Information about Trove user: noelwoodhouse

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,467,244
2 NeilHamilton 3,066,745
3 noelwoodhouse 2,930,937
4 annmanley 2,239,660
5 John.F.Hall 2,157,195

2,930,937 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

May 2017 43,161
April 2017 41,548
March 2017 55,289
February 2017 72,472
January 2017 79,694
December 2016 63,629
November 2016 73,334
October 2016 62,565
September 2016 56,926
August 2016 44,985
July 2016 43,125
June 2016 41,190
May 2016 28,757
April 2016 31,729
March 2016 23,287
February 2016 27,244
January 2016 34,609
December 2015 41,261
November 2015 43,722
October 2015 32,709
September 2015 29,476
August 2015 41,219
July 2015 26,310
June 2015 27,353
May 2015 31,309
April 2015 35,339
March 2015 52,984
February 2015 39,466
January 2015 63,780
December 2014 80,352
November 2014 89,733
October 2014 85,595
September 2014 65,172
August 2014 81,494
July 2014 48,809
June 2014 31,351
May 2014 42,398
April 2014 40,724
March 2014 32,733
February 2014 34,793
January 2014 69,278
December 2013 53,205
November 2013 57,095
October 2013 62,115
September 2013 44,658
August 2013 52,528
July 2013 20,663
June 2013 8,497
May 2013 45,814
April 2013 39,065
March 2013 22,036
February 2013 56,938
January 2013 66,835
December 2012 57,961
November 2012 43,720
October 2012 15,780
September 2012 31,904
August 2012 67,698
July 2012 66,315
June 2012 60,339
May 2012 48,317
April 2012 18,550

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,467,213
2 NeilHamilton 3,066,745
3 noelwoodhouse 2,930,937
4 annmanley 2,239,590
5 John.F.Hall 2,157,190

2,930,937 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

May 2017 43,161
April 2017 41,548
March 2017 55,289
February 2017 72,472
January 2017 79,694
December 2016 63,629
November 2016 73,334
October 2016 62,565
September 2016 56,926
August 2016 44,985
July 2016 43,125
June 2016 41,190
May 2016 28,757
April 2016 31,729
March 2016 23,287
February 2016 27,244
January 2016 34,609
December 2015 41,261
November 2015 43,722
October 2015 32,709
September 2015 29,476
August 2015 41,219
July 2015 26,310
June 2015 27,353
May 2015 31,309
April 2015 35,339
March 2015 52,984
February 2015 39,466
January 2015 63,780
December 2014 80,352
November 2014 89,733
October 2014 85,595
September 2014 65,172
August 2014 81,494
July 2014 48,809
June 2014 31,351
May 2014 42,398
April 2014 40,724
March 2014 32,733
February 2014 34,793
January 2014 69,278
December 2013 53,205
November 2013 57,095
October 2013 62,115
September 2013 44,658
August 2013 52,528
July 2013 20,663
June 2013 8,497
May 2013 45,814
April 2013 39,065
March 2013 22,036
February 2013 56,938
January 2013 66,835
December 2012 57,961
November 2012 43,720
October 2012 15,780
September 2012 31,904
August 2012 67,698
July 2012 66,315
June 2012 60,339
May 2012 48,317
April 2012 18,550

No text corrections for 'Government Gazettes'


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
CANNIBALS AND CHILDREN Peculiar Characteristics AMONG PACIFIC ISLANDERS (Article), Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1878 - 1954), Wednesday 12 August 1931 [Issue No.20303] page 5 2017-05-29 10:26 ; Spread as they are over so large au
area, the people of the Pacific bave a
wide ranßo of temperament and cus-
knowledge of tile process of civilising thc
people on thc various groups of islands
respect to slayings sud devouring^, this
who could bo a cannibal also would not
stop short at (lie crime of infanticide.
ing those of the natives of Mew Guinea,
New Hébridas, and Keir Zealand, with
On tho «thor hand, thc Society Islan-
being «tuer very slight or non-existent.
more activo in this respect than others,
can be traced directly lo them.
Among tho Australian aborigines the
Kew Guinea was probably first sighted
passed', it in 1511,: but the first actual
mined, ^on Jorge de Menses in 1526
took shelter at either Wama or at
Waigeu Island, on the north-west coast,
and Alvaro de ßoavedra was in the
annals of discovery-even to the extent
of giving misleading positions-tba ac-
uadetermincá. But it was Ortis de
Betes who gave the island its présent
name, as he in 1540 fixed geographically
some oj the coastal positions. It was
visited in turn by Lejfialre, Tasman,
Kew Guinea was first annexed to a
pany in 1703, tho troops of the Com-
pany occupying the Islam} of Mauas-
varl in Geelvink Bay. But the annexa-
tion waa not consummated, and the
Dutch extended, their explorations to the
western portion of Kew Guinea aubse
queait te the Aüglo-Dutch peace ia 1815.
The boundary, however, waa very vague,
eves if any definite iatentions of the
at that time in existenea The boun-
dary question was settled only In 1895
¡after Britain and Germany had each an-
nexation of portion of Kew Guinea waa
made by Queensland in 1885,, but was
disallowed by the British OlJvernment
ish protectorate wat proclaimed, and
very soon afterward^ Germany annexed
the portion held by her until tts out-
political ipfluenco wea directed mainly
toward explorations, in which the najaos
of the Her. S, Macfarlane and G. Brown
the Rev. John. Chalmers (1893) whose
explorations of the .Gulf of Papua littor-
al were a valuable service. *
Tbe position cf New Guinea women
waa that af en inferior, and a wife usu-
ally waa bought by « "present"' to her
though ' wive« are selected outside of
time* tte selection must be from out-
side the tribe. On tb J south-east pen-
than in other part« of New Guinea. In-
fanticide wes not practised.
Hendon* also was discoverer of the
Solomon- Islande in 156T, but it was
«ero again aeon by Europeans, when
bUjt infanticide waa rarely practised.
Tile Santa Cruz Group was discovered
by Alvaro Mendena in 1685, who en-
deavoured to found ort the island of Nit
later and named it Queen Charlotte.
have been negligible, and little is ¿avail-
New Hebrides Islands were disco vard
by Pedro Fernandez de Quúwin 1608,
who imagined he had found the.south-
ern continent then so dominantly in the,
minds of the Spanish iu Peru. Boug-
1708 and 1774 respectively, Cook'giving
tralia del Espirita Santo, conferred aá
the Group by Quiros. Annexation w¿s
a tangled business, soma British traders
urging upon the French to occupy/the
islands, while soma of the British /misr
to annex the group. The upshot-' w»is
that Britain and Franc« agreed in,;l|>,T8
t» declare the group neutral, from/which
and French administration. Bjut the
group is primarily under Frepe/i in-
fluence, and the British share in ndmin
istration really is restricted tq . protect-
a lower status than slaves. and fre-
band's graves, Infanticide, was not
New Caledonia,-or Balad/e, the native
name-was discovered hy fpook in 1774,
and D'EntrecasteauK followed in 17S3>
rived on the island in 18/U, and soon a
Britain objecting tba claim lay dormant»
Following upon as attf/ok by natives on
the French frigate. Alcijnene in 1851, the
the Isle of Pines with th« concurrence
partly surveyed by D'UrviHe, and the
lished teachers there in {854. French
nexation took place in 1884. Almost
which fcad beep simmering developed into
ope« rupture wbeç tho Frençti authori-
dered freedom of action far Protest-
ant missions, Eleven years latter (1876)
there were further persecution« of Chris-
women before the natives wore Chris-
tianised 1« not mentioned- '
In New Zealand, although polygamy |
among the Maoris was th» rule, women
generally were well treated »nd were
admitted to the war oouTicile. Infan-
of laissfenarias upon the politics of New
Zealand wera directed mostly against
th» demands made upon the British Gov-
der Samuel Marsden In 1814, and for
many year» made little progress against
the tribal wars, It was not until 113ft
that th« teachings ol the missionaries
could be said to havsj made headway,
resistance mad? by Lord Glenelg-then
Colonial r|eoretary--^aip«.t the land
Th».Fijian, a Melanesian with atrou»
Infusion« ol Samoan and, T0*^0 bloo<5'
waa » strange mixture pf savagery and
hospitality. But the women were, some-
what better placed tuart vas the case of
most. Pacifie women, though they suf-
fered burial elive-together with the
household slaves-rfn the death of her
husband, it » chief. Infanticida wa«
Teach**. Fiji from fong« in lft?5t and
their early efforts' hod much influence
on the eubseousnt history of the group
But their influenae later became sub-
merged under tribal fl'iasenslpu, as well
the United States «nd British govern-
ments arising out of claims and demanda
of traders. Tbs path to annexation was
long and difficult, and it waa not until
1S74 that annexation by Britain ap-
peared to offer th» only solution to the
tive intrigua and commercial rapacity
evolved
The 'Samoan archipelago or Naviga-
by Jacob Roggeveen ¡n 1722. Forty-six
Spread as they are over so large an
area, the people of the Pacific have a
wide range of temperament and cus-
knowledge of the process of civilising the
people on the various groups of islands
respect to slayings and devourings, this
who could be a cannibal also would not
stop short at the crime of infanticide.
ing those of the natives of New Guinea,
New Hebrides, and New Zealand, with
On the other hand, the Society Islan-
being either very slight or non-existent.
more active in this respect than others,
can be traced directly to them.
Among the Australian aborigines the
New Guinea was probably first sighted
by Europeans when Antonio d\Abreu
passed it in 1511,: but the first actual
mined. Don Jorge de Menses in 1526
took shelter at either Warsia or at
Waigen Island, on the north-west coast,
and Alvaro de Saavedra was in the
annals of discovery—even to the extent
of giving misleading positions—the ac-
undetermined. But it was Ortis de
Retez who gave the island its present
name, as he in 1546 fixed geographically
some of the coastal positions. It was
visited in turn by Lemaire, Tasman,
New Guinea was first annexed to a
pany in 1793, the troops of the Com-
pany occupying the Island of Manas-
vari in Geelvink Bay. But the annexa-
tion was not consummated, and the
Dutch extended their explorations to the
western portion of New Guinea subse-
quent to the Anglo-Dutch peace in 1815.
The boundary, however, was very vague,
even if any definite intentions of the
at that time in existence. The boun-
dary question was settled only in 1895
after Britain and Germany had each an-
nexation of portion of New Guinea was
made by Queensland in 1883, but was
disallowed by the British Government.
ish protectorate was proclaimed, and
very soon afterwards Germany annexed
the portion held by her until the out-
political imfluence was directed mainly
toward explorations, in which the names
of the Rev. S. Macfarlane and G. Brown
the Rev. John Chalmers (1893) whose
explorations of the Gulf of Papua littor-
al were a valuable service.
The position of New Guinea women
was that of an inferior, and a wife usu-
ally was bought by a "present"' to her
though wives are selected outside of
times the selection must be from out-
side the tribe. On the south-east pen-
than in other parts of New Guinea. In-
fanticide was not practised.
Mendana also was discoverer of the
Solomon Islands in 1567, but it was
were again seen by Europeans, when
but infanticide was rarely practised.
The Santa Cruz Group was discovered
by Alvaro Mendena in 1595, who en-
deavoured to found on the island of Nit-
later and named it Queen Charlotte
have been negligible, and little is avail-
New Hebrides Islands were discovered
by Pedro Fernandez de Quiros in 1606,
who imagined he had found the south-
ern continent then so dominantly in the
minds of the Spanish in Peru. Boug-
1768 and 1774 respectively, Cook giving
tralia del Espirita Santo, conferred on
the Group by Quiros. Annexation was
a tangled business, some British traders
urging upon the French to occupy the
islands, while some of the British mis-
to annex the group. The upshot was
that Britain and France agreed in 1878
to declare the group neutral, from which
and French administration. But the
group is primarily under French in-
fluence, and the British share in admin-
istration really is restricted to protect-
a lower status than slaves, and fre-
band's graves. Infanticide, was not
New Caledonia—or Balade, the native
name—was discovered by Cook in 1774,
and D'Entrecasteaux followed in 1793,
rived on the island in 1841, and soon a
Britain objecting the claim lay dormant.
Following upon an attack by natives on
the French frigate, Alemene in 1851, the
the Isle of Pines with the concurrence
partly surveyed by D'Urville, and the
lished teachers there in 1854. French
nexation took place in 1864. Almost
which had been simmering developed into
open rupture when the French authori-
dered freedom of action for Protest-
ant missions. Eleven years latter (1875)
there were further persecutions of Chris-
women before the natives were Chris-
tianised is not mentioned.
In New Zealand, although polygamy
among the Maoris was the rule, women
generally were well treated and were
admitted to the war councils. Infan-
of missionaries upon the politics of New
Zealand were directed mostly against
the demands made upon the British Gov-
der Samuel Marsden in 1814, and for
many years made little progress against
the tribal wars,.It was not until 1839
that the teachings of the missionaries
could be said to have made headway,
resistance made by Lord Glenelg—then
Colonial Secretary— against the land
The Fijian, a Melanesian with strong
infusions of Samoan and Tongan blood,
was a strange mixture of savagery and
hospitality. But the women were some-
what better placed than was the case of
most. Pacific women, though they suf-
fered burial alive—together with the
household slaves—on the death of her
husband, if a chief. Infanticida was
reached Fiji from Tonga in 1835, and
their early efforts had much influence
on the subsequent history of the group.
But their influence later became sub-
merged under tribal dissension, as well
the United States and British govern-
ments arising out of claims and demands
of traders. The path to annexation was
long and difficult, and it was not until
1874 that annexation by Britain ap-
peared to offer the only solution to the
tive intrigue and commercial rapacity
evolved.
The Samoan archipelago or Naviga-
by Jacob Roggeveen in 1722. Forty-six
DEATH OF MR. J. DAVIS Esteemed Businessman LOSS TO RACING CIRCLES (Article), Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1878 - 1954), Wednesday 12 August 1931 [Issue No.20303] page 4 2017-05-29 08:19 j DEATH OF MR. J. DAVIS
Uniera! regret uns expressed »hen il
was learned that Mr. Jumes Davie,
senior JIU l iner ol' thc lirm ot Messrs. J.
Davis and Company, hool importen,
Kasl-streot, Rockhampton, liad pn»scd
nway in a private hospital utter a short
illina.
Of a kind and genial disposition, thc
late Mr. Davis was u popular figure in
the sporting and businebä section of
Much of his spare time wus devoted
ho held the position of treasurer for
! club in 11I22, mid immediately he was
appointed to the treasurership' He also
officiated a« steward.
For Hie St. Patrick's Day Race Club
he neled at various periods BS secretary
and treasurer in on eminently efficient
MR. JAMlib DAVIS.
tah Club. ,
was held ¡ri high esteem. He occupied
Joseph's branch and "Past District Pre-
sident. For a Dumber of years, and up
trict trustee of thc Society.
The late' Mr. Davis was a native of
nected with thc boot trade, being for
thc past 16 years senior partner of the
firm in East-street that hears his name.
A keen business (nan. he so.increased
thc firm's trade recently that it was
found necessary to make a chamre of
rhrccv*ons (Messrs. Hilary Davis, State
Davis.. Rockhampton U . a brother (Mr.
.landy Davis) and three elster*. '
The funeral will leave from ll!« late
rtsidewe, fïeoifrc-strect, lictwepn AI
hert .ind North streets, nt II.SO tn"-day.
R..T.C. EXPRESSES SYMPATHY.
" The late Mr. J. Davis luid been a
member of the Rockhampton' Jockey
Club for a number of years, atad for a
lengthy term waB hon. treasurer" said
nolly) at thc meeting of tile commit-
"His work could-not but fail to merit
DEATH OF MR. J. DAVIS
General regret wns expressed when it
was learned that Mr. James Davis,
senior partner of the firm of Messrs. J.
Davis and Company, boot importers,
East-street, Rockhampton, had passed
away in a private hospital after a short
illness.
Of a kind and genial disposition, the
late Mr. Davis was a popular figure in
the sporting and business section of
Much of his spare time was devoted
he held the position of treasurer for
club in 1922, and immediately he was
appointed to the treasurership. He also
officiated as steward.
For the St. Patrick's Day Race Club
he acted at various periods as secretary
and treasurer in an eminently efficient
MR. JAMES DAVIS.
tah Club.
was held in high esteem. He occupied
Joseph's branch and "ast District Pre-
sident. For a number of years, and up
trict trustee of the Society.
The late Mr. Davis was a native of
nected with the boot trade, being for
the past 16 years senior partner of the
firm in East-street that bears his name.
A keen business man, he so increased
the firm's trade recently that it was
found necessary to make a change of
three sons (Messrs. Hilary Davis, State
Davis, Rockhampton), a brother (Mr.
Jack Davis) and three sisters.
The funeral will leave from his late
residence, George-street, between Al-
bert and North streets, at 11.30 to-day.
R.J.C. EXPRESSES SYMPATHY.
The late Mr. J. Davis had been a
member of the Rockhampton Jockey
Club for a number of years, and for a
lengthy term was hon. treasurer," said
nolly) at the meeting of the commit-
"His work could not but fail to merit
No title (Article), Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1878 - 1954), Wednesday 12 August 1931 [Issue No.20303] page 1 2017-05-29 07:51 .'Where ii the pruning knife, Jobn
«onT" inquired a gentleman of his gar-
habits. "Lost again, 1 Suppose, as
"Oh, no, sir-it's not lort," replied
Johnson, "but 1 can't put my hand on
"It conies to about the same thinj,"
said hiB master impatiently; "if you
can't put. your hand on it. ¡fr, lost."
"Well, go and cet it "
"Where is the pruning knife, Jobn-
son?" inquired a gentleman of his gar-
habits. "Lost again, I suppose, as
"Oh, no, sir—it's not lost," replied
Johnson, "but I can't put my hand on
"It come to about the same thing."
said his master impatiently; "if you
can't put your hand on it, it's lost."
"Well, go and get it "
OBITUARY MI5. MARY MARSHALL (Article), Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1878 - 1954), Tuesday 11 August 1931 [Issue No.20302] page 11 2017-05-29 07:46 in church affairs. She leaves a daugh-,
Marshall, of Mackay, to mourn their ,
in church affairs. She leaves a daugh-
Marshall, of Mackay, to mourn their
MORGANSTEIN—MARTIN (Article), Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1878 - 1954), Tuesday 11 August 1931 [Issue No.20302] page 11 2017-05-29 07:45 MORGANSTEIN-MARTIN
A very pretty Trending waa oele
reelden.ce ot the bride'* parents)
ed in matrimony with Harry, die eon
Morgenstern. Many relative« and
a iew old friends of the contracting
parties were witnesses of the faappy
nrUon as guests ot the bride's
parents. The ceremajny was con-
ducted by the Ber. Father McKenna,
aa bridesmaid, Nancy Sydney as
flower girl and Master Kën Sydney
The bride waa attired is white
mariette, ankle length, with irtils on
the skirt and a ttgbt fitting bodice,
and a beautiful veil. The bride'r,
atiéndante wore pale pink mariette.
sive wedding bell, Siled with confetti,
had been hung, congratule t lon s and
good wishes belog interspersed with
Showers of confetti and rose petals.
were invite^ to an excellent repast,
the Ber. Father McSenna presiding
coration of which waa a tbree-Uered
; Usual loyal toast having been hon-
gistic terms and TIr. Mervyn Martin
of the parents of the happy coupl"
WSB entrusted to Mr. K. M. Hill, end
being duly honoured, wa* acknowledg-
ed by Mr. D. Martin. Mr. J. !..
Martin proposed the ttealth of "The
Ladies,'1 to which Mr. r. Sydney re
I plied.
During the afternoon game« were
indulged In by Hie younger gueutn
and tho older people found pleasure
in the le-uolon of old friends, many
of whom eenie from distant parte to
and bridegroom departed (or Bris-
bane and Toowoomba on their doney- j
moon amidst showers of confetti and j
presents receiyed bore eloquent tes-
timony to the popularity of the bilde
brown coal and shirl with a beret
borne of the bridal couple will be at
MORGANSTEIN — MARTIN
A very pretty wedding was cele-
residence of the bride's parents)
ed in matrimony with Harry, the son
Morgenstein. Many relatives and
a few old friends of the contracting
parties were witnesses of the happy
union as guests of the bride's
parents. The ceremony was con-
ducted by the Rev. Father McKenna,
as bridesmaid, Nancy Sydney as
flower girl and Master Ken Sydney
The bride was attired in white
mariette, ankle length, with frills on
the skirt and a tight fitting bodice,
and a beautiful veil. The bride's
attendants wore pale pink mariette.
sive wedding bell, filled with confetti,
had been hung, congratulations and
good wishes being interspersed with
showers of confetti and rose petals.
were invited to an excellent repast,
the Rev. Father McKenna presiding
coration of which was a three-tiered
Usual loyal toast having been hon-
gistic terms and Mr. Mervyn Martin
of the parents of the happy couple
was entrusted to Mr. R. M. Hill, and
being duly honoured, was acknowledg-
ed by Mr. D. Martin. Mr. J. L.
Martin proposed the health of "The
Ladies, to which Mr. P. Sydney re-
plied.
During the afternoon games were
indulged in by the younger guests
and the older people found pleasure
in the re-uniion of old friends, many
of whom came from distant parts to
and bridegroom departed for Bris-
bane and Toowoomba on their honey-
moon amidst showers of confetti and
presents received bore eloquent tes-
timony to the popularity of the bride
brown coat and skirt with a beret
home of the bridal couple will be at
WEDDINGS WILKINSON—DUGGAN (Article), Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1878 - 1954), Tuesday 11 August 1931 [Issue No.20302] page 11 2017-05-29 07:41 of tho Olrls' Comradeship last Wed-
nesday for tho wedding of Ivy May,
Tho Hov. Harris officiated and Mr.
her uncle (Mr. W. Geeves, ot til. Law-
I tlghtflttlng bodice had a yoke of
Eicblieu work and a small bolero
I skirt was worn ankle-length with side
Hares and hip basque. lier double
lace veil was worn with the csp ef-
fect sad arranged with a wreath of
land ¿be upper part formed a cape.
roses end eucbaris lilies, tied with
tulle and ribbon streaners.
McLaren were in attendance ss
á dainty little flower girl. The chief
rowe of fagotting and fagotllng also
trimmed the cuffs wilton finished tbs
caught In front «'Ith a spray ot
I was fashioned with a. hip yoke with
with band embroidery. ? Her white
face with pink flowers ard she also
frills round the bodice, e, V neck with
fully flared skirt wag complétée: at
liant hackle, phe wore a large
groom gift fa string of crystals).
pink and white gerberas, rose«, and
of pale pink crap* de Chine with a
double flared skirt with elds frills on
with leeres to the elbow and long
to her was a gold brooch. She oar.
she left the church. (
Mr. William A. Wilkinson waa best
man and Mr. Erie Robertson grooms
matt.
Hrs. Beid (the bride's aunt) wore
ding breakfast, which wes held at
Cohen's Cale, Mackay. The honey-
moon fg being spent at Emu Park.
Tho bride's travelling dress was of
Boyal blue silk, marocain with loue
tlgbt-fittlng sleeves finished with gold
huttons and a flared skin with a
single flare in front, and a Boya) blue
bat te match turned oft ber face with
a Spray ot Moe flowers ead finished
The bride and bridegroom wil) ntsko
their futures home in Rockhampton,
They wera the recipients of numer-
óos handsome presents, Including
of the Girls' Comradeship last Wed-
nesday for the wedding of Ivy May,
The Rev. Harris officiated and Mr.
her uncle (Mr. W. Geeves, of St. Law-
tightfitting bodice had a yoke of
Richlieu work and a small bolero
skirt was worn ankle-length with side
flares and hip basque. Her double
lace veil was worn with the cap ef-
fect and arranged with a wreath of
and the upper part formed a cape.
roses and eucbaris lilies, tied with
tulle and ribbon streamers.
McLaren were in attendance sa
a dainty little flower girl. The chief
rows of fagotting and fagotting also
trimmed the cuffs which finished the
caught in front with a spray of
was fashioned with a hip yoke with
with hand embroidery. ? Her white
face with pink flowers and she also
frills round the bodice, a V neck with
fully flared skirt wag completed at
liant buckle. She wore a large
groom gift (a string of crystals).
pink and white gerberas, roses, and
of pale pink crepe de Chine with a
double flared skirt with side frills on
with leeves to the elbow and long
to her was a gold brooch. She car-
she left the church.
Mr. William A. Wilkinson was best
man and Mr. Eric Robertson grooms-
man.
Mrs. Reid (the bride's aunt) wore
ding breakfast, which was held at
Cohen's Cafe, Mackay. The honey-
moon is being spent at Emu Park.
The bride's travelling dress was of
Royal blue silk, marocain with long
tight-fitting sleeves finished with gold
buttons and a flared skin with a
single flare in front, and a Royal blue
hat to match turned off her face with
a spray of blue flowers and finished
The bride and bridegroom will make
their futures home in Rockhampton.
They were the recipients of numer-
ous handsome presents, including
PERSONAL (Article), Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1878 - 1954), Tuesday 11 August 1931 [Issue No.20302] page 11 2017-05-29 07:32 Mr«. J. Pattison left by tbs mail train
yesterday for Brisbane, to attend th*
Mr», W. H. Crank and Mis» Maud
Send returned to Bnckfcarapton on Sat-
Mi;» Joan White, St»** Secretary «*?
the Country .'Women's Association, pass
Toiiwooniba, cn route to Townsville,
ing of tb» Northern Division of the As-
Mrs. A. Duncan and Miss Jesu
Mt». R. L, Wedin, who ñas beso the
guest of Mr. and Mrs. C. Bibeln at Yep-
poon for some weeks, returned to Syd
MW yesterday.
Mrs. Dolph Symons and ber son are
fling to-day te spend a holiday at Emu '
arlu They will be accompanied by
Mrs. W. N. B, Hamilton, who will be
whore she will be th» guest of her
fitter (Mrs. Woodforde, Greenslopes).
Mite M. M'Bryde arrived from Mount
Morgen In the week-end and is staying
tho South, lt staying at the Leichhardt
Holt».
Mr, A. W. M "Luckie, who has been
staying at th» Leichhardt Hotel, left
yesterday lot the Smith.
'MT. and Un. B. MHler and Mr. C.
Wood arrived by car from the Sooth
end «re staying et the Criterion Betel.
Mr. D. Small, wa« stayed at the Cri-
"Mr. W. . W. Service,' who has been
Staying at the Criterion Hotel, left for
later «Sr Yeppoon.
Vorth on a holiday trip. He is going
Mr. atad Mrs. J. S. Sullivan arrived
from the Sooth yesterday and aie stay-
Mrs. A. Davey (gladstone) arrived in
Rocina mp top ve«tird*y afternoon on a
Messrs'. R. Baldwin, W. Urary, A. N.
Jeffrey imi' 8.' $no» arrived from,
fhe JSouTJi 'yesterday They are staying'
Mr. and Mr», W. B- Btjtt, who have
been EtfcViitt.it the Commercial Hotel,
Mrs. 5- ß Geddes arrived from Prin-
chester yesterday, Mrs. Geddes is stay-
Mrs. Biddulph and Mieses Biddulph
and Haflnalj arrived from Springsure
Mr. R. Faulkner (Marlborough) ls
staying at th» Grosvenor Hotel.
Misses MTherson and Holt arrived
st the Grosvenor Hotel and left at mid-
Miss Grace M'Kenzie is spending »eve
Miss Shirley COST, who his been stay-
ing With her sisters (Mrs. N. H. Caswell
Mr. Thoma» Purcell, of Galwey
of a' private hospital in Longreach. He
w*s brought up from Galway Downs by
Mrs. J. Pattison left by the mail train
yesterday for Brisbane, to attend the
Mrs. W. H. Crank and Miss Maud
Bond returned to Rockhampton on Sat-
Miss Joan White, State Secretary of
the Country Women's Association, pass-
Toowoomba, en route to Townsville,
ing of the Northern Division of the As-
Mrs. A. Duncan and Miss Jean
Mts. R. L. Dibdin, who has been the
guest of Mr. and Mrs. C. Dibdin at Yep-
poon for some weeks, returned to Syd-
new yesterday.
Mrs. Dolph Symons and her son are
going to-day te spend a holiday at Emu
Park. They will be accompanied by
Mrs. W. N. B. Hamilton, who will be
where she will be the guest of her
sister (Mrs. Woodforde, Greenslopes).
Miss M. M'Bryde arrived from Mount
Morgan in the week-end and is staying
the South, is staying at the Leichhardt
Hotel.
Mr. A. W. M'Luckie, who has been
staying at the Leichhardt Hotel, left
yesterday for the South.
Mr. and Mrs. B. Miller and Mr. C.
Wood arrived by car from the South
and are staying at the Criterion Hotel.
Mr. D. Small, who stayed at the Cri-
Mr. W. W. Service, who has been
staying at the Criterion Hotel, left for
later for Yeppoon.
North on a holiday trip. He is going
Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Sullivan arrived
from the South yesterday and are stay-
Mrs. A. Davey (Gladstone) arrived in
Rockhampton yesterday afternoon on a
Messrs. R. Baldwin, W. Henry, A. N.
Jeffrey and F. E. Snow arrived from
the South yesterday They are staying
Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Stitt, who have
been staying at the Commercial Hotel,
Mrs. E. P. Geddes arrived from Prin-
chester yesterday. Mrs. Geddes is stay-
Mrs. Biddulph and Misses Biddulph
and Hannah arrived from Springsure
Mr. R. Faulkner (Marlborough) is
staying at the Grosvenor Hotel.
Misses M'Pherson and Holt arrived
at the Grosvenor Hotel and left at mid-
Miss Grace M'Kenzie is spending seve-
Miss Shirley Coar, who his been stay-
ing with her sisters (Mrs. N. H. Caswell
Mr. Thomas Purcell, of Galway
of a private hospital in Longreach. He
was brought up from Galway Downs by
Family Notices (Family Notices), Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1878 - 1954), Tuesday 11 August 1931 [Issue No.20302] page 6 2017-05-29 07:23 HERMANN.- Passed away at his late residence,
GOLTZ.- In loving memory of grandfather, Wil-
GOLTZ.- In loving memory of my dear fahther,
MORRIS.- In loving memory of our dear sister
Telephone Nos 148 - 149.
HERMANN.— Passed away at his late residence,
GOLTZ.— In loving memory of grandfather, Wil-
GOLTZ.— In loving memory of my dear father,
MORRIS.— In loving memory of our dear sister
AMAZING STORY New York's Gangland "TAKEN FOR A RIDE" (Article), Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1878 - 1954), Tuesday 11 August 1931 [Issue No.20302] page 1 2017-05-29 07:21 Tlc amazing story has come to . light
at. Nen? York of the exploits of a girl
n member of a hand of robbers over
probable If lt formed the subject of a
Thc girls' name is Margaret Miller,
and the. slain gangster, who waa litt!«
tioning her authority-acknowledged
by a bloodcurdling oath taken by each'
member-was death.
Sweeney was the depnty leader ot'
the band, hnt the girl, lt is asserted
was taken into the ororanÍKatinn. and
soon Sweeney found himself pinyin?
second liddle. Schor-nhart, .not only,
suspected his function?, but also his
place in the "queen's" affections,
for a ride" one night by the girl'*
orders. Tie did not sustiert what wee |
going lo happen to him until thi-. '
motor car, which the sirl herself was
driving nnd in which three "execu
tirinerp" were alfi* denied. Plopped .on
«T. lonely road on Long Islnnil. Mc wa«
told to set Mit. and seems to have ac-
"I'll take it Rtandinp; up," Spiraco
nuotcd him an Ravine/,
Hi* bullet-riddled body sprawling in
the mad VHF seen by nn air-mail pilot
flying over thc spot nt dawn.
The amazing story has come to light
at New York of the exploits of a girl
a member of a hand of robbers over
probable if it formed the subject of a
The girls' name is Margaret Miller,
and the slain gangster, who waa little
tioning her authority—acknowledged
by a bloodcurdling oath taken by each
member—was death.
Sweeney was the depnty leader of
the band, but the girl, it is asserted
was taken into the organisation, and
soon Sweeney found himself playing
second fiddle. Schoenhart, not only
suspected his functions, but also his
place in the "queen's" affections.
for a ride" one night by the girl's
orders. Je did not suspect what was
going to happen to him until the
motor car, which the girl herself was
driving and in which three "execu-
tioners" were also seated, stopped on
a lonely road on Long Island. He was
told to set out, and seems to have ac-
"I'll take it standing up," Spiraco
quotcd him as saying.
His bullet-riddled body sprawling in
the road was seen by an air-mail pilot
flying over the spot at dawn.
Family Notices (Family Notices), Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1878 - 1954), Monday 10 August 1931 [Issue No.20307] page 6 2017-05-28 13:27 HIGSON.- In loving memory of our dear son
BOYLE.- In loving memory of our dear father
(INserted by A. and L. Schuh and family).
BROWN.- In loving memory of our dear
Telephone NO. 48.
HIGSON.— In loving memory of our dear son
BOYLE.— In loving memory of our dear father
(Inserted by A. and L. Schuh and family).
BROWN.— In loving memory of our dear
Telephone No. 48.

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.