Information about Trove user: mrbh

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

RankCorrectorLines corrected
1 JohnWarren 2,687,611
2 annmanley 1,932,395
3 NeilHamilton 1,673,437
4 John.F.Hall 1,306,330
5 maurielyn 1,268,399
6 noelwoodhouse 1,238,531
7 mrbh 1,129,541
8 JudyClayden 1,074,137
9 C.Scheikowski 1,005,856

1,129,541 lines corrected.

Corrections by month

July 2014 6,541
June 2014 13,150
May 2014 9,829
April 2014 17,707
March 2014 27,902
February 2014 19,180
January 2014 25,232
December 2013 22,148
November 2013 18,981
October 2013 8,207
September 2013 12,664
August 2013 10,571
July 2013 5,481
June 2013 5,916
May 2013 8,012
April 2013 26,113
March 2013 9,413
February 2013 7,519
January 2013 11,823
December 2012 7,514
November 2012 7,732
October 2012 13,397
September 2012 19,353
August 2012 15,156
July 2012 20,250
June 2012 23,528
May 2012 27,552
April 2012 42,526
March 2012 25,445
February 2012 29,306
January 2012 26,672
December 2011 28,721
November 2011 28,000
October 2011 27,000
September 2011 21,000
August 2011 29,998
July 2011 20,002
June 2011 30,000
May 2011 30,000
April 2011 31,000
March 2011 25,667
February 2011 28,333
January 2011 31,500
December 2010 5,394
November 2010 3,144
October 2010 4,143
September 2010 14,234
August 2010 31,585
July 2010 25,000
June 2010 25,000
May 2010 26,776
April 2010 16,593
March 2010 7,310
February 2010 4,221
January 2010 2,150
December 2009 1,745
November 2009 472
October 2009 125
September 2009 312
August 2009 69
July 2009 63
June 2009 2,121
May 2009 12,115
April 2009 6,743
March 2009 1,554
February 2009 612
January 2009 8,001
December 2008 18,518
November 2008 8,939
October 2008 13,676
September 2008 23,139
August 2008 9,673
July 2008 73

Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
NEWS BY THE AMERICAN MAIL. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Tuesday 19 November 1901 page Article 2014-07-30 00:57 THE NEGEO AT WHITE HOUSE
A special wiro to the press fiom Waslungton on
Octohci 17 sajs -The public announcement to-day
that President Boosovelt had entertained Bookci 1
Washington, the negio president oi Tuskegee In-
stitute, at dinner on Wcdnesdaj ev einng has created
ti scnsatiou lítete is no cuticism of the Picsidcnt
among tho members of the loutit ni contingent m
tho capital, who piedomniate m tho reccs3 be ison,
butthej mu lindern.bl\ surpiised at the innovation
thus established It is said to bo the first time thnt
JL coloured American citizen Ins dined w ith i Pre. i
dent in tho Vi luto House In Washington s case it is
nothing new for lum to be entert lined at a white
man's table He has been honoured in the North und
m Alub una and eisen here m the South repcitedlj
by invitations to banquets given by the best demo
eratic citizens His acknow lodged good w ork md
sensible, self respecting view s hav a won for Wash
mgtou a standing that is us i iuquo as it is remark-
able President Roosevelt s courage in making a
break in tho White House traditions is commended
ovcu bj those ni oflicial and unofficial life w ho w ould
hc-.it.alo long to follow his exumple
A -peeial wire from New Haven (Conn ) on Octo
her 20 was to tlio effect that Prisidcnt ßooscvcll and
Booker 1 Washington w ero to probably meet tymn at
tlio s imc table that week I bej were to be the guests
of the 'iale President, Di Arthur 1 Hadlev at
lu« reception md the Southern ucnbpipei»
will theiebj bo given food foi more editorials
Booker W ishiugton has arrived at l\cw Haven Ho
n ill bo the guest during the T. alo bi-centennial of
Proiessor John 0 Schwab, who is 1 irgclv a
Southener m sentiment Professor Schwab is the
head of the department of political economy at Ti ale
md has written a lnstorj ot tho Conredcncj no
is the son of tho multi-milliouiiro piopnetor of the
ISorth German Llovd line of steamships Ho is
chairman of tho general Yule bl centennial commit
miinj distinguished guests at tho celebration will
envv AVashuigton and President liooscvelt will sit
on tho same platform at the Yalo commemorative
exercises
THE NEGRO AT WHITE HOUSE.
A special wire to the press from Washington on
October 17 says :—The public announcement to-day
that President Roosevelt had entertained Booker T.
Washington, the negro president of Tuskegee In-
stitute, at dinner on Wednesday evening has created
a sensation. There is no criticism of the President
among the members of the Southern contingent in
the capital, who predominate in the recess season,
but they are undeniably surprised at the innovation
thus established. It is said to be the first time that
a coloured American citizen has dined with a Presi-
dent in the White House. In Washington's case it is
nothing new for him to be entertained at a white
man's table. He has been honoured in the North and
in Alabama and elsewhere in the South repeatedly
by invitations to banquets given by the best demo-
cratic citizens. His acknowledged good work and
sensible, self-respecting views have won for Wash-
ington a standing that is as unique as it is remark-
able. President Roosevelt's courage in making a
break in the White House traditions is commended
even by those in official and unofficial life who would
hesitate long to follow his example.
A special wire from New Haven (Conn.) on Octo-
ber 20 was to the effect that President Roosevelt and
Booker T. Washington were to probably meet again at
the same table that week. They were to be the guests
of the Yale President, Dr. Arthur T. Hadley, at
his reception, and the Southern newspapers
will thereby be given food for more editorials.
Booker Washington has arrived at New Haven. He
will be the guest during the Yale bi-centennial of
Professor John C. Schwab, who is largely a
Southener in sentiment. Professor Schwab is the
head of the department of political economy at Yale
and has written a history of the Confederacy. He
is the son of the multi-millionaire proprietor of the
North German Lloyd line of steamships. He is
chairman of the general Yale bi-centennial commit-
many distinguished guests at the celebration will
envy. Washington and President Roosevelt will sit
on the same platform at the Yale commemorative
exercises.
ON REFORM IN WOMEN'S DRESS. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Wednesday 20 November 1901 page Article 2014-07-29 21:28 ' Light, mora light," woro tho last woids of
Goethe These aro tho commenta of Piliicoss Yson
beig, who, wilting ni the "North American Re
view," pioceeds -Could light bo poured into the
darkness which simounds tlio question of vv omen's
dress in its i dations to this health and happiness of
w omaukinil it would bring about a speedy and far
reaching refoi matron
Until tho present day fashion has ignored the ill
effects losulting to hor lollowcrs fioni strict udhei
enco to hor rule, which ui|uics then health, mid the
health of tho whole of civilised humanity tluough
them It has lein reerv ed for the end of til ? nine-
teenth centuiv to bung about a chango m thnview
of the world on Hie subject of women s dic*s and
tho question lias liceu raised as to whether it nould
not bo belter for humanity in general if women woio
to diess rationalty according to tho rules of health,
instead of dressing uccordinA to Hie vlinallie dictates
of dressmakers, whoso only object is to discover
something new, and who aro indflerent to cv eryUnng
hut Hie task of filling their own-¡lockets
" Light, more light," were the last words of
Goethe. These are the comments of Princess Ysen-
berg, who, writing in the " North American Re-
view," proceeds :—Could light be poured into the
darkness which surrounds the question of women's
dress in its relations to the health and happiness of
womankind it would bring about a speedy and far-
reaching reformation.
Until the present day fashion has ignored the ill
effects resulting to her followers from strict adher-
ence to her rule, which injures their health, and the
health of the whole of civilised humanity through
them. It has been reserved for the end of the nine-
teenth century to bring about a change in the view
of the world on the subject of women's dress ; and
the question has been raised as to whether it would
not be better for humanity in general if women were
to dress rationally according to the rules of health,
instead of dressing according to the variable dictates
of dressmakers, whose only object is to discover
something new, and who are indifferent to everything
but the task of filling their own pockets.
THE RECENT STORMS. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Wednesday 20 November 1901 page Article 2014-07-29 21:21 Dual estimating their loss at about 500 cases. In
Dural estimating their loss at about 500 cases. In
SWIMMING. AN EXPLANATION. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Wednesday 20 November 1901 page Article 2014-07-29 21:18 Respecting a p issago in Hie report of Hie meeting
of tho permit ind standing committee of the ï<cw
bontli Wales Amateur Swimming Association to the
cITcct that the seeietai \ of the Eastern Suburbs Club
wrote complaining or the action of tho "Waverley
Club arranging ita carnival at Bondi on Tobruarj i>,
tho samo dato us the formel s carnival atBrontc Mr
J" Prunk Cox of Hie "Wavcrlov Swimming Club,
wutes -" lho facts aie liio "Waverley, Fort
street School nnd Eastern Suburbs clubs had unfor-
tunately applied to Hie Now South "Wales Amateur
Swimming Association to have then carnivals on
the same iHj As no arrangement could bo como to
application for tho date w as in 10 days before the
T astern Suburbs), and as there uie so fovv Saturdays
availtiblo this season ow tug to Hie Luglisli cnekcters
being here, the tollo» mg motion w na pioposcd and
earned at tho council meeting ou October )1, nuil
w Inch was v otod for by tho delegate of the Unstern
Suburbs Club,-* That nil carnivals be giautxd as
applied for ' Surely this is conclusivo evidence that
the Eastern Suburbs Club havo no ground whatever
club "
SWIMMING. . . ,
Respecting a passage in the report of the meeting
of the permit and standing committee of the New
South Wales Amateur Swimming Association to the
effect that the secretary of the Eastern Suburbs Club
wrote complaining or the action of the Waverley
Club arranging its carnival at Bondi on February 8,
the same date as the former's carnival at Bronte, Mr.
J. Frank Cox, of the Waverley Swimming Club,
writes :—" The facts are : The Waverley, Fort-
street School, and Eastern Suburbs clubs had unfor-
tunately applied to the New South Wales Amateur
Swimming Association to have their carnivals on
the same day. As no arrangement could be come to
application for the date was in 10 days before the
Eastern Suburbs), and as there are so few Saturdays
available this season owing to the English cricketers
being here, the following motion was proposed and
carried at the council meeting on October 31, and
which was voted for by the delegate of the Eastern
Suburbs Club,—' That all carnivals be granted as
applied for.' Surely this is conclusive evidence that
the Eastern Suburbs Club have no ground whatever
club."
SWIMMING.
MOTOR FIRE ENGINE. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Wednesday 20 November 1901 page Article 2014-07-29 21:12 4. (¡re engine dm cn bv a motor lias made its ap
pcnrauce lu Eccles, England, vvhero it underwent
some trials ahoy w ero of such a satisfactory nature
that the corporation has iccentlj disposed of its
horses at tho lire station Iho povverlul little motor
carnes five mon, ¿00 ^anls of hose, ttvo doubie
licadcd stand pipes, scaling ladders, jumping sheet,
bucket and pump combined and many other np
pheances It is draw n hy sev cn horse power double
cj linder watoi -cooled engines, and the motivo jiovvor
is eleetncilv Fourteen to IG miles nu hour is the
speed to winch tins motor cm attain Solid rubber
tvies und langent wheels are fitted The whole
of the bodj is arranged to slide 01 lift off, and ov erj
part of the engine is then exposed to view
MOTOR PIRE ENGINE.
A fire engine driven by a motor has made its ap-
pearance in Eccles, England, where it underwent
some trials. They were of such a satisfactory nature
that the corporation has recently disposed of its
horses at the fire station. The powerful little motor
carries five men, 300 yards of hose, two double-
headed stand pipes, scaling ladders, jumping sheet,
bucket and pump combined, and many other ap-
pliances. It is drawn by seven horse-power double
cylinder water-cooled engines, and the motive power
is electricity. Fourteen to 16 miles an hour is the
speed to which this motor can attain. Solid rubber
tyres and tangent wheels are fitted. The whole
of the body is arranged to slide or lift off, and every
part of the engine is then exposed to view.
MOTOR FIRE ENGINE.
SWORDSMANSHIP IN THE ARMY. (From the London "Daily Telegraph"). (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Wednesday 20 November 1901 page Article 2014-07-29 20:53 (Froni tbo London " Daily Telegraph ").
in full sympathy with critics of tho War Office
during the last fow ' days ; for the now Army
orders just issued by tho Conimander-in-Chicf
seem at first sight to bo likely to min swordsman-
ship in the cavalry, and to deprivo infantry officers
of any cliuuce of using their weapon excopt for tho
picturesque, purposo of greeting various notabilities.
Tho infautry officer, in fact, will learn how to
draw his sword, how to suluto with it, and how to
put it back again. For some timo it lina merely
formed part of his uniform, which bo gladly lays
aside with tho rest of his official trappings. The
now order appears to confirm this viow. Do thoy
really moan thnt tho sword is to bo taken from Hie
British holdior altogether, and that among tho
various changes which "modern progress " has
enforced tho oldest nnd most jiieluresqitc of all
man's fighting-tools is to bo consigned to mqic
i oblivion ? -,
.ARMY.
-_?
(From the London " Daily Telegraph ").
in full sympathy with critics of the War Office
during the last few days ; for the new Army
orders just issued by the Commander-in-Chief
seem at first sight to be likely to ruin swordsman-
ship in the cavalry, and to deprive infantry officers
of any chance of using their weapon except for the
picturesque purpose of greeting various notabilities.
The infantry officer, in fact, will learn how to
draw his sword, how to salute with it, and how to
put it back again. For some time it has merely
formed part of his uniform, which he gladly lays
aside with the rest of his official trappings. The
new order appears to confirm this view. Do they
really mean that the sword is to be taken from the
British soldier altogether, and that among the
various changes which " modern progress " has
enforced the oldest and most picturesque of all
man's fighting-tools is to be consigned to mere
oblivion ?
ARMY.

OUR ST. PETERSBURG LETTER. THE CZAR'S VISIT TO FRANCE. ST. PETERSBURG, Sept. 29. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Tuesday 19 November 1901 page Article 2014-07-29 01:56 seen in the faot that they make less and less im-
pression on the public The anarchists
and their dark deeds aro considered as
humanity, as some force not to be re8isl<-d TIcnce
their strength and their boldness, which II croaoo
down their victims But the result« of their
bad In Russia they have always im-
free institutions But for them Russia might
of government, for nueli was the inten-
tion of tho Czar Alexander II His suc
-ossor resolved thai, this party, having had
recourse to * uch means, should not tri ampi ud
what we now seo shows that there IB little likeli-
hood of ii change in that respec. In the United
fctatcs President Rooscivi It will continue the policy
certain pointe, so that ir this case als"', as m tho
case of the King of Italj, tho purpose of tho anar-
chists (if purpose there was) will not bo attained
Tho project now about to bo d bated in Con-
of anarchism, und oven tho total eradication of
this baneful sect in the United Slates, will no
debates will bo led by the most eminent jurists in
the land It can easily be imagined with what
this problem m America, and with what attention |
the Russian jurrsts wrll follow every dehato con
r,, rnu cr it Here it has been hut A cr) unsulisfac
tonly solved, for the mcossant wutehing of tno
se ret polie o causes many innocent persons to bo
BUBI oefd und uinunicr iblt mist ikes to arise This
w ns clearly show n m the university i lots of last
seen in the fact that they make less and less im-
pression on the public. The anarchists
and their dark deeds are considered as
humanity, as some force not to be resisted. Hence
their strength and their boldness, which increase
down their victims. But the results of their
bad. In Russia they have always im-
free institutions. But for them Russia might
of government, for such was the inten-
tion of the Czar Alexander II. His suc-
cessor resolved that this party, having had
recourse to such means, should not triumph, and
what we now see shows that there is little likeli-
hood of a change in that respect. In the United
States President Roosevelt will continue the policy
certain points, so that in this case also, as in the
case of the King of Italy, the purpose of the anar-
chists (if purpose there was) will not be attained.
The project now about to be debated in Con-
of anarchism, and even the total eradication of
this baneful sect in the United States, will no
debates will be led by the most eminent jurists in
the land. It can easily be imagined with what
this problem in America, and with what attention
the Russian jurists will follow every debate con-
cerning it. Here it has been but very unsatisfac-
torily solved, for the incessant watching of the
secret police causes many innocent persons to be
suspected and innumerable mistakes to arise. This
was clearly shown in the university riots of last year.
OUR ST. PETERSBURG LETTER. THE CZAR'S VISIT TO FRANCE. ST. PETERSBURG, Sept. 29. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Tuesday 19 November 1901 page Article 2014-07-29 01:50 nil the Russian ne« spapcrs, with one voice, hopo
place somo limit to the powers of this so-called
petrating their abominable crimes Tho wound
dealt to President M'Kmley was of the same
of Public Education, M Bogolispoff As
to such persons as Emma Goldmann
thoy are common enough here This typo
it is that causes all tho trouble with tho
workmen, nil the nota at the universities and
colleges, und, what is strange, most of theso
women uro remarkably talented, using their
influence over men to incite them to tho most
abject and cowardly deeds However, oven such
press, have piotested against the murder of
President M Kinley The socialists, Marxists,
and nihilists of nil shades find that such an act
compromises their cause aud does great liai m to
it A good sized madhouse is said to bo the best
prison for these ciumnals The German
CongreBs to discuss means against the anarchists,
because in Germany nil possible measures of re-
pression have already boon resorted to It is
thought in Germany, and even hero, that the
last refuges of tho anurchiBts will bo also closed
to thom aftei then late scandalous and unprovoked
act, and that they will ceaso to be judged as poli-
tical onminttls, but share tho fate of ordinary mur-
derers
THE ANARCHISTS
all the Russian newspapers, with one voice, hope
place some limit to the powers of this so-called
petrating their abominable crimes. The wound
dealt to President McKinley was of the same
of Public Education, M. Bogoliepoff. As
to such persons as Emma Goldmann,
they are common enough here. This type
it is that causes all the trouble with the
workmen, all the riots at the universities and
colleges, and, what is strange, most of these
women are remarkably talented, using their
influence over men to incite them to the most
abject and cowardly deeds. However, even such
press, have protested against the murder of
President McKinley. The socialists, Marxists,
and nihilists of all shades find that such an act
compromises their cause and does great harm to
it. A good sized madhouse is said to be the best
prison for these criminals. The German
Congress to discuss means against the anarchists,
because in Germany all possible measures of re-
pression have already been resorted to. It is
thought in Germany, and even here, that the
last refuges of the anarchists will be also closed
to them after their late scandalous and unprovoked
act, and that they will cease to be judged as poli-
tical criminals, but share the fate of ordinary mur-
derers.
THE ANARCHISTS.
THE ALPS AND THE RAILWAYS. (From the "Spectator.") (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Tuesday 19 November 1901 page Article 2014-07-28 22:07 The lino is closo to tho old roid mormons gene
rating stations hine been orectcd to produce tho
electric pojv or tho sides of the ) alle) are scored
by coloss rl and unsightly ¡npes of iron, which
convoy walo- t tho turbines the torrent of tho
Arve ra e r-*«Ml hv hideous iron bridges It is
t'leso thing ntl not the passing *ruin, which
make rt drfh-jlt not to regret ti p invasion ot
Alpine valleys by a railroad As for tho increasing
crowds of trevellcra who will o brought to
Chamorux, ti ero rs little to I« said ± wo i1 CM
churlish to grudge theso people the plea- ires of
'rival, and unreasonable to lament the profit
which tho natives will mnk i out of thom The
accommodation for tray ellem uni th number of
nins will bo increased , but CliamonU ke mist
Alpmo villages, is nothing but i centre I'T excur-
sions where good nins uro found, which the
tray eilt eau loavo as em) as j subi» in tho
ii ornuig to climb the mountains ns lu0h ns his
lungs and legs pen a u wl ich ho may n turn in
the t vening to oiijn_ Uie ncheicies of tablo d hoto
and tho delights of i fealhei bod If ho is ublo
bodied ho will very soon leave the eiowd behind,
ind enjoy in solitude, or m the corarían) of his
guide, is splendid und unspoilt mountains as
nrno7od Pocooko uud AVmdlr im or fascinated Do
Saussure If, on tho other hand, his legs ate too
feeble to suppoit his bod), or his lungs too weak
to supply lum with breath, ho should thank the
rmh) ii) w Inch has enablt d lum (ineompiu) wilh
ni in) others equ ill) afflicted) to seo the highest
of the Alps at so httlu expenditure of strength,
mono), and bit nth
The line is close to the old road ; enormous gene-
rating stations have been erected to produce the
electric power ; the sides of the valley are scored
by colossal and unsightly pipes of iron, which
convey water to the turbines ; the torrent of the
Arve is crossed by hideous iron bridges. It is
these things, and not the passing train, which
make it difficult not to regret the invasion of
Alpine valleys by a railroad. As for the increasing
crowds of travellers who will be brought to
Chamonix, there is little to be said. It would be
churlish to grudge these people the pleasures of
travel, and unreasonable to lament the profit
which the natives will make out of them. The
accommodation for travellers and the number of
inns will be increased ; but Chamonix like most
Alpine villages, is nothing but a centre for excur-
sions where good inns are found ; which the
traveller can leave as early as possible in the
morning to climb the mountains as high as his
lungs and legs permit, to which he may return in
the evening to enjoy the delicacies of table d'hote
and the delights of a feather bed. If he is able-
bodied he will very soon leave the crowd behind,
and enjoy in solitude, or in the company of his
guide, as splendid and unspoilt mountains as
amazed Pococke and Windham or fascinated De
Saussure. If, on the other hand, his legs are too
feeble to support his body, or his lungs too weak
to supply him with breath, he should thank the
railway which has enabled him (in company with
many others equally afflicted) to see the highest
of the Alps at so little expenditure of strength,
money, and breath.
BALLOONING FROM WARSHIPS. FRENCH EXPERIMENTS. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Wednesday 20 November 1901 page Article 2014-07-27 23:51 Rooognistng tlio increased importance of scouting
in naval warfare, tho Trench nnval authorities hilve
decided to carr} out a series of experiments to do
tei minc whether balloons mav not bo usclully cm
plo}cd in tho work The balloons, sa}s tho " United
Serv leo Garotte," vv ill bo carried bv cruisers, and
from them will make free ascents with a viow to
locating tile position of the cnemj's ships An in-
FRENCH EXPERIMENTS. \
Recognising the increased importance of scouting
in naval warfare, the French naval authorities have
decided to carry out a series of experiments to de-
termine whether balloons may not be usefully em-
ployed in the work. The balloons, says the " United
Service Gazette," will be carried by cruisers, and
from them will make free ascents with a view to
locating the position of the enemy's ships. An in-
FRENCH EXPERIMENTS.

Counts updated hourly

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.