Information about Trove user: noelwoodhouse

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,409,785
2 NeilHamilton 3,045,280
3 noelwoodhouse 2,878,970
4 annmanley 2,235,741
5 John.F.Hall 2,109,672

2,878,970 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

April 2017 32,742
March 2017 55,289
February 2017 72,472
January 2017 79,694
December 2016 63,629
November 2016 73,334
October 2016 62,565
September 2016 56,926
August 2016 44,985
July 2016 43,125
June 2016 41,190
May 2016 28,757
April 2016 31,729
March 2016 23,287
February 2016 27,244
January 2016 34,609
December 2015 41,261
November 2015 43,722
October 2015 32,709
September 2015 29,476
August 2015 41,219
July 2015 26,310
June 2015 27,353
May 2015 31,309
April 2015 35,339
March 2015 52,984
February 2015 39,466
January 2015 63,780
December 2014 80,352
November 2014 89,733
October 2014 85,595
September 2014 65,172
August 2014 81,494
July 2014 48,809
June 2014 31,351
May 2014 42,398
April 2014 40,724
March 2014 32,733
February 2014 34,793
January 2014 69,278
December 2013 53,205
November 2013 57,095
October 2013 62,115
September 2013 44,658
August 2013 52,528
July 2013 20,663
June 2013 8,497
May 2013 45,814
April 2013 39,065
March 2013 22,036
February 2013 56,938
January 2013 66,835
December 2012 57,961
November 2012 43,720
October 2012 15,780
September 2012 31,904
August 2012 67,698
July 2012 66,315
June 2012 60,339
May 2012 48,317
April 2012 18,550

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,409,754
2 NeilHamilton 3,045,280
3 noelwoodhouse 2,878,970
4 annmanley 2,235,671
5 John.F.Hall 2,109,667

2,878,970 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

April 2017 32,742
March 2017 55,289
February 2017 72,472
January 2017 79,694
December 2016 63,629
November 2016 73,334
October 2016 62,565
September 2016 56,926
August 2016 44,985
July 2016 43,125
June 2016 41,190
May 2016 28,757
April 2016 31,729
March 2016 23,287
February 2016 27,244
January 2016 34,609
December 2015 41,261
November 2015 43,722
October 2015 32,709
September 2015 29,476
August 2015 41,219
July 2015 26,310
June 2015 27,353
May 2015 31,309
April 2015 35,339
March 2015 52,984
February 2015 39,466
January 2015 63,780
December 2014 80,352
November 2014 89,733
October 2014 85,595
September 2014 65,172
August 2014 81,494
July 2014 48,809
June 2014 31,351
May 2014 42,398
April 2014 40,724
March 2014 32,733
February 2014 34,793
January 2014 69,278
December 2013 53,205
November 2013 57,095
October 2013 62,115
September 2013 44,658
August 2013 52,528
July 2013 20,663
June 2013 8,497
May 2013 45,814
April 2013 39,065
March 2013 22,036
February 2013 56,938
January 2013 66,835
December 2012 57,961
November 2012 43,720
October 2012 15,780
September 2012 31,904
August 2012 67,698
July 2012 66,315
June 2012 60,339
May 2012 48,317
April 2012 18,550

No text corrections for 'Government Gazettes'


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
THE QUEEN CRISTINA LOST ON LIHON REEF (Article), Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1878 - 1954), Saturday 8 October 1932 [Issue No.20,663] page 9 2017-04-24 15:57 Thrashing lift- way down through I hr
lonely ('in-ill Sea, iii liglil ti-ini; thu
tan« of lim Shanghai Mi vcihiics' acrid
tobacco still in thc reronae«. of lier I
holds, her high leiiu sides running rust ]
that made her appear UK »die were
wounded and bleeding : the (linen
Cristina mis making the best ol her
not very fast way to Newcastle. lt
wai. (liree clear days hefoi > (Jinis! urns
Kvc, and lhere was just a chance tbr.t
: if she maintained a decent tum ol
J speed, md they struck n good slip ol
southerly current after pulsing thc
j parallel of Sandy Cape, she might linke
them into Newcastle in lime to hear
I the Christmas carols.
' They were allowing quite a lol for
luck la fill in; but the philosophy of
within 11100 miles of hume.* 't'iil have
not been seen for months, thc engin
revolutions seem easier to pel, mid thc
flushing rvnnks to bave n move blithe-
the current, nbout which nnlmdy knows
anything until they have hail it, when
it is invariahlv discovered tlu-.t it has
swept them off their course instind of
«Ions; ¡I- If mal only burned Hf
strongly as. does hone on IWILÍ;! low
speed (lint would stagger their owners.
Kither that or their hollers would blow
'.'he Queen Cristina, despite her name,
was not n lady of high social sta nil
¡nu. She did none of that clear, chan
parent effort, that characterises thc
liich-powered ocean aristocrat. Evvrv
the solid, ns it were, with a maximum
of effort, and she rarely managed tc
sluagishlv hy lier gaunt hungry sides
in anv one hour. She never seemed
In strike any slimier . iib 3, or miles
negotiated were Ihr full (I18U feel of
the meticulous Admirulty and, if any
ihinu. were laid out on a slope that
Jt was with this uiinroniisin; ark
then, (hat men half-honed to heat time
and distance, nnd he with their families
wnen Sania Claus was performing his
miraculous feat of fi 11 î n -jr simultane-
ously the stockings of all thc children
tn Christendom in one short night.
Some of them evin figured upon lending
Queer, HIM) miles from her grimy des-
"lurent bad helped them along dunns
the nrcvinus -4 hours at the rate of
about a mile and n-hnlf per nour, lt
? Iso had a tendency to push her over
toward thc gnat reef svstem that lay
lo the south westward: hut it wai
easier to allow f«r Hint Him. il wats
to do Hiti?p i'\tr:i miles, und tilt hcurl«;
of ÍÍ ic ti sni\% M ¿Miin tit «m HS liirifiimfle
at lifimr be;i:iii to have colourable pu*
ci!iil¡tip5. On tim starboard ¡)<MV. | *iS
.»tili-« distant, Hw surf roared aw'
tumbled on thc langlo of rock, conti
and cami Hint nindi» up thc rori> ii«1
CÄVS of Lihou; bul that rn1 caused no-
body (o ci vc ft hcrfiffl ( l'fMi*_'lit to thc
'MrcumstHtiocts. A much more Mender
circumstance was thai, tlu- Ironi-dlr
fincrr of thc aneroid hnn»f-ctor hurl
?dropped um'btruslivcly luci; ti ÍH.7C
tbis hein» slightly lower flinn iltr nor-
mal for that season :ind loen I *y. Al*n.
Hit wind seemed to bc awaken lio-o
»U M umber und wa» siirliin» i;nslilv
over iho Irtup-pnnc dava when ¡i tvsih
did know bow to blow.
Still, ontinism dir* hurd ni fen -
there would be a giant exodus fur thc
beach were il otherwise-so tiny MVMT.
her hfithelv ot) to ber roiirse of S.ilC,
Tbcv run ld at least imiut ber PUH.I »ose
Inward thc pnrl for whieb they were
makiiiL'. This done, thu oiVnpr uf thc,
watch whistled up bis engineer opuo-!
pilc-mimher then on duty and told bim
tbnt ell thc girls of Ncwi-iistle btv' i
hold of the tow-rope, the in'ot"iii*e '«» j
inff tbnt if loving wishy* and *oft d«- j
ulm* of the fair sex of Newc\si.l" b«H I
anything to do with it, tin» dine*'
Queen would do pome af+onUbiu*
(UYaniiug. Hie «en man never put* les°
than tlif> whole feminine population or
bi« nevi pftrt on to (Ii? i mn »ri mn
tow-rope. The engineer, a dour ficot.
retorted that *'if <bcv wad fend ool \:
wee liit decent mill" they could lei«v<
thc lowing in p.i .ri Sud rh cngiiieerinp
skill. Thc I'IIH! wis never ii'ineil that,
once in the ship's limikers. did mit turn
tn iiiiiiifliiniiunlile slap-excepting the
very fine lot (hat went inlo the hunk-
ers KI' ike sliip just next ahead o
astern oM (he coaling herth. A murine
engineer alwin s misses a good run of
cn.-.) h- o'o ru
As the afternnnti wore on the wakine
wind gol ¡uto iii stride anil, comtlif
from almost richi nh nd. started chaf-
ing ambitious wnvc'et.« un nrreinut tue
Munt hows of the tineen Cristina. An-
that worked un from the nni-th east
nr nearly nt right angles to the ther
direction of the wind. lt «<?nied t.
meaningless suit of a «well tn the un
initiated: hot it hrmnjlit the "old lunn"
up on the narrow liriihje -oin ;tftnr hi
awakened fron his aftcrnnon nap.
"H'm.'' he tnu'tcrcd. a- Ile cy il thc
low line of clouds pililo; np on thi
southern hnrir.on. "Don't know nl-out
Chi ¡c-niii-. We'll he-Inri.y if wc,
make il liv New Year" Thc (>neen
fell Into a trmutli thal -cmed to scout J
it «elf out under lier IIÜOT mid then
ris'iitr willi a cn-iviilsive shudder, threw
a few tons id spiny lii.'li shove lie
remitter flie tiriiiM'llnr-lirt«:^ tdiowe
nlmve water for it tiri f mnm'tit. 'Hold
lier up to SS.K.. nod tell tl.cm L-L
to ouse liet down." he ordered. .'She'll
slin«j IIPI- propelloi un Ihr..tin-ii lier
counter if we. ar,, not rinrfill"
Jly « tl p.m. holli wind : uti «en were
heeiMniic; (li-rr.)ic-l lui. end t'ie har
:i««eil yileen had d". ide I to take ll"
further notice of ihc I 'rn -rn.! the
neath.-r ¡un 1er.ile1. *i'-. .l.erei .?? .
inerelv luv "ic1 callow ..]. . lille the
loweriiu- «cud Hew nv. r her «lumpy
lnn«ts und imr-i-ih-il the frc-h-wni'lil
«i'ioke ;i« it i.niir.'il mu of the flinn't
into ,.,.|.;.|Ii,"i.
liv ml.ho MI -l-r lineen I.eke iin.p
from a'l -.?.i-'.i.i'>.'?- ol conn ni a'lil
drlillk w:1h th- r-ihi'.-.'intimi ? "" hei
new-found fr.lom. rolled ami lurched
and vp . il her futile pr..pel'm- e.lt
ill wi.-ki-d i.l.-ii.Ioii. Uv SO ne-.l morn
in? H. ? - ó.d lr.! 1'ie ?-?múdete me-lery.
and Incl H rltei-e.1 il.." ll the «eil In ii
.erv i' ..i-ht. 1- iilro'-n-. monrnfilllv
1.1 the ii'siif.. ii now H-ionnii'd round
the .omer, mid ¡II.ITI.-~ ..f d--'i li. ..i«?<.«-.
.-?Ii i Ir- riv i-ivvi,-., ii-1.. .-.Iii-Ii il ru-1i".l
in il« l".:vll..i,- tl :--'i I »milli mit OM r
,,i..r.-..i-.' «l,rV'.- >,.? lu.'low l..i..."¡ii-.«.
?i.Ullin..' tn ii- i-nntivtinilmii. Uni ulnNr
.ill wa« lim niii-tiT'ill viiir nf «¡ml
Irin", nimm. i...ii,tiuiti'.| .mtv liv iii
»|iulliui.i.' ..f IK ii.;, -pu...i- :i« th., rim
Mimi..,! »irr tin- inn ininti' f,.i III .)( j
tile Huron Cristina. Mir. i" IIIT lum.]
Polin rd ni t hr pliplit into uliii-li hör'
I venturing i"*n '-ail company hud
i bronchi lier, lay over ut a FÍckeninj.»
j nngle and showed ber red undor-nkirU
to the rude blast. Occasionally, ns ii
in a virtuous attempt to regain res-pee
lahiliiy or to throw off ber tormentors
¡ übe would tall to windward, only lo
I lurch baik into her degradation even
iiiHhcr than before. After each of her
feeble efforts to assert lu-rself. the arro
cant wind put a few moro baud« on the
throughout the whole day, while kei-n
cyrd men accepted their impotency and
watched the whirling spume-Inden gusts
go hurtling pn*t. A mightier power
thiin nnv nt their command held thn
Moor, and ibo one thing left to do was
tn *'enug her down" and wait until th*1
?dement« returned'In their senses. H
anything, thev would bnve prcfernd
<hnt their submissive Queen bad suH'
cient eoiirnüc to stand un and face the
riot instead of merely Iring down lo it.
Slip could then hnve be^n kept Rome
where mar her track, whereas she now
let. wind, tide, and ocean current do
with her a« thev wNhed. And between
the three nf them they drove her south
wed instead of to the mnlli-wcst ns was
tho keen-eyed men.
Ti thus transpired that when a
snouting line of mighty breakers were
seen dead to 1 reword at 5.0 that cven
ine. the predominating, sentiment was
incredulity, or that n prcat reef had
sprints un where deep wntcr was when
last thc hydrographer heard from that
locality. Mut there ie no petting away
from thc evidence of one's eyes, and
there is less chance of petting nwnv
from the evidence of ns many pairs of
eyes HS thp Queen lind on hoard, which
were soon ell on the joh of Peeing that
had led hetter lives. They tried to
supplement what they saw by n enst
of the lead, and pot no bottom at (IP
fathoms. Hydrographers pot none at
"ñ(\ fathoms with the plummet dropped
down ni the ed(?c of reefs thereabouts,
-o there was nothimr surprising in this.
"Hiev then drooped the anchor: hut in
those denfhs it was like dangling n
od"o nf a wne7on hnltinp down Razor-
trous thnii"h lind it enu"ht and held,
an (he niMilv surge nt thc edee of the
"rent wall of reef would hare torn thc
hows mil of her. and they would have
found ont how rVcn it was-which was1
more (han the hydrographers did.
A + (hi* iunciurc tito scene was nne of
terrific und paralysing trrandcur. A
ctuhhoru wnll of reef ribing out of over
2"0 fnllionip and rxfondinc fifi miles Rt
rî*»ïit nn«1os to the direction of (he in-
solent "nie. A mMitv oeenn swell fla*
tened br the hurricane onlv ne io
He crept*;, suddenly checked hy this
fragment of continent, gp vp vent to HP
rai* hv nniirin<? over it in ern sh in?
h rpe Vors thet nVnrtVd all human cnn
motions and mocked humnn effort. Tbpn
Mitre wn< thc recoil, when it «cerned nf
'f th« M-hoV ocean vern retreating and
annthlnir rivprs poured from incsed
nrmnftiiTg in the coraline nip«« and re
*m1«d morT avéceme perils, more
?»»?«pl methmls of killing.
' For a brent Wee* instant (hr sobered
OIICCM HB'"*ed down at the very ed*?"
nf M»p reef în com «m rn ti VP calm Bs the
«rcM wnll of water receded. A* far
ns the i-ve could «re tjit» lon^ cliff was
hnred »Mid »-»"Ted. imd even the shrlrfc
>n«* *»nlc wa« fnr«n<**n in the immensity
nf fhe crimp. Tint it wa« nnlr ronineo
tar''. T-ikp ft irren t rutile of hills the
n»vt sen cnnie a""nin to the nttnek. its
toivc-'uT cr?*t creen and torrifvinrr. The
slinrfderin-! Oneen rose with dïwv speed
on ile nnromln" slnnp. sfrurli th" I'dpr
of Inn rrrf «villi Vcr lind nnd (hon. lr
- mimili"", rrn-hin" torrpnt Hint sprmcd
li' » ii fnl'i'ii world. «h» wns wirrit*"'
'i'Mif over flip orfpr ron of thp rrpf nnd
dinrin-d in'olpnt''' «'own allon! lip'f-n
.nilp Tipvond nnd Ipft flipm. Hor flnal
in-> dar« worp over: hut w^nt vim ot
mi»Mi fr^nntar i»nnor*'»npp. sha wnfi so
I'M, nnd irv th-f sho rould not slnl".
p|tli"r. 'TIP mr«" rppf thpt hnd «o
'»pr lind. li., a roiraplf». nnd hr
..^p rr tl«" warrin" T'tnits overdoing lt.
turin"! into n rpfi'"p when ptprnitv
-»pnipil to t>p A mnttpr only of tnlcin?
I tho n-xt stop.
\l|d thrrp H'PV «ripnt ChristninS. I"1!"
-.n,.cr,i dirt pRtiripd down, ttip
^'"e'u,.t""i PPR 1'ti"'a Rprrnmpd mptp^'o.
|in.,q nt |,ai-. PII.I fl-n Pnv.nolo'irod fish
r"oip n'on" *o î.'ci.nnt tt,n ít,»'"'!!' m^8
l-ar. fi.'-iminlri" 'tito t.nr ri-^+nmlpss holds
to make s in'i o' Tl!»h un n'<o-p
mn,n "« WM »lip rti'ppn snt up'i"-hl
.,-1 SfnM. -n-I mn,mnn",l l,pr |otl»
rp^l, O-r linr I'-.,. ""A S(r".'"n ,10
«nw, p.T frr.-, Tiwntrilf, snw
i,, .. .r.riTil.i «...i i».nu cwnrp :f poiild
l,n,."".. Tim- Il.n" tori- -H mOVP
..'.'n V.l||-M s p-il ,'n..nv1r,t Tl-ntl rî|l||P
.'.n "nnn.l,-1 t,p.,,..'..Wr fi Wm»«.
.'?T'n pvi.'nn.l lin- «« .irn-nn.," « p ."J flpnOr
U air'n" -I ^"1 Hip Oimn-I t"nr.n.t
O-- p '"1 r <.?'. it W«l-n.l ¡nnvi'nMn
..... ".",.< ! I ,-"T,n " ;-~n.r,l. lirnt.
:.i, ".'? ..I,.,,--,.- !.,in I'- unman
5"..n.i o ni,,l ti<l;in7 hpr hapless
rr<"* _
Thrashing her way down through the
lonely Coral Sea, in light trim; the
tang of the Shanghai stevedores' acrid
tobacco still in the recesses of her
holds, her high lean sides running rust
that made her appear as she were
wounded and bleeding : the Queen
Cristina was making the best of her
not very fast way to Newcastle. It
was three clear days before Christmas
Eve, and there was just a chance that
if she maintained a decent turn of
speed, and they struck a good slip of
southerly current after passing the
parallel of Sandy Cape, she might fluke
them into Newcastle in time to hear
the Christmas carols.
They were allowing quite a lot for
luck to fill in; but the philosophy of
within 1000 miles of homes that have
not been seen for months, the engine
revolutions seem easier to get, and the
flashing cranks to have a more blithe-
the current, about which nobody knows
anything until they have had it, when
it is invariahlv discovered that it has
swept them off their course instead of
along it. If coal only burned as
strongly as does hope on board low-
speed that would stagger their owners.
Either that or their boilers would blow
The Queen Cristina, despite her name,
was not a lady of high social stand-
ing. She did none of that clear, clean
parent effort, that characterises the
high-powered ocean aristocrat. Every-
the solid, as it were, with a maximum
of effort, and she rarely managed to
sluggishly by her gaunt hungry sides
in any one hour. She never seemed
to strike any shorter miles, or miles
negotiated were at full 6080 feet of
the meticulous Admiralty and, if any-
thing, were laid out on a slope that
It was with this unpromising ark,
then, that men half-hoped to beat time
and distance, and be with their families
when Santa Claus was performing his
miraculous feat of filling simultane-
ously the stockings of all the children
in Christendom in one short night.
Some of them even figured upon lending
Queen, 980 miles from her grimy des-
currend had helped them along during
the previous 24 hours at the rate of
about a mile and a-half per hour. It
also had a tendency to push her over
toward the great reef svstem that lay
to the south westward: but it was
easier to allow for thatn than it was
to do those extra miles, and the hearts
of men sang within them as Christmas
at home began to have colourable pos-
sibillities. On the starboard bow, 178
miles distant, the surf roared and
tumbled on the tangle of rock, coral
and sand that made up the reefs and
cays of Lihou; but the fact caused no-
body to give a second thought to the
circumstances. A much more slender
circumstance was that the tremulin
finger of the aneroid barometer had
dropped unobtrustively back to 29.70
this being slightly lower than the nor-
mal for that season and locality. Also,
the wind seemed to be awakening from
its slumber and was sighing gustily
over the long-gone days when it really
did know how to blow.
Still, optimism dies hard at sea—
there would be a giant exodus rot the
beach were ii otherwise— so they swung
her blithely on to her course of S.E.
They could at least point her snub nose
toward the port for which they were
making. This done, the officer of the
watch whistled up his engineer oppo-
site-number then on duty and told him
that all thc girls of Newcastle had
hold of the tow-rope, the inference be-
ing that if loving wishes and soft de-
sires of the fair sex of Newcastle had
anything to do with it, the dingy
Queen would do some astonishing
steaming. The seaman never puts less
than the whole feminine population of
his next port on to the imaginary
tow-rope. The engineer, a dour Scot,.
retorted that "if they was send oot a
wee bit decent coal" they could leave
the towing to good Scotch engineering
skill. The coal was never mined that,
once in the ship's bunkers, did not turn
to uninflammagle slag—excepting the
very fine lot that went into the bunk-
ers of the ship just next ahead or
astern of the coaling herth. A marine
engineer always misses a good run of
coal by one turn.
As the afternoon wore on the waking
wind got into its stride and, coming
from almost right ahead, started chas-
ing ambitious wavelets up against the
blunt nows of the Queen Cristina. An-
that worked up from the north east
or nearly at right angles to the then
direction of the wind. It seemed a.
meaningless sort of a swell to the un-
initiated: but it brought the "old man"
up on the narrow bridge soon after he
awakened from his afternoon nap.
"H'm.'' he muttered, as he eyed the
low line of clouds piling up on the
southern horizon. "Don't know about
Christmas. We'll be —— lucky if we
make it by New Year" The Queen
fell into a trough that seemed to scoop
itself out under her bilge and then
rising with a convulsive shudder, threw
a few tons of spray high above her
counter as the propelelor-boss showed
above water for a brief moment. 'Hold
her up to S.S.E., and tell them below
to ease her down," he ordered. "She'll
sling her propellor up through her
counter if we are not careful."
By 8.0 pm. both wind and sea were
becoming disrespectful, and the har-
assed Queen had decided to take no
further notice of the ? and the
weather moderated. She, therefore,
merely lay and wallowed, while the
lowering scud flew over her stumpy
masts and inveigled the fresh-warm
smoke as it poured out of the funnel
into wild rebellion.
By midnight the Queen broke away
from all semblances of control and
drunk with the xhilaration of her
new-found freedom, rolled and lurched
and waved her futile propellor about
in wicked abandon. By 8.0 next morn-
ing the wind had the complete mastery,
and had flattened down the sea by its
very weight. From droning mournfully
in the rigging, it now screamed round
the corners and angles of deck houses,
while any crevice into which it rushed
in its headlong flight would emit ear-
piercing shreiks or hollow boomings,
according to its configuration. But above
all was the masterful roar of wind,
triumphant, punctuated only by the
sputtering of flying spume as the riot
bellowed over the inanimate form of
the Queen Cristina. She, in her turn,
sobered at the plight into which her
venturing into bad company had
brought her, lay over at a sickening
angle and showed her red under-skirts
to the rude blast. Occasionally, as if
in a virtuous attempt to regainrespec-
tability or to throw off her tormentors
she would fall to windward, only to
lurch back into her degradation even
further than before. After each of her
feeble efforts to assert herself, the arro-
gant wind put a few more hands on the
throughout the whole day, while keen-
eyed men accepted their impotency and
watched the whirling spume-laden gusts
go hurtling past. A mightier power
than any at their command held the
floor, and the one thing left to do was
to "snug her down" and wait until the
elements returned to their senses. If
anything, thev would have preferred
that their submissive Queen had suffi-
cient courage to stand up and face the
riot instead of merely lying down to it.
She could then have been kept some-
where near her track, whereas she now
let wind, tide, and ocean current do
with her as they wished. And between
the three of them they drove her south-
west instead of to the north-west as was
the keen-eyed men.
It thus transpired that when a
spouting line of mighty breakers were
seen dead to leeward at 5.0 that even-
ing, the predominating sentiment was
incredulity, or that a great reef had
sprung up where deep wntcr was when
last the hydrographer heard from that
locality. But there is no getting away
from the evidence of one's eyes, and
there is less chance of getting away
from the evidence of as many pairs of
eyes ass the Queen had on board, which
were soon all on the job of seeing that
had led better lives. They tried to
supplement what they saw by a cast
of the lead, and got no bottom at 60
fathoms. Hydrographers got none at
250 fathoms with the plummet dropped
down at the edge of reefs thereabouts,
so there was nothing surprising in this.
They then drooped the anchor: but in
those depths it was like dangling a
edge of a waggon bolting down Razor-
trous thought had it caught and held,
as the mighty surge at the edge of the
great wall of reef would have torn the
bows out of her, and they would have
found ont how deep it was—which was
more that the hydrographers did.
At this juncture the scene was one of
terrific and paralysing grandeur. A
stubborn wall of reef rising out of over
250 fathoms and extending 56 miles at
right angles to the direction of the in-
solent gale. A mighty ocean swell flat-
tened by the hurricane only as to
its crests, suddenly checked by this
fragment of continent, gave vent to its
rage by pouring over it in crashing
beakers that dwarfed all human con-
ceptions and mocked human effors. Then
there was the recoil, when it seemed as
if the whole ocean were retreating and
seething rivers poured from jagged
openings in the coraline mass and re-
vealed more awesome perils, more
cruel methods of killing.
For a breathless instant the sobered
Queen sagged down at the very edge
of the reef in comparative calm as the
great wall of water receded. As far
as the eye could see the long cliff was
bared and jagged, and even the shreik-c
ing gale was forgotten in the immensity
of the scene. But it was only momen-
tary. Like a great range of hills the
next sea came again to the attack, itss
towering crest green and terrifying. Thee
shuddering Queen rose with dizzy speed
in its oncoming slope, struck the edge
of the reef with her heel and then, in
a numbing, crashing torrent that seemed
like a falling world, she was carried
right over the outer run of the reef andd
dumped insolently down about half-a-
mile beyond and left them. Her float-
ing days were over; but what was of
much greater importance, she was so
high and dry that she could not sink
either. The very reef that had so
menaced her had, by a miracle, and by
one of the warring Titans overdoing it,
turned into a refuge when eternity
seemed to be a matter only of taking
the next step.
And there they spent Christmas. The
gale passed, the sea calmed down, the
disturbed sea birds screamed maledic-
tions at her, and the gay-coloured fish
came along to inspect the strange mons-
ter, swimming into her bottomless holds
to make a job of it. High up above
mean sea level the Queen sat upright
and staid, and commenced her long
reigh over her new and strange do-
main. Men came from Townsville, saw
her, marvelled and then swore if could
not happen. They then took all move-
able valuables and departed. Then came
the occasional beche-de-mer fishermen,
who explored her storerooms and depar-
ted enriched. But the Queen stored
one a ruler where it seemed inevitable
that she would become a jagged, brut-
ish wreck plunging into the unmea-
sured depths and taking her hapless
Family Notices (Family Notices), Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1878 - 1954), Saturday 8 October 1932 [Issue No.20,663] page 6 2017-04-24 14:00 HAMILTON.- At the residence of her nephew
JENKINS.-In loving memory of our dear
HAMILTON.— At the residence of her nephew
JENKINS.—In loving memory of our dear
ENGAGEMENT NOTICES (Article), Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1878 - 1954), Saturday 8 October 1932 [Issue No.20,663] page 4 2017-04-24 13:56 The engagement is announced ot
Hrs. T. Davidson, of ltoekhamplon, to
Ernest .lames Klccle-Overlnn, second
Gunnedah, Kew South Wales.
The engagement is announced of
Mrs. T. Davidson, of Rockhampton, to
Ernest James Steele-Overton, second
Gunnedah, New South Wales.
PERSONAL (Article), Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1878 - 1954), Saturday 8 October 1932 [Issue No.20,663] page 4 2017-04-24 13:55 Mrs. rt. Hod^i-r, wini spent I lip past
IS numil)* willi 1I:T lii'iiilii-r I Mr. (i.
tull) ut Mt. |sn, returned to Kuckhuntn-1
lon mi 'I'liui'Mhiv.
Mr.-. Xiv. M i fl roy and lier two child-
ren lett yesterday for Tow nsvill«, whci't.
they int e ui to spend II few weeks.
Mr. Montpomi'iy Mtiarl, who stayed
at the Leichhardt lintel ilor)»K his visit
lo Jvi uk lin i II pl ci». left hy plum, yester-
day for the Smth.
Messrs, A. C. turvopso and A. Ti.
(.aims, who arrived from the North,
and Messrs. lilian tole and IÏ. A. Kinnie,
ing at the Leichhardt Hotel
Mr. XX. 'I'. Wilka, «ho arrived from
the North rend li.ft for the Smith yes
while in Hocklui Hinton.
Mi*. 1". H. XX'otts arrived from V.ves
Iinm, Lonej-oai-h. yesterday and left by
Mr. V. Walker arrivid from X'cpponii
vcKterday and is staying al I he Criterion
Mr. ft. M'Cnriiiack. who liad liceii
staying at the l.rilei io.1 Hotel, left yes
tcrdav for thc South.
Mr. ami Mrs. J. Dow retnrnr.:] to
Piookhnnipton hy ear after a visit to
Mr. nml Mrs. XX". G. Wood left by
day trip lo Jliislmiio and 'Joowoomlia.
Pilot .1. Brniu-li. wini had hecn May-
ing at thc I'oinineriiul lint«), left by
'piturie yo'terdav fir Brisbane.
Mr. )?'. (."reaiiy, who stayed nt (¡ie
Brisbane. Mr. W. A. Crirk left, for
Townsville, and Mr. H. lt. Woolrjoh left
staying nt thc Commercial Hotel.
Mr. J. Benslead Ima oiTivcd H Unrk
hampton from the Dawson Valley and ie
staving nt the Connni-rcinl Hotel. j
Mr». Crokev arrived from Brisbane
\Vowan. She will visit friends there be-
fore going lo Avamae. where. Mr.
Croker was recently transferred lo Ihe
management of (he Bank of New South
j Wales.
Mrs. O. Rodger, who spent the past
18 months with her brother (Mr. G.
Catt) at Mt. Isa, returned to Rockhamp-
ton on Thursday.
Mrs. Viv. Millroy and her two child-
ren left yesterday for Townsville, where.
they intend to spend a few weeks.
Mr. Montgomery Stuart, who stayed
at the Leichhardt Hotel during his visit
to Rockhampton, left by plane yester-
day for the South.
Messrs. A. C. Carvosso and A. B.
Cairns, who arrived from the North,
and Messrs. Brian Cole and E. A. Binnie,
ing at the Leichhardt Hotel.
Mr. W. T. Wilks, who arrived from
the North and left for the South yes-
while in Rockhampton.
Mrs. E. H. Watts arrived from Eves-
ham, Longreach, yesterday and left by
Mr. F. Walker arrived from Yeppoon
yesterday and is staying at the Criterion
Mr. R. M'Cormack, who had been
staying at the Criterion Hotel, left yes-
terday for the South.
Mr. and Mrs. J. Dow returned to
Rockhampton by car after a visit to
Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Wood left by
day trip to Brisbane and Toowoomba.
Pilot J. Branch, who had been stay-
ing at the Commercial Hotel, left by
'plane yeterday for Brisbane.
Mr. F. Greany, who stayed at the
Brisbane, Mr. W. A. Crick left, for
Townsville, and Mr. B. R. Woolrych left
staying at the Commercial Hotel.
Mr. J. Benstead has arrived in Rock-
hampton from the Dawson Valley and is
staying at the Commercial Hotel.
Mrs. Croker arrived from Brisbane
Wowan. She will visit friends there be-
fore going to Aramac, where Mr.
Croker was recently transferred to the
management of the Bank of New South
Wales.
MR. MICHAEL FINN (Article), Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1878 - 1954), Saturday 8 October 1932 [Issue No.20,663] page 4 2017-04-24 13:40 After A short illness, Mr. Michael
Timi, for many yeaTs » Mt, Morgau
resident, passed away hst, week at
lowniville, where he lad been, residing
for the past five years, at Ute «ge of
months apo. J?<V Wes a grown-up
family of four -daughters! mid mic R"n,
Mr, J. B. Finn, who still resides in Mt'
Horgan.
After a short illness, Mr. Michael
Finn, for many years a Mt. Morgan
resident, passed away last week at
Townsville, where he had been residing
for the past five years, at the age of
months ago. He leaves a grown-up
family of four daughters and one son,
Mr. J. B. Finn, who still resides in Mt.
Morgan.
PERSONAL. (Article), Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1878 - 1954), Friday 7 October 1932 [Issue No.20,662] page 12 2017-04-24 13:32 PERSOfíAi.
-mm -
Mrs J P Templeton arrived from
Alrilra Station »esterdav and is 6.1a» mj;
at, the Leichhardt Motel
Mr and Mrb Go aid Burke a id their
! tile ron «Ho hid been sta»in). at the
Mcisrs H t,coree ml I G Holland
«ho arrived from the "»outil are «stay
inn nt the leichhaidt Hotel
Mr A G Steele »»lo lind been stay
me at the Le chliardt Hotel left for
the fcouth
Ml»» Hnrrl Vivien has nrn»ed in
Rockhampton from Marla» and la
stavino: at the Lntorion Hotel
Messrs 1 II Mair Roy Adair and
Len Branch left for Bl ml anc by the
niano vesliulav The» lind been stay
ian at the Criter on Hotel
Miss V Vareoe »»ho staled at the
Criterion »»Iule in Rockhampton, left
by 'plane yesterday for HriFbane
Mr G Matheion »»ho had been stay
ins at the Criterion Hotel left yester
dar bv car for Cracow
Mr and Mrs M H Gale arrived from
the North vesteidav They are stay
me at tho Criterion Hotel
Mr C Oates who >»ta»cd at the Com
Mexico Jericho
Lieutenant-colonel Alderman and Mr
Colin M Gowan nrrived from Mackaj
vestcrday The» are sta»mg at the
Commercial Hotel
Moara A F \\ alker and F Starick,
»»ho had been 6ta»intr at the Commor
cial Hotel left for the South \oslerdav
Miss D Dawson arrived from tim
Dawson Valley ycttcrdav and is stay
hit; at the Gros»enor Hotel
Mr J Thompson »»ho armed from
the Dawson \allcv, ia sttmnK *** the
Grosvenor Hotel
Mr L Collins who armed from Din
t»o and Mr J CollinH »»ho arrived from
Marlboiough are anton«; the visitors
.»»ho are etayin-j at the Grosvenor
Hotel
Messrs C G Lush and Lloyd, who
staved at the Grosvenor Hotel i»lnle in
.Rockhampton left for the North
Mesara H Barron and Sawcll arrived
from the South and Mr D C Scott
arrived from the \orth »esterdav Thev
are stavinp at the Grosvenor Hotel
Mrs R J Smibert who has been the
jrttest of MrB E J Munro Lennox
She will be accompanied by Mrs Reír
Fiench and daughter Pat
Mrs H J Reynolds will leave for
her little son Gerald
PERSONAL.
Mrs J. P. Templeton arrived from
Alpha Station yesterday and is staying
at the Leichhardt Hotel.
Mr and Mrs. Gerald Burke and their
little son, who had been staying at the
Leichhardt Hotel left for Springsure.
Messrs. H. George and C. G. Holland,
who arrived from the South, are stay-
ing at the Leichhaidt Hotel.
Mr A. G. Steele, who had been stay-
ing at the Leichhardt Hotel, left for
the South.
Miss Hazel Vivien has arrived in
Rockhampton from Mackay and is
staying at the Criterion Hotel.
Messrs E. H. Mair, Roy Adair and
Len Brasch left for Brisbane by the
'plane yesterday. They had been stay-
ing at the Criterion Hotel.
Miss V. Barcoe, who stayed at the
Criterion while in Rockhampton, left
by 'plane yesterday for Brisbane.
Mr G. Matheson, who had been stay-
ing at the Criterion Hotel left yester-
day by car for Cracow.
Mr and Mrs. M. H. Gale arrived from
the North yesterday. They are stay-
ing at the Criterion Hotel
Mr C. Oates, who stayed at the Com-
Mexico, Jericho
Lieutenant-colonel Alderman and Mr.
Colin M Gowan arrived from Mackay
yesterday. They are staying at the
Commercial Hotel.
Messrs. A. E. Walker and F. Starick,
who had been staying at the Commer-
cial Hotel left for the South yesterday.
Miss D. Dawson arrived from the
Dawson Valley yesterday and is stay-
ing at the Grosvenor Hotel.
Mr J. Thompson, who arrived from
the Dawson Valley, is staying at the
Grosvenor Hotel.
Mr L. Collins who arrived from Din-
go, and Mr. J. Collins, who arrived from
Marlborough, are among the visitors
who are staying at the Grosvenor
Hotel.
Messrs C. G. Lush and Lloyd, who
stayed at the Grosvenor Hotel while in
Rockhampton left for the North.
Messrs H. Barron and Sawell arrived
from the South and Mr D. C. Scott
arrived from the North yesterday. They
are staying at the Grosvenor Hotel.
Mrs R. J. Smiibert, who has been the
guest of Mrs. R. J. Munro, Lennox-
street will return to Sea Hill tooday.
She will be accompanied by Mrs. Reg.
French and daughter Pat.
Mrs H. J. Reynolds will leave for
Barcaldine to-night accompanied by
her little son Gerald.
Advertising (Advertising), Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1878 - 1954), Friday 7 October 1932 [Issue No.20,662] page 6 2017-04-24 13:11 I I NUI M N Uli I s
Till tunera! ,f II" lain Mr M [ 111.11
TllilVMS I HU li »lil ii « linn, lil* I le
roi Iron Ilia, sir n 'I Ills Uni, ,j Hill
MJI»». «I IO n elu k In Hie Jl « I I iwi| lui
Crmrtcr«
TllhlH «. «.IVhlllll
1 id I ukin
TdepliLire \ f US 140
Mrsinut«, of Hi" e.i|rieniiiil Masonic I n 1R
«rp i, Mini to ml,ni lim I in Ml ni til
Jaie «or Iii «. 1 I I'HU 11 in i dom
lils lair icldmc al in nil * f >r li Hu k
hfltnptntl (pin lr«i» Rroiluon 1 ullicr lolj.c ur.
Imitcd lo »(uni \ « lln,alia
THI. l-l ,tils ni Ml«,« J on] Il «H M I'll«
are rrsppt: full» ii Hird ti altin! lill« lull«1
ral of Iheir ii, r is-s« !,»]", I Snli»r Uli'» to
moir from llrr Into rr«l li»i i» DJ 11 1 so«cr
ifrret THIS Urila«! IfllirMlOS al 10
o clock, for Ih" Hick inmplnn Oni Irn
! IM \\s,u\ i, McKVNi'It',
1 nir-rmUm
Telephone No fil M illlnni FI-IVI
TMF FriciiH« ,,f Mrs. HiANh P Ml II? «ml
Fanill» (»ifeanrl O 11 Irruí Mr* 1 MI'lR
(Molhrr) Mr anil Mr* > MI 1R (fir .111«- in 1
Slater In la«) Mr" ".V MVIMIIl iSi«rr)un
reapectnilli imttril Io alten! llic Fumral of
their ilepcnAeil lieloir-o" Tluphnnn1 Filler Sor
«ml nrolher. the late Mr H»«.\h PI.TVnsON
MUH. lo lraie KI Aniire« s Prwrtiilcrlan
Olrarch. THIS fFrito) «.PTFtlNno», at T"ir.
for Hie Stonie» piree! Halium «tallon, lor In
tennent in the Ipauich Cr-metm
LUTTON nnns
e>nilertakrrs
Telephone No 6lT
FUNERAL NOTICES.
THE Funeral of the late Mr. ALFRED
THOMAS LLOYD will move from his late
residence, Brae-street, THIS (Friday) FORE-
NOON, at 10 o'clock, for the Rockhampton
Cemetery.
TUCKER & NANKIVELL,
Undertakers,
Telephone Nos. 148 - 149.
MEMBERS of the Capricornia Masonic Lodge
are invited to attend the Funeral of the
late Wor. Bro. A. T. LLOYD, to move from
his late residence at 10 o'clock, for the Rock-
hampton Cemetery. Brethren of other lodges are.
invited to attend. No Regalia.
THE Friends of Misses J. and H. SHARPLES
are respectfully invited to attend the Fune-
ral of their deceased beloved Sister, BELLA, to
move from her late residence, 92 Bolsover-r
street, THIS (Friday) FORENOON, at 10
o'clock, for the Rockhampton Cemetery.
FINLAYSON & McKENZIE,
Undertakers.
Telephone No. 61 William-street.
THE Friends of Mrs FRANK P. MUIR and
Family (Wife and Children), Mrs. J. MUIR
(Mother), Mr. and Mrs. V. MUIR (Brother and
Sister-in-law), Mrs. W. M'CAMLEY (Sister) are
respetfully invited to attend the Funeral of
their deceased beloved Husband, Father, Son
and Brother, the late Mr. FRANK PATERSON
MUIR, to leave St. Andrew's Presbyterian
Church, THIS (Friday) AFTERNOON at 12.15,r.
for the Stanley-street Railway Station, for in-
terment in the Ipswich Cemetery.
LUTTON BROS.,
Undertakers.
Telephone No. 617.
Family Notices (Family Notices), Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1878 - 1954), Friday 7 October 1932 [Issue No.20,662] page 6 2017-04-24 13:04 DORAN - GRANT.- A quiet wedding was
WETHERALL.- In loving memory of our dear
DORAN — GRANT.— A quiet wedding was
WETHERALL.— In loving memory of our dear
HOT WATER CHAPTER III. (Article), Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1878 - 1954), Friday 7 October 1932 [Issue No.20,662] page 5 2017-04-24 13:02 And if Ins host nnd hostess the Mon
Bicur and Madame Gedge should grow
ponccrncd at his absence-wh», that
has already luntcd took a light hearted
view of life and its prol lems was un
fortunate but could not be helped
His motives for cmliarl ing on this
simply Although Mr Gedge s stale
net er aober had been an exaggeration
for hours at a time-it is undoubtedly
the fes tue And becoming acquainted
hotel on the prenons evening he bad
so on far into the night This morn
ing he had woken feeling a little uti
der the weather, and It had seemed to
set as a pick mc np
correct AH he splashed his way
vigorously about the haibour he was
growing conscious of a marked improve
ment
in the sun White boats lay at
anchor ever}where and gulls wheeled
and cried under the blue sky And so
at first had given lum a shooting pain
almost musical
Exhilarated he rested on Ins oars
and looked about lum And looking
a few fcot of ramming an Auxiliary
Yawl bearing on its side the name Fly
tng Cloud Fe backed a yard or two
and it was 11 this moment that he
observed tearing over the side of the
vessel a man who smoked a pipe And
Franklyn
He waved effusively Packy took
no notice He wa», ed again Packy
appeared not to be aware of his exis*
deck to think and he was dome St
for wavers
taken Packy Tranklyn to the shores of
Brittany had become, by the time lie
Rocque, a little dimmed He was still
as full of teal as ever, but as he
morning meal he had to admit to him
«elf that if anyone were to ask him
jitst what he proposed to do now that
badly
at even date, he would be able tn
In her life little but brotherly evm
pathy and understanding In order tn
to how this wai to be done Unless
»tin pretty striking ideas on the sub
icct were to present themselves shortly
distress would he perceived be even
lower than that of Blair Egg'eston
However there was still a hope He
had not \ct smoked the aflcr
hreakfast pipe which, as even body
knowB, con often prove a source of the
subtlest inspiration lighting this
»jipe, he vient on deck and leaning over
the sido told his brain to go to it
and see what it had got
It had got nothing whatever He
urged it to try again And it was
at this point that lie received the first
Intimation that his friend the Vicomto
had come back into his life Unable
to attract Pack) s attention in a sit
*ing p ««¡lure it lind occurred to the Vi
comte that better results might be ob
tamed were he to stand up
It was a inoRt unfortunate move
and waved in a St Boi-que pleasure
boat without disaster but the Vicomte
had not the early ti arning necessary
ror the task A sudden lurch sent
him staggering sidewava and from
there to it the water WBB an easy step
He went ln like a performing seal
there rose immediately a babb«e of
alarm The Tiench aie an emotional
race A\ hen the} see drami unfold
ling itself befire llieir eves, they do
not treat it with neilin ed silence They
»cream and shout and jump and hop
The interpretation which Tacky first
a number of mindel s must have broken
out simultaneously in the vicinity It
he obseived noatinjr in it a human
form And, scanning tins form moro
closely he recognised it as thit of the
\ icomte de Blissac
' Hello, there, ' he said
He found noll ing to surprise him m
the spectacle Ho liad known that the
\ iroiutr was in fat Itocquc, and an foi
his leing in the middle of the liar'uiu
in a double breasted suit of mauve eloth
eut tnugly about the shoulders, the,«*
wus culling particularly odd aboat
that Lightecn months ago Packy had
<nly just restrained him from taking a
dip tu ene of New \orks belter KEewn
fc.uiiioiiis in full dress clothes
It wie with gratification, accotdinglv,
lather tuan astonishment that he leaned
over the side and greeted him
"üello, thci^, Veekl" he 6aid
' H(v b the boy Î"
The bjy at the moment of the eu
quiry was not doing any too well A
with a Blight gmgling sound When he
lose a<.ain, it was so evident that he
was a poor swimmer that Packy rea
lined tim he had got to do sonclhin;»
i nmediately
îlany n« in Paeky's position would
haye shrunk from diving *o the rescue,
fully elad Packy was one of them
H.e was fond of the Vicomte, but not
flannel suit in his interests However
the spirit of Auld Lang Syne was sulll
cicntly strong in him to cause bim to
climb into the elinghv, and in a few
minutes he had gaticd the poor bit of
flotsam and lu ought it safely aboard
he deferred ovvnu lo the necessity of
cost money in St Kocque It was some
little time before Packy returned When
lie did so, he found that the Vicomte
had not been idle in Ins absence He
had removed his wet clothes and don
scent, and was now drinking a medí
oma! dram against a possible cold in
the head
reassuringly
"I'm all right, mv old Packy Quite
OC Absolutely OC"
An education at Tton and subsequent
travel m both Great Britain and the
United Stntcs had given the Vicomte de
BlisBac a considerable fluency in the
English tongue but not a perfect com
niand of it He belonged to the school
of thi/Uglit which lioldB that if you talk
quick the words will take care of them
fi<Ives This was one of his sirupler
efforts and Packy interpreted his mean
ing without difficulty He regarded him
fondly, as men will a friend dramati
into r'casant conversation
'I didn't know you were coming to
St Iî'eque, Packy You said nothing
«vlien we met at Waterloo"
"I didn't know myself then"
" Vt hat do \ ou do here T"
Parky was guarded There are some
mitsicus too secret to reveal even to ai
old fneild
"Oh Im just pottering around Tell
me Veck, what happened to you t"
"I fell overboard"
"No I mean eighteen months ago
York without a word Did they deport
you Î '
"Oh, no My mamma sent e cable
that I should go out West to Colorado
I left New \ork to arrive there It was
a ei cat wrenrh "
" You w ere sorry to go !"
" No I liked going I had fun "
"Then why was it a urcat wiench T'
"Beeau«e it was A great cattle
little eonfusing at time« but I get you
What mado >our mamma send rou
there ! '
' She hear that I have been making
cures That is why I go now to stay
with these Gcdges at the Chateau The}
arc rich Americans who have taken the
Chateau and I bet >ou, nn Pack} mj
Packy who had been sitting cm thi
side of the boat rose us if he had just
discovered the woodwoik t» be red hot
A thrill of elation pissed throush lum
coupled with a stiong vote of censun
on that indifferent brain of his Odd
he felt that the human linn when
tacl ling a problem always has that
solution
Until now this matter of gilling
into the Linteau had seemed ti lum a
streicht issue between himself nnil
these unKnown Geldes How he had
asked himself vi as he to establish i m
nection with these (,edges and lnilnci
them to invite lum to the house v \uA
all the while (hore wai the i Id \ eek
richi on the spot in a iio'idon to ,it
ns rninv of his fiicnils invited ns he
plcisrd
" Are you at the Chateau non * '
"Not vet I go poon neilin «"
' Perhaps ? '
"Well von never know mv Pn li
If the Testivnl is sn unod ris ni« ns it
him heen nnvle I do not arrive for
ilnv« uni ilivs"
'What reslnnl .».
Tile \ ic nile waved a hand 'li le
wards The little ti w11 nils civ willi
fli£r»v an 1 lmifin«T *ml urn nt tina
early hour enrcfue nnsi& Ind liue,un lo
make themselves heaid
" To dav is the Festival of the baint
St Rocque, j ou uudci stand It is Ins
anniversary which IB being celebrated
Just one of those dam silly binges wheic
the gas," explained the Vicomte, gem
lower orders, "but not had Quito
good fun I broke almost ni», ned last
year, jumping over a table '
Packy was not intciestcd in the les
tival of the Saint
"Look here, ^eck" he said nigcntlv
"be a sport Get me invited to the
Chateau will }ou ' I cant explain
but I have a paitieular reason foi
wanting to spend a few dav.s there"
"Aha' The beautiful Miss Opal
yes Î '
Packy was annoved Jane Opal ex
ing to him It was intensely nritating
to have to listen to such nonsense
" To Miss Opal » '
"Not to Miss Opal I nitroluccd vou
to mv fiancee at Waterloo-'
"Was that your finneee Î That very
lovely girl î '
" \ cs "
" Vid vet ion come all this vv i> to
see Miss Opal 1 '
líoluetnntlv Piel v almud ned the
idea of lualing his finnd over tito lua'l
with a behn ing pin Ile must he felt
be tictfnl
'Well never mini never mind Ti«
point is ran \ou get mo "'to He
Uintcau ? '
" M is no
' W hv not ' '
"Mv old Paiky. what mu ask is im
possible. Hv the time 1 auive at the
Chateau, 1 shall be H vcrv «King with
these fledges and what 1 sav will not
go. Thcv c\pi«rt ni" ai living jc6tpld.iv,
and most llkelv I do not tin ii up lill
the dav after to monow, if even limit,
This will niinov llicse (¡edges confound-
edly. Thcv will be bicker than mud.
You lruli.i stand ''"
Pnekv vvns uiiivilling to accept defeat
"Xn," sahl Hie Me.initc definitolv. "it
cannot he done. Fo fat flinn mutin.
nu fiioinls lo (h.. tlmteiiu 1 shall li,. c\
tli.ini'Iv folttlli.lte if 1 do no1 lnusoll
lmmme kicked out. 1 lu vc nirt Ihesc
(«edges, never, hut nu minima 1 "Ils ni'«
thcv aie ven upi ¡ghi ro-pci !nl.Ie
bniiigcois. anil von wniild "lot believe,
.ne Paikv, ho« mue li mil liked liv no
right, lesp it,ilil,. lunn n,-,,is I ian grow
in quite n sh.nl s,,i ,, ,,f tim» It will
lie n ras" of "nil., Monsieur li- \ leoiuti»,
.-onie in. riomiitve, Mon-ienr 1<«
Mi.mite get out.' .iiirl I si, ,11 |,i. bick
one" linne in in» gm.il lillie hntil"
Pnikv nigiied no fuilhei Ile was
ilejiiossp,] I",t he .""1,1 s," Il". f",". ,,f
the odieiV riiieiining The \ mumc
iinirht Im corni i.mi|iiiiv. bul lu» w.is
not n good sol ml sponsor «s. n ill he
icilis,,], must l"« ",.,,1,. ds-whoie for
inrr.li« ni entli lo tin« (ii iii.Ill Hil»», li»
'. \inl now." sn,,l il" \ iioniti«, dis.
missing the impioiitabli tli,-mi». . l"t in
lorui'l (liest. (;e«d_»es mid n,e ( IMICIIU,
and «e will HKMk of (he 11 stii.il. Iii"»
l'estival is good ftm, 1'iukv. Do you
loinciiibci ho« in New Volk once you
lake mc lo a fete of aitists at Wcbs
tci 'AU Y'
Packy '.lodilcd austeicly. He lCralled
tin» episode, but it was one which in his
cupaeity of n bliiulv jouiig fellow en-
gaged to a gul of ideals lie preferred
to toi get.
" W eli, it is like that, something,
only blggei inueh It in our great
tune», losliunc carnival, j on undcistand.
1 ho w hole tow ii gooi cuckoo. Ev crybody
put«, on fun» i} clothes and becomes pio
c} ed "
1'ackv, «»hivcicd prudislily. Ile was
aw aie«, of course, that tlicrc wera still
the-mselv ps in the manner descubed. but
it wns not niiu to have to hear about
'"What gi cat good foi lune that you
(should uria me« on this particular day,
my Packv, anv that we should BO
happily have met. Wc will whoop it
Uli "
""«t Anthonv might have equalled
P.iekv s sime«, but onlv on one of his
best "il.iv «,
" \ ou don't suppose I'm coining, do
J ou ."
" \\ hv, what ilsc 1"
Taekv rubbol his chin pensively. He
hail Midihiily discovereil that this was
cpeinng up n new line of thought.
A'.i.vllniig III the nalluc of rowdy
icvcliy wus, of COUIHC, lntcnsclj dis
tiisteful to linn uoundavs. Ile lind put
all Ihrt soit of thing far behind lum.
Hut in tilt, eiiFe of lins 1 estival of the
Saint there was Hcatnec lo be conaid
ired. lie.itnre, recognising the great
.'(linaine« vnluc of the n\pcileuce, would
pioli.ililv be lime Ii niinojed wcic he to
lins*, siiih a culoul ful. chaiaetelistie
allan Ami he would not like to do
unj tiling to displease lîeiitiicc.
' It's pu.itv lull of hintuiie« interest,
lins 1 estival, 1 should imagine, is it
nut ' .Mimili In oallen the mind a good
(leal I take ii J"
.Must a lot of dam fools hotting it
up niul gell in,; so tight as owl-''
l'.ukv flow ned. It seemed to linn that
Ino hu nd was wilful]) missing the
poi it.
"Naluiallv on such oriasiniis," he
su ni "tillie «mild lu. a icrtain .1 mount
ot hcnitv, o'nl «olid jollitj. ílint i*
onlv to be e"\|n«u«l Hut what I mean
is sii|i|i,,-« ,1 lellow wanted to stud} the«
Soul ot I Lime
'.(111 iiniloiilitrillv."
"( .111111 1 1e III, ' 'saul Pick«.. « Hut
th ii.» pi-t one thing If jim lln'ik
von 01 nnvlioilv else mc going to get
nie tul,, turn \ diess, joule veij niiiili
mistnkeii "
' Nut 1 v -11 11 simple pullut ,
« \o, s,, ? ?
' \ pu not is not much "
"N.i '
" M w11 " sinl th" \ iiomte, ' 1 at
lend the munni 11s ,1 ho« du von
mil tims, little gip, 11 linn:? lli.it nu
iiliiuit iiii.l In« ni the MIHI '"
' .mi dont 1111111 to till nie," saul
I'nl,, slmiL'il ih,1 von me going tu
Hu- minimi, c ns , l,^,d v
" 1 i"nl ' lint is 11. \i.» I go tv«.
J I1/11.I '
'1 Ii I] l s,,,,,, llorlv st,.| - ,,p M"! "
wluir .1! the l«i-tiv ii <f tin» saint it
is pin of ill,. r »oil tun We s,liall meei, J
tlli'i (o linn, li. eight o i buk nt tin
Hot.I ,|.s 1 Inn. lint is tim In.
gn it lu liliin von -ee lb ii I i side ti,
(.is,no V,.i, will fin.] me ill tin« iori,
tail Im '
\ on dont nee.l t.. I 1 nie ibu,' sii,]
Pu, ki.
'(.emilllllcj lu uuium )
And if his host and hostess the Mon-
sieur and Madame Gedge should grow
concerned at his absence—why, that
has already hinted, took a light hearted
view of life and its problems was un-
fortunate but could not be helped.
His motives for embarking on this
simply. Although Mr Gedge's state-
never sober had been an exaggeration—
for hours at a time—it is undoubtedly
the festive. And, becoming acquainted
hotel on the previous evening he had
so on far into the night. This morn-
ing he had woken feeling a little un-
der the weather, and it had seemed to
set as a pick me up.
correct. As he splashed his way
vigorously about the harbour he was
growing conscious of a marked improve-
ment.
in the sun. White boats lay at
anchor everywhere and gulls wheeled
and cried under the blue sky. And so
at first had given him a shooting pain
almost musical.
Exhilarated he rested on his oars
and looked about him. And looking,
a few feet of ramming an Auxiliary
Yawl, bearing on its side the name Fly-
ing Cloud. He backed a yard or two
and it was at this moment that he
observed leaning over the side of the
vessel a man who smoked a pipe. And
Franklyn.
He waved effusively. Packy took
no notice He waved again. Packy
appeared not to be aware of his exis-
tence.
deck to think and he was doing it
for wavers.
taken Packy Franklyn to the shores of
Brittany had become, by the time he
Rocque, a little dimmed. He was still
as full of zeal as ever, but as he
morning meal he had to admit to him-
self that if anyone were to ask him
just what he proposed to do now that
badly.
at even date, he would be able to
in her life little but brotherly sym-
pathy and understanding. In order to
to how this was to be done. Unless
some pretty striking ideas on the sub-
ject were to present themselves shortly
distress would, he perceived, be even
lower than that of Blair Eggleston.
However there was still a hope. He
had not yet smoked the after-
breakfast pipe which, as everybody
knows, can often prove a source of the
subtlest inspiration. Lighting this
pipe, he went on deck and leaning over
the side told his brain to go to it
and see what it had got.
It had got nothing whatever. He
urged it to try again. And it was
at this point that he received the first
intimation that his friend the Vicomte
had come back into his life. Unable
to attract Packy' s attention in a sit-
ing posture it had occurred to the Vi-
comte that better results might be ob-
tained were he to stand up.
It was a most unfortunate move.
and waved in a St. Rocque pleasure
boat without disaster, but the Vicomte
had not the early training necessary
for the task. A sudden lurch sent
him staggering sideways and from
there to it the water was an easy step.
He went in like a performing seal
there rose immediately a babble of
alarm. The French are an emotional
race. When they see drama unfold-
ing itself before their eyes, they do
not treat it with wellbred silence. They
scream and shout and jump and hop.
The interpretation which Packy first
a number of murders must have broken
out simultaneously in the vicinity. It
he obseived floating in it a human
form. And, scanning this form more
closely he recognised it as that of the
Vicomte de Blissac.
"Hello, there,"' he said
He found nothing to surprise him in
the spectacle. He had known that the
Vicomte was in St. Rocque, and as for
his being in the middle of the harbour
in a double breasted suit of mauve cloth
cut snugly about the shoulders, there
was nothing particularly odd about
that. Eighteen months ago Packy had
only just restrained him from taking a
dip in one of New York's better known
fountains in full dress clothes.
It was with gratification, accordingly,
rather than astonishment that he leaned
over the side and greeted him.
"Hello, there, Veek!" he said
' Hpw's the boy?"
The boy at the moment of the en-
quiry was not doing any too well. A
with a slight gurgling sound. When he
rose again, it was so evident that he
was a poor swimmer that Packy rea-
lised that he had got to do something
immediately.
Many men in Packy's position would
have shrunk from diving to the rescue,
fully clad. Packy was one of them.
He was fond of the Vicomte, but not
flannel suit in his interests., However
the spirit of Auld Lang Syne was suffi-
ciently strong in him to cause him to
climb into the dinghy, and in a few
minutes he had fagged the poor bit of
flotsam and brought it safely aboard.
he deferred owing to the necessity of
cost money in St Rocque. It was some
little time before Packy returned. When
he did so, he found that the Vicomte
had not been idle in his absence. He
had removed his wet clothes and don-
scent, and was now drinking a medi-
cinal dram against a possible cold in
the head.
reassuringly.
"I'm all right, my old Packy. Quite
O.C. Absolutely O.C."
An education at Eton and subsequent
travel in both Great Britain and the
United Statcs had given the Vicomte de
Blissac a considerable fluency in the
English tongue but not a perfect com-
mand of it. He belonged to the school
of thought which holds that if you talk
quick the words will take care of them-
selves. This was one of his simpler
efforts and Packy interpreted his mean-
ing without difficulty. He regarded him
fondly, as men will a friend dramati-
into pleasant conversation.
"I didn't know you were coming to
St Rocque, Packy. You said nothing
when we met at Waterloo."
"I didn't know myself then."
" What do you do here?"
Parky was guarded. There are some
missions too secret to reveal even to an
old friend.
"Oh, I'm just pottering around. Tell
me Veek, what happened to you?"
"I fell overboard."
"No. I mean eighteen months ago.
York without a word. Did they deport
you?"
"Oh, no. My mamma sent a cable
that I should go out West to Colorado.
I left New York to arrive there. It was
a great wrench."
" You were sorry to go ?"
" No. I liked going. I had fun "
"Then why was it a great wrench?"
"Because it was. A great cattle
little eonfusing at times, but I get you.
What made your mamma send you
there?"'
"She hear that I have been making
cures. That is why I go now to stay
with these Gedges at the Chateau. They
are rich Americans who have taken the
Chateau and I bet you, my Packy, my
the nostrils."
Packy who had been sitting on the
side of the boat, rose as if he had just
discovered the woodwork to be red hot.
A thrill of elation passed through him,
coupled with a strong vote of censure
on that indifferent brain of his. Odd,
he felt, that the human brain when
tackling a problem always has that
solution.
Until now this matter of getting
into the Chateau had seemed to him a
straight issue between himself and
these unknown Geldes. How he had
asked himself, was he to establish con-
nection with these Gedges and induce
them to invite him to the house? And
all the while there was the old Veek
right on the spot, in a position to get
as many of his friends invited as he
pleased.
" Are you at the Chateau now?"'
"Not yet. I go soon. . . . perhaps."
"Perhaps ?"
"Well you never know, my Packy.
If the Festival is so good as always it
has been, maybe I do not arrive for
days and days."
'What Festival?"
The Vicomte waved a hand shore-le
wards. The little town was gay with
flags and bunting, and even at this
early hour carefree noises had begun to
make themselves heard.
" Tp-day is the Festival of the Saint.
St Rocque, you understand. It is his
anniversary which is being celebrated.
Just one of those dam silly binges where
the gas," explained the Vicomte, geni-
lower orders, "but not bad. Quite
good fun. I broke almost my neck last
year, jumping over a table."
Packy was not interested in the Fes-
tival of the Saint.
"Look here, Veek," he said urgently,
"be a sport. Get me invited to the
Chateau will you? I can't explain
but I have a particular reason for
wanting to spend a few days there."
"Aha! The beautiful Miss Opal
yes ?"
Packy was annoved Jane Opal ex-
ing to him. It was intensely irritating
to have to listen to such nonsense.
be engaged to be married."
" To Miss Opal?" '
"Not to Miss Opal. I introduced you
to my fiancee at Waterloo-'
"Was that your fiancee? That very
lovely girl?"
"Yes."
" And yet you come all this way to
see Miss Opal?"
Reluctantly, Packy abandoned the
idea of beating his friend over the head
with a belaying pin. He must, he felt,
be tactful.
'Well never mind, never mind. The
point is, can you get me into the
Chateau?"'
"Alas, no."
"Why not?"
"My old Packy, what you ask is im-
possible. By the time I arrive at the
Chateau, I shall be in very wrong with
these Gedges and what I say will not
go. They expect me arriving yesterday,
and most likely I do not turn up till
the day after to-morrow, if even then.
This will annoy these Gedges confound-
edly. They will be sicker than mud.
You understand?"
Packy was unwillingg to accept defeat.
"No," said the Vicomte definitely. "it
cannot be done. So far from inviting
my friends to the Chateau, I shall be ex-
tremely fortunate if I do not myself
become kicked out. I have met these
Gedged never, but my maman tells me«
they are very upright, respectable
bourgeois, and you would not believe,
my Packy, how much not liked by up-
right, respectable gourgeois I can grow
in quite a short space of time. It will
be a case of "allo, Monsieur le Vicomte,
come in. Good-bye, Monsieur le
Vicomte, get out,' and I shall be back
once more in my good little hotel."
Packy argued no further. He was
depressed, but he could see the force of
the other's reasoning. The Vicomte
might be good company, but he was
not a good social sponsor. Search, he
relised, must be made elsewhere for
means of entry to the Chateau Blissac.
"And now," said the Vicomte, dis-
missing the unprofitable theme, "let us
forget these Gedges and the Chateau,
and we will speak of the Festival. This
Festival is good fun, Packy. Do you
remember how in New York once you
take me to a fete of artists at Webs-
ter 'All?"
Packy nodded austerely. He recalled
the episode, but it was one which in his
capacity of a steady young fellow en-
gaged to a girl of ideals he preferred
to forget.
" Well, it is like that, something,
only bigger much. It is our great
fancy costume carnival, you understand.
The whole town goes cuckoo. Everybody
puts on funny clothers and becomes pie-
eyed."
Packy shivered prudislily. He was
aware, of course, that there were still
themselves in the manner described, but
it was not nice to have to hear about
'"What great good fortune that you
should arriving on this particular day,
my Packv, any that we should so
happily have met. We will whoop it
up."
"St Anthony might have equalled
Packy's stare, but onlv on one of his
best days.
"You don't suppose I'm coming, do
you?."
"Why, what else?"
Packy rubbed his chin pensively. He
and suddenly discovered that this was
opening up a new line of thought.
Anything in the nature of rowdy
revelry was, of course, intensly dis-
tasteful to him nowadays. He had put
all that sort of thing far behind him.
But in the case of this Festival of the
Saint there was Beatrice to be consid-
ered. Beatrice, recognising the great
educative value of the experience, would
probably be much annoyed were he to
miss such a colourful, characteristic
affair. And he would not like to do
anything to displease Beatrice.
"It's pretty fully of historic interest,
this Festival, I should imagine, is it
not? Might broaden the mind a good
deal, I take it?"
"Just a lot of dam fools hotting it
up and getting so tight as owls."
Packy frowned. It seemed to him that
his friend was wilfully missing the
point.
"Naturally on such occasions," he
said, "there would be a certain amount
of hearty, old world jollity. That is
only to be expected. But what I mean
is, suppose a fellow wanted to study the
Soul of France. . . .?"
"Oh, undoubtedly,."
"Count me in," said Packy. "But
there's just one thing. If you think
you or anybody else are going to get
me into fancy dress, you're very much
mistaken."
"Not even a simple pierrot?"
"NO, sir!"
"A pierrot is not much "
"No."
"Myself," said the Vicomte, "I at-
tend the carnival as a . . .. how do
call those little green things that run
about and lie in the sum?"
"You don't mean to tell me,: said
Packy, shocked, "that you are going to
this jamboree as a lizard?"
"Lizard! That is it. Yes, I go as.
as lizard."
"I hope somebody steps on you."
"Everyone steps on everyone every-
where at the Festival of the Saint. It
is part of the good fun. We shall meet,
then, to dine, at eight o'clock at then
Hotel des Etrangers. That is that big
great building you see there beside the
Casino. You will find me in the cock-
tail bar."
"You don't need to tell me that," said
Packy.
(Continued to-morrow.)
HOT WATER CHAPTER III. (Article), Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1878 - 1954), Friday 7 October 1932 [Issue No.20,662] page 5 2017-04-24 07:31 row-boat ********************************************
it. It was his plan to revell to-night
occasion and only on (lie morrow to
present himself at the homo of lu»
ancestors-and even then only if ho foi*
considerably better than he expected |
row-boat.
it. It was his plan to revel to-night
occasion and only on the morrow to
present himself at the home of his
ancestors—and even then only if he felt
considerably better than he expected

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.