Information about Trove user: mrbh

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 3,884,618
2 NeilHamilton 2,791,454
3 noelwoodhouse 2,292,794
4 annmanley 2,181,523
5 John.F.Hall 1,811,647
...
8 C.Scheikowski 1,349,879
9 kayoung 1,295,377
10 JudyClayden 1,293,925
11 mrbh 1,181,192
12 SheffieldPark 1,145,541
13 yelnod 1,114,980

1,181,192 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

June 2016 9,438
May 2016 7,804
April 2016 2,729
March 2016 740
February 2016 571
January 2016 766
December 2015 107
November 2015 29
October 2015 206
September 2015 679
August 2015 2,612
July 2015 697
June 2015 2,494
May 2015 324
April 2015 899
March 2015 1,219
February 2015 1,413
January 2015 616
December 2014 524
November 2014 962
October 2014 1,152
September 2014 4,756
August 2014 10,866
July 2014 6,589
June 2014 13,150
May 2014 9,829
April 2014 17,707
March 2014 27,902
February 2014 19,180
January 2014 25,232
December 2013 22,148
November 2013 18,981
October 2013 8,207
September 2013 12,664
August 2013 10,571
July 2013 5,481
June 2013 5,916
May 2013 8,012
April 2013 26,113
March 2013 9,413
February 2013 7,519
January 2013 11,823
December 2012 7,514
November 2012 7,732
October 2012 13,397
September 2012 19,353
August 2012 15,156
July 2012 20,250
June 2012 23,528
May 2012 27,552
April 2012 42,526
March 2012 25,445
February 2012 29,306
January 2012 26,672
December 2011 28,721
November 2011 28,000
October 2011 27,000
September 2011 21,000
August 2011 29,998
July 2011 20,002
June 2011 30,000
May 2011 30,000
April 2011 31,000
March 2011 25,667
February 2011 28,333
January 2011 31,500
December 2010 5,394
November 2010 3,144
October 2010 4,143
September 2010 14,234
August 2010 31,585
July 2010 25,000
June 2010 25,000
May 2010 26,776
April 2010 16,593
March 2010 7,310
February 2010 4,221
January 2010 2,150
December 2009 1,745
November 2009 472
October 2009 125
September 2009 312
August 2009 69
July 2009 63
June 2009 2,121
May 2009 12,115
April 2009 6,743
March 2009 1,554
February 2009 612
January 2009 8,001
December 2008 18,518
November 2008 8,939
October 2008 13,676
September 2008 23,139
August 2008 9,673
July 2008 73

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 3,884,617
2 NeilHamilton 2,791,454
3 noelwoodhouse 2,292,794
4 annmanley 2,181,523
5 John.F.Hall 1,811,647
...
8 C.Scheikowski 1,349,872
9 kayoung 1,295,377
10 JudyClayden 1,293,925
11 mrbh 1,181,170
12 SheffieldPark 1,145,495
13 yelnod 1,114,980

1,181,170 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

June 2016 9,416
May 2016 7,804
April 2016 2,729
March 2016 740
February 2016 571
January 2016 766
December 2015 107
November 2015 29
October 2015 206
September 2015 679
August 2015 2,612
July 2015 697
June 2015 2,494
May 2015 324
April 2015 899
March 2015 1,219
February 2015 1,413
January 2015 616
December 2014 524
November 2014 962
October 2014 1,152
September 2014 4,756
August 2014 10,866
July 2014 6,589
June 2014 13,150
May 2014 9,829
April 2014 17,707
March 2014 27,902
February 2014 19,180
January 2014 25,232
December 2013 22,148
November 2013 18,981
October 2013 8,207
September 2013 12,664
August 2013 10,571
July 2013 5,481
June 2013 5,916
May 2013 8,012
April 2013 26,113
March 2013 9,413
February 2013 7,519
January 2013 11,823
December 2012 7,514
November 2012 7,732
October 2012 13,397
September 2012 19,353
August 2012 15,156
July 2012 20,250
June 2012 23,528
May 2012 27,552
April 2012 42,526
March 2012 25,445
February 2012 29,306
January 2012 26,672
December 2011 28,721
November 2011 28,000
October 2011 27,000
September 2011 21,000
August 2011 29,998
July 2011 20,002
June 2011 30,000
May 2011 30,000
April 2011 31,000
March 2011 25,667
February 2011 28,333
January 2011 31,500
December 2010 5,394
November 2010 3,144
October 2010 4,143
September 2010 14,234
August 2010 31,585
July 2010 25,000
June 2010 25,000
May 2010 26,776
April 2010 16,593
March 2010 7,310
February 2010 4,221
January 2010 2,150
December 2009 1,745
November 2009 472
October 2009 125
September 2009 312
August 2009 69
July 2009 63
June 2009 2,121
May 2009 12,115
April 2009 6,743
March 2009 1,554
February 2009 612
January 2009 8,001
December 2008 18,518
November 2008 8,939
October 2008 13,676
September 2008 23,139
August 2008 9,673
July 2008 73

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 murds5 22,105
2 EricTheRed 19,873
3 PhilThomas 1,504
4 lindamcd 1,244
5 nbay 769
...
133 cmcpartl[NLA] 22
134 jdrake[NLA] 22
135 ausire 22
136 mrbh 22
137 WillowtreeBear 22
138 AngelaDay 21

22 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

June 2016 22


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
The Sydney Morning Herald. MONDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1901. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Monday 23 December 1901 [Issue No.19,901] page 6 2016-06-29 12:40 Hie Sheik Maraboulcli, of Kowcjt, has been sum-
moned to Constantinople to make obeiBancc to the
Sultan Ihi einissarj of the ¡sultan was not allowed
to land at Kowcj t
The Emir lim Haschid, the enemy of Maraboukh,
bos, at the instigation of the Forte, collected au
army Maraboulch appeals for, British protection,
and offers to abdicate in faronr of his son
Tho " lunes " insists that drastic measures should
lie taLcu to onforco the status quo in the Persian Gulf,
01, if that is opposed, to sweep an ay the shadowy
suzeinintv of the Sultan.
Tlie Uganda railway Ins been completed to Vic-
toria T^yanra
Hie Koyal Welsh Tiisüieis
In pursuing and surrounding i number of brigands
outside of Cimnhuu Chung, Lieutenant Hall with a
handful ot Punjab Infuutiy killed 10 of the robbers
and captured four others
tion with Great Britain íegartling the prosecutions of
breaking of Customs neals
Tiio " Dady Chroniclo " advises the Common
ss ealth to amend the Customs Act and so avoid
international complications «
Tapan»se oflicers ure engaged in training the
Chinese arms
Japan has ofTeteil to send a general officer to
organisa the forces of China
The ofhcials at Tong Chao have made atonement
for last yem's massacres and have attended the
funeral ot 70 victims
The oihaals al=o signed a promiso to protect con-
verts to Christianity Tifty villages were repre-
sented at the atonement
Colonel Agnpojeff states it would bo dangerous for
Russia to go to war with Japan owing to tho latter's
great naval resources and her ability to land 150,000"
soldiers within a fortnight at tho theatre of svar
General Castro, Prosident of tho Republic of Vone
?ucla, is defiant, and ti ates he ss ill not suffer Ger-
many to himihate Venezuela or deprive the repub-
lic of its rights
Theodore and Laura Horos, alias TacLsou, hare
been sentenced to IS j care', and Ins wife to seven
} ears' imprisonment
The " ng " m pig iron warranta ha» collapsed,
owing to tho failure of William Sargant and Co
Pig iron is quoted at 49s
The Sheik Maraboukh, of Koweyt, has been sum-
moned to Constantinople to make obeisance to the
Sultan. The emissary of the Sultan was not allowed
to land at Koweyt.
The Emir Ibn Raschid, the enemy of Maraboukh,
has, at the instigation of the Porte, collected an
army. Maraboukh appeals for British protection,
and offers to abdicate in favour of his son.
The " Times " insists that drastic measures should
be taken to enforce the status quo in the Persian Gulf,
or, if that is opposed, to sweep away the shadowy
suzerainty of the Sultan.
The Uganda railway has been completed to Vic-
toria Nyanza.
the Royal Welsh Fusilers.
In pursuing and surrounding a number of brigands
outside of Chuntian Chung, Lieutenant Hall with a
handful of Punjab Infantry killed 10 of the robbers
and captured four others.
tion with Great Britain regarding the prosecutions of
breaking of Customs seals.
The " Daily Chronicle " advises the Common-
wealth to amend the Customs Act and so avoid
international complications.
Japanese officers are engaged in training the
Chinese army.
Japan has offered to send a general officer to
organise the forces of China.
The officials at Tong Chao have made atonement
for last year's massacres and have attended the
funeral of 70 victims.
The officials also signed a promise to protect con-
verts to Christianity. Fifty villages were repre-
sented at the atonement.
Colonel Agapejeff states it would be dangerous for
Russia to go to war with Japan owing to the latter's
great naval resources and her ability to land 150,000
soldiers within a fortnight at the theatre of war.
General Castro, President of the Republic of Vene-
zuela, is defiant, and states he will not suffer Ger-
many to humiliate Venezuela or deprive the repub-
lic of its rights.
Theodore and Laura Horos, alias Jackson, have
been sentenced to 15 years', and his wife to seven
years' imprisonment.
The " rig " in pig iron warrants has collapsed,
owing to the failure of William Sargant and Co.
Pig iron is quoted at 49s.
SOUTH COAST. MILTON, Monday. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Tuesday 3 December 1901 [Issue No.19,884] page 6 2016-06-29 01:58 There was a largo bushfire on Saturday botw con
Eurongilly and Jutiee. Mrs. Heffernan, of Rose
Green, lost 3000 ncrcs of grass, and Mr. A. M'Donald,
wlulst assisting to oxbnguish tho fire, was jolted
from n w atcrcart he was dnviug nnd liad thrco^ribs
fractured. \
KEMPSEY Monday.
Tho Bishop of Grafton and Armidale hold a
Confirmation scrvico yesterday. About 50 candidates j
Tho newly-finished Wcslejnn Church at Portland
has been opened for worship 'iho first Sunda) ser-
vices w ero conducted by tho Revs F J Curwood
(Lithgow ) and J Penman (bunny Corner), and tho
congregatious woto largo
The Miuistei for Lauds, Mr Crick, has postponed
his proposed v isa to the mountains to inquire into
some local matters until tho recess
Mr P II Goldsmid, late superintendent of the
Cobar Copper Refilling AVoiks, vv as prior to leaving
for b) dney the recipient of a present from the
officials at the works
Mr John Hurle), M L A , has been notified by
tho Railway Department that it is intended to erect
a waiting shed and próvido other necessary conve-
niences foi the ¡leonie of Portland
A race club has been fonned lit Wallerawang, and
the first meeting is to bo held on New Year's Day
Difhculty is boniE experienced in getting trustees
for the road from Bell to Mount Wilson those no-
minated by the district member having dechucd to
act
There was a large bushfire on Saturday between
Eurongilly and Junee. Mrs. Heffernan, of Rose
Green, lost 3000 acres of grass, and Mr. A. McDonald,
whilst assisting to extinguish the fire, was jolted
from a watercart he was driving and had three ribs
fractured.
KEMPSEY, Monday.
The Bishop of Grafton and Armidale held a
Confirmation service yesterday. About 50 candidates
The newly-finished Wesleyan Church at Portland
has been opened for worship. The first Sunday ser-
vices were conducted by the Revs. F. J. Curwood
(Lithgow) and J. Penman (Sunny Corner), and the
congregations were large.
The Minister for Lands, Mr. Crick, has postponed
his proposed visit to the mountains to inquire into
some local matters until the recess.
Mr. P. H. Goldsmid, late superintendent of the
Cobar Copper Refining Works, was prior to leaving
for Sydney the recipient of a present from the
officials at the works.
Mr. John Hurley, M.L.A., has been notified by
the Railway Department that it is intended to erect
a waiting shed and provide other necessary conve-
niences for the people of Portland.
A race club has been formed at Wallerawang, and
the first meeting is to be held on New Year's Day.
Difficulty is being experienced in getting trustees
for the road from Bell to Mount Wilson, those no-
minated by the district member having declined to
act.
TRADES AND LABOUR. THE TAILORESSES' STRIKE. CONFERENCE WITH MR. S. HORDERN. PROSPECT OF A SETTLEMENT. FREEDOM OF CONTRACT MAINTAINED. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Tuesday 3 December 1901 [Issue No.19,884] page 5 2016-06-29 01:53 Mr D \ Tones saul ho bohoved that tho trouble
would bo over jirovidod Mr Hordern accepted theso
recommendations of tho union, without in any wa}
s icnflcuig any of his principles Au eniplo} or might
reg ird it ils ii principio th it he shonld I o allow ed to
conduct lies own business without any interference
from outside Ho behoved that Mr Hordern could
agrco toa settlement on tho lines proposed without in
any avny in|iuing his reputation m tho oves cither of
tho woikers or of business men, aud thereforo ho
urged Sir Hordern to bring about a settlement
Mr T T Hoskins expressed tho hopo thnt Mi
Hordern would civo Ibu requests ii fnvouinblo
answer, nnd judging from lus past ovpiessions bo
removed Although somo little timo had elapsed
ho thought it better to let bj gone» bo bygones As
trades unionists thoy had to adopt up-to-dnio
methods It nail been said that the unta vv capon of
past tiley lnul been only too ready to strike, but a good
(leal of thut had boen done away with, and now the
uiuons adopted othet methods lhoy talked matters
over first iho council was composed of reasonable
mon, and could not make differential terms between
ono empIo}ei and anothor Iho girls had admitted
that tliuy vv oro better satisfied vv ith Messrs Ajithony
Hordern and Sons' factory than w ith others Ho
thought Mr Hordern would admit that ho boUev ed
liiijuyiuga fnir wage , but if ho stood out now the
result w ould bo to dnvo the girls bock to bad condi-
tions From a commercial poml of viow Mr Hor-
dern had nothing to lose, but a lot to g nu
Mr. D. A. Jones said he believed that the trouble
would be over provided Mr. Hordern accepted these
recommendations of the union, without in any way
sacrificing any of his principles. An employer might
regard it as a principle that he should be allowed to
conduct his own business without any interference
from outside. He believed that Mr. Hordern could
agree to a settlement on the lines proposed without in
any way injuring his reputation in the eyes either of
the workers or of business men, and therefore he
urged Mr. Hordern to bring about a settlement.
Mr. T. J. Hoskins expressed the hope that Mr.
Hordern would give the requests a favourable
answer, and judging from his past expressions he
removed. Although some little time had elapsed
he thought it better to let bygones be bygones. As
trades unionists they had to adopt up-to-date
methods. It had been said that the only weapon of
trades unions was strikes. Unfortunately, in years
past they had been only too ready to strike ; but a good
deal of that had been done away with, and now the
unions adopted other methods. They talked matters
over first. The council was composed of reasonable
men, and could not make differential terms between
one empIoyer and another. The girls had admitted
that they were better satisfied with Messrs. Anthony
Hordern and Sons' factory than with others. He
thought Mr. Hordern would admit that he believed
in paying a fair wage ; but if he stood out now the
result would be to drive the girls back to bad condi-
tions. From a commercial point of view Mr. Hor-
dern had nothing to lose, but a lot to gain.
NEWCASTLE. BURWOOD COLLIERY EXPLOSION. THE INQUEST RESUMED. EXPERT EVIDENCE. NEWCASTLE, Monday. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Tuesday 3 December 1901 [Issue No.19,884] page 6 2016-06-29 01:45 CAUSE Or THE EXPLOSION
?Witness was of opinion that the 'explosion originated at
a point some few janis m bejond the Iso r4 »lenton in the
front crosscut When the deceased men Alalloj nnd Pat
tison were corking1 witness'« opinion waa that a slight
accumulation of pu took piano in among tho baulk* mid
slabbing overhead, whom tho deceased JJ al lo j
and Pattison were at m ork, and that by "omi,
mnuns i tlie gus was ignited at one of tho
lumps carried by thein .Witness believed from
Die position in which Malloy'« body was found und from
where Pattison waa sud to hue been found that the igni-
tion look place at deceased l'attisons light He behoved,
in view of the «halo which was being taken down m that
particular part, that a slight quantity of ina hud been
issuing therefrom and accumulated, as ulread\ stated,
through the derangement of the brattice cloth m the
>o A stenton Witness waa forced to the
opinion that the goa waa au accumulation Nothing
had ever como under Jit« observation in pre-1
viona examinations of tho shaft crosscut, "~" or in I
that would indicate to bim am sudden discharge of lire
damp in vbfit particular part of the mino Do wau there-
fore toned to tlie opinion Üiat the brattice clothing of Ko
.I stcnton had been deranged for vnnm considerable time
boforo Mr Urock, the underground manager, d!s
cotored it on the morning of tho l ith ultimo
Witness, in conducting Ina examinations in the
shaft crosfccnt dihtrict w hero the) w ero dm ing
on the coal scum, failed to Und um trace of gas with his
safet) lamp Atthemme time the issue of ga« from tho
aenm waa audible, hut hw ing to tile audicienev of the \cnti
lnttonitwas rendered harmless Naked light« wero being
Ubod at tho tune of his inspections, and be was of opinion
that if the rentil ition which he found in tho abaft cross-
cut hud bOfMi maintained, an accident of the kind which
bud rccmtlj occurred could nut lune taken place
The bratticu ninth might hare l>cen dragged down
bj tho horse*« limuiers catching m it Witness waa of
opinion that the brattico cloth had been dpranged on the
e\euiug prior to tho ex illusion If suth bad luipi ened it
was thedutj of tbo wheeler or anyone who found it de
nnged to repot t the matter at once, an laid down in special
rulo No 13 Hule 70 enjoined unj one m the mino to ro
puifc such an occurrence Witness concluded from the
cud en ce mid from Ina observations that the examination
mndo on tlio morning of the explosion bj the examining
deputy waa not carried out aa carefully na it should lia\e
been Oho cllicicut \pntUntion of tho place fiom No A
«tentón to tho fuce of tlie crosscut hinged on attention
being gi\en to the brattice In No 4 stcntoti, mid tina brat
tieo waa completely earned away
Ilj tho corom r He had hai3 upward» of TO years'
ex]>ericucc incoaljumlngin all it« branches, and the c\i
dcncaliQl-adgi.cn waa from his knowledge as a miuuij
engineer
liy Clnof Inspector Atkinson Witnws iliil not think
that Selb)'a examination of No 4 ¡-.teuton rclatUfl to
the brntlicing waa carefully conducted Witness did not
reganl 1 ol¿ms from hw own statement to bo a compétent
person under the menning of general rulo No 4 Wit-
ness ni all lim examinations dunng the dm ing of the cross-
cut had failed to lind any trace of gas lit did not con-
sider tho fchaft crosscuts to bo " dr\ and dustv roads "
tvitbin the menning of tho rule relating to use of safety
lampa In his inspections of Tlurwood Cnllcrv be had ut
times found that the air was not cour-ed to tim face na it
»houldha.obeen, and at other times ho had found Ute air
inadequate 'Iho attention of the manager was drawn to
these mattera Ho had imtrmadcain complaint, how-
ever, relativo to tho shaft crosscut* Witness had ncv*»r
found hu j thing prc\ iona to the accident to cm we lum to
make a recommendation ti t safety lamps should be used
in tho shaft croitscut district
SAH.TY LAMTS I-ECOSrAtENDED.
Cliitf Inspector Atkinson (to witness) Having in view
be nsed in the shaft crosscut m futuro .
Witness In Me« of whit bus recently transpired I
should recommend that safety lamps be used not onl) in
thoHlmftcro_>cu.H but m the whole of the mino with the
exception of the nunn haulage road I sa> this in \ lew of
ga« having been lound on ono occasion lu th»
west bjundmj district, of gas having been reported
in ii bord in the No J east uro«scut heading, and the state-
ment of tho manager in his evidence thut gus tins boen
found ni the fourth left-hand district, known as the pillar
dwLrict
air Curley cross-examined witness at length, and tlie
exdminntion of Inspector Dixon waa not concluded when
the court ro*e
to-morrow. ________"
CAUSE OF THE EXPLOSION.
Witness was of opinion that the explosion originated at
a point some few yards in beyond the No. 4 stenton in the
front crosscut. When the deceased men Malloy and Pat-
tison were working witness's opinion was that a slight
accumulation of gas took place in among the baulks and
slabbing overhead, where the deceased Malloy
and Pattison were at work, and that by some
means the gas was ignited at one of the
lamps carried by them. Witness believed from
the position in which Malloy's body was found and from
where Pattison was said to have been found that the igni-
tion look place at deceased Pattison's light. He believed,
in view of the shale which was being taken down in that
particular part, that a slight quantity of gas had been
issuing therefrom, and accumulated, as already stated,
through the derangement of the brattice cloth in the
No. 4 stenton. Witness was forced to the
opinion that the gas was an accumulation. Nothing
had ever come under his observation in pre-
vious examinations of the shaft crosscut, or in
that would indicate to him any sudden discharge of fire-
damp in that particular part of the mine. He was there-
fore forced to the opinion that the brattice clothing of No.
4 stenton had been deranged for some considerable time
before Mr. Brock, the underground manager, dis-
covered it on the morning of the 13th ultimo.
Witness, in conducting his examinations in the
shaft crosscut district where they were driving
on the coal seam, failed to find any trace of gas with his
safety lamp. At the same time the issue of gas from the
seam was audible, but owing to the sufficiency of the venti-
lation it was rendered harmless. Naked lights were being
used at the time of his inspections, and he was of opinion
that if the ventilation which he found in the shaft cross-
cut had been maintained, an accident of the kind which
had recently occurred could not have taken place.
The brattice cloth might have been dragged down
by the horse's limmers catching on it. Witness was of
opinion that the brattice cloth had been deranged on the
evening prior to the explosion. If such had happened it
was the duty of the wheeler or anyone who found it de-
ranged to report the matter at once, as laid down in special
rule No. 18. Rule 70 enjoined anyone in the mine to re-
port such an occurrence. Witness concluded from the
evidence and from his observations that the examination
made on the morning of the explosion by the examining
deputy was not carried out as carefully as it should have
been. The efficient ventilation of the place from No. 4
stenton to the face of the crosscut hinged on attention
being given to the brattice in No. 4 stenton, and this brat-
tice was completely carried away.
By the coroner : He had had upwards of 30 years'
experience in coal mining in all its branches, and the evi-
dence he had given was from his knowledge as a mining
engineer.
By Chief Inspector Atkinson : Witness did not think
that Selby's examination of No. 4 Stenton relative to
the bratticing was carefully conducted. Witness did not
regard Follins from his own statement to be a competent
person under the meaning of general rule No. 4. Wit-
ness in all his examinations during the driving of the cross-
cut had failed to find any trace of gas. He did not con-
sider the shaft crosscuts to be " dry and dusty roads "
within the meaning of the rule relating to use of safety
lamps. In his inspections of Burwood Colliery he had at
times found that the air was not coursed to the face as it
should have been, and at other times he had found the air
inadequate. The attention of the manager was drawn to
these matters. He had never made any complaint, how-
ever, relative to the shaft crosscuts. Witness had never
found anything previous to the accident to cause him to
make a recommendation that safety lamps should be used
in the shaft crosscut district.
SAFETY LAMPS RECOMMENDED.
Chief Inspector Atkinson (to witness) : Having in view
be used in the shaft crosscut in future ?
Witness : In view of what has recently transpired I
should recommend that safety lamps be used not only in
the shaft crosscuts but in the whole of the mine with the
exception of the main haulage road. I say this in view of
gas having been found on one occasion in the
west boundary district, of gas having been reported
in a bord in the No. 2 east crosscut heading, and the state-
ment of the manager in his evidence that gas has been
found in the fourth left-hand district, known as the pillar
district.
Mr. Curley cross-examined witness at length, and the
examination of Inspector Dixon was not concluded when
the court rose.
to-morrow.
LIFE IN LONDON AND THEREABOUT. (CHRONICLED BY HENRY W. LUCY.) Redvers Buller and the War Office—Ministerial Indecision—The Treasury and the War Chest— Two Judges. WESTMINSTER, Oct. 25. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Saturday 30 November 1901 [Issue No.19,882] page 5 2016-06-29 01:20 In tho King s Bench Division, Mi Tustico
Mathow has been lccogmsed us a sound law)ci,
an upiight Judgo Dialing w ith abstniso mutter»
afTeotin0 tommtrcial c iscs tho biisnitss of his
Court does not loom largo m tho nowspapors In
tho way of causing latightei among tho Junioi
Bur and tho ushers of tho couit, Su rames is
hopelessly beuten by other Judges Ho thinks it
more dignified to leseivo his sallies of huinotu foi
the social cuelo and tho diiincis of tho Inns of
Couit riicro Ihty fin>h with constant eornsou
tiou Sun o Iho death of Loid Tustico Bowen,
Air Tustico Mathow is admittejly tho wittiest
of hying Tud0is
Aftei suying that it is dangerous to quote nu
illustration 1 venturo to lccnll one, smco out of
his wealth it was lavished ni ii pmate letter
written to a htimblo individual Rcfertiico was
made ni a lettei on anothoi subject to the fact
Mi Arthur Cohen lind again been passed over foi
piomotion to the Tudiciul Bench Hie slight was
tho moro painful sinco a Liberal Government vyero
in power with Lord Herschel on the Woolsack
bil James Mathow admitting the h ndsliip of the
cuso íeplied AVlion two Jews tomo to0othu
what can }ou expect but it 1 « oy ti
Tho letueiiiont of Mi Tustico 1) i}-Day of
Judgment as ho is lucy eiently (ailed at tho Bin
mess-removes a familial faco and figuio from the
Bench If tho cuimmtl population am m tho
habit of holding occasional meetings they mo
Euro to pass a resolution of congi itulution on tho
event Mr Justico Day w us almost suvugo in the
weight of bis sentences, in vvbioh aa often ni
possible flogging figured. "Whilst Mr. AsquttJ
was ut tlio Homo Oíllco lio rando n calctilutio»
estimating ,tbo number of years lio.lind reduced
tlio aggregate of sentences of pemil servitud«
passed by Mr. Justice Buy. I forgot tho precis«
figure, but it wits something appalling. Withal
tho Jiulgo was ono of tho kindest-hearted men ou
tho Benoh. There aro vvoll-iiutlienticuted storici
hud sentenced lo heavj' tonus of ponai sorvitudo,
and ondeuvouring to solnoo thom. If his wordj
of comfort hud taken tho form of halving or
quartering tho tonn of his sentenco it would
doubtless bnv o hoon moro acceptable. Behind a
couuleniuico of iiiscrntublo gravity Sir John Day
hides a keen bonso of 11111110111' and 11 largo fund of
good slorios. Somo years ago C had tho good
fortuno lo shuro his company on a yachting cruiBo
on- tho West Const of Scotland. Knowing bira
pioviously from observation taken in front of tho
[Jonch (not from tho dock), I was amazed and de-
lighted at tho versatility of his huinour.
In the King's Bench Division, Mr. Justice
Mathew has been recognised as a sound lawyer,
an upright Judge. Dealing with abstruse matters
affecting commercial cases, the business of his
Court does not loom large in the newspapers. In
the way of causing laughter among the Junior
Bar and the ushers of the court, Sir James is
hopelessly beaten by other Judges. He thinks it
more dignified to reserve his sallies of humour for
the social circle and the dinners of the Inns of
Court. There they flash with constant corusca-
tion. Since the death of Lord Justice Bowen,
Mr. Justice Mathew is admittedly the wittiest
of living Judges.
After saying that, it is dangerous to quote an
illustration. I venture to recall one, since out of
his wealth it was lavished in a private letter
written to a humble individual. Reference was
made in a letter on another subject to the fact
Mr. Arthur Cohen had again been passed over for
promotion to the Judicial Bench. The slight was
the more painful since a Liberal Government were
in power, with Lord Herschel on the Woolsack.
Sir James Mathew admitting the hardship of the
case replied, " When two Jews come together
what can you expect but a Passover."
The retirement of Mr. Justice Day—Day of
Judgment, as he is irrevently called at the Bar
mess—removes a familiar face and figure from the
Bench. If the criminal population are in the
habit of holding occasional meetings, they are
sure to pass a resolution of congratulation on the
event. Mr. Justice Day was almost savage in the
weight of his sentences, in which as often as
possible flogging figured. Whilst Mr. Asquith
was at the Home Office he made a calculation
estimating the number of years he had reduced
the aggregate of sentences of penal servitude
passed by Mr. Justice Day. I forget the precise
figure, but it was something appalling. Withal
the Judge was one of the kindest-hearted men on
the Bench. There are well-authenticated stories
had sentenced to heavy terms of penal servitude,
and endeavouring to solace them. If his words
of comfort had taken the form of halving or
quartering the term of his sentence it would
doubtless have been more acceptable. Behind a
countenance of inscrutable gravity Sir John Day
hides a keen sense of humour and a large fund of
good stories. Some years ago I had the good
fortune to share his company on a yachting cruise
on the West Coast of Scotland. Knowing him
previously from observation taken in front of the
Bench (not from the dock), I was amazed and de-
lighted at the versatility of his humour.
AT THE FRONT. WITH COLONEL WILLIAMS'S COLUMN. JUNCTION OF TWO COLUMNS. BOERS IN LAAGER. A LARGE CONVOY. IMPORTANT CAPTURES. (FROM OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT.) PRETORIA, Nov. 1. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Tuesday 3 December 1901 [Issue No.19,884] page 7 2016-06-28 19:27 Befoit leaving Kloiksdorp General rofhoreton
haugh liado good bj t to tilt officers of Willmms'sand
Hicken s columns, who foi »i\ months had boon
associatid with lum, and p\pro std in oidcis his
hisli irppicti ition of tho mauiiti in which both
ofhcLn an 1 mtn had performed Ultu w oi 1
Ä\ hiUt ot Ivlerksdoip tho Now bonth Wnlcs mon
exoeneneel a surpnst Wo had been led lobtbevo
that wo should rpend thrto or foin dit} s longei m
that town and Ihen stl out onto moro foi tho
"jiujahcsbtrg, with tilt ob|cet ot ltnowuig our
nepi nut mci with Ddaioj Ktnip, mut Co But
about in (hugill of tho 22ud ultimo nu order How
rounl the camp to tho tllett that: SO men
from catii of the fivo squadrons of Mounted
Pifies anl tho f«o squadrons of iJuslnn n
shoullhold themselves m ltudiness to proctcd In
tramftt hilf an houi's nota c ICnturnll\ thero wns
muc'is]cciilation ns to what itali meant, and tho
prospect of setting out in a tonentnl downpoui of
rain was to say iho least, bomewhat dtsagn pable
Alhught tin rim lull as though tho very lloolgatts
oltlc h avutshud »ecu tim,«ii open mid ltwns
still pouring v\ ni u at about ii o'clock tho oidtr v as
receive I tisiddh ii]i and proceed to the nilv ii)
itatiun tomi Ilion the itjioit spica 1 that wo
«re lound foi Piptonu, Loid Ivitthtner hiving
imospccul work fin us, and immtdintclj Hit dis
(omfoits occisKined bj the l-ani hi trued
to vam h With eagerness and iii tilt most
cheerful --pints tho mon intiichpd off to tilt
ihticn tlmtigh the driving shotts of l-niii
The woik ol trucking lim hoisos and mules mid
retting tilt v uptons te , on hoard the stveral
trams was iccouiphahod in rtmarkably quick tnnt,
oir min, luuiilv ns ti«j nie, doing much of the
ihiintiii^ Ihunsplves We -v oio obligtd to travel in
open tr i ks so ciow dod that ii wns luipossiblo foi nil
tolo«nat( 1 it ono tillie lins sort ot thing vv is to
becv]cctc 1 ni th tulvpnit of tho w u, but with
all the lolling stock now availablo thora is n illv no
reas >n vvliv the li iopa should, m travelling fiom place
toola 11 > i ni, bo pcimtd up like cattlo
Before leaving Klerksdorp General Fetherston-
haugh bade good-bye to the officers of Williams's and
Hicken's columns, who for six months had been
associated with him, and expressed in orders his
high appreciation of the manner in which both
officers and men had performed their work.
Whilst at Klerksdorp the New South Wales men
experienced a surprise. We had been led to believe
that we should spend three or four days longer in
that town, and then set out once more for the
Magaliesberg, with the object of renewing our
acquaintance with Delarey, Kemp, and Co. But
about midnight of the 22nd ultimo an order flew
round the camp to the effect that 80 men
from each of the five squadrons of Mounted
Rifles and the two squadrons of Bushmen
should hold themselves in readiness to proceed by
train at half an hour's notice. Naturally there was
much speculation as to what it all meant, and the
prospect of setting out in a torrential downpour of
rain was, to say the least, somewhat disagreeable.
All night the rain fell as though the very floodgates
of the heavens had been thrown open, and it was
still pouring when at about 6 o'clock the order was
received to saddle up and proceed to the railway
station at once. Then the report spread that we
were bound for Pretoria, Lord Kitchener having
some special work for us, and immediately the dis-
comforts occasioned by the rain seemed
to vanish. With eagerness and in the most
cheerful spirits the men marched off to the
station through the driving sheets of rain.
The work of trucking the horses and mules and
getting the waggons, &c., on board the several
trains was accomplished in remarkably quick time,
our men, handy as they are, doing much of the
shunting themselves. We were obliged to travel in
open trucks, so crowded that it was impossible for all
to be seated at one time. This sort of thing was to
be expected in the early part of the war, but with
all the rolling stock now available there is really no
reason why the troops should, in travelling from place
to place by rail, be penned up like cattle.
THE FAR EAST. (FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.) HONGKONG, Nov. 8. THE DEATH OF LI HUNG CHANG. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Wednesday 4 December 1901 [Issue No.19,885] page 5 2016-06-28 19:12 , In tho meaawhilo tho people throughout tho
whole of China aro being squeezed to tho utter-
most farthing on tho plea that funds are
required for tho payment of tho indem-
nity. This fact is further impressed upon tho
people by tho posting throughout tho country of
the edict provided for in tho Pcaeo Protocol, and
this uatuially does not tend to allay anti-foreign
the sceno of tho Boxer outbreak, whoro the people
complain with a good deal of justice that thoy aro
being punished for tho sins of others. This tends
to oréalo a very bad feeling, and many mischier
makors aro spreading views to tho cifeot that it
would bo fur belter to expend the money in oust-
ing tho foreigners, for tho moro they aro given
tho moro thoy will domand.
In the meanwhile the people throughout the
whole of China are being squeezed to the utter-
most farthing on the plea that funds are
required for the payment of the indem-
nity. This fact is further impressed upon the
people by the posting throughout the country of
the edict provided for in the Peace Protocol, and
this naturally does not tend to allay anti-foreign
the scene of the Boxer outbreak, where the people
complain with a good deal of justice that they are
being punished for the sins of others. This tends
to create a very bad feeling, and many mischief-
makers are spreading views to the effect that it
would be far better to expend the money in oust-
ing the foreigners, for the more they are given
the more they will demand.
LIFE IN LONDON AND THEREABOUT. (CHRONICLED BY HENRY W. LUCY.) Redvers Buller and the War Office—Ministerial Indecision—The Treasury and the War Chest— Two Judges. WESTMINSTER, Oct. 25. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Saturday 30 November 1901 [Issue No.19,882] page 5 2016-06-28 17:46 I loam fiom a high authoiity tho pieeisc posi
tton of tho Treasury in lespcot of wa} s and means
for wai exp«nditure On tho ovo of tho proroga-
tion Mr Chniiicerhiin confidently oxprestcu the
belief that in tho month of Soptenibei muttois
would hayo so shaped thointelycs in South Africa
that it w ould ho possible to bring homo large
bitches of ti oops therpby i educing thowtekl} ox
ptndittue On that basis the Clinnctlloi of thef
Lxchequei mudo Ins final airangeineiits calen
luted lo meet all wor oxponditmo up to tho end of
tho finunciul jeal Hie hope liko some cnihei
ones, has been disappointed Tho expeuditnio on
tho war is still bomg kept up it a into of a
million and a quailot it week It is estimated that
by the end of January tho lienstirj will haye in
cuired liability foi t ii millions sterling in excess
of money Aoted by Parliament Thtio will albo
bo money wauled tn nicol tho exigencies of rebiu
ury and Maroh, closing tho htiincial yeal lins
necessitates the mooting of l'nrli uncut lioitniglit
earlier than usual AVhat will thereupon happen
will not bo tho moving of a vote on account much
loss tho imposition of fiosli taxes Tho fact is tho
ChancoUoi of tho Lxcliequci warned by e ulior
oxpenonco, was caicfiil, on last coining to Puilm
ment for mono} to ask foi suflioiont to coy 01 01 cn
tho contiugeno} leahsed But it has not nil boen
appropriated As soon as tho Address is A otod
and stops will bo taken to bring the debate to a
closo b} Junuaiy 31-*ho Houso will IOSOIAO itself
into Committeo of Supply and Supplemental}
rstimatob will bo lntiodiiood authorising tho AA ar
Ofllto to oppropnato whatovti ma} bo necessary
of tho binn authorised bj Puihamout last BOSSIOII
Tho appointment of Mr Justice ATuthew to b»
a Loid of Appeal, is nu nioidout pleasantly vanjr
mg tho ordinal y habits of tho Lord Glmucolloi
Amongst tho many chnrges accuiuuluting against
the Government not least sonous is that w Inch
Umonts tho lotvenng of tho status of tho Tudici ii
Bondi through tho putronugo of Lord Ilalsburj
Kvoryono aeknoyy ledges that Sir James Muthoiv
was tho best possiblo man for tho y aeauov, fol-
lowing in succession on tho retirement of tho
Master of tho Rolls But that w us no icason why
ho should bo solcotod for promotion On tho otnor
hand, thoio were exceptional i casons why ho
should be overlooked by a Lord Chancollor of oven
antique Tor} ism Sir Mathow is not only a
Liberal m polities ho is a Ilomo Rider, and f athel
in law of John Ddlon Of course, Kimo ho took
his seat on tho Bench ho bus studiously ay oidcd
participation m politics But nino ycais ago,
acting tis chairman of tho Evicted Tenants' Com-
mission hih method of dealing w ltli tho business
deeply offended tho landlords
I learn from a high authority the precise posi-
tion of the Treasury in respect of ways and means
for war expenditure. On the eve of the proroga-
tion Mr. Chamberlain confidently expressed the
belief that in the month of September matters
would have so shaped themselves in South Africa
that it would be possible to bring home large
batches of troops, thereby reducing the weekly ex-
penditure. On that basis the Chancellor of the
Exchequer made his final arrangements, calcu-
lated to meet all war expenditure up to the end of
the financial year. The hope, like some earlier
ones, has been disappointed. The expenditure on
the war is still being kept up at a rate of a
million and a quarter a week. It is estimated that
by the end of January the Treasury will have in-
curred liability for ten millions sterling in excess
of money voted by Parliament. There will also
be money wanted to meet the exigencies of Febru-
ary and March, closing the financial year. This
necessitates the meeting of Parliament a fortnight
earlier than usual. What will thereupon happen
will not be the moving of a vote on account, much
less the imposition of fresh taxes. The fact is, the
Chancellor of the Exchequer, warned by earlier
experience, was careful, on last coming to Parlia-
ment for money, to ask for sufficient to cover even
the contingency realised. But it has not all been
appropriated. As soon as the Address is voted—
and steps will be taken to bring the debate to a
close by January 31—The House will resolve itself
into Committee of Supply, and Supplementary
Estimates will be introduced authorising the War
Office to appropriate whatever may be necessary
of the sum authorised by Parliament last session.
The appointment of Mr. Justice Mathew to be
a Lord of Appeal, is an incident pleasantly vary-
ing the ordinary habits of the Lord Chancellor.
Amongst the many charges accumulating against
the Government, not least serious is that which
laments the lowering of the status of the Judicial
Bench through the patronage of Lord Halsbury.
Everyone acknowledges that Sir James Mathew
was the best possible man for the vacancy, fol-
lowing in succession on the retirement of the
Master of the Rolls. But that was no reason why
he should be selected for promotion. On the other
hand, there were exceptional reasons why he
should be overlooked by a Lord Chancellor of even
antique Toryism. Sir Mathew is not only a
Liberal in politics, he is a Home Ruler, and father-
in-law of John Dillon. Of course, since he took
his seat on the Bench he has studiously avoided
participation in politics. But nine years ago,
acting as chairman of the Evicted Tenants' Com-
mission, his method of dealing with the business
deeply offended the landlords.
TRADES AND LABOUR. THE TAILORESSES' STRIKE. CONFERENCE WITH MR. S. HORDERN. PROSPECT OF A SETTLEMENT. FREEDOM OF CONTRACT MAINTAINED. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Tuesday 3 December 1901 [Issue No.19,884] page 5 2016-06-28 17:30 HIE CONFERLNCE
In tile afternoon Messrs 1 H Throw or,
D Quinn, F B-ennnn, U A Tonis, and I J
Hoskins (members of tho exocutivo of the Lubour
Council), w uted on Mr Samuel Hordern to conley
to lum tho lecomiucudations of tho council to Iho
Tailoresses'Uiuon, und which had beau adopted b}
that union
Mr Tluowor (picsidont of tho S} dnoy Labour
Council) thanked Mr Hoidorn, on bohall of tho
eouucil, for iccciving the deputation, and trusted thnf
tho} would bo able to arrive at a sctllcmcnt of tho
difficulty
Mr Hordern I think we shall, uow it is in } our
hands
Mr Throwei said that Mr Hordern would le
niombcr thnt last week thoy did not urnvo at a satis-
factory sottlomont The mattet had smco boon con-
sidered by the Labour Council and cortain recom-
mandations w oro adopted w Inch tho oxecutiv o con-
voyed to a meeting ol the lailorcsscs' Union Iho
recommendations w oro -
1 I hat tho tailorossos return to w ork
2 lhal tho question of forow omen belonging to
tho uidon bo waived by tho Tmlores. cs' Uiuon
3 I hut Mr Hoidcru bo asked to rocogniso tho
union »
1 J. hat all the members of the uiuon who carno
out on striko bo reinstated, ond that no women or
mon shall bo \ lctuuised
It wus also resolved that a deputation should
convoy tho niattei to Mr Hordern iho lailorcsscs'
Union had adopted the recommend lirons Ho said
tho Labour Council thought it only fair that tho
lailorcsscs' Union should bo recognised ns a union
m the sumo manner as othoi unions w ere It repre-
sented a mnjontv of tho tniloicsscs
Mi Brennan siud ho smcoroly hoped that thac would
bo a final interview, and, judging from Mr Hor-
dern s rcuinrks to a previous deputation, bo believed
that on tho lines proposed thnro was tho pos.ibilil}
of a settlement being arm ed at that afternoon It
was proposed thnt tho tailoresscs should return to
work lío took it that theio would hu no objection
to that 1 buy waived Iho question of forow omen
being m a union at all Ihev asked for recognition
of tho union, mid that no enmity should be shown by
the brui towards them, and thal nono of them
should bo deprived of work Ho behoved that Mr
Hordern would agree sti light off to all tho icauists
hut lccognition of tho union If ha did
not rccoguiso the union then it would go out of
existence Tho union had boon the means of im-
proving tho condition of tho tailorcsses md tho onl}
wa} by which that improvement could bo maintained
was byomployers iccogmsing tho union Its non
rccoguitiou would mean that other employers would
tnku ndvnnt.iL,o of tho opportunity to got nd of union
hands and to roduco the v\ uges
Mr D Quinn saul the question of tho striko lind
not boon biought under notice of tho labour council
pnot to the tailorcsses going out on strike Ho was
desirous of removing sluts thnt bud been cast upon
the Inborn council I boro wera liimoui. that Mi
Hoidorn had boen subscribing to tho labour council
Mr Hoidcru said ho had only subsetibed to the
Mr Quinn s nd Hutt the council never wished to
forco a strike, and if possible it vv untad the jicoplo
concerned in an} difficulty to remnin at work ponding
the result of negotiations That was tho position
thu labour council took up The council considered
thut it vv os tho responsible body to tako up this
matlor and bnng it under Mr Ilordcrn's notice
Ho hoped thnt Mr Hordern would allow tbeso
pcojilo to return to work and that nono of tlitm
would bo victimised
THE CONFERENCE.
In the afternoon Messrs. T. H. Thrower,
D. Quinn, F. Brennan, G. A. Jones, and T. J.
Hoskins (members of the executive of the Labour
Council), waited on Mr. Samuel Hordern to convey
to him the recommendations of the council to the
Tailoresses' Union, and which had been adopted by
that union.
Mr. Thrower (president of the Sydney Labour
Council) thanked Mr. Hordern, on behalf of the
council, for receiving the deputation, and trusted that
they would be able to arrive at a settlement of the
difficulty.
Mr. Hordern : I think we shall, now it is in your
hands.
Mr. Thrower said that Mr. Hordern would re-
member that last week they did not arrive at a satis-
factory settlement. The matter had since been con-
sidered by the Labour Council and certain recom-
mendations were adopted which the executive con-
veyed to a meeting of the Tailoresses' Union. The
recommendations were :—
1. That the tailoresses return to work.
2. That the question of forewomen belonging to
the union be waived by the Tailoresses' Union.
3. That Mr. Hordern be asked to recognise the
union.
4. That all the members of the union who came
out on strike be reinstated, and that no women or
men shall be victimised.
It was also resolved that a deputation should
convey the matter to Mr. Hordern. The Tailoresses'
Union had adopted the recommendations. He said
the Labour Council thought it only fair that the
Tailoresses' Union should be recognised as a union
in the same manner as other unions were. It repre-
sented a majority of the tailoresses.
Mr. Brennan said he sincerely hoped that that would
be a final interview, and, judging from Mr. Hor-
dern's remarks to a previous deputation, he believed
that on the lines proposed there was the possibility
of a settlement being arrived at that afternoon. It
was proposed that the tailoresses should return to
work. He took it that there would be no objection
to that. They waived the question of forewomen
being in a union at all. They asked for recognition
of the union, and that no enmity should be shown by
the firm towards them, and that none of them
should be deprived of work. He believed that Mr.
Hordern would agree straight off to all the requests
but recognition of the union. If he did
not recognise the union then it would go out of
existence. The union had been the means of im-
proving the condition of the tailoresses and the only
way by which that improvement could be maintained
was by employers recognising the union. Its non-
recognition would mean that other employers would
take advantage of the opportunity to get rid of union
hands and to reduce the wages.
Mr. D. Quinn said the question of the strike had
not been brought under notice of the labour council
prior to the tailoresses going out on strike. He was
desirous of removing slurs that had been cast upon
the Iabour council. There were rumours that Mr.
Hordern had been subscribing to the labour council.
Mr. Hordern said he had only subscribed to the
eight-hours committee.
Mr. Quinn said that the council never wished to
force a strike, and if possible it wanted the people
concerned in any difficulty to remain at work pending
the result of negotiations. That was the position
the labour council took up. The council considered
that it was the responsible body to take up this
matter and bnng it under Mr. Hordern's notice.
He hoped that Mr. Hordern would allow these
people to return to work and that none of them
would be victimised.
SOUTH COAST. MILTON, Monday. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Tuesday 3 December 1901 [Issue No.19,884] page 6 2016-06-28 17:04 Mr Kidd, Minister for Agriculture, accompanied
by Mr. F. A Wright, M.L A., amved from Sjdney
by mail train this morning To-morrow the Munster
will inspect a site for tho proposed model farm.
Tho new Roman Catholic Church w as opened yes-
lagher Tho building is of weatherboard, and was
erected through tho exertions of the Rev. Father
O'Donoghuc. ) It was opened free of debt. An ad-
day confirmed 26 children
Messrs. Boisser, Forsyth, and Angove hnvo been
elected to represent the local branca of the Civil Ser
vico Association at the conference to be hold ni
GRENFELL, Monday
Farmers have commenced stnppmg Rabbits
throughout tho district aro playing liavoi with the
Tho rainfall for the li months of the year was S61
Tho Inverell tram has not lacked passengers since
Uio opening of the line, and if present av eragc keeps
up it w ill bo a paying concern
Cansdell and Co.'s store, was presented (¡with a
chequo on behalf of the firm, nnd by the employees
with an illuminated address, dressing and cigar casa
Tho net proceeds from tho Church of England
banuir were £S.
expected. Many fanners anticipate 35 bushels lo tho
acre. Taking tho wbolo district right through the
official estimate vv ill bo largely exceeded.
At tho Warden's Court to-day, before Warden
Brown, tho caso Snap v. Day was heard Plaintiff
sought tobo put in possession of blocks 11 and 12,
pansh Nulhmaiina After hearing voluminous evi-
dence tin) Warden found for the plaintiff, allow ing
At Uio, Caledonian Society meeting on Saturday
last tho president (Air .T. Siticlau) occupied the
chair, aud jircsontcd Mr. E Roos' handsome) cup for
the best amateur dancer of tho Highland lliug to Mr
mate statement of accounts wits submitted, showing
that the total receipts forthelastgatbouug amounted
to £3M 9s Id, which, with the sum of £60 on back
deposits received, gnvo a grand total of £11-1 0s Id.
Tho expenses wero £330. The thanks of the society
wero tendered to tho Roy. It. M. Legato for tho
address which he delivered on tho Sunday prior to
the gathonng ; to Uiu " Sydney Morning Herald "
for its report of tho proceedings of tlie gathenng ,
and to Mr, Johnstone, treasurer, who has held tho
nosition since the foundation of the society.
Mr. Kidd, Minister for Agriculture, accompanied
by Mr. F. A. Wright, M.L.A., amved from Sydney
by mail train this morning. To-morrow the Minister
will inspect a site for the proposed model farm.
The new Roman Catholic Church was opened yes-
lagher. The building is of weatherboard, and was
erected through the exertions of the Rev. Father
O'Donoghue. It was opened free of debt. An ad-
day confirmed 26 children.
Messrs. Boisser, Forsyth, and Angove have been
elected to represent the local branch of the Civil Ser-
vice Association at the conference to be held in
GRENFELL, Monday.
Farmers have commenced stripping. Rabbits
throughout the district are playing havoc with the
The rainfall for the 11 months of the year was 861
The Inverell train has not lacked passengers since
the opening of the line, and if present average keeps
up it will be a paying concern.
Cansdell and Co.'s store, was presented with a
cheque on behalf of the firm, and by the employees
with an illuminated address, dressing and cigar case.
The net proceeds from the Church of England
bazaar were £8.
expected. Many farmers anticipate 35 bushels to the
acre. Taking the whole district right through the
official estimate will be largely exceeded.
At the Warden's Court to-day, before Warden
Brown, the case Snap v. Day was heard. Plaintiff
sought to be put in possession of blocks 11 and 12,
pansh Nullamanna. After hearing voluminous evi-
dence the Warden found for the plaintiff, allowing
At the Caledonian Society meeting on Saturday
last the president (Mr. J. Sinclair) occupied the
chair, and presented Mr. E. Roos' handsome cup for
the best amateur dancer of the Highland fling to Mr.
mate statement of accounts was submitted, showing
that the total receipts for the last gathering amounted
to £354 9s 4d, which, with the sum of £60 on back
deposits received, gave a grand total of £414 9s 4d.
The expenses were £330. The thanks of the society
were tendered to the Rev. R. M. Legate for the
address which he delivered on the Sunday prior to
the gathering ; to the " Sydney Morning Herald "
for its report of the proceedings of the gathering ;
and to Mr. Johnstone, treasurer, who has held the
position since the foundation of the society.

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.