Information about Trove user: mrbh

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

RankCorrectorLines corrected
1 JohnWarren 2,674,274
2 annmanley 1,926,202
3 NeilHamilton 1,655,349
4 John.F.Hall 1,299,261
5 maurielyn 1,251,857
6 noelwoodhouse 1,227,637
7 mrbh 1,128,224
8 JudyClayden 1,071,969
9 C.Scheikowski 1,001,851

1,128,224 lines corrected.

Corrections by month

July 2014 5,224
June 2014 13,150
May 2014 9,829
April 2014 17,707
March 2014 27,902
February 2014 19,180
January 2014 25,232
December 2013 22,148
November 2013 18,981
October 2013 8,207
September 2013 12,664
August 2013 10,571
July 2013 5,481
June 2013 5,916
May 2013 8,012
April 2013 26,113
March 2013 9,413
February 2013 7,519
January 2013 11,823
December 2012 7,514
November 2012 7,732
October 2012 13,397
September 2012 19,353
August 2012 15,156
July 2012 20,250
June 2012 23,528
May 2012 27,552
April 2012 42,526
March 2012 25,445
February 2012 29,306
January 2012 26,672
December 2011 28,721
November 2011 28,000
October 2011 27,000
September 2011 21,000
August 2011 29,998
July 2011 20,002
June 2011 30,000
May 2011 30,000
April 2011 31,000
March 2011 25,667
February 2011 28,333
January 2011 31,500
December 2010 5,394
November 2010 3,144
October 2010 4,143
September 2010 14,234
August 2010 31,585
July 2010 25,000
June 2010 25,000
May 2010 26,776
April 2010 16,593
March 2010 7,310
February 2010 4,221
January 2010 2,150
December 2009 1,745
November 2009 472
October 2009 125
September 2009 312
August 2009 69
July 2009 63
June 2009 2,121
May 2009 12,115
April 2009 6,743
March 2009 1,554
February 2009 612
January 2009 8,001
December 2008 18,518
November 2008 8,939
October 2008 13,676
September 2008 23,139
August 2008 9,673
July 2008 73

Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
RIVAL CANAL ROUTES. NICARAGUA FAVOU[?]D, LONDON Nov. 19. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Wednesday 20 November 1901 page Article 2014-07-23 02:26 [Two commissions havo boen appnh 'ed to report
on the Isthmian Canal roula. The fir- 'xmimiuloii
reported in Muy of 10Q0 in favour of tr .> inuto from
Brito lo Lako Nicaragua, called the aids Route,
and from tho lako to Graytown, cr.i!o<l Iho Lull
Route. This routo leaving 13rito i.jllows tho
loft bank of Iho Rio Grando to near Bueno
Retiro, and crosses the weston «"wide of
tho valley of tho Lagos, which i" Jiovvs to
Lake Nicaragua. Crossing tho lako ilt .lo head of
the San Juan River, it follows tho Tit * r River to
lioarBoca San Callos, llionco in oxc. i ibu hy the
lelt bank of the river to tho San Jnunii 'and across
tho low country to Graytown. Thia rt^tto requires
but a singlo dum witli legulating work at both ends
of thesummit lovel.
One cstitnato of tho cost is £24,000,005 ,\nd another
Tho member« of the commission whroo locom
inondation lins now been received by cnbln mo Roar
Admiral Walker, General P. O. Hiiint., Lieutenant -
Colonel O. n. Ernst, Mr. A. Noble, Mr. O. S.
Monson, Professor W.U. Burr, Pit"-sor 13. R.
Johnson, Mr. L. M. Haupt, Mr. S. IV,.. '
[Two commissions have been appointed to report
on the Isthmian Canal route. The first commission
reported in May of 1900 in favour of the route from
Brito to Lake Nicaragua, called the ?lds Route,
and from the lake to Greytown, called the Lull
Route. This route leaving Brito follows the
left bank of the Rio Grande to near Bueno
Retiro, and crosses the western divide of
the valley of the Lagas, which it follows to
Lake Nicaragua. Crossing the lake at the head of
the San Juan River, it follows the U?r River to
near Boca San Carlos, thence in exc?ion by the
left bank of the river to the San Juan? and across
the low country to Greytown. This route requires
but a single dam with regulating work at both ends
of the summit level.
One estimate of the cost is £24,000,000 and another
The members of the commission whose recom-
mendation has now been received by cable are Rear-
Admiral Walker, General P. C. Hains, Lieutenant-
Colonel O. H. Ernst, Mr. A. Noble, Mr. G. S.
Morison, Professor W. H. Burr, Professor E. R.
Johnson, Mr. L. M. Haupt, Mr. S. Pa?.
HARBOUR FACILITIES IN SOUTH AUSTRALIA. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Wednesday 20 November 1901 page Article 2014-07-23 02:17 Other schemes thete uro in plenty Tor instance,
thero is the jiroposal to oonstt tiela harbour on
the south-eastern coast, but thero is no warrant,
according to Mi Lindon Bates' îepcil, for belief
that tile project is feasible, all things conBidered
at the present time Thus the unthoiiigo nt Robe
is unsafe from Tune to Decoinbci a breakwiitei
have to be bl ought from Victor Hmbour Kings-
ton, again, has now a jetty 4000ft loug, with
only 16ft of watci at its outer end Hero a
breakwater of 8900ft m length would have to bo
conslruoted, and the material m this taso also
would hav e to bo brought from Victor Harbour
Other sitts also were considered but Mr
Lindon Bates reg irdB tilt R.ohe project as Die best
trade It would, ho estimates tost altogether
£093,000, whilst i harbour at Kingston would
como to £1,990,000
Other schemes there are in plenty. For instance,
there is the proposal to construct a harbour on
the south-eastern coast ; but there is no warrant,
according to Mr. Lindon Bates' report, for belief
that the project is feasible, all things considered,
at the present time. Thus, the anchorage at Robe
is unsafe from June to December ; a breakwater
have to be brought from Victor Harbour. Kings-
ton, again, has now a jetty 4000ft. long, with
only 16ft. of water at its outer end. Here a
breakwater of 8900ft. in length would have to be
constructed, and the material in this case also
would have to be brought from Victor Harbour.
Other sites also were considered ; but Mr.
Lindon Bates regards the Robe project as the best
trade. It would, he estimates cost altogether
£693,000, whilst a harbour at Kingston would
come to £1,990,000.
MINING IN NEW SOUTH WALES. THE LACHLAN GOLDFIELDS, LIMITED, FORBES. A HIGHLY PROMISING GROUP OF MINES. PROGRESS AND PROSPECTS. (BY OUR SPECIAL MINING REPORTER.) I. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Wednesday 20 November 1901 page Article 2014-07-23 02:11 thick, flora which assnjsgavo lüdvvt 12gi , lldvvt
4gr,9dwt 8gr , and lGdvvt bgr gold per ton of ore
Going south a drtv o has bcon extended along tho
lode foi 00ft In tho first Ooft the lodo is oxpo«ed
along the hack and sides of drive, hut from thnt point
to tho fino tho oro occurs in small bunches in a ol ly
formation At 30ft fiam the shaft a crosscut shows
the lode to bo lOit wide, aud a sample taken
across tho full width gay o by ussni
a return equal to 5dwt 'igr gold
per ton of oio Tom. samples taken at intervals
along the duvo between tins cro'scut mid the end of
tho stonognvo an avoiago retuni equal to 7dwt 12gr
gold pel ton of oro Going north 1 rom tho shaft a
drive has been put in ISOft lho first 35ft followed
n vein leading a few felt to tho west, and ntth it
point tho drive turns to the nimn lodo and follows
t to tho fain At 22ft a crosscut w us put in cast
2Jtt to tho footwall and from the end of this cross-
cut a rise lollow ed tho lode up on tho incline ,i6ft
At the bottom of the i ise tito lodo is Sft w ide, of n
mixed character An al erago sample gnvo a retui n
of 3dvvt bgr gold pel ton Going up in the nso the
lodo widens lor tho first 20ft, and then gr idnallj
nairows in lo about 2tt nt the top Along the main
thick, from which assays gave 16dwt. 12gr., 19dwt.
4gr., 9dwt. 8gr., and 16dwt. 8gr. gold per ton of ore.
Going south a drive has been extended along the
lode for 90ft. In the first 65ft. the lode is exposed
along the back and sides of drive, but from that point
to the face the ore occurs in small bunches in a clay
formation. At 30ft. from the shaft a crosscut shows
the lode to be 10ft. wide, and a sample taken
across the full width gave by assay
a return equal to 5dwt. 5gr. gold
per ton of ore. Four samples taken at intervals
along the drive between this crosscut and the end of
the stone gave an average return equal to 7dwt. 12gr.
gold per ton of ore. Going north from the shaft a
drive has been put in 180ft. The first 35ft. followed
a vein leading a few feet to the west, and at that
point the drive turns to the main lode and follows
it to the face. At 22ft. a crosscut was put in east
23ft. to the footwall, and from the end of this cross-
cut a rise followed the lode up on the incline 56ft.
At the bottom of the rise the lode is 8ft. wide, of a
mixed character. An average sample gave a return
of 3dwt. 6gr. gold per ton. Going up in the rise the
lode widens for the first 20ft., and then gradually
narrows in to about 2ft. at the top. Along the main
MODERN WEEKLY news magazine Tides And Sun May Provide Alternative Sources Of Power Sydney Man Traps Own Electricity (Article), South Western Advertiser (Perth, WA : 1910 - 1954), Thursday 22 July 1948 page Article 2014-07-22 19:09 OCIENTISTS and engineer^ the world over are seeking new power
In Sydney, retired engineer Julian (S. Ihain, has already solved his own
power problem without having to worry over Bunnerong's intermittent close
before retiTing he was a Bunnerong engineer.
But now he is independent of it—2 windmills he^
wants. Windmills are 4-bladed wooden fans, ex
workshop for lathes, drills, battery chargers, and a motor
"I've retired from m.v job as an engineer at Bunnerong
MR., Julian Thain at4
the switchboard oj his
own "BunnerongThe
provides the power.
SCIENTISTS and engineers the world over are seeking new power
In Sydney, retired engineer Julian G. Thain, has already solved his own
power problem without having to worry over Bunnerong's intermittent close-
before retiring he was a Bunnerong engineer.
But now he is independent of it—2 windmills he
wants. Windmills are 4-bladed wooden fans, ex-
workshop for lathes, drills, battery chargers, and a motor-
"I've retired from m.v job as an engineer at Bunnerong ........
<PHOTO INSERT> MR. Julian Thain at
the switchboard of his
own "Bunnerong." The
provides the power. <END INSERT>
FURTHER AMENDMENTS ASKED FOR. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Wednesday 20 November 1901 page Article 2014-07-22 01:24 W R Du, TIA (president of tho Actual ml
faoeieli of Now South Willes) wns nlso present lho
bill, w Inch vv ns on tho business pnpoi of-tlio Assembly
for its second reading that dnj, was fieely
discussed Consulerablo suipnso vvus oxprisscd nt
»orno of 1(3 provisions, especially that requuiug tho
Hiles of the lanoits registered societies to piovtdo
thal sepm to accounts should bo kept relating to tho
contributions of old mid non members, mid
that tho finnis of each should also lia
separated lho question ot tho definition of au
urinary utidr-i tho Alt was also loforrod to.
It was considered that a propel dehiubon should bo
embodied 111 nu amendment to thom.asure wluht
before tho Assoinbly Exception wns also taken lo
tho clause piovithng foi tho limited registration of
oneil eocietj After discussion it was deemed advis-
able to ask for a luithei e tension of lime 111
which to legistei and to nquost the np
Xioiiitment by tho Government of u select committco
to make full inquines into lim wholo question dilling
the recess and to leport t irlj next session Suli
sequcutly a deputation attended Parliament House
anil interview ed Mr J N Brtinkci, ML A, who
took chingo of tho matter on their behulf and who
also expressed tho opinion th tt the coiit=o proposed
would result beneliciully in the interests of tho
societies concón.eil
W. R. Day, F.I.A. (president of the Actuarial
Society of New South Wales) was also present. The
bill, which was on the business paper of the Assembly
for its second reading that day, was freely
discussed. Considerable surprise was expressed at
some of its provisions, especially that requiring the
rules of the various registered societies to provide
that separate accounts should be kept relating to the
contributions of old and new members, and
that the funds of each should also be
separated. The question of the definition of an
actuary under the Act was also referred to.
It was considered that a proper definition should be
embodied in an amendment to the measure whilst
before the Assembly. Exception was also taken to
the clause providing for the limited registration of
each society. After discussion it was deemed advis-
able to ask for a further extension of time in
which to register and to request the ap-
pointment by the Government of a select committee
to make full inquiries into the whole question during
the recess and to report early next session. Sub-
sequently a deputation attended Parliament House
and interviewed Mr. J. N. Brunker, M.L.A., who
took charge of the matter on their behalf, and who
also expressed the opinion that the course proposed
would result beneficially in the interests of the
societies concerned.
THE FEDERAL REVENUE. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Wednesday 20 November 1901 page Article 2014-07-22 01:15 It is but fair to acknowle Ige thal the Fede-
ral Treasurer is entitled to plead (lint his
tariff and revenue must not be judged on tho
uniformity. Bul on the other hand all those
who, like ourselves, regard the new sclieduln
are entitled lo say thal the collections fur
last month raise the strong presumption thal
Should furtl|er experience repeat that now
ascertained, ive shall lind the case for reduc-
tion of duties materially strengthened, or clso
cial condition of the Slates, must be aban-
doned. But as far us this State is concerned,
under the now tariff presage a revenuo
of ten millions a year must bo held
to justify our protest that the turill'
be reduced. J t is true, that under tho Brad-
don clause the Federal Treasurer must sharo
any windfall or oxcoss revenue with tho
tho States a fair quota of the customs rorenuc
nil has been done that was needed. For Sir
revenue in the main derived from un exces-
sive tariff in New South Wales is mi injury
wealth. ________________
It is but fair to acknowledge that the Fede-
ral Treasurer is entitled to plead that his
tariff and revenue must not be judged on the
uniformity. But on the other hand all those
who, like ourselves, regard the new schedule
are entitled to say that the collections for
last month raise the strong presumption that
Should further experience repeat that now
ascertained, we shall find the case for reduc-
tion of duties materially strengthened, or else
cial condition of the States must be aban-
doned. But as far as this State is concerned,
under the new tariff presage a revenue
of ten millions a year must be held
to justify our protest that the tariff
be reduced. It is true that under the Brad-
don clause the Federal Treasurer must share
any windfall or excess revenue with the
the States a fair quota of the customs revenue
all has been done that was needed. For Sir
revenue in the main derived from an exces-
sive tariff in New South Wales is an injury
wealth.
WHERE IS THE BRITISH THRONE? (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Wednesday 20 November 1901 page Article 2014-07-22 01:11 By its sido stands an almost exact replica 1 na a
a throne made m 1089 for Queen Mary the wife oi
William III It was last u«cd in 1831 ly Queen
Adelaide but will doubtless be brought out again lot
Queen Alexandra . ,.
Witbm a stone's throw of the Abboj stands tie
Palato of Westminster and here, in tho House «
Lords, wo find another throno lins is as sumptu-
ous in appearance as the ancient one is niugj
Standing undei an elaborate and jichlv gilt collopy,
it is raised a few steps above the floor of ho Uliam
ber It is constructed of carved anti gihM wooo,
moat richly upholstered nud studded with crjstau
Ibis is occupied by tho Sovereign when opening ot
proroguing Parharoonf ni state On cither sale is a
tower throne, uitcLded for tho heir to tho thT1» "f
the Queen Cm ort respect» ely But «ince thei awes
sion of his i're»e..tM,i|Cslj,aseco.idi.i»lpreBselj
similar tliiono has been placed beside tho first lot in«
uso of tlio Quoen . ,
By its side stands an almost exact replica. This is
a throne made in 1689 for Queen Mary, the wife of
William III. It was last used in 1831 by Queen
Adelaide, but will doubtless be brought out again for
Queen Alexandra.
Within a stone's throw of the Abbey stands the
Palace of Westminster, and here, in the House of
Lords, we find another throne. This is as sumptu-
ous in appearance as the ancient one is dingy.
Standing under an elaborate and richly gilt canopy,
it is raised a few steps above the floor of the Cham-
ber. It is constructed of carved and gilded wood,
most richly upholstered and studded with crystals.
This is occupied by the Sovereign when opening or
proroguing Parliament in state. On either side is a
lower throne, intended for the heir to the throne and
the Queen Consort respectively. But since the acces-
sion of his present Majesty, a second and precisely
similar throne has been placed beside the first lot the
use of the Queen.
MAJOR-GENERAL SIR HECTOR MACDONALD. A CITIZENS' GREETING. BANQUET IN THE TOWN HALL. A BRILLIANT FUNCTION. SPEECH BY MR. G. H. REID, M.P. SIR HECTOR MACDONALD ON DISCIPLINED TROOPS. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Tuesday 19 November 1901 page Article 2014-07-22 01:04 looked upon Su Hectoi Macdonald ns ..........
ouo of tho grandest lluka winch milled Die
muss of the muk and Ilio of tho British army with
thou distinguished leaders (Loud theors ) Ho
could onl) hope that in tho future it would become
moio and moro evident to the soldiois und sailors of
the EiUjiiro that no accident of hirth, no uccidcnt us
lo the mode of entering upon Iinponul dut), «ould
prevent mont nnd vnlonr from leaching the highest
ronalds (Cheers) Iho best sort of nobihtj «a«
that which made itself (Cheers) Ho looked upon
tho distinguished oarecr ol Sir Hector Macdonald is
ope ung a brighter page in tho annals ol tho British
uni) to the humblest «ol her in the ranks, and otter-
ing ivcij inducement to lum to «lum thal ho was
fitted lo nil l> distinction (Clieeis ) But thcro
«cie solditrs in the British uinij «ho were novel
privileged to indulge in fcals of valour upon tho field
of battle, and who j ot had renden d ycomnn's ser
vito to tho Crown and Lrapire Ibero was juc of
those disunguisho 1 men presold He íoforred to
Miijor-GimcralFrcuch (Loudopplausc ) There was
no living soldier ni tho British Empire who had dona
more to consohdnto tho citizen iorrts of the self
governing dominions of tho Empire than Mnjor
uenernl French had done, und therefore III proposing
the toast he could ask tho companj to receive it most
hoartil). (Loud cheers )
Tho to ist was acknowledged with great
enthusiasm
looked upon Sir Hector Macdonald as
one of the grandest links which united the
mass of the rank and file of the British army with
their distinguished leaders. (Loud cheers.) He
could only hope that in the future it would become
more and more evident to the soldiers and sailors of
the Empire that no accident of birth, no accident as
to the mode of entering upon Imperial duty, would
prevent merit and valour from reaching the highest
rewards. (Cheers.) The best sort of nobility was
that which made itself. (Cheers.) He looked upon
the distinguished career of Sir Hector Macdonald as
opening a brighter page in the annals of the British
army to the humblest soldier in the ranks, and offer-
ing every inducement to him to show that he was
fitted to rise to distinction. (Cheers.) But there
were soldiers in the British army who were never
privileged to indulge in feats of valour upon the field
of battle, and who yet had rendered yeoman's ser-
vice to the Crown and Empire. There was one of
those distinguished men present. He referred to
Major-General French. (Loud applause.) There was
no living soldier in the British Empire who had done
more to consolidate the citizen forces of the self-
governing dominions of the Empire than Major-
General French had done, and therefore in proposing
the toast he could ask the company to receive it most
heartily. (Loud cheers.)
The toast was acknowledged with great
enthusiasm.
The Miraculous Medal and a new saint Blessed Catherine Laboure To Be Canonised Later This Month (Article), Catholic Weekly (Sydney, NSW : 1942 - 1954), Thursday 17 July 1947 page Article 2014-07-22 00:54 Approaching Death ......
In the beginning of 1876, Sis
life. . She repeated this at almost
| all the anniversaries of that year:
'It is the last time I shall keop
this Feast; I shall not see 1877.'
The last day of the year dawn
ed; it was Sundhy, December 31,
Sister Catherine's mortal, life. She
asked for the Liist Sacraments,
which she received in -the pres
deeply moved. Later on, the Di
rector came to give her the LaBt
her the two famllios of St. Vin
cent. When the Sisters wont on
their knees to recite the invoca
tions 6f Our Lady, their Bnlntly
'He who -humbleth himself
shall be exalted.' This Divine pro
spent long years of voluntary con
The humble Sister, whose pres
by so few, was unexpectedly sur
rounded by persons of every con
the house In which she had spent
46 years prayed that the preci
t.o remain at Reullly, as she had
I^lace soon became the object of
the intercession of Sister Cathe
- At last the day came when the
Charity felt it . their duty to ask
out in Paris In 1896 led to the
de Paul, July 19, 1931, at the clos
Miraculous Medal, solemnly de
virtues of Sister Catherine La-,
he promulgated the Decree of Ap
? probation of the two miracles
worked by God through the inter
cession of His Servant, and pro
Her Beatification
on steadily in
the graces- re
Approaching Death
In the beginning of 1876, Sis-
life. She repeated this at almost
all the anniversaries of that year:
"It is the last time I shall keep
this Feast; I shall not see 1877."
The last day of the year dawn-
ed; it was Sunday, December 31,
Sister Catherine's mortal life. She
asked for the Last Sacraments,
which she received in the pres-
deeply moved. Later on, the Di-
rector came to give her the Last
her the two families of St. Vin-
cent. When the Sisters went on
their knees to recite the invoca-
tions of Our Lady, their saintly
"He who humbleth himself
shall be exalted." This Divine pro-
spent long years of voluntary con-
The humble Sister, whose pres-
by so few, was unexpectedly sur-
rounded by persons of every con-
the house in which she had spent
46 years prayed that the preci-
to remain at Reuilly, as she had
place soon became the object of
the intercession of Sister Cathe-
At last the day came when the
Charity felt it their duty to ask
out in Paris in 1896 led to the
de Paul, July 19, 1931, at the clos-
Miraculous Medal, solemnly de-
virtues of Sister Catherine La-
he promulgated the Decree of Ap-
probation of the two miracles
worked by God through the inter-
cession of His Servant, and pro-
Her Beatification .........
on steadily in-
the graces re-
AUSTRALIAN PLANS FOR OLYMPIC GAMES (Article), Maryborough Chronicle (Qld. : 1947 - 1954), Wednesday 16 July 1952 page Article 2014-07-22 00:47 Treloar has drawn lane six .......
metres — in which he is likely
from Britain s Alan Lillington.
Weinberg is due to clash wXh
the strongly favoured Macdon
Macmillan.' He meets Jamaica's
Arthur Wint, Russia s Modoj,
and Japan's Hioichl Vamamoto.
The probable' winner appears!
to be Wint who won. the 400 1
and was runner-up in the BOO
metres to America's Mai Whit
field. ' '
drawn in the second heat ui
the 400 metres hurdles agahnt
America's Dfewey Yoder ar.J
tne Russian, Timothy Lunev. |
should have: a comparatively
easy .passage 'through the 8th j
60 entrants has meant thut
none of . the top sprinters will
Miss Jdckson, who has drawn
an inside -lane is likely to re
ceive* most opposition Ir6m the
Winsome Xripps will run in
lane five -in. the first heat, with
her most -serious rival,. Bul
garia's TzCCtana Berkovska.
. The IBM. Olympic sprint
champion; Dow a *sportfe repot- -
tpr, tb-dtay- predicted that the
io^ietres champion in 19l8
would »*tOL the 110-meires
b^rjbes in-.the coming Olympic
Gtfmtt.' -? - ?
Harrison -pillard was the man
picked for .this unprecedented
teat tsy* Hdrold .Abrahams, ; of
Britain, lOfcmetres champion 28
years ago.' -. . ' ; ?
. 'Here IS the-man. who . will
become thfe'first to win both Uie
HB-metres - and hurdles in the
Olympic »rGames,' . Abrahams
said. 1
;-The Australian wrestler,
Treloar has drawn lane six
metres—in which he is likely
from Britain's Alan Lillington.
Weinberg is due to clash with
the strongly favoured Macdon-
Macmillan. He meets Jamaica's
Arthur Wint, Russia's Modoj,
and Japan's Hioichi Yamamoto.
The probable winner appears
to be Wint who won the 400
and was runner-up in the 800
metres to America's Mal Whit-
field.
drawn in the second heat of
the 400 metres hurdles against
America's Dewey Yoder and
the Russian, Timothy Lunev.
should have a comparatively
easy passage through the 8th
60 entrants has meant that
none of the top sprinters will
Miss Jackson, who has drawn
an inside lane is likely to re-
ceive most opposition from the
Winsome Cripps will run in
lane five in the first heat, with
her most serious rival, Bul-
garia's Tzvetana Berkovska.
The 1924 Olympic sprint
champion, now a sports repor-
ter, to-day predicted that the
100-metres champion in 1948
would win the 110-metres
hurdles in the coming Olympic
Games.
Harrison Dillard was the man
picked for this unprecedented
feat by Harold Abrahams, of
Britain, 100-metres champion 28
years ago.
"Here is the man who will
become the first to win both the
100-metres and hurdles in the
Olympic Games," Abrahams
said.
;-The Australian wrestler, .......

Counts updated hourly

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.