warren Hast
ings, arid mere grumbling counts for little.
present Viceroy's reforms are bearing use
ful fruit.' 'Tho reversal of Lord Elgin's
worthless returns have .been abolished.
famine without finances becoming disorder
ed or progress on railways' and canals' be
ing stopped. Rearmament. with modern
strength of the Indian forces is being in
China. There is even a 'possibility of re
ducing taxation. ^ *
ning to be recognised that the real jJlue
to his personal conundrum is a single
ter and stronger and richer tlvan he found
tho crew are taking orders 'more' kindly.
Thoir confidenco in the skipper is growing.
bids fair to prosper.'
two French chemists (husband and wife),?
from this body a new gas, which is in
tensely phosphorescent,, and a sample of
tho dark for mouths. Professor Lipp
mann states that a French- scientist, M.
Naiidon, lias found means of producing
Rontgon rays without electricity. This
tho rays of light of the violet end of the
spectrum. ' 'X' rays are first given forth
on the side of the plate turnea towards the
It also affords an example of how this Vice-
roy first rouses opposition and then over-
When the Queen died, almost every sec-
tion of the community, in India was pre-
pared to contribute to some memorial.
Had the matter been left to private initia-
greater or less pretension, would have been
and the demonstration would have ended
there. Local jealousies would have re-
mained dormant, and there would have
been no opposition. On the other hand,
we should have had no historical museum,
such as the antiquarian and the scholar
in Lord Curzon had long desired for In-
dia, and such as will now be built. Much
other place, for its location; but the mu-
seum scheme, is triumphant. Granted
undoubtedly live down the title of 'Cur-
Pioneer,' and become a real and immense-
ly valuable index to India's past.
Lord Curzon has hustled the Indian pub-
lic. That somewhat lethargic body is pro-
hustled the army and the Punjab Govern-
With the army the trouble arose over cer-
soldiers had to be punished for violence to
natives. Lord Curzon thought justice
was being evaded, and intervened. He
found himself, as the result, bitterly ac-
It was even suggested that the Govern-
ment of India had"'usurped the functions
of a final court of judicial revision." Some
sharp, but not altogether judicious, pun-
British soldiers were revised for the bet-
ter, and Lord Curzon thereafter transfer-
red all responsibility to his military ad-
the Government of India "would not inter-
fere in a disciplinary matter with the su-
perior military authority" provokes a smile
by its adroitness but it has served its pur-
pose in terminating a distinctly undesir-
able situation.
The Indian official world is now discuss-
ing a supposed slight put upon the Punjab.
Administration in connection with the
the susceptibilities of the Indian Civil Ser-
of seniors in the Punjab Commission in or-
Deane. — but eight years ago a captain — at
the head of the charge. Colonel Deane is
the ablest 'political' on the frontier. He
but is a youngster compared to civilians
hitherto in charge of the principal divi-
sions in what is to be the new province.
Other civilians are asking what guarantee
question cf the appointment of posts be-
tween members of the Political Depart-
have occurred, but they have been isolat-
ed. The Government of India is a benevo-
head, and its members recognise its abso-
lute authority. It would not be fair to
name those whose views have been over-
would constitute an organised opposition.
Francis to Lord Curzon's Warren Hast-
ings, and mere grumbling counts for little.
present Viceroy's reforms are bearing use-
ful fruit. The reversal of Lord Elgin's
worthless returns have been abolished.
famine without finances becoming disorder-
ed or progress on railways and canals be-
ing stopped. Rearmament with modern
strength of the Indian forces is being in-
China. There is even a possibility of re-
ducing taxation.
ning to be recognised that the real clue
to his personal conundrum is a single-
ter and stronger and richer than he found
the crew are taking orders more kindly.
Their confidence in the skipper is growing.
bids fair to prosper.
two French chemists (husband and wife),
from this body a new gas, which is in-
tensely phosphorescent, and a sample of
tho dark for mouths. Professor Lipp-
mann states that a French scientist, M.
Naudon, has found means of producing
Rontgen rays without electricity. This
the rays of light of the violet end of the
spectrum. "X" rays are first given forth
on the side of the plate turned towards the
LORD CURZON AND HIS CRITICS A VICEROY UBIQUIOTUS BUT WISE. Simla, April 10. (Article), The Daily News (Perth, WA : 1882 - 1950), Saturday 1 June 1901 page Article 2015-05-13 17:57 IOBD CURZON AND HIS
'A VICEROY UBIQinTOTJS,.BTJT WISE.
(By E. C. Gates dn the 'ODaily Mail.')
. ' -1 . Simla; April -10.
office alloted to an Indian Viceroy. - He
has reached the midway house in his jour
a&y1- of state.
The time has come when it begins to\be
possible to form an estimate of his aims'
and methodsj and to foresee the end in the
lioht of lihe bee:innin2. The largo measure
of; official opposition he is meeting with
calls for some explanation. ?
Lord Curzon is full of strenuous, restless'
energy, which has carried him hoWoot
-from end to end of India to see things for
himself, and has plunged his administra
tion in a vortex of reforms. These re
Government. Foremost ? among them are!
measures directed to clearing ' the
tangle of red tape^-the clogging super
fluity of report-writing. Closely associat-.
ed are changes, now being 'introduced, to
the influence of officers on their own dis
legislation to cope with agricultural in
many years .pasfc by experienced' officers.
cauterisetoe cancer of police corruption ;
famine ; to reorganise the finance of rail
way projects; and to change Indian educa
crafts. '' ' . ?
His predecessors saw the .same ends to''
? attain, the same ills to cure, but they, }
commencing their Indian careers in ignor- !
ance of India, allowed their activity to bo '
the factors in each caso, almost to persu
ade himself/ he has discovered them, and
to formulate an amuzing array of mea
be beneficial. He forwards these with ex
compels doubting and sometimes unwill
ing officials to forward them teo.
Ever before Aim is the shor&iess of his
five years of office ; ever upon him the
?impatience of the Israelite who would not
eat bread until he had- seen his desire ac
VICE-REGAL. METHODS.
to Queen. Victoria, first Empress of India,
excellent in its way;, though' no.t likely to
have been selected but for- his eloquence
?position he holds.1 This scheme, for the
building in Calcutta of a historical mu
seum, is already furnished with magnifi
It witnesses the officiency of his methods.
LORD CURZON AND HIS
'A VICEROY UBIQUITOUS, BUT WISE.
(By E. C. Gates in the 'Daily Mail.')
Simla; April 10.
office alloted to an Indian Viceroy. He
has reached the midway house in his jour-
ney of state.
The time has come when it begins to be
possible to form an estimate of his aims
and methods and to foresee the end in the
light of the beginning. The large measure
of official opposition he is meeting with
calls for some explanation.
Lord Curzon is full of strenuous, restless
energy, which has carried him hot-foot
from end to end of India to see things for
himself, and has plunged his administra-
tion in a vortex of reforms. These re-
Government. Foremost among them are
measures directed to clearing the
tangle of red tape —the clogging super-
fluity of report-writing. Closely associat-
ed are changes, now being introduced, to
the influence of officers on their own dis-
legislation to cope with agricultural in-
many years past by experienced officers.
cauterise the cancer of police corruption;
famine; to reorganise the finance of rail-
way projects; and to change Indian educa-
crafts.
His predecessors saw the same ends to
attain, the same ills to cure, but they,
commencing their Indian careers in ignor-
ance of India, allowed their activity to be
the factors in each case, almost to persu-
ade himself he has discovered them, and
to formulate an amazing array of mea-
be beneficial. He forwards these with ex-
compels doubting and sometimes unwill-
ing officials to forward them t0o.
Ever before him is the shortness of his
five years of office; ever upon him the
impatience of the Israelite who would not
eat bread until he had seen his desire ac-
VICE-REGAL METHODS.
to Queen Victoria, first Empress of India,
excellent in its way; though not likely to
have been selected but for his eloquence
position he holds. This scheme, for the
building in Calcutta of a historical mu-
seum, is already furnished with magnifi-
It witnesses the efficiency of his methods.
RELICS OF A COLLECTION. (Article), The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), Thursday 9 May 1901 page Article 2015-05-13 17:52 It was natural to expect that among tihe
mnntr wmiM* Ho, firvimil 'nrdf -nonwfin.Vilft '
Such ivas the case. Out of some 123,000
numbers of silver coins, with a fair propor
teller were comparatively few, but iis to
variety the Story is a different one. Paper
and a florin issued by the East India Com
Halfpence neatly silvered, chocolate 'six-
pence, discs of tin and' cardboard adver
less tfhan in former years, upwards of £10
coin. Included in the spoils were the num
, To-day, according to a previous arrange
who have been elected to the Federal Par
'Kament to represent Soutlb Australia will
resign tlheir local positions.
It was natural to expect that among the
many would be found "not negotiable".
Such was the case. Out of some 123,000
numbers of silver coins, with a fair propor-
teller were comparatively few, but as to
variety the story is a different one. Paper
and a florin issued by the East India Com-
Halfpence neatly silvered, chocolate six-
pence, discs of tin and cardboard adver-
less than in former years, upwards of £10
coin. Included in the spoils were the num-
To-day, according to a previous arrange-
who have been elected to the Federal Par-
liament to represent South Australia will
resign their local positions.
SCIENCE NOTES. (Article), Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 - 1918), Saturday 4 May 1901 page Article 2015-05-13 17:49 tbo Black Sea, mixed with Itnliau wheat,
especially from Fogi^ia. The coarse flour is
kneaded" in hot water, then pressed through
. holes, cut into lengths and dried. Macaroni ia
the Torre dell Anniuiziata.
As the first reports of Tesla'a wireless tele
we may add that wliile Marconi and others
telegraph by, ethereal •' waves1 through the at
mosphere, caused by elcctric sparks, Teala sends
his eleotric waves through the body of the earth.
sets up. electrical waves in theground. They
they succeed eachother with enormous rapidity,
and tfreyflow in~all directions from the starting
point, just as the waves of witc*r in a pond do
In short,- signals, or -intelligible messages, can
be transmitted by these w-aues, and received;'a.t
any part of the terrestiul-surface where thSre
principle of this telegraph , by electrifying the
ground is (the "Globe reminds us) by no mean's
years ago (see Fa-hieV "History of Wireless
Telegraphy") and it has even been suggested for I
Transatlantic telegraphy, but the idea, as' a
rule, precedes tho means of realising it, and
It remains to be seen whether Testa, with im
to a depth of over'200ft. Could a diver descend
in darkness as a profound, as though he were
immersed in a sea of ink.'
Professor Nipheiv of Washington University,
have been exposed to sunlight Mill serve for
Boutgcn ray photographs. - The give a positive
image on development, find they^can.ivi.dfiie
lopc(T"by~l'lie feeble light of an ordinary lamp;
so that line details which-may Ire lost by over
The Cornell Brain Association has an ener-:
getic President in Professor Wilder, of that;
Universily. He is seeking to obtain promises i
from great Americans that they will bequeath!
; their brains-to the association when .they die. ■
Mr. Ch'iuncey Dfcpew has written :—"You are .
mind," will have further meaning now .for
teestators who hearken to tlie professor's :
A French investigator has come to the con
clusion that the brains of military and naval i
men give out most quickly, says the "Mcdicai;
Record " (loth December). "He state3 that
out of every 100,000 men of the army or naval;
profession 199 are ^hopeless lunatics-. Of the ;
so-called liberal professions, artists are the;
first to succumb to the brain strain, next the:
lawyers, followed at some distance by doctors,.'
clergy, literary men, and civil servant?.
to each 100,000." '
An aeetelycnc automobile is causing talk in:
France. The usual- gasoline reservoir is re-,
70 miles at a f pood of 8 • to 10 miles an lio;ir.:
The motor develops S to 10 horse-power, a.n'd.
According to M. Souleyvc in the "Revue;
Scientifique," the tradition of a deluge, which:
is very widespread, indicates that in the dawn;
of human history great cataclysms 'were pro-;
duced, and , he ascribes that which caused the>
remarkable gorge of Constantino in Algeria to;
tho same timo as the "Hood" which submerged;
the plains of Babylonia at least 0700 years ago.;
Radium, the new metal, is an illumiriant of
great power. Half a pound of it will make air
ordiuary-sized room light- as day for a million1
years. At present the price of the metal ia too'
high for general use. One ounce i3 worth about'
£2<>Q. - - ■
the Black Sea, mixed with Italian wheat,
especially from Foggia. The coarse flour is
kneaded in hot water, then pressed through
holes, cut into lengths and dried. Macaroni is
the Torre dell Annunziata.
As the first reports of Tesla's wireless tele-
we may add that while Marconi and others
telegraph by, ethereal waves through the at-
mosphere, caused by electric sparks, Tesla sends
his electric waves through the body of the earth.
sets up electrical waves in the ground. They
they succeed each other with enormous rapidity,
and they flow in all directions from the starting
point, just as the waves of water in a pond do
In short, signals, or intelligible messages, can
be transmitted by these waves, and received at
any part of the terrestial surface where there
principle of this telegraph, by electrifying the
ground is (the "Globe reminds us) by no means
years ago (see Fahie's "History of Wireless
Telegraphy") and it has even been suggested for
Transatlantic telegraphy, but the idea, as a
rule, precedes the means of realising it, and
It remains to be seen whether Tesla, with im-
to a depth of over 200ft. Could a diver descend
in darkness as a profound as though he were
immersed in a sea of ink.
Professor Nipher of Washington University,
have been exposed to sunlight still serve for
Rontgcn ray photographs. The give a positive
image on development, find they can be deve-
loped by the feeble light of an ordinary lamp;
so that fine details which may be lost by over-
The Cornell Brain Association has an ener-
getic President in Professor Wilder, of that
Universily. He is seeking to obtain promises
from great Americans that they will bequeath
their brains to the association when they die.
Mr. Chauncey Depew has written :—"You are
mind," will have further meaning now for
testators who hearken to the professor's :
A French investigator has come to the con-
clusion that the brains of military and naval
men give out most quickly, says the "Medical
Record " (15th December). "He states that
out of every 100,000 men of the army or naval
profession 199 are hopeless lunatics. Of the
so-called liberal professions, artists are the
first to succumb to the brain strain, next the
lawyers, followed at some distance by doctors,
clergy, literary men, and civil servants.
to each 100,000."
An acetelycnc automobile is causing talk in
France. The usual- gasoline reservoir is re-
70 miles at a speed of 8 to 10 miles an hour.
The motor develops 8 to 10 horse-power, and
According to M. Souleyve in the "Revue
Scientifique," the tradition of a deluge, which
is very widespread, indicates that in the dawn
of human history great cataclysms'were pro-
duced, and he ascribes that which caused the
remarkable gorge of Constantine in Algeria to
the same time as the "flood" which submerged
the plains of Babylonia at least 5700 years ago.
Radium, the new metal, is an illuminant of
great power. Half a pound of it will make an
ordinary-sized room light as day for a million
years. At present the price of the metal is too
high for general use. One ounce is worth about
£240.
In the South-Western District. (Article), West Australian Sunday Times (Perth, WA : 1897 - 1902), Sunday 13 January 1901 page Article 2015-05-13 17:39 Having occasion recently to visi
*he Banbury district, and havin<
: more that the regulation quantity oi
business to transact during the fe«
days that I could spare from Perth, 3
. determined on the day of my depar
in order to have the whole of the fol
lowing day for business. I must con
fess right away that I shall never bf
guilty of a like performance again, ai
the mixed special which I had tnt
privilege of travelling in, and which ie
Banbury, and-travelled at the alarm-
ing rate of a shade under IS miles per
.lasts, there are objects to be seen
polls up at Jarrahdale, the care and
attention of the . Commissioner for
quired it Pinjarrah. One passenger
? intimated his intention of dining at
to a ' weakness for dinner, I began to
*Í?he little farce, however, seems to be
cation that only one person was inde
. cent enough to feel hungry when the
- tram rushed-or, to be correct, crawled
--into Pinjarrah, the whole six lined np
and partook of. a square meal for
which ^ach parted with the modest
porter's query. Throughout the car- ?
riages the porter gets about two replies j
on the average, and although the pro- ;
there is sufficient te feed a hundred.
travellers are going to bave dinner at
be its chief ? feature, the game isn't
Üailways I would like to state thai
?while travelling. On this particular
journey the only ^ay that it was pos-
the Ballway Department, I have
cessor ; but this little matter of suffi-
issue entitled " Another Marvel of
Scotchwoman), can be found at thc
bit in the pocket of «ach passenger by
faefc. ÎT.B.-The Hon. H. Venn is at
the Collie. _ The railway people
seems » to have a playful way
at the Collie. Su playful is the system
.had to clear out to Kew South Wales,
at their disposal. lu New South
bali a dozen mines on account of a
scarcity of trucks, while at* the same
time thtír-3 are 40 or 50 empty
.and it s'iould not be the cus-
tom in Western Australia if tlie
. i
get trucks to send their coal down tn,
would do well to pay a visit "to the
deep drainage ; as well as to note the
timber is destroyed by those engaged i
in securing marketable stuff. So far I
as I could cather the people on the !
Commissioner for Crown ' Lands, but
in its midst. During my visit the.,
principal topic was the-choice of a
presentative for 'Bunbury, two "candi-
dates having been spoken 6£ , The;
[merits of these two were" being dis-
i when one "who evidently was greatly
interested,in the matter, gave it as Iiis
opinion that neither of these-gentle-
matter over. It is;VhöWeyer, certain"
year? has only caused a feeling of
Bunbnryites to have the next Premier
residing in Bunbury. .By the way,
with two local candidates in the field"
there is a splendid opening ia Bunbury.
1 '". "' '
Having occasion recently to visit
the Banbury district, and having
more that the regulation quantity of
business to transact during the few
days that I could spare from Perth, I
determined on the day of my depar-
in order to have the whole of the fol-
lowing day for business. I must con-
fess right away that I shall never be
guilty of a like performance again, as
the mixed special which I had the
privilege of travelling in, and which is
Banbury, and travelled at the alarm-
ing rate of a shade under 15 miles per
lasts, there are objects to be seen
pulls up at Jarrahdale, the care and
attention of the Commissioner for
quired at Pinjarrah. One passenger
intimated his intention of dining at
to a weakness for dinner, I began to
The little farce, however, seems to be
cation that only one person was inde-
cent enough to feel hungry when the
train rushed—or, to be correct, crawled
—into Pinjarrah, the whole six lined up
and partook of a square meal for
which each parted with the modest
porter's query. Throughout the car-
riages the porter gets about two replies
on the average, and although the pro-
there is sufficient to feed a hundred.
travellers are going to have dinner at
be its chief feature, the game isn't
Railways I would like to state that
while travelling. On this particular
journey the only way that it was pos-
the Railway Department, I have
cessor; but this little matter of suffi-
issue entitled "Another Marvel of
Scotchwoman), can be found at the
bit in the pocket of each passenger by
fact. N.B.-The Hon. H. Venn is at
the Collie. _The railway people
seems to have a playful way
at the Collie. So playful is the system
had to clear out to New South Wales,
at their disposal. In New South
half a dozen mines on account of a
scarcity of trucks, while at the same
time there are 40 or 50 empty
and it should not be the cus-
tom in Western Australia if the

get trucks to send their coal down in,
would do well to pay a visit to the
deep drainage; as well as to note the
timber is destroyed by those engaged
in securing marketable stuff. So far
as I could cather the people on the
Commissioner for Crown Lands, but
in its midst. During my visit the
principal topic was the choice of a
presentative for Bunbury, two candi-
dates having been spoken of.The
merits of these two were being dis-
when one who evidently was greatly
interested in the matter, gave it as his
opinion that neither of these gentle-
matter over. It is, however, certain
years has only caused a feeling of
Bunburyites to have the next Premier
residing in Bunbury. By the way,
with two local candidates in the field
there is a splendid opening in Bunbury.

SCIENCE & INVENTION. PERPETUAL LIGHT. THE STORY OF A WONDERFUL DISCOVERY. (Article), The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 - 1954), Wednesday 19 December 1900 page Article 2015-05-13 17:30 j SCIENCE & INVENTION.!
THE STORY OFT WONDERFUL
The "San Francisco Examiner" is re- I
no expenso, oven though the "lamp" be
loft alone for a hundred years. Day
after doy it will omit its rays and spread
centuries pass its radianco will remain
the samo. There will be no problem
. carrying oil from one part of the coun-
ish stone will bo placed in the wall or
SCIENCE & INVENTION.
THE STORY OF A WONDERFUL
The "San Francisco Examiner" is re-
no expense, even though the "lamp" be
left alone for a hundred years. Day
after day it will emit its rays and spread
centuries pass its radiance will remain
the same. There will be no problem
carrying oil from one part of the coun-
ish stone will be placed in the wall or

Counts updated hourly

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

  1. 00-The Big Book of Australian History
    List
    Public

    These links relate to a book to be released on October 1, 2013. This is a list of lists, and some of those lists may themselves be lists of list of lists. Where necessary, there is duplication, but this is a place to fossick and enrich your mind. This work is close to completed in September, 2013, though I don't imagine it will ever be completely finished, even after the book is released.

    19 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  2. 01-An Ancient Land
    List
    Public

    Chapter 1 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    7 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  3. 02-The Dreaming
    List
    Public

    Chapter 2 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    14 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  4. 03-Voyages of Discovery
    List
    Public

    Chapter 3 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    11 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  5. 04-Founding Colonies
    List
    Public

    Chapter 4 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    29 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  6. 05-The Explorers
    List
    Public

    Chapter 5 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    58 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  7. 06-Gold
    List
    Public

    Chapter 6 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    7 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  8. 07-Settling the land
    List
    Public

    Chapter 7 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    10 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  9. 08-Growth of the Cities
    List
    Public

    Chapter 8 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    10 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  10. 09-Federation
    List
    Public

    Chapter 9 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    21 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  11. 10-Becoming ANZACS
    List
    Public

    Chapter 10 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    36 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  12. 11- the 1920s
    List
    Public

    Chapter 11 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    30 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  13. 12-the Great Depression
    List
    Public

    Chapter 12 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    16 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  14. 13-World War 2
    List
    Public

    Chapter 13 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    38 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  15. 14-Post-war Australia
    List
    Public

    Chapter 14 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    20 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  16. 15-Controversial issues
    List
    Public

    Chapter 15 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    9 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  17. 16-Sporting Life
    List
    Public

    Chapter 16 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    43 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  18. 17-People from everywhere
    List
    Public

    Chapter 17 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    9 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  19. 18-Famous Australians
    List
    Public

    Chapter 18 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    31 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  20. 19-Disasters
    List
    Public

    Chapter 19 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'. The chapter numbers changed a bit during editing, but I have left the names of the last few lists as they were.

    9 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  21. A capital site
    List
    Public

    The search for a site for the new capital of the Commonwealth

    36 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-10-30
    User data
  22. Australia First conspiracy trial
    List
    Public

    In 1942, a small group of individuals in Western Australia planned to seize the reins of government "when the Japanese landed". They moulded themselves on the various European collaborators with the Germans, but were totally pathetic as plotters. The coverage is taken from the 'Kalgoorlie Miner': this is for consistency, because I first encountered it there: I may add other sources later.

    31 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2013-02-13
    User data
  23. Australian inventions
    List
    Public

    A list of curious inventions, mainly those originated in Australia.

    20 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-07-20
    User data
  24. beach sand gold
    List
    Public

    Some of the claims for minerals found in beach sand, mainly but not limited to, gold.

    22 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-11-11
    User data
    Tags:
  25. bubonic plague
    List
    Public

    Details of the bubonic plague in Australia, circa 1900: these are selected articles, in chronological order. I plan to add more references at some future date.

    33 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-05-05
    User data
  26. bunyip
    List
    Public

    Early references to the bunyip and other "monsters".

    25 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-07-21
    User data
  27. Calvert's gold
    List
    Public

    I selected John Calvert (1814-1897) as a suitable case for treatment when I came across a reference in an 1850s 'Scientific American' to a London court case against James Wyld in April 1854 (Wyld was, at that point, the subject of my enquiries). Calvert shares his name with one of Leichhardt's 1844-1846 exploration party, but I knew it wasn't the same man, and he sounded sufficiently dubious to be interesting to investigate. The entries are in chronological order. The 'Encyclopaedia of Australian Science' says some thought him a romancer. I am at one with his contemporaries (you will find them in this list) who called him an impostor and a Munchausen.

    40 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-12-23
    User data
  28. coolies in Australia
    List
    Public

    Looking at the various attempts to introduce coolies into Australia. I hope soon to annotate the rest of the entries more usefully. Note that "coolies" at first meant Indian workers only, but was later extended to include Chinese. The systems under which they were employed were similar to the contracts used with Kanakas, late in the 19th century. Note that the language and attitudes of the day were somewhat confronting (or worse!). The order is strictly chronological, so if you know a date, scroll down!

    70 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-05-09
    User data
  29. early medical books
    List
    Public

    Books relating to medicine in Australia in the 19th century. The term "medicine" will be used broadly.

    5 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2015-04-13
    User data
  30. early use of language
    List
    Public

    This records my searches for the earliest instances in newspapers of a number of apparently Australian terms. The order is alphabetical by term and then by year, with the year of use appearing in each note. My plan is generally to offer three to five of the earliest hits that I find on any given word or phrase. (This parsimonious intention has been ignored, as in "billy", where there is a curious pattern of uptake to be observed and tested more fully.) Note that some of these selections have explanatory comments and references as well. IMPORTANT: please look at the first item, as I have now started assembling these into a rather more accessible web page, which is the first item in the list.

    197 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-01-02
    User data
    Tags:
  31. Georgiana Molloy
    List
    Public

    Possible references to Georgiana Molloy, plant collector

    22 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-03-24
    User data
  32. gold books
    List
    Public

    23 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2013-09-07
    User data
  33. gold history
    List
    Public

    This is a super-list, and some of the links are, in fact, also lists. This is the One List to Rule Them All.

    60 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-11-29
    User data
  34. gold relief schemes
    List
    Public

    Schemes to send unemployed men out in the Great Depression to find gold.

    8 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2014-07-15
    User data
  35. John and Elizabeth Gould
    List
    Public

    These are the bird Goulds: they visited Australia in 1839 and the early 1840s

    16 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-10-12
    User data
  36. John Lewin
    List
    Public

    This is to help others track down the Lewin material that I have corrected and tagged as "John Lewin". I have also added some external material that others don't seem to know about, all at Macquarie Law, which is a most excellent resource.

    41 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-08-17
    User data
  37. Kokoda track
    List
    Public

    This began as a selection of the best journalism written by those unsung heroes, the Australian journalists who travelled the Owen Stanley Track, and against trenchant censorship from the Brass, told the tale. I have since added a few other useful backgrounders on the early history of the track. The order is chronological, the selector's bias shows in the way items referring to the "Kokoda Trail" have been ignored. Those items were mostly left out because they are more likely than not to be poisoned by McArthur's publicity machine, written by people who had been no closer than Melbourne. Those who actually went there called it a track.

    22 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-11-09
    User data
  38. M'Gregor's gold
    List
    Public

    A Wellington shepherd named Hugh M'Gregor, alias Macgregor or McGregor was widely credited with being the first to find gold. This is an attempt to pull all of the available information on him together: it will certainly assist anybody trying to track down this elusive character. With this aim in mind, I have also flagged the rare items which mention his forename, and attempt to follow his later life.

    43 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-08-04
    User data
  39. migration controls and regulations
    List
    Public

    Accounts having a bearing on the control of entry and exit from ports in Australia.

    5 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-12-22
    User data
  40. Murdoch and the media
    List
    Public

    A collection of comments made over the years about the Murdoch family and media monopolies.

    11 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2014-02-03
    User data
  41. passage times
    List
    Public

    This will be a slow-growing list of articles where reference is made to fast or slow passages to Britain, Europe or the USA (and more recently, within Australia). The items will be in chronological order.

    18 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-01-02
    User data
    Tags:
  42. Royal Commission on Gold Stealing
    List
    Public

    Stories relating to the W.A. Royal Commission which examined the prevalence of gold stealing in the eastern goldfields. It began with a 1906 report on gold theft by an English journalist called Scantlebury, and ended up leading to some changes, aimed at trapping the fences who bought stolen gold. The hero was 33-year-old Detective Sergeant Peter Kavanagh who got the evidence, but died in Sydney in 1908.

    59 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-11-01
    User data
  43. seashores
    List
    Public

    A collection of pieces relating to shore life and coastal and estuarine environments: beaches, rocks, rock pools, tides, waves and more. This list can be expected to grow continually during 2011 and 2012. There are two conscious purposes shaping my selections: my writerly aim is to find material relevant to a writing project that I have in mind, my pedagogical aim is to provide a collection of thought-provoking pieces for use in education at any level. That is to say, I hope that these choices may help learners to think—and to question their assumptions as I did, when I found the marine spiders!

    76 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-10-02
    User data
  44. steam power
    List
    Public

    Material relevant to some future social history of steam in Australia.

    95 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-08-17
    User data
  45. The Pfalz case
    List
    Public

    The incidents leading up to and following the firing of the first shots in the Great War. The S.s. Pfalz, tried to leave Port Phillip at the outbreak of war, and was turned back.

    21 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2013-09-08
    User data
  46. The road to Port Essington
    List
    Public

    Before Ludwig Leichhardt took off to find a route, others were talking about it. This pulls together some of those threads and reveals why people thought finding such a "road" would be a good idea. Personally, I suspect that some of them were thinking of a future railway, but did not dare stick their necks out that far.

    50 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-12-28
    User data
  47. Vignettes of the Great War
    List
    Public

    Snippets offering a sense of the way people faced the war, largely intended as a classroom resource in the tradition of the old Jackdaws. These are random, happened-upon gleanings, where most of my lists are rather more calculated and planned. This list will grow slowly.

    1 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-02-02
    User data
  48. Wicked Grocer
    List
    Public

    G. K. Chesterton, in 'A Song Against Grocers' wrote:
    God made the wicked Grocer
    For a mystery and a sign,
    That men might shun the awful shops
    And go to inns to dine...

    This list is about food adulteration.

    12 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2013-05-06
    User data
  49. Wildman's gold
    List
    Public

    A Dutch or German sailor called Wildman claimed in 1863 to have found gold in Camden Harbour (near the Glenelg River) seven years previously, and claiming to have sold the gold in Liverpool. He offered, for a remission, to lead the way there. The gold was never found, in part because he failed to cooperate, and then tried to steal the ship's two boats and make a run for it.

    12 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-01-16
    User data
  50. William Hay Caldwell
    List
    Public

    Articles relating to the visit to Australia of zoologist William Hay Caldwell who elucidated the reproductive modes of monotremes and marsupials and studied the lungfish, along with some notes on his little-known marriage to a Sydney heiress. There are many more articles tagged with Caldwell's name which may be accessed from any of these. There are also other tags that may help the dedicated scholar: the furore over marsupial reproduction can be identified by the tag "bad science". Just watch the tags, OK?

    59 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2013-05-15
    User data
  51. wireless telegraphy
    List
    Public

    Early days of radio: an occasional list that may not grow much.

    1 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-10-30
    User data
  52. Women in trousers
    List
    Public

    The very idea of women wearing trousers horrified many in the 1930s and 1940s. The war changed a lot of that, but even in the 1950s, there were strong reactions. This is an attempt to landmark some of the events in the slow climb to rationality. This will be a slow-growing collection, but there is already enough to reveal the sort of shock that was aroused.

    23 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2013-12-27
    User data

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.