Information about Trove user: peter-macinnis

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

RankCorrectorLines corrected
1 JohnWarren 3,206,407
2 NeilHamilton 2,236,872
3 annmanley 2,041,746
4 noelwoodhouse 1,821,951
5 maurielyn 1,448,688
...
35 tbfrank 525,278
36 RobertMorison 517,930
37 cmt17 498,069
38 peter-macinnis 489,866
39 RonnieLand 481,250
40 aleon 468,165

489,866 lines corrected.

Corrections by month

April 2015 4,004
March 2015 5,598
February 2015 3,805
January 2015 538
December 2014 253
November 2014 107
October 2014 49
September 2014 84
August 2014 121
July 2014 399
June 2014 1,048
May 2014 6,333
April 2014 23,016
March 2014 21,127
February 2014 22,103
January 2014 10,627
December 2013 26,128
November 2013 1,934
October 2013 1,619
September 2013 1,744
August 2013 1,684
June 2013 5,013
May 2013 15,746
April 2013 14,168
March 2013 20,421
February 2013 30,105
January 2013 9,339
December 2012 737
November 2012 7,316
October 2012 14,568
September 2012 6,009
August 2012 3,269
July 2012 11,562
June 2012 19,091
May 2012 17,682
April 2012 11,011
March 2012 17,788
February 2012 12,215
January 2012 14,195
December 2011 12,429
November 2011 14,432
October 2011 26,085
September 2011 5,912
August 2011 8,313
July 2011 2,074
June 2011 1,593
April 2011 2,846
March 2011 1,558
February 2011 1,673
January 2011 3,508
December 2010 10,600
November 2010 11,524
October 2010 7,900
September 2010 9,529
August 2010 52
July 2010 265
June 2010 49
May 2010 713
April 2010 4,834
March 2010 33
February 2010 167
January 2010 216
December 2009 15
November 2009 154
October 2009 23
September 2009 73
August 2009 94
July 2009 37
June 2009 18
May 2009 15
April 2009 24
March 2009 83
February 2009 17
January 2009 76
December 2008 123
November 2008 99
October 2008 88
September 2008 34
August 2008 32

Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
CATHCART. (Article), Delegate Argus (NSW : 1906 - 1943), Friday 18 October 1907 page Article 2015-04-19 13:05 UATHCART.
semor-uonstaDie ana Mrs. Mo
tones were entertained by the
residents at a gipsy tea on Satur
?eserve. An impending storm
aroke Up the party earlier than
Dassed away to the north. Rev.
*^i*\f A i n rtr1 'erxrtlro in (^i^lr»rrie+-to to**mr-
-f the guests and Concluded his
?emarks by wishing them success
n their new home. ' . . '
?
CATHCART.
Senior-constable and Mrs. Mc-
Innes were entertained by the
residents at a gipsy tea on Satur-
reserve. An impending storm
broke up the party earlier than
passed away to the north. Rev.
Cordiner spoke in eulogistic terms
of the guests and concluded his
remarks by wishing them success
in their new home.
[From Our Correspondent.]
SPORTING. (Article), The Bega Budget (NSW : 1905 - 1921), Wednesday 24 January 1906 page Article 2015-04-19 12:59 'Sunny : Jim' Mackay, this
'Sunny : Jim Mackay, this
Bombala. (Article), Delegate Argus and Border Post (NSW : 1895 - 1906), Saturday 29 July 1905 page Article 2015-04-19 12:47 he had to go to Nimitybslle, and could not
would not be dictated to by an- Dill Macky
he had to go to Nimitybelle, and could not
would not be dictated to by any Dill Macky
WEDNESDAY. (Article), Goulburn Herald (NSW : 1881 - 1907), Wednesday 19 April 1905 page Article 2015-04-19 12:38 struggle to keelp their elderly mother, a
esned circumstances in which they were
with stealing, at Burrows, on 29th April,
Jurors.
deposed that on 26th May, 1902, he sawac-
cuscd at Frederick King's selection, on the
was at Crookwell ; accused said he had a
do you know she's crook? ' he replied, " I
chesthnut mare and accused rode Stede's mare
Wituess, continuing, said he had not seen
afterwsards he came back and went to work
There werw several previous convictions
struggle to keep their elderly mother, a
ened circumstances in which they were
with stealing, at Burrowa, on 29th April,
jurors.
deposed that on 26th May, 1902, he saw ac-
cused at Frederick King's selection, on the
was at Crookwell; accused said he had a
do you know she's crook?" he replied, " I
chestnut mare and accused rode Stede's mare
Witness, continuing, said he had not seen
afterwards he came back and went to work
There were several previous convictions
WEDNESDAY. (Article), Goulburn Herald (NSW : 1881 - 1907), Wednesday 19 April 1905 page Article 2015-04-19 12:34 Hlenry Thomas Winton deposed that hlie
knew Stede's chestnut maro; that was not the
To Mr. Belts: Hle could not say that the
mare outside the court was tile one he sow
naccused riding.
John Farrell, labourer, residing at Burrown,
deposed that the imar outside thi court was
his;.he ]psi her.in.102. .
To his Meonor t Ie'dlid iot know what part
of the year; lie thought it was the middle.
To the Crown Prosecutor: It was in Jan.
usary.
To his Honor: He did not know haow many
months there were in a year; Ithe did not
know what year lhis was; le ]nsew the day
of the wscek;.that day was Wduesdtlny; it
wasoin the summer timeho lost the mare; lie
did not know whether Januuiry was ip the
esumer; he did nnt know lie uames of tlls
The silnecssmcontinuing, int npsrer: to the
crown prosecutor, saidlhi got the mnare back
frori theJ police; he saw the accused at Biur.
rowa,. naloutlh lforo tl(e plnyo was lost.
Mr, letts dlid 'tot elall evidenpo 'for thl
defence, bit atddressed the jury at length,
contending tha:t the evidenc was' altogether
Ills Honor suntined up, stating that the
-in aec:enad's possession waso very we.ik; but
tile reas e as strensgthei;ed by the euvdence of
tihe oosstablt, nal adt would be for the j4gry to
say whether they could pinoo reliance on his
unrontlrtadicted evidence, One thing that told
Rglntst the anc0sed was that he bolted assay
sthen tie eonsltabl took him to the stabln.
The jury relired at 11.45 a.m,, and returned
tit a quarter past twelve with a verdict of
guilty, and aroused wtas remanded till 2 p.m,
for s?entene.
Accused haId nothing to say slwhy sentence
There .wer. several previous, convictions
igsinast neersed for cattle stealing.
cery. bad tman. His previous' sbtoiPco for
siimilar offences had had no effect on him,
and he'- would now have to pass a hlielty,
soitenneo.
Stenctee: Soveu years' pounal servitude.
Henry Thomas Winton deposed that he
knew Stede's chestnut mare; that was not the
To Mr. Betts: He could not say that the
mare outside the court was the one he saw
accused riding.
John Farrell, labourer, residing at Burrowa,
deposed that the mar outside the court was
his; he lost her in 1902.
To his Honor He did not know what part
of the year; he thought it was the middle.
To the Crown Prosecutor: It was in Jan-
uary.
To his Honor: He did not know how many
months there were in a year; he did not
know what year this was; he knew the day
of the week; that day was Wednesday; it
was in the summer time he lost the mare; he
did not know whether January was in the
summer; he did not know the names of the
The witness continuing, in answer to the
crown prosecutor, said he got the mare back
from the police; he saw the accused at Bur-
rowa, a month before the mare was lost.
Mr Betts did not call evidence for the
defence, but addressed the jury at length,
contending that the evidence was altogether
His Honor summed up, stating that the
in accused's possession was very weak; but
the case was strengthened by the evidence of
the constable, and it would be for the jury to
say whether they could place reliance on his
uncontradicted evidence. One thing that told
against the accused was that he bolted away
when the constable took him to the stable.
The jury retired at 11.45 a.m,, and returned
at a quarter past twelve with a verdict of
guilty, and accused was remanded till 2 p.m,
for sentence.
Accused had nothing to say why sentence
There werw several previous convictions
against accused for cattle stealing.
very bad man. His previous sentences for
similar offences had had no effect on him,
and he would now have to pass a heavy
sentence.
Sentence: Seven years' penal servitude.
WEDNESDAY. (Article), Goulburn Herald (NSW : 1881 - 1907), Wednesday 19 April 1905 page Article 2015-04-19 12:24 shrep should be allowed out usndler the First
steal sheelp.
Each necused wasc sentencedl to nine
months' hard labor in Goulbura jail.
Francis lHetl1rt' Cottnm, convicted on the
revibous day of omanslaughter atQueasnbyan,
Mr. Selryn Belts referred to Ihe excellent
strong affection for his motllher. He askled
his Honor to take these facts into considera.
[is oanor said the jury had given tile ase
very careful andt very earnest consideration,
and hod s?een their way to find him guilty of
manslaughter only. loe was not finding fault
seen their way to convict of itnnslhughter
only. 41. the l amgl timnu it was no doubt a
cast of manslaughter that bordered very
closely on murder, und lie could not pans it over
lihghtly. People were altogether too ready to
consequences. lhe had taken the recommen.
datiou of the jury and all the facts into
would be penal servitudo for five years.
CHARGE OF HORBE-BTE4ALINO,
Williarli O'Donnell (about 40) was charged
with stealing, at Burtonw, on 29th April,
Accused pleaded not guilty, and was de
fended by Mr. Betts. le challenged two
deposed that on 20th May, 19002, he saw no.
cuscd at Frederick King'o selection,'on the
Temorn road; he recognised accused. as
harry J.ones, glias VWilliam O'Donnell, alias
,John Tigmlpig; accused was working in a
paddgck, and witnese asked him how long hlie
had been working (hero; accused said about
woo at Crooliwell ; neaused said hoe had a
llarris's paddock; Mr. King ran up come
'brought a chestnut more and a black mare to
necused's camp; wilteos told accused to
- if I do, she's crook-you can't run me
do you know she's :crook ' lihe replied, " I
know nothing about her.;" witness led the
lchesthLut mare and accused rodeStede's mare
jnto I ounjl; while, thiey were in the forage
room at Sub-inspeptor: B;rne's residenco, nc
Tn his .honor: 4t that time lie was not
upder arrest.
Wituess, continuing, said he had riot seen
him since till April thit year at the Young
To Mr. Belts s le did not arrest accubed,
and lie charge was made egailst himn; wit.
ness was only detaining him,
Frederick King, farmer, residing at Hrimp.
'stead, deposed that he remembered Constable
McInnes coming to sco accused in May,
11103; the day after acc'ised came to his
placo he saw him driving up the road with a
afterwsards lie eane back and went to work
willt 8tode I he saw accused riding a chestnut
smare or a horseo; it was similar to the one
outside the court; later Ithe se Constable Me
hines leading the chestnut mare away.
Robert Stedo, labourer, residing at Spring
Creek, deposed that' the mnre the constable
To Mr. Detts: Thii horse the constable led
oolk out in the wnggonetto; Ithe did not see
accused riding any other mare eicopt the one
witness took out in the waggonetto.
sheep should be allowed out under the First
steal sheep.
Each accused was sentenced to nine
months' hard labor in Goulburn jail.
Francis Herbert Cottam, convicted on the
previous day of manslaughter at Queanbeyan,
Mr. Selwyn Betts referred to the excellent
strong affection for his mother. He asked
his Honor to take these facts into considera-
His honor said the jury had given the case
very careful and very earnest consideration,
and had seen their way to find him guilty of
manslaughter only. He was not finding fault
seen their way to convict of manslaughter
only. At the same time it was no doubt a
case of manslaughter that bordered very
closely on murder, and he could not pass it over
lightly. People were altogether too ready to
consequences. He had taken the recommen-
dation of the jury and all the facts into
would be penal servitude for five years.
CHARGE OF HORSE-STEALING
William O'Donnell (about 40) was charged
with stealing, at Burrows, on 29th April,
Accused pleaded not guilty, and was de-
fended by Mr. Betts. He challenged two
deposed that on 26th May, 1902, he sawac-
cuscd at Frederick King's selection, on the
Temora road; he recognised accused as
Harry Jones, alias William O'Donnell, alias
John Timmins; accused was working in a
paddock, and witness asked him how long he
had been working there; accused said about
was at Crookwell ; accused said he had a
Harris's paddock; Mr. King ran up some
brought a chestnut mare and a black mare to
accused's camp; witness told accused to
—— if I do, she's crook—you can't run me
do you know she's crook? ' he replied, " I
know nothing about her;" witness led the
chesthnut mare and accused rode Stede's mare
into Young; while, they were in the forage
room at Sub-inspector Byrne's residence, ac-
To his Honor: at that time he was not
under arrest.
Wituess, continuing, said he had not seen
him since till April that year at the Young
To Mr. Betts: He did not arrest accused,
and no charge was made against him; wit-
ness was only detaining him.
Frederick King, farmer, residing at Hamp-
stead, deposed that he remembered Constable
McInnes coming to see accused in May,
1903; the day after accused came to his
place he saw him driving up the road with a
afterwsards he came back and went to work
with Stede; he saw accused riding a chestnut
mare or a horse; it was similar to the one
outside the court; later he saw Constable Mc
Innes leading the chestnut mare away.
Robert Stede, labourer, residing at Spring
Creek, deposed that the mare the constable
To Mr. Betts: The horse the constable led
took out in the waggonette; he did not see
accused riding any other mare except the one
witness took out in the waggonette.
WEDNESDAY. (Article), Goulburn Herald (NSW : 1881 - 1907), Wednesday 19 April 1905 page Article 2015-04-19 12:12 lis IHonor took his sent at 9.30.
sheep-atealing, were brought up for sentence.
said ther hald been bhorn in the district, and
againsrt them. 'The hlder of the two men
wos married, and they hLad had a hard
struggle to keelp their, elderly mother, a
brother, and wife ound two children. Of
what; t hey did, but lhe wished to call his lonor's
otte:tion to the extraordinary and itrait
esod circunmtances in which they were
pllced. If his ihonor would not deal with
thoe under the First Offenders' Act, he
asked that only n light scnteanco he passed.
Mr. Betts had said, and it was What he had
been thinking hitiself. At Ithe same time he
had to take care of the interests of the pub
lic. He knew perfeclly well tlhat there was
a great deal of shsep-stealing going on, and
he did not tink that a person who stole
I;'NTENCES,
FPIErIST''EALING,
His Honor took his seat at 9.30.
sheep-stealing, were brought up for sentence.
said they had been born in the district, and
against them. The elder of the two men
was married, and they had had a hard
struggle to keelp their elderly mother, a
brother, and wife and two children. Of
what they did, but he wished to call his Honor's
attention to the extraordinary and strait-
esned circumstances in which they were
placed. If his Honor would not deal with
them under the First Offenders' Act, he
asked that only a light sentence be passed.
Mr. Betts had said, and it was what he had
been thinking himself. At the same time he
had to take care of the interests of the pub-
lic. He knew perfectly well that there was
a great deal of sheep-stealing going on, and
he did not think that a person who stole
SENTENCES,
SHEEP STEALING,
"THE MINER'S" FIRST LIBEL ACTION. A Constable Sues for £200. Defendants Pay £2 into Court. Conflicting Evidence by a Constable and a Reporter. (Article), Barrier Miner (Broken Hill, NSW : 1888 - 1954), Wednesday 22 July 1896 page Article 2015-04-19 11:49 " THE MINER'S" FIRST LIBEL
Défendants Pay £2 into Court.
THE bearing of this libel action was com
Knight and 0. von Rieben, proprietors and
publishers of the BARRIES MINER. The
i MIKES on April ll. The defendants paid
plaintiff, enumerated the fa'its set forth
and bad been for some time, the only one
which it scated-for all sorts of re-
the country rieht away to Wilcannia. It
district could rely. This wa3 all ' the more
who did not require damages, bat only that
The .first witness called was the plaintiff,
who stated :-I am a constable of police,
How long at Broken Hill ?-A little over
Do you know defendants ?-Yes.
By sight, I suppose ?-Yes.
'the BARRIER MINER?-Yes.
-No.
got ?-I believe a large one.
How is it sold in town ? - Boys sell it about
parts outside the district ?-Yea.
Where ?-To Adelaide and Wilcannia.
On the 29th March where were you ? -On
certain people there ? - Yea,
yard you saw a man ?-Yes.
Mr. Beran : What was that person doing?
-He was in the yard making ase of bad
Yo J took his name and address ?-Yes.
Could you seo him distinctly ?-No, it was
His Honor: What time was it?-A
mons ?-Yes.
Did you state the facts?-Yes-that I saw
ceedings against Carr?-No.
You had some conversation with the sub
inspector?-Yes.
And after that what did you do?-Two
summonses were issued - one against
Which case came on first?-Carr's. I
in the case? -No.
His Honor : W ere the members of the
Press and tho public allowed access to the
room?-Vea.
there ?-Yes.
def euc*! ?-I believe there were four.
Whatbecimoof the,case?-Ihe informa-
Then waa Hacking's case the next heard?
-Yes.
Did you serve a summons on him ?-No.
Who served it?-Constable M'Innis.
Did you know Hoi king at all ?-No.
-No, not to my knowledge.
after Carr's?-Yes.
Or before 1-I am not very certain about
* You went into the box and gave your
evidence 1-Yes. (Depositions produced. )
Did you look at Hocking carefully before'
you star- td to give evidence ?-No, I did not
take particular notice of h m.
Duiing the course of cross-examination
officer who was conducting the case ?-Yes.
What was it ?-I said I did not think the
mon before the court was the man for whom
You signed the depositions ?-Yes.
trates ?-Yes. I said, " I think there has
intended the summons for. lie made appli-
cation for the withdrawal of the butnmons,
you see this articL?-On the 11th April.
TO THE EDITOR O' THS BVKBIBB HUTBB.
Si«,-I was much interested in acose which carno
before the local bench on Thursday-that of the
with opening his bar on Sunday, ia contravention
same way, and wheu I lost I had to pay police
costs ; but when I won conld not get costs ngaiust
the police. Tb o evMence of Carr and his wife
must ba accepted RS trno, for the bench decided in
tho case are as follow :-The co establo swore th it
12 raeu were drinking on the premises : as a mattel
of fact the bar was cloied and locked, and was only
it was empty. Though in such coses the police
the constable gave his ovidence was evident to any
intelligent person present, and evidently, j>dgin<
by th« ' esult, impressed thu bench unfavorably. IE
fact, Mrs. Carr characterised his s-tateaiKnta ir
court OJ deliberate li. ti. He took tho name of a
"THE MINER'S" FIRST LIBEL
Defendants Pay £2 into Court.
THE hearing of this libel action was com-
Knight and O. von Rieben, proprietors and
publishers of the BARRIER MINER. The
MINER on April 11. The defendants paid
plaintiff, enumerated the facts set forth
and had been for some time, the only one
which it stated—for all sorts of re-
the country right away to Wilcannia. It
district could rely. This was all the more
who did not require damages, but only that
The first witness called was the plaintiff,
who stated :—I am a constable of police,
How long at Broken Hill ?—A little over
Do you know defendants ?—Yes.
By sight, I suppose ?—Yes.
the BARRIER MINER?-Yes.
—No.
got ?—I believe a large one.
How is it sold in town ? — Boys sell it about
parts outside the district ?—Yes.
Where ?—To Adelaide and Wilcannia.
On the 29th March where were you ? —On
certain people there ? —Yes.
yard you saw a man ?—Yes.
Mr. Bevan : What was that person doing?
—He was in the yard making use of bad
You took his name and address ?—Yes.
Could you see him distinctly ?—No, it was
His Honor: What time was it?—A
mons ?—Yes.
Did you state the facts?—Yes—that I saw
ceedings against Carr?—No.
You had some conversation with the sub-
inspector?—Yes.
And after that what did you do?—Two
summonses were issued — one against
Which case came on first?—Carr's. I
in the case? —No.
His Honor : Were the members of the
Press and the public allowed access to the
room?—Yes.
there ?—Yes.
defence?—I believe there were four.
What became of the,case?—The informa-
Then was Hocking's case the next heard?
—Yes.
Did you serve a summons on him ?—No.
Who served it?—Constable M'Innis.
Did you know Hocking at all ?—No.
—No, not to my knowledge.
after Carr's?—Yes.
Or before?-I am not very certain about
You went into the box and gave your
evidence?— Yes. (Depositions produced. )
Did you look at Hocking carefully before
you started to give evidence ?—No, I did not
take particular notice of him.
During the course of cross-examination
officer who was conducting the case ?—Yes.
What was it ?—I said I did not think the
man before the court was the man for whom
You signed the depositions ?—Yes.
trates ?—Yes. I said, "I think there has
intended the summons for. He made appli-
cation for the withdrawal of the summons,
you see this article?-On the 11th April.
TO THE EDITOR OF THE BARRIER MINER.
Sir,-I was much interested in a case which came
before the local bench on Thursday—that of the
with opening his bar on Sunday, in contravention
same way, and when I lost I had to pay police
costs ; but when I won could not get costs against
the police. The evidence of Carr and his wife
must be accepted as true, for the bench decided in
the case are as follow :-The constable swore that
12 men were drinking on the premises: as a matter
of fact the bar was closed and locked, and was only
it was empty. Though in such cases the police
the constable gave his evidence was evident to any
intelligent person present, and evidently, judging
by the result, impressed the bench unfavorably. In
fact, Mrs. Carr characterised his statements in
court as deliberate lies. He took tho name of a
POLICE V. PUBLICAN. An Answer to the Charge. (Article), Barrier Miner (Broken Hill, NSW : 1888 - 1954), Monday 13 April 1896 page Article 2015-04-19 11:35 Añ Answer to the Charge.
TH thé MINER on Saturday a corre-
spondent, signing himself " Another
Pablican," made certain comments on
the licensing case,: Police vV G»rr.
I as unfounded. The' officer attacked is
Constable "Wiliiami,. and in his behalf
say that 12 men were diiaking on the
.is briefly stated thus .--Williams heard
going in be found two men fighting in
como ont of the bar and close the door
home. As they were, leaving tho yard
bios, when the offender begged that a
summons should be issued iustead.
Constable Wi'liama tcok his name and
address, and when applying to- Sub-
inspector Webb ia the usual course for
thu sub-inspector considered would
justify an action rg&insh the licensee
tho language was served by Constable
M'Innis (not William?, as "Another
Smith. When tho accused went
ment of the error was ma Ie to the
saw the accused at the hotel ;- this and
the same neighborhood as tho real
Further, io is stated, that Constable
Williams wft3 net one of the two
policemen whose e\idenco in a case
heard some time ago was " flatly denied
by Mr. Justin M'Carthy and fonr
well-known reputable citizen?." In
justice to tho constable referred to,
these facts ara published, as officers of
the police force are cot allowed to
An Answer to the Charge.
In the MINER on Saturday a corre-
spondent, signing himself "Another
Publican," made certain comments on
the licensing case, Police v Carr.
as unfounded. The officer attacked is
Constable Williams. and in his behalf
say that 12 men were drinking on the
is briefly stated thus:—Williams heard
going in he found two men fighting in
come out of the bar and close the door
home. As they were, leaving the yard
him, when the offender begged that a
summons should be issued instead.
Constable Williams took his name and
address, and when applying to Sub-
inspector Webb in the usual course for
the sub-inspector considered would
justify an action against the licensee
the language was served by Constable
M'Innis (not Williams, as "Another
Smith. When the accused went
ment of the error was made to the
saw the accused at the hotel; this and
the same neighborhood as the real
Further, it is stated, that Constable
Williams was not one of the two
policemen whose evidence in a case
heard some time ago was "flatly denied
by Mr. Justin M'Carthy and four
well-known reputable citizens." In
justice to the constable referred to,
these facts are published, as officers of
the police force are not allowed to
SUICIDE AT THE RATHOLE. [BY TELEGRAPH.] SILVERTON, Saturday Afternoon. (Article), Barrier Miner (Broken Hill, NSW : 1888 - 1954), Saturday 23 September 1893 page Article 2015-04-19 11:21 I had fallen into the tank and sunk to
had fallen into the tank and sunk to

Counts updated hourly

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

  1. 00-The Big Book of Australian History
    List
    Public

    These links relate to a book to be released on October 1, 2013. This is a list of lists, and some of those lists may themselves be lists of list of lists. Where necessary, there is duplication, but this is a place to fossick and enrich your mind. This work is close to completed in September, 2013, though I don't imagine it will ever be completely finished, even after the book is released.

    19 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  2. 01-An Ancient Land
    List
    Public

    Chapter 1 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    7 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  3. 02-The Dreaming
    List
    Public

    Chapter 2 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    14 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  4. 03-Voyages of Discovery
    List
    Public

    Chapter 3 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    11 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  5. 04-Founding Colonies
    List
    Public

    Chapter 4 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    29 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  6. 05-The Explorers
    List
    Public

    Chapter 5 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    58 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  7. 06-Gold
    List
    Public

    Chapter 6 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    7 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  8. 07-Settling the land
    List
    Public

    Chapter 7 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    10 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  9. 08-Growth of the Cities
    List
    Public

    Chapter 8 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    10 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  10. 09-Federation
    List
    Public

    Chapter 9 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    21 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  11. 10-Becoming ANZACS
    List
    Public

    Chapter 10 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    36 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  12. 11- the 1920s
    List
    Public

    Chapter 11 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    30 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  13. 12-the Great Depression
    List
    Public

    Chapter 12 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    16 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  14. 13-World War 2
    List
    Public

    Chapter 13 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    38 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  15. 14-Post-war Australia
    List
    Public

    Chapter 14 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    20 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  16. 15-Controversial issues
    List
    Public

    Chapter 15 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    9 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  17. 16-Sporting Life
    List
    Public

    Chapter 16 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    43 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  18. 17-People from everywhere
    List
    Public

    Chapter 17 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    9 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  19. 18-Famous Australians
    List
    Public

    Chapter 18 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    31 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  20. 19-Disasters
    List
    Public

    Chapter 19 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'. The chapter numbers changed a bit during editing, but I have left the names of the last few lists as they were.

    9 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  21. A capital site
    List
    Public

    The search for a site for the new capital of the Commonwealth

    36 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-10-30
    User data
  22. Australia First conspiracy trial
    List
    Public

    In 1942, a small group of individuals in Western Australia planned to seize the reins of government "when the Japanese landed". They moulded themselves on the various European collaborators with the Germans, but were totally pathetic as plotters. The coverage is taken from the 'Kalgoorlie Miner': this is for consistency, because I first encountered it there: I may add other sources later.

    31 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2013-02-13
    User data
  23. Australian inventions
    List
    Public

    A list of curious inventions, mainly those originated in Australia.

    20 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-07-20
    User data
  24. beach sand gold
    List
    Public

    Some of the claims for minerals found in beach sand, mainly but not limited to, gold.

    22 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-11-11
    User data
    Tags:
  25. bubonic plague
    List
    Public

    Details of the bubonic plague in Australia, circa 1900: these are selected articles only, which seem to have high historical value. In the first instance, I am using just one publication, because a quick scan revealed that it had a fairly wide coverage. I plan to add more references later.

    33 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-05-05
    User data
  26. bunyip
    List
    Public

    Early references to the bunyip and other "monsters".

    25 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-07-21
    User data
  27. Calvert's gold
    List
    Public

    I selected John Calvert (1814-1897) as a suitable case for treatment when I came across a reference in an 1850s 'Scientific American' to a London court case against James Wyld in April 1854 (Wyld was, at that point, the subject of my enquiries). Calvert shares his name with one of Leichhardt's 1844-1846 exploration party, but I knew it wasn't the same man, and he sounded sufficiently dubious to be interesting to investigate. The entries are in chronological order. The 'Encyclopaedia of Australian Science' says some thought him a romancer. I am at one with his contemporaries (you will find them in this list) who called him an impostor and a Munchausen.

    40 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-12-23
    User data
  28. coolies in Australia
    List
    Public

    Looking at the various attempts to introduce coolies into Australia. I hope soon to annotate the rest of the entries more usefully. Note that "coolies" at first meant Indian workers only, but was later extended to include Chinese. The systems under which they were employed were similar to the contracts used with Kanakas, late in the 19th century. Note that the language and attitudes of the day were somewhat confronting (or worse!). The order is strictly chronological, so if you know a date, scroll down!

    70 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-05-09
    User data
  29. early medical books
    List
    Public

    Books relating to medicine in Australia in the 19th century. The term "medicine" will be used broadly.

    5 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2015-04-13
    User data
  30. early use of language
    List
    Public

    This records my searches for the earliest instances in newspapers of a number of apparently Australian terms. The order is alphabetical by term and then by year, with the year of use appearing in each note. My plan is generally to offer three to five of the earliest hits that I find on any given word or phrase. (This parsimonious intention has been ignored, as in "billy", where there is a curious pattern of uptake to be observed and tested more fully.) Note that some of these selections have explanatory comments and references as well. IMPORTANT: please look at the first item, as I have now started assembling these into a rather more accessible web page, which is the first item in the list.

    197 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-01-02
    User data
    Tags:
  31. Georgiana Molloy
    List
    Public

    Possible references to Georgiana Molloy, plant collector

    22 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-03-24
    User data
  32. gold books
    List
    Public

    23 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2013-09-07
    User data
  33. gold history
    List
    Public

    This is a super-list, and some of the links are, in fact, also lists. This is the One List to Rule Them All.

    60 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-11-29
    User data
  34. gold relief schemes
    List
    Public

    Schemes to send unemployed men out in the Great Depression to find gold.

    8 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2014-07-15
    User data
  35. John and Elizabeth Gould
    List
    Public

    These are the bird Goulds: they visited Australia in 1839 and the early 1840s

    16 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-10-12
    User data
  36. John Lewin
    List
    Public

    This is to help others track down the Lewin material that I have corrected and tagged as "John Lewin". I have also added some external material that others don't seem to know about, all at Macquarie Law, which is a most excellent resource.

    41 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-08-17
    User data
  37. Kokoda track
    List
    Public

    This began as a selection of the best journalism written by those unsung heroes, the Australian journalists who travelled the Owen Stanley Track, and against trenchant censorship from the Brass, told the tale. I have since added a few other useful backgrounders on the early history of the track. The order is chronological, the selector's bias shows in the way items referring to the "Kokoda Trail" have been ignored. Those items were mostly left out because they are more likely than not to be poisoned by McArthur's publicity machine, written by people who had been no closer than Melbourne. Those who actually went there called it a track.

    22 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-11-09
    User data
  38. M'Gregor's gold
    List
    Public

    A Wellington shepherd named Hugh M'Gregor, alias Macgregor or McGregor was widely credited with being the first to find gold. This is an attempt to pull all of the available information on him together: it will certainly assist anybody trying to track down this elusive character. With this aim in mind, I have also flagged the rare items which mention his forename, and attempt to follow his later life.

    43 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-08-04
    User data
  39. migration controls and regulations
    List
    Public

    Accounts having a bearing on the control of entry and exit from ports in Australia.

    5 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-12-22
    User data
  40. Murdoch and the media
    List
    Public

    A collection of comments made over the years about the Murdoch family and media monopolies.

    11 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2014-02-03
    User data
  41. passage times
    List
    Public

    This will be a slow-growing list of articles where reference is made to fast or slow passages to Britain, Europe or the USA (and more recently, within Australia). The items will be in chronological order.

    18 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-01-02
    User data
    Tags:
  42. Royal Commission on Gold Stealing
    List
    Public

    Stories relating to the W.A. Royal Commission which examined the prevalence of gold stealing in the eastern goldfields. It began with a 1906 report on gold theft by an English journalist called Scantlebury, and ended up leading to some changes, aimed at trapping the fences who bought stolen gold. The hero was 33-year-old Detective Sergeant Peter Kavanagh who got the evidence, but died in Sydney in 1908.

    59 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-11-01
    User data
  43. seashores
    List
    Public

    A collection of pieces relating to shore life and coastal and estuarine environments: beaches, rocks, rock pools, tides, waves and more. This list can be expected to grow continually during 2011 and 2012. There are two conscious purposes shaping my selections: my writerly aim is to find material relevant to a writing project that I have in mind, my pedagogical aim is to provide a collection of thought-provoking pieces for use in education at any level. That is to say, I hope that these choices may help learners to think—and to question their assumptions as I did, when I found the marine spiders!

    76 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-10-02
    User data
  44. steam power
    List
    Public

    Material relevant to some future social history of steam in Australia.

    95 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-08-17
    User data
  45. The Pfalz case
    List
    Public

    The incidents leading up to and following the firing of the first shots in the Great War. The S.s. Pfalz, tried to leave Port Phillip at the outbreak of war, and was turned back.

    21 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2013-09-08
    User data
  46. The road to Port Essington
    List
    Public

    Before Ludwig Leichhardt took off to find a route, others were talking about it. This pulls together some of those threads and reveals why people thought finding such a "road" would be a good idea. Personally, I suspect that some of them were thinking of a future railway, but did not dare stick their necks out that far.

    50 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-12-28
    User data
  47. Vignettes of the Great War
    List
    Public

    Snippets offering a sense of the way people faced the war, largely intended as a classroom resource in the tradition of the old Jackdaws. These are random, happened-upon gleanings, where most of my lists are rather more calculated and planned. This list will grow slowly.

    1 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-02-02
    User data
  48. Wicked Grocer
    List
    Public

    G. K. Chesterton, in 'A Song Against Grocers' wrote:
    God made the wicked Grocer
    For a mystery and a sign,
    That men might shun the awful shops
    And go to inns to dine...

    This list is about food adulteration.

    12 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2013-05-06
    User data
  49. Wildman's gold
    List
    Public

    A Dutch or German sailor called Wildman claimed in 1863 to have found gold in Camden Harbour (near the Glenelg River) seven years previously, and claiming to have sold the gold in Liverpool. He offered, for a remission, to lead the way there. The gold was never found, in part because he failed to cooperate, and then tried to steal the ship's two boats and make a run for it.

    12 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-01-16
    User data
  50. William Hay Caldwell
    List
    Public

    Articles relating to the visit to Australia of zoologist William Hay Caldwell who elucidated the reproductive modes of monotremes and marsupials and studied the lungfish, along with some notes on his little-known marriage to a Sydney heiress. There are many more articles tagged with Caldwell's name which may be accessed from any of these. There are also other tags that may help the dedicated scholar: the furore over marsupial reproduction can be identified by the tag "bad science". Just watch the tags, OK?

    59 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2013-05-15
    User data
  51. wireless telegraphy
    List
    Public

    Early days of radio: an occasional list that may not grow much.

    1 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-10-30
    User data
  52. Women in trousers
    List
    Public

    The very idea of women wearing trousers horrified many in the 1930s and 1940s. The war changed a lot of that, but even in the 1950s, there were strong reactions. This is an attempt to landmark some of the events in the slow climb to rationality. This will be a slow-growing collection, but there is already enough to reveal the sort of shock that was aroused.

    23 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2013-12-27
    User data

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.