Information about Trove user: mrbh

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

RankCorrectorLines corrected
1 JohnWarren 2,767,181
2 annmanley 1,977,789
3 NeilHamilton 1,773,342
4 noelwoodhouse 1,353,860
5 maurielyn 1,333,271
6 John.F.Hall 1,318,202
7 mrbh 1,143,226
8 JudyClayden 1,090,918
9 C.Scheikowski 1,034,569

1,143,226 lines corrected.

Corrections by month

September 2014 2,771
August 2014 10,866
July 2014 6,589
June 2014 13,150
May 2014 9,829
April 2014 17,707
March 2014 27,902
February 2014 19,180
January 2014 25,232
December 2013 22,148
November 2013 18,981
October 2013 8,207
September 2013 12,664
August 2013 10,571
July 2013 5,481
June 2013 5,916
May 2013 8,012
April 2013 26,113
March 2013 9,413
February 2013 7,519
January 2013 11,823
December 2012 7,514
November 2012 7,732
October 2012 13,397
September 2012 19,353
August 2012 15,156
July 2012 20,250
June 2012 23,528
May 2012 27,552
April 2012 42,526
March 2012 25,445
February 2012 29,306
January 2012 26,672
December 2011 28,721
November 2011 28,000
October 2011 27,000
September 2011 21,000
August 2011 29,998
July 2011 20,002
June 2011 30,000
May 2011 30,000
April 2011 31,000
March 2011 25,667
February 2011 28,333
January 2011 31,500
December 2010 5,394
November 2010 3,144
October 2010 4,143
September 2010 14,234
August 2010 31,585
July 2010 25,000
June 2010 25,000
May 2010 26,776
April 2010 16,593
March 2010 7,310
February 2010 4,221
January 2010 2,150
December 2009 1,745
November 2009 472
October 2009 125
September 2009 312
August 2009 69
July 2009 63
June 2009 2,121
May 2009 12,115
April 2009 6,743
March 2009 1,554
February 2009 612
January 2009 8,001
December 2008 18,518
November 2008 8,939
October 2008 13,676
September 2008 23,139
August 2008 9,673
July 2008 73

Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
GREAT BRITAIN AND GERMANY. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Friday 22 November 1901 page Article 2014-09-15 02:34 At the School of Mta veslenlii} nflemoon aiium
beroi ladies «tteiidrd it demolish ilion on the art of
dressent! in"' bj Mrs Mill«, «ho has pist leturned
from it tour through Ama lea mid Luroiie Sirs
Milli r (¡poko ot tho latest dcvelopiui nts in ladies'
cobttimo Hork, and oxpluuied tho Lauder festem
of cutting Mrs I, u¿,rer, ti ho «as pictent gavean
interesting iiccouut of dresscutting and illustritca
her lcmaiks by the actual cutting oí piltcrns
A\ohiito been requested to dritt ittcntion toan
advertisement which appears in another eoliimn non
fling the fact Unit it school of pit} ne ii etilf uro under
tlio Sandon 8}stem lins been established meaney
undei tim supervision of Mr L 2s Itiivinonil
Ilioîiaval forces Band «ill perform it the Hush
cutter Buy Pcscrvo drill-died this evening, nt 8
o'clock
'Ihn It A A Bund will not pel form in II} do Part
this nftctnoou
' Intnlids' bl mputluscr " it rites complaining of an
oidoi îssuodut the instance of the million lulhoníiej
torbidduig tho eoutiiiunnce of the in ess ige nuil elec-
trical treatment in respect of Kit ah le I merni era of
Slate and luijierial contingents ish> serte 1 in the
South Alrican caiiipugn Our i one. p indent cou
tends that this treatment baa protêt lug!It benefi-
cial, and much »uncling Hill lesultlioniits ibaudon
incut
Oiinrutnl of the Illatt arra traill} estéril 1} morning,
the Omi Ambiihiuee rcinoied ii gunner miine 11 rant
Cook, ttho ti is suffering from mimics caused
through tho ti hod of mi Army »» i v ice waggon
passing otci lum Cook it na conto} e 1 to the head
quin lei's of tho Cit ii Ambulance Bngude «herat
trmslei tt as made to the militai} ainbiiluice which
lcmotcd tho siiffcici to the Gamson IIosj ihl
A man nairn d Janies Dalling 10, r sidiugatthi
collier of Kent and M irparet streets, w is cmplojed
ud'usttng a Jheiiroot door at Mes-as Dutson anil
Sons' tobacco firtmy }csteidu}, lihou tlio door fell
upon lum Hie mibiilimcoatííieíied to tí o factory
leudoied ' hist aid " uno remot ed the sufferer to
the S} dnev Hospital, ttheio he ttas treated for»
Hound on one arm and abrasions ou the face
At the School of Arts yesterday afternoon a num-
ber of ladies attended a demonstration on the art of
dresscutting by Mrs. Miller, who has just returned
from a tour through America and Europe. Mrs.
Miller spoke of the latest developments in ladies'
costume work, and explained the " Langer " system
of cutting. Mrs. Langer, who was present, gave an
interesting account of dresscutting, and illustrated
her remarks by the actual cutting of patterns.
We have been requested to draw attention to an
advertisement which appears in another column noti-
fying the fact that a school of physical culture under
the Sandow system has been established in Sydney
under the supervision of Mr. E. N. Raymond.
The Naval forces Band will perform at the Rush-
cutter Bay Reserve drill-shed this evening, at 8
o'clock.
The R.A.A. Band will not perform in Hyde Park
this afternoon.
" Invalids' Sympathiser " writes complaining of an
order issued at the instance of the military authorities
forbidding the continuance of the massage and elec-
trical treatment in respect of invalided members of
State and Imperial contingents who served in the
South African campaign. Our correspondent con-
tends that this treatment has proved highly benefi-
cial, and much suffering will result from its abandon-
ment.
On arrival of the Illawarra train yesterday morning,
the Civil Ambulance removed a gunner named Frank
Cook, who was suffering from injuries caused
through the wheel of an Army Service waggon
passing over him. Cook was conveyed to the head-
quarters of the Civil Ambulance Brigade, where a
transfer was made to the military ambulance, which
removed the sufferer to the Garrison Hospital.
A man named James Dalling, 40, residing at the
corner of Kent and Margaret streets, was employed
adjusting a fireproof door at Messrs. Dixson and
Sons' tobacco factory yesterday, when the door fell
upon him. The ambulance attached to the factory
rendered " first aid " and removed the sufferer to
the Sydney Hospital, where he was treated for a
wound on one arm and abrasions on the face.
BANK OF NEW SOUTH WALES. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Saturday 23 November 1901 page Article 2014-09-15 01:54 You will observe that deposits havo decreased
£ ISO,000. which is entirely due to fluctuations in the
amounts of tho Gov ernmnnt balances held by us bete
and elsewhere those derived from tile jmblie show,
m fact, a slight inciense Bills payable and other
liabilities aro 1&-.S by 1,160,000, duo to normal lluctu i
tions Coin and cash balances aro less hy £710,000,
vv Inch is c mscd by nu expansion of our advance
business, rcfeired to later on British and colonial
Government securities aro higher b) £300,1 ti,
during tho year llio advance to Governments of
£115,000, appenring in the balance sheet last yeo*,
has been rep ml 1 aking the liquid lessets as a vv hole
there is a reduction of some £9110,000, but thov still
amount to £7,000,000 in value, which re
»resents the very satisfactory proportion of
ties Our advances to customers BIIO» an increase of
£li_5,000 spread over neirlvall the colonies where we
are represented and arising from the natural and
legitimate requirements of our customurs and the
stead) grow th of the business of tho bank Bills re-
ce^ able, on hand, and in transit show a decrease of
£ 100,000, which taken m couiuuction with the small
falhng-off m the amount of lulls payable might be
thought to mdicite a falhng-olT in our exchange
business , this, hovvevei, is not so, for that portion of
our business continues te grow on sitisfactory lines
i he conditions of drought, which, as) oil are aware,
havo (lining tho last Ino years m a greater or less
decree allected consider iblc areas in nearly all the
colonies, li ivo been much nioditied, and in many ilis
tnets silisfactor) îains have fallen, anil although the
loss of stock bus been greattho increased value vv Inch
Ins taken place, especially m the cattle ni irkct has
gone far to recompenso the gra/iors foi the (bininu
lion m numbera In the Western Division ot Now
South Wales the eOectol tim drought was jierhups
more severely felt than in mi) other por-
tion of Anstrahlt, and recognising tins cu
euiiistauco the Government of the colon) ap-
report upon the condition of tho Crown tenants in
tlio Western Iprtitonal Division of New South
W iles " The gentlemen who loimed this commission
You will observe that deposits have decreased
£480,000, which is entirely due to fluctuations in the
amounts of the Government balances held by us here
and elsewhere ; those derived from the public show,
in fact, a slight increase. Bills payable and other
liabilities are less by £150,000, due to normal fluctua-
tions. Coin and cash balances are less by £740,000,
which is caused by an expansion of our advance
business, referred to later on. British and colonial
Government securities are higher by £300,000,
during the year. The advance to Governments of
£435,000, appearing in the balance sheet last year,
has been repaid. Taking the liquid assets as a whole
there is a reduction of some £900,000, but they still
amount to £7,000,000 in value, which re-
presents the very satisfactory proportion of
ties. Our advances to customers show an increase of
£635,000 spread over nearly all the colonies where we
are represented, and arising from the natural and
legitimate requirements of our customers and the
steady growth of the business of the bank. Bills re-
ceivable, on hand, and in transit show a decrease of
£360,000, which taken in conjunction with the small
falling-off in the amount of bills payable might be
thought to indicate a falling-off in our exchange
business ; this, however, is not so, for that portion of
our business continues to grow on satisfactory lines.
The conditions of drought, which, as you are aware,
have during the last five years in a greater or less
degree affected considerable areas in nearly all the
colonies, have been much modified, and in many dis-
tricts satisfactory rains have fallen, and although the
loss of stock has been great the increased value which
has taken place, especially in the cattle market, has
gone far to recompense the graziers for the diminu-
tion in numbers. In the Western Division of New
South Wales the effect of the drought was perhaps
more severely felt than in any other por-
tion of Australia, and recognising this cir-
cumstance the Government of the colony ap-
report upon the condition of the Crown tenants in
the Western Territorial Division of New South
W iles " The gentlemen who loimed this commission ......
METHODS OF SINKING. DEALING WITH THE WATER. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Saturday 23 November 1901 page Article 2014-09-15 01:33 of the shaft than the drills were when started. This      
was done with tho object of ¡minga lifting power
to tho shots When ihese holes had been charged
and fiad the filling and sending of the " muck " to
tho surface was begun, and before tho operation was
completed the drilling uf tho side h iles v.us well
under wnj llio latter, geueially eight in number,
weie put down vertical)} round the circumference tf
the shaft, BO that when fired thoy carried oil tho
11 canches " or " benches," which tno " sumphing "
shots had left Ihcso operations wore repeated, the
numbci, position, and depth of lióles put down de-
pending, of couiso, on tho nature of tho rock
To I»gin with, the explosive used was rack-a-rock,
but when a depth of about GOOft had been i cached
gelignite w is substituted The mode of bring tho
shots was ctthci hv, electiiatj or bj fuse conueeied to
detonatoiH In the ease ol tho former tho shots
wein tired fioin the surface by inenns of a rack-bar
exploder
of the shaft than the drills were when started. This
was done with the object of giving a lifting power
to the shots. When these holes had been charged
and fired, the filling and sending of the " muck " to
the surface was begun, and before the operation was
completed the drilling of the side holes was well
under way. The latter, generally eight in number,
were put down vertically round the circumference of
the shaft, so that when fired they carried off the
" canches " or " benches," which the " sumphing "
shots had left. These operations were repeated, the
number, position, and depth of holes put down de-
pending, of course, on the nature of the rock.
To begin with, the explosive used was rack-a-rock,
but when a depth of about 650ft. had been reached
gelignite was substituted. The mode of firing the
shots was either by electricity or by fuse connected to
detonators. In the case of the former the shots
were fired from the surface by means of a rack-bar
exploder.
THE TYRANNY OF SMOKING. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Saturday 23 November 1901 page Article 2014-09-15 01:26 TUE TYRANN ST OF SMOKING.
An animated correspondence has been {¡oint
no less ii subject than " The Tyranny _[
Smoking." It was begun by a gentleman
" frebh from Australia," as he put it, who ff.g
surprised on going with his wife to Queen'»
Hall to enjoy an ovening with Wagner, to find
himself in the midst of hundreds of smokers
to hear matches struck during tho pcrfor'
manee of some of tho finest pieces of music
and before long to Do compelled lo breathe an
atmosphere thick with tobacco smoke, As lie '
said in his'letter, "it will be a long day eta -
the executive of those admirable orchestra] con-
certs in tlie magnificent Town Hall of Sydney
will permit smoking at ono of their famous
musical gatherings," and, in effect, he asks why .
Londoners cannot exorcise the same rc.
strahlt in this regard as their Australian
cousins exorcise, if they cannot enjoy music
not institute " smoking concerts " for them?
hurd that women, who object strongly to
smoking nnd its accessories, and men who
submit to tho tyranny encouraged by the
governing body oí such halls. And upon this
hint many enrnost correspondents look heart
Why should any porson or any number oí
THE TYRANNY OF SMOKING.
An animated correspondence has been going
no less a subject than " The Tyranny of
Smoking." It was begun by a gentleman,
" fresh from Australia," as he put it, who was
surprised on going with his wife to Queen's
Hall to enjoy an evening with Wagner, to find
himself in the midst of hundreds of smokers,
to hear matches struck during the perfor-
mance of some of the finest pieces of music,
and before long to be compelled to breathe an
atmosphere thick with tobacco smoke. As he
said in his letter, " it will be a long day ere
the executive of those admirable orchestral con-
certs in the magnificent Town Hall of Sydney
will permit smoking at one of their famous
musical gatherings," and, in effect, he asks why
Londoners cannot exercise the same re-
straint in this regard as their Australian
cousins exercise. If they cannot enjoy music
not institute " smoking concerts " for them ?
hard that women, who object strongly to
smoking and its accessories, and men who
submit to the tyranny encouraged by the
governing body of such halls. And upon this
hint many earnest correspondents look heart
Why should any porson or any number oí .....
A WOMAN'S LETTER FROM LONDON. LONDON, Oct. 18. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Saturday 23 November 1901 page Article 2014-09-14 23:12 some collar With unothei form of Eton you
havo mordy tho L'Aiglon collar at tho back, aud
havo either strappings or braid to finish tho edges
Wo havo harked back to braids tin« season , they
aro superseding stitchmgs and Btiappings, vvhioh
smart as thoy are, havo become tcriibly general
Tho braids uro lovely, and aro to bo had in any
number of mixtures Tho favourite one is a blnolc
braid with thick white edges These uro much
used ou grey costumes, hut, as j ou ITIOVV , braid
is a snare to the home drcssmakei or to tho little
modiBtc, who takes Olio's own m iteuals It is a
manly art this putting on of braid, und betrays
tiio amateur at once If you havo a handy man
near j on in tho shape of a îop iiring tailor, get
hmi to in ike all youl button holes and put j our
braid on foi you And yet auotlici hint, when
you send tho litüo tailor j our things do not sow
your buttons on I find thoy always maleo tho
button bolo befoio putting on tho button Wh>,
I can't say, but tailors aro conscivative, and will
only go to vvoik in then own way
some collar. With another form of Eton you
have merely the L'Aiglon collar at the back, and
have either strappings or braid to finish the edges.
We have harked back to braids this season ; they
are superseding stitchings and strappings, which
smart as they are, have become terribly general.
The braids are lovely, and are to be had in any
number of mixtures. The favourite one is a black
braid with thick white edges. These are much
used on grey costumes, but, as you know, braid
is a snare to the home dressmaker or to the little
modiste, who takes one's own materials. It is a
manly art this putting on of braid, and betrays
the amateur at once. If you have a handy man
near you in the shape of a repairing tailor, get
him to make all your button-holes and put your
braid on for you. And yet another hint, when
you send the little tailor your things do not sew
your buttons on. I find they always make the
button hole before putting on the button. Why,
I can't say, but tailors are conservative, and will
only go to work in their own way.
SOUTH COAST. WOLLONGONG, Friday. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Saturday 23 November 1901 page Article 2014-09-14 03:23 last night communications were lead lr»m thu Rail-'
way Department vv ith refeicncoto tho thrco tennis
courts adjacent to tlio railway station, which wero
untd recently managed by tho lato stationmaster,
Air T R Rodrigue/ It was unanimously agreed
that thu progress committco should tako over the
eourts on lease as olfered hythe Radii ay Depart-
ment It was a/rced to cliargo v cry moderato rate*!
A sub committee was appointed to drift a codo of
rcgulitibnsfto lo submitted to tho legular monthly
meeting to he held on Monday ni^ht noxt
Complaints ire very frequently uiado hero of lato
about the nregulai running of goods traills over the
Mountains Local business people, too, complain of
the delay m carnage of goods from by dncy
BLACKHEATH, Tnday
last night communications were read from the Rail-
way Department with reference to the three tennis
courts adjacent to the railway station, which were
until recently managed by the late stationmaster,
Mr. T. R. Rodriguez. It was unanimously agreed
that the progress committee should take over the
courts on lease as offered by the Railway Depart-
ment. It was agreed to charge very moderate rates.
A sub-committee was appointed to draft a code of
regulations to be submitted to the regular monthly
meeting to be held on Monday night next.
Complaints are very frequently made here of late
about the irregular running of goods trains over the
Mountains. Local business people, too, complain of
the delay in carriage of goods from Sydney.
BLACKHEATH, Friday.
UNFULFILLED DREAMS OF AUSTRALIA. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Saturday 23 November 1901 page Article 2014-09-14 02:52 Oxley'« dream of the interior was, as wo know,
birt a dismal one-a gi eat interior marsh or
shallow s"ii, destitute of much Ufo and ovcr
Hhadovvcd by a prevailing wretchedness of mono
tony A melancholy picture, indeed, how
wiilcly diffusent from the reality, and how
gludly would tho we&tcru men bait even a
T ill poition of tho gloomy shore of a dead
intoi íor si i
Mitchell had a bold dream of a central range
In his mind it vv is a geogiuphic ii necessity th it
a continent bo extensive as Australia bhould, »ni
must hive a letty mountain bickbono 13ut
mut h as ii would b ive unproved Iho climato and
countiv of oin iii J, tho mountain bickbone is
Oxley's dream of the interior was, as we know,
but a dismal one—a great interior marsh or
shallow sea, destitute of much life and over-
shadowed by a prevailing wretchedness of mono-
tony. A melancholy picture, indeed ; how
widely different from the reality, and how
gladly would the western men hail even a
small portion of the gloomy shore of a dead
interior sea.
Mitchell had a bold dream of a central range.
In his mind it was a geographical necessity that
a continent so extensive as Australia should, and
must, have a lofty mountain backbone. But
much as it would have improved the climate and
country of our land, the mountain backbone is
A STRANGER IN GLASGOW. GLASGOW, Sept. 26. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Saturday 23 November 1901 page Article 2014-09-14 02:43 hung on tho wall, this represented shillings, from
corresponded to the iowa of stick« on tlio table
IIo indicated with his finger the numbei that w_B
propel to my desired stick Thou carno tho tug of
w ar I dared greatly I handed him tho differ-
ence of puco in shillings, expecting I knew not
what of shrugs, of repudiation of gesture But
without a moment's heBit ition ho took tho monoy,
with his inv anublo smilo and bow and his inuablo
littlo ill of English "Thank ) on very much "
I Bliall toll this story to tho next " fiuriuei " -»ho
threatens me on tho pait of tho nations of Europe,
with decimal com ige I deepened tho Russian
impression by Btudymg icons, trying ginget -
bread, and walking ibout tho Russian btrcet, with
its p ivihons of wood rough, bnrbauc, painted in
pile teds and greens and blues, the roofs high
aud pointed, tho wulls of thick w oiitherhourd
And tho piopcr eonelusiou was a dinner at the
Rusfli m restiiurant, which began with cuviari mid
other lands of /ukouslikn, and ended, if ono hired,
with tho montubio tea in tumblers Surely then
is no moro refreshing drink than good IiuEsnn
ten Tho caviare wns much like ni) cairnie when
eaton west of Berlin, which is said to bo its utmost
lum. of excellence Tho rooking was Trench, and
yet not French I thought thero vv us too much
sugar in Boup, ßnuccB, and salad, but us most of
th( diners at tho otbxi tables were taking iddi
tionul sugai in tho form of Russian champagno,
which tho Englishman cannot suiter, I dnro say it
nil went very well logetlui I tried tho vodka
but found that, liko tho 'whiskies of othei
couutnes, a tasto for it must bo nquired
hung on the wall ; this represented shillings, from
corresponded to the rows of sticks on the table.
He indicated with his finger the number that was
proper to my desired stick. Then came the tug of
war. I dared greatly. I handed him the differ-
ence of price in shillings, expecting I knew not
what of shrugs, of repudiation of gesture. But
without a moment's hesitation he took the money,
with his invariable smile and bow, and his amiable
little all of English : " Thank you very much."
I shall tell this story to the next " furriner " who
threatens me, on the part of the nations of Europe,
with decimal coinage. I deepened the Russian
impression by studying icons, trying ginger-
bread, and walking about the Russian street, with
its pavilions of wood, rough, barbaric, painted in
pale reds and greens and blues, the roofs high
and pointed, the walls of thick weatherboard.
And the proper conclusion was a dinner at the
Russian restaurant, which began with caviare and
other kinds of zakoushka, and ended, if one liked,
with the inevitable tea in tumblers. Surely there
is no more refreshing drink than good Russian
tea. The caviare was much like any caviare when
eaten west of Berlin, which is said to be its utmost
limit of excellence. The cooking was French, and
yet not French. I thought there was too much
sugar in soup, sauces, and salad, but as most of
the diners at the other tables were taking addi-
tional sugar in the form of Russian champagne,
which the Englishman cannot suffer, I dare say it
all went very well together. I tried the vodka,
but found that, like the whiskies of other
countries, a taste for it must be acquired.
A STRANGER IN GLASGOW. GLASGOW, Sept. 26. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Saturday 23 November 1901 page Article 2014-09-14 02:35 I was nmu'-ed to note that tho pielurcsquo sub-
jects of the C/ur who kept then stalls m their
nativo dress, capped e iftnnned, bashed, and
bearded, although they bad but tho smallest
knowledge of tho English language, were com
pleto iiuiHteis of tho English (oiiiugc I have
boen told by 1 .enchinen that Our pounds, shillings,
and penco aie enough to drivo a dceimulist mad
It maybe that Imperials and quarter îoublos train
tho mind moro strictly than francs and napoleons
I tested ono Mahmoud Something off ho passed,
iinsi ithed I had bought a walking stick oi
Kiisil vood fioni tho Caucasus, of which tho knob
and upper part were ornamented iv lth i doliente
pattern, m fino hues of beaten silver, and littlo
mlaid plates of turquoise I wibhed to exchange
this on tho following duy for u mole oxpensivo
btiek of tho s imo kind But Mahmoud could siy
uppirently, m words wh"h I could understand,
only " Thank )Ouieiy much " And thoiesnnds of
peisons visit his Btall ovety day, und there ire
other stalls which BIIOW tho samo sort oi goods
Well, the wholo transaction w us as e isy ns pos-
sible I displayod my stiok I displa) ed myself,
and we both bmiled knowledge ibly, I laid down
tho stick umoug it« fellows, und signed that I had
done with it E thou took up that which my soul
preferred, mid pointed to tho card of prices which
I was amused to note that the picturesque sub-
jects of the Czar, who kept their stalls in their
native dress, capped caftanned, sashed, and
bearded, although they had but the smallest
knowledge of the English language, were com-
plete masters of the English coinage. I have
been told by Frenchmen that our pounds, shillings,
and pence are enough to drive a decimalist mad.
It may be that Imperials and quarter-roubles train
the mind more strictly than francs and napoleons.
I tested one Mahmoud Something-off ; he passed,
unscathed. I had bought a walking stick of
Kusil wood from the Caucasus, of which the knob
and upper part were ornamented with a delicate
pattern, in fine lines of beaten silver, and little
inlaid plates of turquoise. I wished to exchange
this on the following day for a more expensive
stick of the same kind. But Mahmoud could say
apparently, in words which I could understand,
only " Thank you very much." And thousands of
persons visit his stall every day, and there are
other stalls which show the same sort of goods.
Well, the whole transaction was as easy as pos-
sible. I displayed my stick ; I displayed myself,
and we both smiled knowledgeably. I laid down
the stick among its fellows, and signed that I had
done with it. I then took up that which my soul
preferred, and pointed to the card of prices which
THE USE AND ABUSE OF STATISTICS. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Saturday 23 November 1901 page Article 2014-09-14 02:26 which statistics arc used, as the old theolo-
gians '»ere accustomed to employ isolated
passages from tho Bible for buttressing thoir
own behcfB uni for bombarding those nho
differed from thom Yot it is obvious that
statistics must ho"l a x allic, and rightly used
may help to confirm or to dibpel a picuously
accepted conclusion It is because they aro
io often misused that many persons, und
espcuull) those who say they hnve no head
for figure», li^lit shy of them, and look upon
llicm with posilicji mistrust and uvcrsion
which statistics are used, as the old theolo-
gians were accustomed to employ isolated
passages from the Bible for buttressing their
own beliefs and for bombarding those who
differed from them. Yet it is obvious that
statistics must have a value, and rightly used
may help to confirm or to dispel a previously
accepted conclusion. It is because they are
so often misused that many persons, and
especially those who say they have no head
for figures, fight shy of them, and look upon
them with positive mistrust and aversion.

Counts updated hourly

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.