Information about Trove user: peter-macinnis

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

RankCorrectorLines corrected
1 JohnWarren 3,313,192
2 NeilHamilton 2,335,429
3 annmanley 2,082,229
4 noelwoodhouse 1,897,902
5 maurielyn 1,515,427
...
37 JanMcDonald 509,155
38 cmt17 502,446
39 aleon 502,168
40 peter-macinnis 497,880
41 RonnieLand 488,863
42 PenrithLibraryVolunteers 469,489

497,880 lines corrected.

Corrections by month

July 2015 917
June 2015 1,097
May 2015 4,286
April 2015 5,718
March 2015 5,598
February 2015 3,805
January 2015 538
December 2014 253
November 2014 107
October 2014 49
September 2014 84
August 2014 121
July 2014 399
June 2014 1,048
May 2014 6,333
April 2014 23,016
March 2014 21,127
February 2014 22,103
January 2014 10,627
December 2013 26,128
November 2013 1,934
October 2013 1,619
September 2013 1,744
August 2013 1,684
June 2013 5,013
May 2013 15,746
April 2013 14,168
March 2013 20,421
February 2013 30,105
January 2013 9,339
December 2012 737
November 2012 7,316
October 2012 14,568
September 2012 6,009
August 2012 3,269
July 2012 11,562
June 2012 19,091
May 2012 17,682
April 2012 11,011
March 2012 17,788
February 2012 12,215
January 2012 14,195
December 2011 12,429
November 2011 14,432
October 2011 26,085
September 2011 5,912
August 2011 8,313
July 2011 2,074
June 2011 1,593
April 2011 2,846
March 2011 1,558
February 2011 1,673
January 2011 3,508
December 2010 10,600
November 2010 11,524
October 2010 7,900
September 2010 9,529
August 2010 52
July 2010 265
June 2010 49
May 2010 713
April 2010 4,834
March 2010 33
February 2010 167
January 2010 216
December 2009 15
November 2009 154
October 2009 23
September 2009 73
August 2009 94
July 2009 37
June 2009 18
May 2009 15
April 2009 24
March 2009 83
February 2009 17
January 2009 76
December 2008 123
November 2008 99
October 2008 88
September 2008 34
August 2008 32

Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
CUMBERLAND AND CAMDEN BATHURST BURR AND THISTLE BILL. To the Editor of the Herald. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Tuesday 2 November 1869 page Article 2015-07-06 22:30 CUMBERLAND AND CAMDEN BATHURBT
CUMBERLAND AND CAMDEN BATHURST
CUMBERLAND AND CAMDEN BATHURST BURR AND THISTLE BILL. To the Editor of the Herald. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Tuesday 2 November 1869 page Article 2015-07-06 22:30 I To the Editor of the Herald. I
I Silt,-I am pleased to notice that this measure has been
moro favourably received in tho Assembly than it was
when previously brought forward in tho Legislative
tion of tho Houeo, it moy find a majority of frionds. I beg
thought. In the first placo, I cannot see why the provi»
berland and Camden, seeing that tho necessity of such a law
is felt throughout tho country. I recently made a trip
eradicate the peat, having men employed to go through tho
run end cut them up. I am sorry to say that, in other in-
stances, thia work waa wholly neglected, not because tho
desttnetive effect wbb not seriously felt, but, strange to say,
be oil very well if no other plants from this eocd
to show tho great necessity there ia for this
Act to extend its operations to tho interior. I also hope
tbat this bill will bo mode a completo measure, and of tho
greatest service to men like myself, whoso occupation is
agriculture. In this locality we have (owing to tho
floodB which bring seed to supplement that wo already
have) more than a fair shore of these noxious weeds, no
less than ten different sorts, all of which aro to bo found in
our crops, and giving much labour to tho diligent farmer
caused by men who aro careless, and upon whoso ground
plants in abondance are always tobo found. Of thoeo dif-
ferent weeds I trust the following may be namod in the
schedule of the Act, viz. ¡-Bathurst burr, castor oil plant,
dockweed, prickly pear, and rushes; the latter Ia fast
sproiding over ail tho grsBs paddocks in this locality. In
teferenco <o the brior, 1 think It ought tobeonfinedto
1 beg to apologise for occupying so much of your valu
1 oble spsce ; but the subject is one in which the class to
* which I belong oro much interested.
I URAWFORD ROBERT BEDWELL. I
" Richmond, October 28th.
To the Editor of the Herald.
Sir,-I am pleased to notice that this measure has been
more favourably received in the Assembly than it was
when previously brought forward in the Legislative
tion of the House, it may find a majority of friends. I beg
thought. In the first place, I cannot see why the provi-
berland and Camden, seeing that the necessity of such a law
is felt throughout the country. I recently made a trip
eradicate the pest, having men employed to go through the
run and cut them up. I am sorry to say that, in other in-
stances, this work was wholly neglected, not because the
destructive effect was not seriously felt, but, strange to say,
be all very well if no other plants from this seed
to show tho great necessity there is for this
Act to extend its operations to the interior. I also hope
tbat this bill will be made a complete measure, and of the
greatest service to men like myself, whose occupation is
agriculture. In this locality we have (owing to the
floods which bring seed to supplement that ws already
have) more than a fair share of these noxious weeds, no
less than ten different sorts, all of which are to be found in
our crops, and giving much labour to the diligent farmer
caused by men who are careless, and upon whose ground
plants in abundance are always to be found. Of these dif-
ferent weeds I trust the following may be named in the
schedule of the Act, viz.:—Bathurst burr, castor oil plant,
dockweed, prickly pear, and rushes; the latter is fast
spreading over all the grass paddocks in this locality. In
reference to the briar, I think it ought to be confined to
I beg to apologise for occupying so much of your valu-
able space ; but the subject is one in which the class to
which I belong are much interested.
CRAWFORD ROBERT BEDWELL.
Richmond, October 28th.
THE VINEYARDS OF THE NORTHERN DISTRICT. No. XV—KIRKTON. (Article), The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 - 1893), Saturday 3 February 1866 page Article 2015-07-06 22:20 (two of ten acreä each, and one of twelve acres), I
.vines are planted in quincunx form, giving
brown oolour, and, judging by the healthy state
ture. ' The older part of the vineyard is shel-
At Kirkton, a& in many other vineyards, much
(two of ten acres each, and one of twelve acres),
vines are planted in quincunx form, giving
brown colour, and, judging by the healthy state
ture. The older part of the vineyard is shel-
At Kirkton, as in many other vineyards, much
THE CULTIVATION OF THE VINE (Article), South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900), Saturday 25 March 1843 page Article 2015-07-06 21:56 the cultivate the vino, and thus avail them
they have hitherto nut enjoyed, merely because
The truth and justness of these obser
vations must strike every one who is ac
usual in countries blessed with tho vino ;
desirable that South Australia should be
as the production of a wholesome wive,
from the juice of Ihi) grape, the growth of
our making such lavge importations ot i
constitution of those who habitunllv in
dulge in them, on; peculiarly so in a cli
much, that few persons have lit ads strong
discussed, that, on this head, little origi
fellow-colonists need only such instruc
cannot help, however, entertaining a de
put in possession of 6ome striking facts,
them to make just calculations of the ex
necessary to supply their tables witb
might be made to what has been the ex
more than thirty years, and Mr Uusby's
made by a few spirited individuals to ex
tend vine culture, siid very good wine lias
vineyards, yet no great benefit has been j
derived from them ; no considerable com- j
mcrcial results have been produced ; no
expense which have been bestowed upon i
long period referred to. It must then be j
cause this singular result is to be attri
that the cause is chiefly to be traced to I
the apathy felt by the inhabitants of a cold j
northern country like Knglaud, in. relation ]
to an object with which they arc little |
existing i;\ tavnur of spirit; and mah li
' ijuors Much iillowaiKV must also !>>•
| ?'iadc for thu j>i>ciiliir position <_'f iv".v co
lonists, whusn capital is almost necessarily
spc-.'dily absorbed in other pursuits.
about to select the bust mode of employ
dafa by which he nny form a correct
branch of rural economy. l.:ntil he is
enabled to do this it is useless to e.vpocl
that he should diverge from ilu> bi>ati>n
the cultivate the vine, and thus avail them
they have hitherto not enjoyed, merely because
The truth and justness of these obser-
vations must strike every one who is ac-
usual in countries blessed with the vine;
desirable that South Australia should be-
as the production of a wholesome wine,
from the juice of the grape, the growth of
our making such large importations of
constitution of those who habitually in-
dulge in them, on; peculiarly so in a cli-
much, that few persons have heads strong
discussed, that, on this head, little origi-
fellow-colonists need only such instruc-
cannot help, however, entertaining a de-
put in possession of some striking facts,
them to make just calculations of the ex-
necessary to supply their tables with
might be made to what has been the ex-
more than thirty years, and Mr Busby's
made by a few spirited individuals to ex-
tend vine culture, and very good wine has
vineyards, yet no great benefit has been
derived from them ; no considerable com-
mercial results have been produced; no-
expense which have been bestowed upon
long period referred to. It must then be
cause this singular result is to be attri-
that the cause is chiefly to be traced to
the apathy felt by the inhabitants of a cold
northern country like England, in relation
to an object with which they arc little
existing in favour of spirits and malt li-
quors Much allowance must also be
made for the peculiar position of new co-
lonists, whose capital is almost necessarily
speedily absorbed in other pursuits.
about to select the best mode of employ-
data by which he may form a correct
branch of rural economy. Until he is
enabled to do this it is useless to expect
that he should diverge from his beaten
THE VINE AND OLIVE. Extracts from a recent work of James Busby, Esq, (a settler in New South Wales), entitled "Journal of a Visit to the principal Vineyards of Spain and France." (Article), The Perth Gazette and Western Australian Journal (WA : 1833 - 1847), Saturday 18 March 1837 page Article 2015-07-06 17:34 grown, and called by the Spaniards " Albariza,"
contains 70 per cent of carbonate of lime, the re
Bélica, and occasionally a little^, magnesia. This
quality, is produced from sandy soils ;-on such a
matter-a vineyard, in a good state, yielded ty to
4 butts of wine per acre. 11 appears that throughout
the Xérès vineyards, the vines are manured with
any kind of dung, chiefly strong stable dung ; and
Sherry ; and this variety is thought by some to be
stock, the latter being 12 to l8 inches from the
ground before the branches spring out ; this is done
always trenched to the depth of 30 to 36 inches *
every way. Biaek grapes are sometimes, but rare-
wiih the prickly pear, and it is not possible to ima-
at certain distances along the proposed line-in
three at furthest, it becomes a belter fence than a
ac\e, (less than the Englibh by about 1-th.) The
grown, and called by the Spaniards "Albariza,"
contains 70 per cent of carbonate of lime, the re-
selica, and occasionally a little magnesia. This
quality, is produced from sandy soils;—on such a
matter—a vineyard, in a good state, yielded 2½ to
4 butts of wine per acre. It appears that throughout
the Xeres vineyards, the vines are manured with
any kind of dung, chiefly strong stable dung; and
Sherry; and this variety is thought by some to be
stock, the latter being 12 to 18 inches from the
ground before the branches spring out; this is done
always trenched to the depth of 30 to 36 inches;
every way. Black grapes are sometimes, but rare-
with the prickly pear, and it is not possible to ima-
at certain distances along the proposed line—in
three at furthest, it becomes a better fence than a
acre, (less than the English by about 1-th.) The
Lantana Camera (Linn.) (Article), Logan Witness (Beenleigh, Qld. : 1878 - 1893), Saturday 5 February 1881 page Article 2015-07-06 17:24 PHILOPHYTDS.
PHILOPHYTUS.
Lantana Camera (Linn.) (Article), Logan Witness (Beenleigh, Qld. : 1878 - 1893), Saturday 5 February 1881 page Article 2015-07-06 17:24 Lautaua I'amara (Linn.)
Several deaths ot children have lately oc
curred around Urishanc that doctors trace
bask to the eating of small black berries of a
shiub, which enjoys no other English name
now tuao its botauical designatiou, Lantana
a- long way is bordered by a fence of this
plant j a thicket of it (irons luxuriantly near
Norman's Creek, and then patches of U can
be got everywhere. I bavo seen it growing
near Beeuloign und other parts of the district,
although it has 'not got a firm bold in the
currant-like may tempt them, aud prove fatal
Not much skill is n eded to dirtiaguMi this
a much-ijraiiclied shrub with a deep creen
foliage. The branches, like many rerieuiimce,
are quadrangular ; short prickles run scattered
ono to two inches long, moist to the touch,
that of currants. The flowers, rather nhowy
are arranged iu heads. Two or three outsido
rows running cjccciitricilly, are colored pale
red, and the inner iowb white, having the
centre tinged yellow. Kveryoue is acquainted
with the verbenas uf o -r gardens, eo there is
no need of debating further the flowers uf this
plant than by sayinc they are verbena like.
The berries, of the size of a Binall pea, arc
succulent, grce» for a long time, then turning
black. Like most , f the weeds which trouble
settlers, this is an introduced plaut. I believe
it was brought hero for ornamental
hedges, to which purpose it answers aduiir
bounds. The headquarters ot the genus is
America, without auj representative in Aus
of plants that botanists call llj?ji!a, and in
this district, down by Burleigh KcaHp, I have
gathered Lijipia nodifara (Jlidil).
?If the deaths of these children are really
attributable to pblsoucus' principles contained
in the berries, ifwould ratl.cr detract from the
good repute that the order to which :t belongs
contains. Tiie beauty of verbenas, sucli a
garden favorite, of the derodendrons, some of
order are numerous, some are tonic, come are
even used as tea. Tho beech of our scrubs,
Gnelina LcichluirMi, the white mangrove of
ourshores, Avircnitia (ffiviiuiUn, full of tannin,
border ; so it crimes rather as a surprise to the
botanist to be told tint berries from a plant of
company sometimes we find daugcrouB indi
viduals that ncetiR muBt be thunucd, howsoever
good is tho society wilhiu which it moves, eo
without minding the many excellent quAlitiet
of numerous plantB belonging to the I'cna'it
Lantana Camara (Linn.)
Several deaths of children have lately oc-
curred around Brisbane that doctors trace
back to the eating of small black berries of a
shrub, which enjoys no other English name
now than its botanical designation, Lantana
a long way is bordered by a fence of this
plant; a thicket of it grows luxuriantly near
Norman's Creek, and then patches of it can
be got everywhere. I have seen it growing
near Beenleigh and other parts of the district,
although it has not got a firm hold in the
currant-like may tempt them, aud prove fatal.
Not much skill is needed to distinguish this
a much-branched shrub with a deep green
foliage. The branches, like many verbenianæ,
are quadrangular; short prickles run scattered
one to two inches long, moist to the touch,
that of currants. The flowers, rather showy
are arranged in heads. Two or three outside
rows running concentrically, are colored pale
red, and the inner rows white, having the
centre tinged yellow. Everyone is acquainted
with the verbenas of our gardens, so there is
no need of debating further the flowers of this
plant than by saying they are verbena like.
The berries, of the size of a small pea, are
succulent, green for a long time, then turning
black. Like most of the weeds which trouble
settlers, this is an introduced plant. I believe
it was brought here for ornamental
hedges, to which purpose it answers admir-
bounds. The headquarters of the genus is
America, without any representative in Aus-
of plants that botanists call Lippia, and in
this district, down by Burleigh Heads, I have
gathered Lippia nodiflora (Ridib).
If the deaths of these children are really
attributable to poisonous principles contained
in the berries, it would rather detract from the
good repute that the order to which it belongs
contains. The beauty of verbenas, such a
garden favorite, of the derodendrons, some of which grow in our scrubs, scarcely can be sur-
order are numerous, some are tonic, some are
even used as tea. The beech of our scrubs,
Gnelina Leichhardti, the white mangrove of
ourshores, Avicennia officinalis, full of tannin,
order; so it comes rather as a surprise to the
botanist to be told that berries from a plant of
company sometimes we find dangerous indio
viduals that needs must be shunned, howsoever
good is the society within which it moves, so
without minding the many excellent qualities
of numerous plants belonging to the Verrain order we must avoid Lantana Camara as a
Scientific GENERAL NOTES. (Article), Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904), Saturday 22 November 1879 page Article 2015-07-06 17:05 |In the belief that our readers are familiar
In the belief that our readers are familiar
Scientific GENERAL NOTES. (Article), Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904), Saturday 22 November 1879 page Article 2015-07-06 17:04 The subject of naturalized weeds in the Aus
botanists of no less than three provinces, to wit •
Tasmania, by the Bev. "W. W. Spicer (Pro
Queensland, by Sir. F, M. Bailey (Proceedings
Linnean Society, New Sonth Wales, 1879); and
South Australia, by 2>r. Bichard Scbomburgk.
So much has the aspect of nature changed In the
neighbourhood of oar cities and large towns and
foliage of the gnmtrees. He would see the
bring about so marked a change, though in re
is to snpplant the indigenous vegetation, the
Queensland, Tasmania, and South Aus
that which is imparted by the agral weeds of j
the Mediterranean region, and by a few South j
African plants. This community of species of {
a certain type is probably due to an interchange j
between one province and another, and not that j
each province has been separately supplied from j
the head-quarters of the species. Mr. Bailey, '
Adelaide iu 1840 or 1841, and soon covered the
west — as, for instance, on the Diamartina
tbe'country and destroy a large proportion of
the|prevailing type of the aliens, each province
Las a form ot vegetation proper to itself; thus
sob-tropical climate, possesses more plants of
probably conld rot endure either the dry heat
winter of Tasmania. Of the tropical and sub
spread, there .may be mentioned the small
grenadilla (Pasnftora edv.lis), redhead (Asclepias
cunassa-vica), snrubby periwinkle ( Vinca rosea),
ytllow Mexican poppy (Aryemone Mexicana),
and Lantana camera.
(Githayo segetum), mallow (Malm sylvcstris),
maculatum), shepherd's needle (Scarulix pecten
(jSherardia arvcnsis), and many grasses. Only
a few of these plants are known in South Aus
the well-known Btiokweed (Inula suavolens), the
yellow egg-apple (Solarium sodomcum), thorn
apple (Datura totala), coekspnrs (Centaurea
Mlelitensis and C. solstitialis), Bathurst burr
(Xardhium spinosum), &c.
"Whilst viewing with great favour Dr. Schom
burgk's recent pamphlet " On the Naturalized
"Weeds and other Plants in South Australia," we
cannot overlook the fact that it is not exhaus
tive ; and in the hope that the indefatigable
bold to snggest by a few observations a line of
adopted country. Io speaking of an introduced
plant as an alien it Bhould be borne in mind
or interfere with the progress and distriDution
which, to whatever cause it may owe its intro
to derx t.d ngon man, and has set up on its
required in discriminating an alien ; and it is
banging about the precincts of the Botanical
conclude it has no claim to civic rights j
the colony to the fostering hand of the cultiva
tor, though now it may have partially escaped i
from his grasp. Sir Joseph Hooker observes in !
the- course cf some iutroouctory remarks in his
greet work on the flora of Australia—"I: i
would be interesting to discover the date and j
particulars undtr which these plants were intro
duced, and so to register their increase and I
the means of comparing their future condition ;
with their present. In the early times of a :
colony there is comparatively little difficnlty iu 1
species. But as the snrface of the land becomes
plants are influenced; the endemic species i
are driven from the native places, and take re
plantB, are apt to be classed in the same cate
to be truly indigenous." Not only is it desir
that the names of the intruders should be care
of our aliens should be carefully-collected, em
Beem to determine their restriction. And we
question cvi bono; hence no treatise on onr
such as their suitability as" fodder plants, and
the extent' to which some may be worth the
attention of agriculturists, as well as "on their
bnrtfulness'passively or. actively, and also to
extermination or keeping them in check. - For
this latter purpose" would it not be worth
while to introduce- the goldfinch' 'kind'
linnet to aid in checking the inroads of'the
thistles? ' Both kinds of birds are exceedingly
fond, of tb'eir seeds; indeed, the scientific! name
of rardnelis applied to the goldfihch' is meant to.
Carduus.' ;
| In the belief that our readers'are familiar
with the pb&in facts connected with the mode of
fertilization of flowering.plants, about which .-so
many interesting phenomena have been- de
scribed, not. only scientifically, but popularly, we
venture to lead them a step farther—to the study .
Of the little-known mode of | fertilization of red
material called pollenis contained in the anthers
or lobes of the stamen,';whilst the embryonic
Seeds, called ovules, are .contained In the central
grgan of a perfect flower, "called the pistil,
Generally the stamens andpistil occur in the same,
flower ;hut in some plants £be .male and female,'
Organs are in different, flowers, and in; others
they.Me m jeither pase
the onion of the pollen grains with that
ton is effected,.; by. '^contact 1 of . bhei.j
. . with the pistil';, baizes,-the pollen,
liesj.have not the ^mty^of moving to
s distant female organ, "it is hecsesaaxy' to
.Scientific
organ, it 18 necessary
The subject of naturalized weeds in the Aus-
botanists of no less than three provinces, to wit:
Tasmania, by the Rev. W. W. Spicer (Pro-
Queensland, by Sir. F. M. Bailey (Proceedings
Linnean Society, New South Wales, 1879); and
South Australia, by Dr. Bichard Schomburgk.
So much has the aspect of nature changed in the
neighbourhood of our cities and large towns and
foliage of the gumtrees. He would see the
bring about so marked a change, though in re-
is to supplant the indigenous vegetation, the
Queensland, Tasmania, and South Aus-
that which is imparted by the agral weeds of
the Mediterranean region, and by a few South
African plants. This community of species of
a certain type is probably due to an interchange
between one province and another, and not that
each province has been separately supplied from
the head-quarters of the species. Mr. Bailey,
Adelaide in 1840 or 1841, and soon covered the
west — as, for instance, on the Diamantina
the country and destroy a large proportion of
the prevailing type of the aliens, each province
has a form of vegetation proper to itself; thus
sub-tropical climate, possesses more plants of
probably could not endure either the dry heat
winter of Tasmania. Of the tropical and sub-
spread, there may be mentioned the small
grenadilla (Passiflora edulis), redhead (Asclepias
curassavica), shrubby periwinkle ( Vinca rosea),
ytllow Mexican poppy (Argemone Mexicana),
and Lantana camara.
(Githago segetum), mallow (Malva sylvcstris),
maculatum), shepherd's needle (Scandix pecten
(Sherardia arvensis), and many grasses. Only
a few of these plants are known in South Aus-
the well-known stinkweed (Inula suavolens), the
yellow egg-apple (Solarium sodomeum), thorn
apple (Datura totala), coekspurs (Centaurea
Melitensis and C. solstitialis), Bathurst burr
(Xanthium spinosum), &c.
Whilst viewing with great favour Dr. Schom-
burgk's recent pamphlet "On the Naturalized
Weeds and other Plants in South Australia," we
cannot overlook the fact that it is not exhaus-
tive; and in the hope that the indefatigable
bold to suggest by a few observations a line of
adopted country. In speaking of an introduced
plant as an alien it should be borne in mind
or interfere with the progress and distribution
which, to whatever cause it may owe its intro-
to depend upon man, and has set up on its
required in discriminating an alien; and it is
hanging about the precincts of the Botanical
conclude it has no claim to civic rights
the colony to the fostering hand of the cultiva-
tor, though now it may have partially escaped
from his grasp. Sir Joseph Hooker observes in
the course of some iutroductory remarks in his
greet work on the flora of Australia—"I
would be interesting to discover the date and
particulars under which these plants were intro-
duced, and so to register their increase and
the means of comparing their future condition
with their present. In the early times of a
colony there is comparatively little difficulty in
species. But as the surface of the land becomes
plants are influenced; the endemic species
are driven from the native places, and take re-
plants, are apt to be classed in the same cate-
to be truly indigenous." Not only is it desir-
that the names of the intruders should be care-
of our aliens should be carefully collected, em-
seem to determine their restriction. And we
question cui bono; hence no treatise on our
such as their suitability as fodder plants, and
the extent to which some may be worth the
attention of agriculturists, as well as on their
hurtfulness passively or actively, and also to
extermination or keeping them in check. For
this latter purpose would it not be worth
while to introduce the goldfinch and
linnet to aid in checking the inroads of the
thistles? Both kinds of birds are exceedingly
fond, of their seeds; indeed, the scientific name
of carduelis applied to the goldfinch is meant to
Carduus.
|In the belief that our readers are familiar
with the main facts connected with the mode of
fertilization of flowering plants, about which so
many interesting phenomena have been de-
scribed, not only scientifically, but popularly, we
venture to lead them a step farther—to the study
Of the little-known mode of fertilization of red
material called pollen is contained in the anthers
or lobes of the stamen, whilst the embryonic
seeds, called ovules, are contained in the central
organ of a perfect flower, called the pistil,
Generally the stamens and pistil occur in the same
flower; but in some plants the male and female
organs are in different, flowers, and in others
they are in separate plants. In either case
the union of the pollen grains with that
fertilization is effected by contact of the
pollen with the pistil, but as the pollen
bodies have not the faculty of moving to
a distant female organ, it is necessary to
Scientific

(From the S. M. Herald.) BATHURST, September 28. (Article), Rockhampton Bulletin (Qld. : 1871 - 1878), Thursday 5 October 1876 page Article 2015-07-06 16:15 considcration; the taking off everything and
putting nothiug on in return was the cause of
thc ruin of much of the best land in Victoria
and resulted in a large proportion of th
selectors disposing of their properties t
capitalists, and of taking up land in Riverint
and in some parts of Queensland where it i
probable they will carry on their old game <
consideration; the taking off everything and
putting nothing on in return was the cause of
the ruin of much of the best land in Victoria
and resulted in a large proportion of the
selectors disposing of their properties to
capitalists, and of taking up land in Riverina,
and in some parts of Queensland where it is
probable they will carry on their old game of

Counts updated hourly

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

  1. 00-The Big Book of Australian History
    List
    Public

    These links relate to a book to be released on October 1, 2013. This is a list of lists, and some of those lists may themselves be lists of list of lists. Where necessary, there is duplication, but this is a place to fossick and enrich your mind. This work is close to completed in September, 2013, though I don't imagine it will ever be completely finished, even after the book is released.

    19 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  2. 01-An Ancient Land
    List
    Public

    Chapter 1 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    7 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  3. 02-The Dreaming
    List
    Public

    Chapter 2 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    14 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  4. 03-Voyages of Discovery
    List
    Public

    Chapter 3 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    11 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  5. 04-Founding Colonies
    List
    Public

    Chapter 4 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    29 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  6. 05-The Explorers
    List
    Public

    Chapter 5 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    58 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  7. 06-Gold
    List
    Public

    Chapter 6 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    7 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  8. 07-Settling the land
    List
    Public

    Chapter 7 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    10 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  9. 08-Growth of the Cities
    List
    Public

    Chapter 8 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    10 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  10. 09-Federation
    List
    Public

    Chapter 9 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    21 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  11. 10-Becoming ANZACS
    List
    Public

    Chapter 10 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    36 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  12. 11- the 1920s
    List
    Public

    Chapter 11 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    30 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  13. 12-the Great Depression
    List
    Public

    Chapter 12 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    16 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  14. 13-World War 2
    List
    Public

    Chapter 13 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    38 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  15. 14-Post-war Australia
    List
    Public

    Chapter 14 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    20 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  16. 15-Controversial issues
    List
    Public

    Chapter 15 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    9 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  17. 16-Sporting Life
    List
    Public

    Chapter 16 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    43 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  18. 17-People from everywhere
    List
    Public

    Chapter 17 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    9 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  19. 18-Famous Australians
    List
    Public

    Chapter 18 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    31 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  20. 19-Disasters
    List
    Public

    Chapter 19 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'. The chapter numbers changed a bit during editing, but I have left the names of the last few lists as they were.

    9 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  21. A capital site
    List
    Public

    The search for a site for the new capital of the Commonwealth

    36 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-10-30
    User data
  22. Australia First conspiracy trial
    List
    Public

    In 1942, a small group of individuals in Western Australia planned to seize the reins of government "when the Japanese landed". They moulded themselves on the various European collaborators with the Germans, but were totally pathetic as plotters. The coverage is taken from the 'Kalgoorlie Miner': this is for consistency, because I first encountered it there: I may add other sources later.

    31 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2013-02-13
    User data
  23. Australian inventions
    List
    Public

    A list of curious inventions, mainly those originated in Australia.

    20 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-07-20
    User data
  24. beach sand gold
    List
    Public

    Some of the claims for minerals found in beach sand, mainly but not limited to, gold.

    22 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-11-11
    User data
    Tags:
  25. bubonic plague
    List
    Public

    Details of the bubonic plague in Australia, circa 1900: these are selected articles, in chronological order. I plan to add more references at some future date.

    33 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-05-05
    User data
  26. bunyip
    List
    Public

    Early references to the bunyip and other "monsters".

    25 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-07-21
    User data
  27. Calvert's gold
    List
    Public

    I selected John Calvert (1814-1897) as a suitable case for treatment when I came across a reference in an 1850s 'Scientific American' to a London court case against James Wyld in April 1854 (Wyld was, at that point, the subject of my enquiries). Calvert shares his name with one of Leichhardt's 1844-1846 exploration party, but I knew it wasn't the same man, and he sounded sufficiently dubious to be interesting to investigate. The entries are in chronological order. The 'Encyclopaedia of Australian Science' says some thought him a romancer. I am at one with his contemporaries (you will find them in this list) who called him an impostor and a Munchausen.

    40 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-12-23
    User data
  28. coolies in Australia
    List
    Public

    Looking at the various attempts to introduce coolies into Australia. I hope soon to annotate the rest of the entries more usefully. Note that "coolies" at first meant Indian workers only, but was later extended to include Chinese. The systems under which they were employed were similar to the contracts used with Kanakas, late in the 19th century. Note that the language and attitudes of the day were somewhat confronting (or worse!). The order is strictly chronological, so if you know a date, scroll down!

    70 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-05-09
    User data
  29. early medical books
    List
    Public

    Books relating to medicine in Australia in the 19th century. The term "medicine" will be used broadly.

    5 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2015-04-13
    User data
  30. early use of language
    List
    Public

    This records my searches for the earliest instances in newspapers of a number of apparently Australian terms. The order is alphabetical by term and then by year, with the year of use appearing in each note. My plan is generally to offer three to five of the earliest hits that I find on any given word or phrase. (This parsimonious intention has been ignored, as in "billy", where there is a curious pattern of uptake to be observed and tested more fully.) Note that some of these selections have explanatory comments and references as well. IMPORTANT: please look at the first item, as I have now started assembling these into a rather more accessible web page, which is the first item in the list.

    197 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-01-02
    User data
    Tags:
  31. Georgiana Molloy
    List
    Public

    Possible references to Georgiana Molloy, plant collector

    22 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-03-24
    User data
  32. gold books
    List
    Public

    23 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2013-09-07
    User data
  33. gold history
    List
    Public

    This is a super-list, and some of the links are, in fact, also lists. This is the One List to Rule Them All.

    60 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-11-29
    User data
  34. gold relief schemes
    List
    Public

    Schemes to send unemployed men out in the Great Depression to find gold.

    8 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2014-07-15
    User data
  35. John and Elizabeth Gould
    List
    Public

    These are the bird Goulds: they visited Australia in 1839 and the early 1840s

    16 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-10-12
    User data
  36. John Lewin
    List
    Public

    This is to help others track down the Lewin material that I have corrected and tagged as "John Lewin". I have also added some external material that others don't seem to know about, all at Macquarie Law, which is a most excellent resource.

    41 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-08-17
    User data
  37. Kokoda track
    List
    Public

    This began as a selection of the best journalism written by those unsung heroes, the Australian journalists who travelled the Owen Stanley Track, and against trenchant censorship from the Brass, told the tale. I have since added a few other useful backgrounders on the early history of the track. The order is chronological, the selector's bias shows in the way items referring to the "Kokoda Trail" have been ignored. Those items were mostly left out because they are more likely than not to be poisoned by McArthur's publicity machine, written by people who had been no closer than Melbourne. Those who actually went there called it a track.

    22 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-11-09
    User data
  38. M'Gregor's gold
    List
    Public

    A Wellington shepherd named Hugh M'Gregor, alias Macgregor or McGregor was widely credited with being the first to find gold. This is an attempt to pull all of the available information on him together: it will certainly assist anybody trying to track down this elusive character. With this aim in mind, I have also flagged the rare items which mention his forename, and attempt to follow his later life.

    43 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-08-04
    User data
  39. migration controls and regulations
    List
    Public

    Accounts having a bearing on the control of entry and exit from ports in Australia.

    5 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-12-22
    User data
  40. Murdoch and the media
    List
    Public

    A collection of comments made over the years about the Murdoch family and media monopolies.

    11 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2014-02-03
    User data
  41. passage times
    List
    Public

    This will be a slow-growing list of articles where reference is made to fast or slow passages to Britain, Europe or the USA (and more recently, within Australia). The items will be in chronological order.

    18 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-01-02
    User data
    Tags:
  42. Royal Commission on Gold Stealing
    List
    Public

    Stories relating to the W.A. Royal Commission which examined the prevalence of gold stealing in the eastern goldfields. It began with a 1906 report on gold theft by an English journalist called Scantlebury, and ended up leading to some changes, aimed at trapping the fences who bought stolen gold. The hero was 33-year-old Detective Sergeant Peter Kavanagh who got the evidence, but died in Sydney in 1908.

    59 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-11-01
    User data
  43. seashores
    List
    Public

    A collection of pieces relating to shore life and coastal and estuarine environments: beaches, rocks, rock pools, tides, waves and more. This list can be expected to grow continually during 2011 and 2012. There are two conscious purposes shaping my selections: my writerly aim is to find material relevant to a writing project that I have in mind, my pedagogical aim is to provide a collection of thought-provoking pieces for use in education at any level. That is to say, I hope that these choices may help learners to think—and to question their assumptions as I did, when I found the marine spiders!

    76 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-10-02
    User data
  44. steam power
    List
    Public

    Material relevant to some future social history of steam in Australia.

    95 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-08-17
    User data
  45. The Pfalz case
    List
    Public

    The incidents leading up to and following the firing of the first shots in the Great War. The S.s. Pfalz, tried to leave Port Phillip at the outbreak of war, and was turned back.

    21 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2013-09-08
    User data
  46. The road to Port Essington
    List
    Public

    Before Ludwig Leichhardt took off to find a route, others were talking about it. This pulls together some of those threads and reveals why people thought finding such a "road" would be a good idea. Personally, I suspect that some of them were thinking of a future railway, but did not dare stick their necks out that far.

    50 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-12-28
    User data
  47. Vignettes of the Great War
    List
    Public

    Snippets offering a sense of the way people faced the war, largely intended as a classroom resource in the tradition of the old Jackdaws. These are random, happened-upon gleanings, where most of my lists are rather more calculated and planned. This list will grow slowly.

    1 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-02-02
    User data
  48. Wicked Grocer
    List
    Public

    G. K. Chesterton, in 'A Song Against Grocers' wrote:
    God made the wicked Grocer
    For a mystery and a sign,
    That men might shun the awful shops
    And go to inns to dine...

    This list is about food adulteration.

    12 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2013-05-06
    User data
  49. Wildman's gold
    List
    Public

    A Dutch or German sailor called Wildman claimed in 1863 to have found gold in Camden Harbour (near the Glenelg River) seven years previously, and claiming to have sold the gold in Liverpool. He offered, for a remission, to lead the way there. The gold was never found, in part because he failed to cooperate, and then tried to steal the ship's two boats and make a run for it.

    12 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-01-16
    User data
  50. William Hay Caldwell
    List
    Public

    Articles relating to the visit to Australia of zoologist William Hay Caldwell who elucidated the reproductive modes of monotremes and marsupials and studied the lungfish, along with some notes on his little-known marriage to a Sydney heiress. There are many more articles tagged with Caldwell's name which may be accessed from any of these. There are also other tags that may help the dedicated scholar: the furore over marsupial reproduction can be identified by the tag "bad science". Just watch the tags, OK?

    59 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2013-05-15
    User data
  51. wireless telegraphy
    List
    Public

    Early days of radio: an occasional list that may not grow much.

    1 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-10-30
    User data
  52. Women in trousers
    List
    Public

    The very idea of women wearing trousers horrified many in the 1930s and 1940s. The war changed a lot of that, but even in the 1950s, there were strong reactions. This is an attempt to landmark some of the events in the slow climb to rationality. This will be a slow-growing collection, but there is already enough to reveal the sort of shock that was aroused.

    23 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2013-12-27
    User data

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.