Information about Trove user: peter-macinnis

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

RankCorrectorLines corrected
1 JohnWarren 2,498,224
2 annmanley 1,833,444
3 NeilHamilton 1,495,982
4 John.F.Hall 1,272,755
5 maurielyn 1,178,861
...
26 arundel 516,002
27 Scottishlass 515,870
28 tbfrank 469,406
29 peter-macinnis 456,313
30 cmt17 454,867
31 diaper 438,090

456,313 lines corrected.

Corrections by month

April 2014 11,802
March 2014 21,127
February 2014 22,103
January 2014 10,627
December 2013 26,128
November 2013 1,934
October 2013 1,619
September 2013 1,744
August 2013 1,684
June 2013 5,013
May 2013 15,746
April 2013 14,168
March 2013 20,421
February 2013 30,105
January 2013 9,339
December 2012 737
November 2012 7,316
October 2012 14,568
September 2012 6,009
August 2012 3,269
July 2012 11,562
June 2012 19,091
May 2012 17,682
April 2012 11,011
March 2012 17,788
February 2012 12,215
January 2012 14,195
December 2011 12,429
November 2011 14,432
October 2011 26,085
September 2011 5,912
August 2011 8,313
July 2011 2,074
June 2011 1,593
April 2011 2,846
March 2011 1,558
February 2011 1,673
January 2011 3,508
December 2010 10,600
November 2010 11,524
October 2010 7,900
September 2010 9,529
August 2010 52
July 2010 265
June 2010 49
May 2010 713
April 2010 4,834
March 2010 33
February 2010 167
January 2010 216
December 2009 15
November 2009 154
October 2009 23
September 2009 73
August 2009 94
July 2009 37
June 2009 18
May 2009 15
April 2009 24
March 2009 83
February 2009 17
January 2009 76
December 2008 123
November 2008 99
October 2008 88
September 2008 34
August 2008 32

Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
COUNTRY NEWS WILUNA NOTES Wiluna, Aug. 26. (Article), Kalgoorlie Miner (WA : 1895 - 1950), Monday 2 September 1935 page Article 2014-04-16 21:19 [?]
days and nights were experienced. :
Messrs. Eves and Co., who re
On FrirKv \n.nrl .fi-a/fcnv.dn.v W t?..
to extremely lajige audiences in the
Capitol Hall. The company, con
sisting of 2-3 persons, produced the
fa,r seen here. ?? The programme was
enquiries . it is linderstood the i
Bi'evities will make regular visits to \
weeks. .
The Wiluna 'Co-operative Society,
stock of the ? assigned estate of
Liicaims ' and Moylan. _?. ,
The annual -meeting of the Wiluna
Infant Health' Centre will be held i
on Sunday next, September 1, when!
l^ast 12 months the centre lias imade
McPhee ? has resigned to accept
are made the clinic will bei closed 1
The Rt. Rev. J. Frewer, Bishop'
of the North- West, reached Wiluna
on Saturday.. Oil Sunday he was the ,
afternoon conflr'miedi 18 candidates.
All services were well attendfed.
COUNTRY NEWS
days and nights were experienced.
Messrs. Eves and Co., who re-
On Friday and Saturday, W. R.
to extremely large audiences in the
Capitol Hall. The company, con-
sisting of 23 persons, produced the
far seen here. The programme was
enquiries, it is linderstood the
Brevities will make regular visits to
weeks.
The Wiluna Co-operative Society,
stock of the assigned estate of
Lucanus and Moylan.
The annual meeting of the Wiluna
Infant Health Centre will be held
on Sunday next, September 1, when
last 12 months the centre has made
McPhee has resigned to accept
are made the clinic will be closed
The Rt. Rev. J. Frewer, Bishop
of the North-West, reached Wiluna
on Saturday. OnSunday he was the
afternoon confirmed 18 candidates.
All services were well attended.
A DISGUSTING AFFAIR MAN AND WOMAN'S BEHAVIOUR. BOTH SENT TO GAOL (Article), Kalgoorlie Miner (WA : 1895 - 1950), Saturday 31 August 1935 page Article 2014-04-16 21:16 that her daughter had beer..' 'After
the woman had been arrested ; she
wanted to sign the statement. .'
Detective Triat gave corrobora
The.; woman in her evidence said
that her husband had been em
ployed by Cockburn f6r two and :i
at Kurn alpi. The mine was about
five ! miles away from , the battery
.the mine. Her daughter .visited the
'battery to read Cockburn's letters
most of the occasions her daugh
to Cockburn's. It was. .untrue, that
The first occasion on which shn
i witness) knew that the girl had
in te rcourse wi th Cockbum w as
daughter had told her. Witness de
She said she had questioned Cock
However, lie had denied the allega
never allowed the girl to go - the
returned to Kurnalpi from Kal
daughter at Cockburn's catnip, but
he (Cockburn) eitlher slept in the
true that Cockburn slept in tho
ago she was told that .her daughter
had inter course wilh Coekburu ami
Detective Triat : Have you* re
other i children.
.Witness: No. -
18 vears ? — Yes. J
Is she married 1 — No.
Detective Triat: Oh,' no ' coni
pla'ints.-
The Witness: I thought yoti
Mr.' Cook : So would anybody
else. ,
Triat witness said that when she.
was:; told of the alleged inter
coiirse s%3 maght not. have in
formed her husband, and she -did
not; tell the police because she did'
not- want to make trouble. .
The Witness :: This is enough ta
Tie Magistrate : If ought to.
Ifhe woman denied that she was
jea'lpus oi; % her daughter and she
refused to. say whether' she had :
slept .with. Cockburn! ', . :
$-he magistrate said he could not
foward and tell wilful and corrupt,
lies i to send her mother to gaol.
James'. Cockburn,' ???giving evidence,
denied that the .woman had caught
him having intercourse with, the
daiigjhiiei1. HoweveV, the wjithtess
said hat the girl did . sleep with
hirri at Kalgoorlie one night.
that her daughter had beer. After
the woman had been arrested she
wanted to sign the statement.
Detective Triat gave corrobora-
The woman in her evidence said
that her husband had been em-
ployed by Cockburn for two and
at Kurnalpi. The mine was about
five miles away from the battery
the mine. Her daughter visited the
battery to read Cockburn's letters
most of the occasions her daugh-
to Cockburn's. It was untrue, that
The first occasion on which she
(witness) knew that the girl had
intercourse with Cockbum was
daughter had told her. Witness de-
She said she had questioned Cock-
However, he had denied the allega-
never allowed the girl to go the
returned to Kurnalpi from Kal-
daughter at Cockburn's camp, but
he (Cockburn) either slept in the
true that Cockburn slept in the
ago she was told that her daughter
had intercourse with Cockburn and
Detective Triat : Have you re-
other children.
Witness: No.
18 vears ? — Yes.
Is she married? — No.
Detective Triat: Oh, no com-
plaints.
The Witness: I thought you
Mr. Cook : So would anybody
else.
Triat witness said that when she
was told of the alleged inter-
coiirse she might not have in-
formed her husband, and she did
not tell the police because she did
not want to make trouble.
The Witness : This is enough to
The Magistrate : If ought to.
The woman denied that she was
jealous of her daughter and she
refused to. say whether she had
slept with Cockburn.
The magistrate said he could not
foward and tell wilful and corrupt
lies to send her mother to gaol.
James Cockburn, giving evidence,
denied that the woman had caught
him having intercourse with the
daughter. However, the witness
said that the girl did sleep with
him at Kalgoorlie one night.
A DISGUSTING AFFAIR MAN AND WOMAN'S BEHAVIOUR. BOTH SENT TO GAOL (Article), Kalgoorlie Miner (WA : 1895 - 1950), Saturday 31 August 1935 page Article 2014-04-16 21:11 shoes. Cockburn also bought pre
sents for the others. ?;; :
When her;;mbther caught her and
Oockburn ^together ? ? she . had
that her mother told iher to b-v
careful ; ; ;
that with Detective . Triat he had
on; Thursday. .She made a) state
anent but had rehised ? to sign jt
to be arrested. , In the . statement
she had said that one niglht ,' the
three slept together)* andVshe .-knew
shoes. Cockburn also bought pre-
sents for the others.
When her mother caught her and
Oockburn together she .had
that her mother told her to be
careful.
that with Detective Triat he had
on Thursday. She made a state-
ment but had refused to sign it
to be arrested. In the statement
she had said that one night, the
three slept together and she .-knew
A DISGUSTING AFFAIR MAN AND WOMAN'S BEHAVIOUR. BOTH SENT TO GAOL (Article), Kalgoorlie Miner (WA : 1895 - 1950), Saturday 31 August 1935 page Article 2014-04-16 21:10 battery by motor car- It was a dis
tance of five miles. Cbckburn's eyes
I'eading his n-ail fox him. She had
driven the truck intp Kalgoorlie f°r
Cockiburn .and. one night i n Kalgoor
?The- girl stated that she had told
.her. mother that she had intercourse
The Magistrate : jn qt to be good.
Answering a question- by Mr.
McGinn, the girl said that Cock
burn had bought iier clothes and
battery by motor car. It was a dis-
tance of five miles. Cockburn's eyes
reading his mail fox him. She had
driven the truck into Kalgoorlie for
Cockburn and one night in Kalgoor-
The girl stated that she had told
her mother that she had intercourse
The Magistrate : Not to be good.
Answering a question by Mr.
McGinn, the girl said that Cock-
burn had bought her clothes and
A DISGUSTING AFFAIR MAN AND WOMAN'S BEHAVIOUR. BOTH SENT TO GAOL (Article), Kalgoorlie Miner (WA : 1895 - 1950), Saturday 31 August 1935 page Article 2014-04-16 21:09 She had beenin the-bush for nearly
ihrep, vears. a,n,rl slip.; had visited
Cockburn' at ' 'the battery on several
occasions- — the last time about three
would accompany- her to- the battery
was .aged 18 years. Witness said she
had driven CkxMraxii's truck to Kal
#oorld:e, and she had taken glasses uf
different tiones when she visited the
battery !=.he would stay overnight
once slept with her another and
witnessed intercourse taking pLaco
between the witness and Cpckburn,
had told G'ockburn that he ought : 1-o
have miOir c sjsn se . Af t e r. th at i n 6i ?
dent, however, she continued-.. to vis -.t
Cockiburnv ; ' ?;:;-:-:;j;.^---':;.'';- ??.-,; '
: Arigwering Mr. Cook the girl ^aid
She had been in the bush for nearly
three years, ad she had visited
Cockburn at the battery on several
occasions — the last time about three
would accompany her to the battery
was aged 18 years. Witness said she
had driven Cockburn's truck to Kal-
goorlie, and she had taken glasses of
different times when she visited the
battery she would stay overnight
once slept with her mother and
witnessed intercourse taking place
between the witness and Cockburn,
had told Cockburn that he ought to
have more c sjsn se . Af t e r. th at i n 6i ?
dent, however, she continued to visit
Cockburn.
Answering Mr. Cook the girl said
A DISGUSTING AFFAIR MAN AND WOMAN'S BEHAVIOUR. BOTH SENT TO GAOL (Article), Kalgoorlie Miner (WA : 1895 - 1950), Saturday 31 August 1935 page Article 2014-04-16 21:07 was revealed tin. the Kalgoorlie
an elderly widower, James Cock
burn (64), of Kurnalpi, and a mar
ried, woman, whose 14-yearH-ld
daughter was coanmatted to the care
both charged with having contri
was represented by Mr. E. M. Hee
woman, repr^sentd by Mr. R. F.
she also was convicted and :receivr»d
informed Cockiburn that he was in
deed fortunate that he had nob been
a penalty of five yea:rs, with or
stated in regard to Cockburn 's case
time, w-a,s 14 years of age, arid the
defendant had known her for '.two
and a half years. The girl met Cock
father was engaged in anining work
with Oocktburn at Koirnalpi, and
girl had been in the habit of visit
ing Gockbitrn's battery 'and had
stayed the night there' on occasions.
carnal knowledge of the girl, -h©' ad-
mitted- .giving her liquor. The de
ienaanTi nact oeen warnea oy one
but Cockburn had contiinued to take
liquor to the girl. 'According to
the girl's statements;'' said the de
tective, 'CockbuTn got into bed with
her and intercourse is alleged to,
have taken place. The. girl had
and was aged 64 ye^rs. Tt appeared
three families with einployment 'd
considered that the child was pre
Qooious. He stated that the parents
charge against the woman, the gir-i
'14' years and four months, and she
MAN AND WOMAN'S ,
BEHAVIOUR,
was revealed in the Kalgoorlie
an elderly widower, James Cock-
burn (64), of Kurnalpi, and a mar-
ried, woman, whose 14-year-old
daughter was committed to the care
both charged with having contri-
was represented by Mr. E. M. Hee-
woman, representd by Mr. R. F.
she also was convicted and received
informed Cockburn that he was in-
deed fortunate that he had not been
a penalty of five years, with or
stated in regard to Cockburn's case
time, was 14 years of age, and the
defendant had known her for two
and a half years. The girl met Cock-
father was engaged in mining work
with Cockburn at Kurnalpi, and
girl had been in the habit of visit-
ing Cockburn's battery and had
stayed the night there on occasions.
carnal knowledge of the girl, he ad-
mitted giving her liquor. The de-
fendant had been warned by one
but Cockburn had continued to take
liquor to the girl. "According to
the girl's statements;'' said the de-
tective, 'Cockburn got into bed with
her and intercourse is alleged to
have taken place. The girl had
and was aged 64 years. It appeared
three families with employment at
considered that the child was pre-
cocious. He stated that the parents
charge against the woman, the girl
14 years and four months, and she
MAN AND WOMAN'S
BEHAVIOUR.
MIDWEEK MAGAZINE Untangling NSW's forestry versus conservation snarl (Article), The Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 - 1995), Wednesday 19 July 1989 page Article 2014-04-16 19:55 and you can't find a place to pull off the road fora picnic,
Elsewhere in the mid-north coast region the commis
in state forests. The state forests in the region are man
aged on a policy of multiple-use. ,
commission to support the beleaguered woodchip indus
with the "misunderstandings" of the public, and ofa lack
What has led this respectable, scientifically-based gov
70,000 committed active conservationists around Aus
types were being cleared and burnt for agriculture. Vari
state forests there have beer, cut and re-cut, treated
scientifically according to available silvicultural knowl
The far south coast, by contrast, was slower to devel
certain degree of timber-getting was carried out, particu
Vast tracts of timbered land, however, remained un
touched. These forests, according to Forestry Commis
some natural or man-made disaster upsets the equilibri
large numbers of old, twisted, hollow-ridden trees pro
fall, allowing light in for the necessary process of regener
ation, then rotting to return valuable humus and nutri
"chip" on his shoulder from his experiences at the Wash
which the commission wants to allow logging to contin
The Wilderness Society, the South East Forest Alli
The first politician to attempt to exploit this promis
transparent lunge at the environment vote in a desperate j
government failed miserably. His idea was to create ,
80,000 ha of national park from the disputed areas of the <
were enraged, and they overwhelmingly voted in the ;
Liberal candidate for the newly created seat of Bega, j
The next politician to get egg on his face may well be j
Jim Snow, the Federal Member for Eden-Monaro. Fear-'
electorate, Snow has been backing the industry, seeming ;
to forget that the majority of his support comes from i
He will certainly regret his stance if the newly-an- •
nounced Green candidate for the seat of Eden-Monaro, u
John McGlynn, splits the Labor vote and he is unseated. *
mise wildlife disturbance. In addition, their operations ^
are not contributing to the greenhouse effect as regener- -
rate of 6/1, whereas the mature forest has a conversion r
shed more light on the conflicting claims of the commis
Meanwhile the conservationists mount ever-increas
Judy Lambert, at the "save the forests" rally at Parlia
ment House on Sunday, identified the movement's pres- •
low-value added forest products bringing in export earn
claim that they are silviculturally treating the "overma
suggest that the Forestry Commission is allowing Harris j
that if we prevent them we can all go home satisfied that ?
created on remnant Crown land which had no deccnt
private land and have already been cleared for agricul
Victorian-based Australian Trust for Conservation Vol
unteers which deserve the most support. <
By the way, there is nothing which identifies a greenie I
felling". Trees are failed, not felled, a person cutting .
down trees is a tree fuller, not a tree feller, pulpwood
and you can't find a place to pull off the road for a picnic,
Elsewhere in the mid-north coast region the commis-
in state forests. The state forests in the region are man-
aged on a policy of multiple-use.
commission to support the beleaguered woodchip indus-
with the "misunderstandings" of the public, and of a lack
What has led this respectable, scientifically-based gov-
70,000 committed active conservationists around Aus-
types were being cleared and burnt for agriculture. Vari-
state forests there have been cut and re-cut, treated
scientifically according to available silvicultural knowl-
The far south coast, by contrast, was slower to devel-
certain degree of timber-getting was carried out, particu-
Vast tracts of timbered land, however, remained un-
touched. These forests, according to Forestry Commis-
some natural or man-made disaster upsets the equilibri-
large numbers of old, twisted, hollow-ridden trees pro-
fall, allowing light in for the necessary process of regener-
ation, then rotting to return valuable humus and nutri-
"chip" on his shoulder from his experiences at the Wash-
which the commission wants to allow logging to contin-
The Wilderness Society, the South East Forest Alli-
The first politician to attempt to exploit this promis-
transparent lunge at the environment vote in a desperate
government failed miserably. His idea was to create
80,000 ha of national park from the disputed areas of the
were enraged, and they overwhelmingly voted in the
Liberal candidate for the newly created seat of Bega,
The next politician to get egg on his face may well be
Jim Snow, the Federal Member for Eden-Monaro. Fear-
electorate, Snow has been backing the industry, seeming
to forget that the majority of his support comes from
He will certainly regret his stance if the newly-an-
nounced Green candidate for the seat of Eden-Monaro,
John McGlynn, splits the Labor vote and he is unseated.
mise wildlife disturbance. In addition, their operations
are not contributing to the greenhouse effect as regener-
rate of 6/1, whereas the mature forest has a conversion
shed more light on the conflicting claims of the commis-
Meanwhile the conservationists mount ever-increas-
Judy Lambert, at the "save the forests" rally at Parlia-
ment House on Sunday, identified the movement's pres-
low-value added forest products bringing in export earn-
claim that they are silviculturally treating the "overma-
suggest that the Forestry Commission is allowing Harris
that if we prevent them we can all go home satisfied that
created on remnant Crown land which had no decent
private land and have already been cleared for agricul-
Victorian-based Australian Trust for Conservation Vol-
unteers which deserve the most support.
By the way, there is nothing which identifies a greenie
felling". Trees are falled, not felled, a person cutting
down trees is a tree fsller, not a tree feller, pulpwood
MAGAZINE Jog around oval to soleus searching Part-time couch potato Ian Mathews finally discovers a use for his teres major (Article), The Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 - 1995), Saturday 12 August 1989 page Article 2014-04-16 19:49 ——^— MAGAZINE —
DO an unexpected bit of exer
and taken pains to avoid too much strenu
7.20am, there are some 32 pieces of equip
which demands 30 seconds intensive exer
A script not dissimilar to Piltdown mail
ONE of the treasures of the Archaeo
scribed object found in this area of the pal
in Linear A,a form of writing that dates back
But when you follow some young, power
ful footballers — there are several Schwartz
have too much trouble with my gluteus med
and magnus or my vasti lateralis and medi
from lying down to an almost sitting posi
Colin McEvedy investigates a possible an
anything like it. This prompted the sugges
tion that the disc had been brought to Phais
probably in Anatolia. The idea of an Anato
pictograms, vaguely reminiscent of the hier
the inscriptions read from the centre out
have their proponents. What does seem cer
skilful or extraordinarily lucky because, de
series of wires and pulleys, the weights centi
That's when my soleus cries out, accom
around my stomach than in my calf: gastroc
instructor puts us through some gentle cool
Sometime I hope to see some improve
discovered the key to this text.Scveral have
that it i$ some sort of hymn, possibly to an
of an exploration of the Sahara by a particu
been various claimed as Greek, Semitic, Mi
noan and Basque. None of these "decipher
object from the ancient world to bear evi
similar. Discovered in 1912, he got a warm *
welcome from the scientific establishment >
because he fitted in with what was known of ?
human evolution at the time. But as, the \
years passed and more finds were made, his '
position became less comfortable. .
The new pieces of the evolutionary jigsaw J
interlocked with each other but never with >
him. By the 1950s he was looking distinctly '
out of place, a human cranium with an ape's '
jaw: an amateur's idea of the "missing link" •
— which is what he turned out to be. !
Piltdown man was a one-off. So is the •
oddly thin, compared with most clay tablets *
and seems literally, half-baked. It is a pecu- '>
liar colour. And, as time has passed, it.has J
bccome harder to place it in the rostcr of i
ancient scripts and writing techniques. :!!::? |
You can solve this as regards the Cretan J
scripts by saying that it has been imported to_>
the island from elsewhere. You can sol^Ktei
as regards ancient scripts generally by saying ;
it's a hoax. This diagnosis would tidy up thii |
matter of the spiral layout. It was not too I
difficult for the scribe to fit his text to the •
space: he simply went on punching away «
until he got to the end. .. " ^
Maybe the time has come for the experts®*
to have another look at his handiwork. • > *
The author wrote the Penguin Atlas ot Ancient^»
History. !j " ;
MAGAZINE
DO an unexpected bit of exer-
and taken pains to avoid too much strenu-
7.20am, there are some 32 pieces of equip-
which demands 30 seconds intensive exer-
A script not dissimilar to Piltdown man
ONE of the treasures of the Archaeo-
scribed object found in this area of the pal-
in Linear A, a form of writing that dates back
But when you follow some young, power-
ful footballers — there are several Schwartz-
have too much trouble with my gluteus med-
and magnus or my vasti lateralis and medi-
from lying down to an almost sitting posi-
Colin McEvedy investigates a possible an-
anything like it. This prompted the sugges-
tion that the disc had been brought to Phais-
probably in Anatolia. The idea of an Anato-
pictograms, vaguely reminiscent of the hier-
the inscriptions read from the centre out-
have their proponents. What does seem cer-
skilful or extraordinarily lucky because, de-
series of wires and pulleys, the weights centi-
That's when my soleus cries out, accom-
around my stomach than in my calf: gastroc-
instructor puts us through some gentle cool-
Sometime I hope to see some improve-
discovered the key to this text. Stveral have
that it is some sort of hymn, possibly to an
of an exploration of the Sahara by a particu-
been various claimed as Greek, Semitic, Mi-
noan and Basque. None of these "decipher-
object from the ancient world to bear evi-
similar. Discovered in 1912, he got a warm
welcome from the scientific establishment
because he fitted in with what was known of
human evolution at the time. But as, the
years passed and more finds were made, his
position became less comfortable.
The new pieces of the evolutionary jigsaw
interlocked with each other but never with
him. By the 1950s he was looking distinctly
out of place, a human cranium with an ape's
jaw: an amateur's idea of the "missing link"
— which is what he turned out to be.
Piltdown man was a one-off. So is the
oddly thin, compared with most clay tablets
and seems literally, half-baked. It is a pecu-
liar colour. And, as time has passed, it.has
bccome harder to place it in the rostcr of
ancient scripts and writing techniques.
You can solve this as regards the Cretan
scripts by saying that it has been imported to
the island from elsewhere. You can solve it
as regards ancient scripts generally by saying
it's a hoax. This diagnosis would tidy up this
matter of the spiral layout. It was not too
difficult for the scribe to fit his text to the
space: he simply went on punching away
until he got to the end.
Maybe the time has come for the experts
to have another look at his handiwork.
The author wrote the Penguin Atlas ot Ancient
History.
MIDWEEK Reds and Greens sprout from same roots (Article), The Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 - 1995), Wednesday 23 August 1989 page Article 2014-04-16 19:43 'OU ONLY have to talk to a dedicated
A that his program is about far more than j ust
taking a vow", and the religious language is appo
Like fundamentalist Christianity, Greenery re
industrial materialism. Like fundamentalist Is
lam, it inspires single-minded, sometimes fanati
other effect upon either than their relative impov
environmentalist believes that the fact that popu
facto dangerous, since, of course, both will contin
growth and social mobility, protecting their exclu
spite of his otherwise determinedly non-anthropo
"the soil" and consider that agrarian life is superi
Both, however, must be dislodged. For any so
ruthlessly makes all other good principles subordi
environmentalism are always, by the rigid applica
the thought of Jean-Jacques Rousseau, the intel
Rousseau and the Romantics had strong pre
religion one of whose chief differences from Chris
Rousseau, then, was only engaging in the popu
lar pastime of the 18th century, which was design-;
vacant slot previously occupied by God was pre
domestication of wild nature by science and indus
dethroning of reason which, under the Deist dis
natural world was there to serve man. Christiani
Marx's Labour Theory of Value which, in addi
economically and politically marginalising not on
Darwin also gave powerful support to the as
respectable sort of Greenery. For "conservation
unmediated psychological reality — or what Lio
nel Trilling called "authenticity" — and unre
not only because it acted as a restraint upon natu
thodoxies by which the cities that their primitiv
Again, what partook of the divine and the numi
and environmentalism in their militant and dis
spectator
YOU ONLY have to talk to a dedicated
that his program is about far more than just
taking a vow", and the religious language is apposite.
Like fundamentalist Christianity, Greenery re-
industrial materialism. Like fundamentalist Is-
lam, it inspires single-minded, sometimes fanati-
other effect upon either than their relative impov-
environmentalist believes that the fact that popu-
facto dangerous, since, of course, both will contin-
growth and social mobility, protecting their exclu-
spite of his otherwise determinedly non-anthropo-
"the soil" and consider that agrarian life is superi-
Both, however, must be dislodged. For any so-
ruthlessly makes all other good principles subordi-
environmentalism are always, by the rigid applica-
the thought of Jean-Jacques Rousseau, the intel-
Rousseau and the Romantics had strong pre-
religion one of whose chief differences from Chris-
Rousseau, then, was only engaging in the popu-
lar pastime of the 18th century, which was design-
vacant slot previously occupied by God was pre-
domestication of wild nature by science and indus-
dethroning of reason which, under the Deist dis-
natural world was there to serve man. Christiani-
Marx's Labour Theory of Value which, in addi-
economically and politically marginalising not on-
Darwin also gave powerful support to the as-
respectable sort of Greenery. For "conservation-
unmediated psychological reality — or what Lio-
nel Trilling called "authenticity" — and unre-
not only because it acted as a restraint upon natu-
thodoxies by which the cities that their primitiv-
Again, what partook of the divine and the numi-
and environmentalism in their militant and dis-
Spectator
AIDS sleuths put heat on chimpanzees MAGAZINE The West African sooty mangabey may be in danger as scientists point the finger, warns Nicholas Russell. (Article), The Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 - 1995), Saturday 26 August 1989 page Article 2014-04-16 19:39 i . ..
j put heat on
) chimpanzees
\ Africa.
* Until recently, that is. From a name familiar
I regular feature of tabloid headlines: notorious as
" the species which may have given us AIDS.
I Molecular biologists have been aware for
) some time that several species of primates carry
' Simian Immunodeficiency Viruses {SIVs) and
f host species give a picture of the behaviour of
1 HIV-like viruses in animals other than man.
; humans and for testing possible therapies,
v Second, the appearance of a new pathogen is
? evolutionary science in its own right. If a recent
f connection can be shown between this type of
; "slow virus" in monkeys and humans, then
?• understanding their evolutional^ relationships
' and studying host resistance in different primate
' species could generate useful information for
I AIDS therapies. These monkeys and their vi
« ruses have become the subjects of intensive re
s' search.
5 An American research group led by Vanessa
| Hirsch, of Georgetown University, near Wash
jj ington, recently published new molecular com
* parisons between HIV and SIV gene sequences
J which suggest a pattern of relationships between
I various viruses and their hosts.
j Riotous mutation
J '
't The group proposed that the simian virus
! found in West African sooty mangabeys was
S transmitted to the local human population in the
? recent past and evolved into the human variant
i H1V-2. Sooty mangabeys kept in captivity with
5 African rhesus macaques may have transfered
J the same SIV virus to members of the later
| species, which has evolved into the macaque
| variant.
? The published data are consistent with this
i hypothesis, although similar evidence has .been
lj taken to favour independent virus evolution in
$ separate host species.
5 There are certainly unusual features in the
| behaviour of slow viruses if recent transfers art
h accepted. These include a sudden transition fro it
5 symptomless coexistence of the virus within th(
i: cell nuclei of source species to infective transmis
| sion from individual to individual in newly in
) vaded species, with fata! disease as <
i consequence; deply conservative gene structure
j> over millions of years in source species but riot
*•' ous mutation and high-speed evolutionar
change in new ones; and the inter-spccies move
possible relationships between other simian vi
HIV-1 from African green monkey virus in Cen
There is not yet enough evidence to say wheth
The association between AIDS and homosex
ual behaviour awakened unjustified homopho
The phrase "guilty primate" has already ap
t which would punishment.
: Increasing interest in the primates and SIVs
i could also upset environmental and animal wel
: fare specialists at the other end of the biological
• spectrum from molecular biology.
i apart from man which can be infected with HIV,
5 they have already been used extensively in AIDS
- research. The chimpanzee is an endangered spe
1 cies and there are fears that research demands
An increasing demand for macaques, manga
These monkeys were captured with great difficul
It would be even more tragic if intensive inves
and it was later found that the current assump
Nicholas Russell works in the Department of Lite
Sciences at Bromley College ol Technology, in Britain.

put heat on
chimpanzees
Africa.
Until recently, that is. From a name familiar
regular feature of tabloid headlines: notorious as
the species which may have given us AIDS.
Molecular biologists have been aware for
some time that several species of primates carry
Simian Immunodeficiency Viruses {SIVs) and
host species give a picture of the behaviour of
HIV-like viruses in animals other than man.
humans and for testing possible therapies,
Second, the appearance of a new pathogen is
evolutionary science in its own right. If a recent
connection can be shown between this type of
"slow virus" in monkeys and humans, then
understanding their evolutional^ relationships
and studying host resistance in different primate
species could generate useful information for
AIDS therapies. These monkeys and their vi-
ruses have become the subjects of intensive re-
search.
An American research group led by Vanessa
Hirsch, of Georgetown University, near Wash-
ington, recently published new molecular com-
parisons between HIV and SIV gene sequences
which suggest a pattern of relationships between
various viruses and their hosts.
Riotous mutation

The group proposed that the simian virus
found in West African sooty mangabeys was
transmitted to the local human population in the
recent past and evolved into the human variant
H1V-2. Sooty mangabeys kept in captivity with
African rhesus macaques may have transfered
the same SIV virus to members of the later
species, which has evolved into the macaque
variant.
The published data are consistent with this
hypothesis, although similar evidence has been
taken to favour independent virus evolution in
separate host species.
There are certainly unusual features in the
behaviour of slow viruses if recent transfers are
accepted. These include a sudden transition from
symptomless coexistence of the virus within the
cell nuclei of source species to infective transmis-
sion from individual to individual in newly in-
vaded species, with fatal disease as a
consequence; deply conservative gene structure
over millions of years in source species but riot-
ous mutation and high-speed evolutionary
change in new ones; and the inter-spccies move-
possible relationships between other simian vi-
HIV-1 from African green monkey virus in Cen-
There is not yet enough evidence to say wheth-
The association between AIDS and homosex-
ual behaviour awakened unjustified homopho-
The phrase "guilty primate" has already ap-
which would punishment.
Increasing interest in the primates and SIVs
could also upset environmental and animal wel-
fare specialists at the other end of the biological
spectrum from molecular biology.
apart from man which can be infected with HIV,
they have already been used extensively in AIDS
research. The chimpanzee is an endangered spe-
cies and there are fears that research demands
An increasing demand for macaques, manga-
These monkeys were captured with great difficul-
It would be even more tragic if intensive inves-
and it was later found that the current assump-
Nicholas Russell works in the Department of Life
Sciences at Bromley College of Technology, in Britain.

Counts updated hourly

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

  1. 00-The Big Book of Australian History
    List
    Public

    These links relate to a book to be released on October 1, 2013. This is a list of lists, and some of those lists may themselves be lists of list of lists. Where necessary, there is duplication, but this is a place to fossick and enrich your mind. This work is close to completed in September, 2013, though I don't imagine it will ever be completely finished, even after the book is released.

    19 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  2. 01-An Ancient Land
    List
    Public

    Chapter 1 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    7 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  3. 02-The Dreaming
    List
    Public

    Chapter 2 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    14 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  4. 03-Voyages of Discovery
    List
    Public

    Chapter 3 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    11 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  5. 04-Founding Colonies
    List
    Public

    Chapter 4 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    27 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  6. 05-The Explorers
    List
    Public

    Chapter 5 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    58 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  7. 06-Gold
    List
    Public

    Chapter 6 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    7 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  8. 07-Settling the land
    List
    Public

    Chapter 7 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    10 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  9. 08-Growth of the Cities
    List
    Public

    Chapter 8 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    10 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  10. 09-Federation
    List
    Public

    Chapter 9 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    21 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  11. 10-Becoming ANZACS
    List
    Public

    Chapter 10 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    36 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  12. 11- the 1920s
    List
    Public

    Chapter 11 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    29 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  13. 12-the Great Depression
    List
    Public

    Chapter 12 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    16 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  14. 13-World War 2
    List
    Public

    Chapter 13 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    37 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  15. 14-Post-war Australia
    List
    Public

    Chapter 14 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    19 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  16. 15-Controversial issues
    List
    Public

    Chapter 15 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    9 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  17. 16-Sporting Life
    List
    Public

    Chapter 16 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    43 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  18. 17-People from everywhere
    List
    Public

    Chapter 17 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    9 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  19. 18-Famous Australians
    List
    Public

    Chapter 18 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'.

    31 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  20. 19-Disasters
    List
    Public

    Chapter 19 sources for a volume with the working title 'Big History Book'. The chapter numbers changed a bit during editing, but I have left the names of the last few lists as they were.

    9 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-11-17
    User data
  21. A capital site
    List
    Public

    The search for a site for the new capital of the Commonwealth

    32 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-10-30
    User data
  22. Australia First conspiracy trial
    List
    Public

    In 1942, a small group of individuals in Western Australia planned to seize the reins of government "when the Japanese landed". They moulded themselves on the various European collaborators with the Germans, but were totally pathetic as plotters. The coverage is taken from the 'Kalgoorlie Miner': this is for consistency, because I first encountered it there: I may add other sources later.

    31 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2013-02-13
    User data
  23. Australian inventions
    List
    Public

    A list of curious inventions, mainly those originated in Australia.

    20 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-07-20
    User data
  24. beach sand gold
    List
    Public

    Some of the claims for minerals found in beach sand, mainly but not limited to, gold.

    22 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-11-11
    User data
  25. bubonic plague
    List
    Public

    Details of the bubonic plague in Australia, circa 1900: these are selected articles only, which seem to have high historical value. In the first instance, I am using just one publication, because a quick scan revealed that it had a fairly wide coverage. I plan to add more references later.

    33 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-05-05
    User data
  26. bunyip
    List
    Public

    Early references to the bunyip and other "monsters".

    25 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-07-21
    User data
  27. Calvert's gold
    List
    Public

    I selected John Calvert (1814-1897) as a suitable case for treatment when I came across a reference in an 1850s 'Scientific American' to a London court case against James Wyld in April 1854 (Wyld was, at that point, the subject of my enquiries). Calvert shares his name with one of Leichhardt's 1844-1846 exploration party, but I knew it wasn't the same man, and he sounded sufficiently dubious to be interesting to investigate. The entries are in chronological order. The 'Encyclopaedia of Australian Science' says some thought him a romancer. I am at one with his contemporaries (you will find them in this list) who called him an impostor and a Munchausen.

    41 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-12-23
    User data
  28. coolies in Australia
    List
    Public

    Looking at the various attempts to introduce coolies into Australia. I hope soon to annotate the rest of the entries more usefully. Note that "coolies" at first meant Indian workers only, but was later extended to include Chinese. The systems under which they were employed were similar to the contracts used with Kanakas, late in the 19th century. Note that the language and attitudes of the day were somewhat confronting (or worse!). The order is strictly chronological, so if you know a date, scroll down!

    69 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-05-09
    User data
  29. early use of language
    List
    Public

    This records my searches for the earliest instances in newspapers of a number of apparently Australian terms. The order is alphabetical by term and then by year, with the year of use appearing in each note. My plan is generally to offer three to five of the earliest hits that I find on any given word or phrase. (This parsimonious intention has been ignored, as in "billy", where there is a curious pattern of uptake to be observed and tested more fully.) Note that some of these selections have explanatory comments and references as well. IMPORTANT: please look at the first item, as I have now started assembling these into a rather more accessible web page, which is the first item in the list.

    197 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-01-02
    User data
    Tags:
  30. Georgiana Molloy
    List
    Public

    Possible references to Georgiana Molloy, plant collector

    22 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-03-24
    User data
  31. gold books
    List
    Public

    23 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2013-09-07
    User data
  32. gold history
    List
    Public

    This is a super-list, and some of the links are, in fact, also lists. This is the One List to Rule Them All.

    60 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-11-29
    User data
  33. John and Elizabeth Gould
    List
    Public

    These are the bird Goulds: they visited Australia in 1839 and the early 1840s

    16 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-10-12
    User data
  34. John Lewin
    List
    Public

    This is to help others track down the Lewin material that I have corrected and tagged as "John Lewin". I have also added some external material that others don't seem to know about, all at Macquarie Law, which is a most excellent resource.

    41 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-08-17
    User data
  35. Kokoda track
    List
    Public

    This began as a selection of the best journalism written by those unsung heroes, the Australian journalists who travelled the Owen Stanley Track, and against trenchant censorship from the Brass, told the tale. I have since added a few other useful backgrounders on the early history of the track. The order is chronological, the selector's bias shows in the way items referring to the "Kokoda Trail" have been ignored. Those items were mostly left out because they are more likely than not to be poisoned by McArthur's publicity machine, written by people who had been no closer than Melbourne. Those who actually went there called it a track.

    22 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-11-09
    User data
  36. M'Gregor's gold
    List
    Public

    A Wellington shepherd named Hugh M'Gregor, alias Macgregor or McGregor was widely credited with being the first to find gold. This is an attempt to pull all of the available information on him together: it will certainly assist anybody trying to track down this elusive character. With this aim in mind, I have also flagged the rare items which mention his forename, and attempt to follow his later life.

    43 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-08-04
    User data
  37. migration controls and regulations
    List
    Public

    Accounts having a bearing on the control of entry and exit from ports in Australia.

    5 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-12-22
    User data
  38. Murdoch and the media
    List
    Public

    A collection of comments made over the years about the Murdoch family and media monopolies.

    11 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2014-02-03
    User data
  39. passage times
    List
    Public

    This will be a slow-growing list of articles where reference is made to fast or slow passages to Britain, Europe or the USA (and more recently, within Australia). The items will be in chronological order.

    17 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-01-02
    User data
    Tags:
  40. Royal Commission on Gold Stealing
    List
    Public

    Stories relating to the W.A. Royal Commission which examined the prevalence of gold stealing in the eastern goldfields. It began with a 1906 report on gold theft by an English journalist called Scantlebury, and ended up leading to some changes, aimed at trapping the fences who bought stolen gold. The hero was 33-year-old Detective Sergeant Peter Kavanagh who got the evidence, but died in Sydney in 1908.

    59 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-11-01
    User data
  41. seashores
    List
    Public

    A collection of pieces relating to shore life and coastal and estuarine environments: beaches, rocks, rock pools, tides, waves and more. This list can be expected to grow continually during 2011 and 2012. There are two conscious purposes shaping my selections: my writerly aim is to find material relevant to a writing project that I have in mind, my pedagogical aim is to provide a collection of thought-provoking pieces for use in education at any level. That is to say, I hope that these choices may help learners to think—and to question their assumptions as I did, when I found the marine spiders!

    76 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-10-02
    User data
  42. steam power
    List
    Public

    Material relevant to some future social history of steam in Australia.

    94 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-08-17
    User data
  43. The Pfalz case
    List
    Public

    The incidents leading up to and following the firing of the first shots in the Great War. The S.s. Pfalz, tried to leave Port Phillip at the outbreak of war, and was turned back.

    21 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2013-09-08
    User data
  44. The road to Port Essington
    List
    Public

    Before Ludwig Leichhardt took off to find a route, others were talking about it. This pulls together some of those threads and reveals why people thought finding such a "road" would be a good idea. Personally, I suspect that some of them were thinking of a future railway, but did not dare stick their necks out that far.

    50 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2011-12-28
    User data
  45. Vignettes of the Great War
    List
    Public

    Snippets offering a sense of the way people faced the war, largely intended as a classroom resource in the tradition of the old Jackdaws. These are random, happened-upon gleanings, where most of my lists are rather more calculated and planned. This list will grow slowly.

    1 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-02-02
    User data
  46. Wicked Grocer
    List
    Public

    G. K. Chesterton, in 'A Song Against Grocers' wrote:
    God made the wicked Grocer
    For a mystery and a sign,
    That men might shun the awful shops
    And go to inns to dine...

    This list is about food adulteration.

    12 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2013-05-06
    User data
  47. Wildman's gold
    List
    Public

    A Dutch or German sailor called Wildman claimed in 1863 to have found gold in Camden Harbour (near the Glenelg River) seven years previously, and claiming to have sold the gold in Liverpool. He offered, for a remission, to lead the way there. The gold was never found, in part because he failed to cooperate, and then tried to steal the ship's two boats and make a run for it.

    12 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-01-16
    User data
  48. William Hay Caldwell
    List
    Public

    Articles relating to the visit to Australia of zoologist William Hay Caldwell who elucidated the reproductive modes of monotremes and marsupials and studied the lungfish, along with some notes on his little-known marriage to a Sydney heiress. There are many more articles tagged with Caldwell's name which may be accessed from any of these. There are also other tags that may help the dedicated scholar: the furore over marsupial reproduction can be identified by the tag "bad science". Just watch the tags, OK?

    59 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2013-05-15
    User data
  49. wireless telegraphy
    List
    Public

    Early days of radio: an occasional list that may not grow much.

    1 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2012-10-30
    User data
  50. Women in trousers
    List
    Public

    The very idea of women wearing trousers horrified many in the 1930s and 1940s. The war changed a lot of that, but even in the 1950s, there were strong reactions. This is an attempt to landmark some of the events in the slow climb to rationality. This will be a slow-growing collection.

    23 items
    created by: public:peter-macinnis 2013-12-27
    User data

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.