Information about Trove user: maurielyn

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

RankCorrectorLines corrected
1 JohnWarren 2,877,308
2 annmanley 2,008,656
3 NeilHamilton 1,863,859
4 noelwoodhouse 1,469,063
5 maurielyn 1,372,598
6 John.F.Hall 1,324,251
7 mrbh 1,146,363

1,372,598 lines corrected.

Corrections by month

October 2014 24,656
September 2014 28,719
August 2014 46,848
July 2014 54,325
June 2014 10,647
May 2014 15,795
April 2014 16,770
March 2014 3
February 2014 92
January 2014 36
December 2013 4,433
November 2013 6,312
October 2013 40,154
September 2013 26,891
August 2013 19,229
July 2013 30,238
June 2013 35,889
May 2013 34,599
April 2013 5,953
March 2013 4,178
February 2013 60
December 2012 122
November 2012 6,412
October 2012 9,007
September 2012 2,074
August 2012 13,001
July 2012 8,995
June 2012 41,702
May 2012 10,728
April 2012 4,423
March 2012 12,588
February 2012 9,171
January 2012 2,655
December 2011 22,428
November 2011 29,308
October 2011 28,340
September 2011 20,977
August 2011 22,871
July 2011 20,215
June 2011 11,018
May 2011 7,946
April 2011 45,102
March 2011 14,791
February 2011 30,582
January 2011 36,679
December 2010 14,510
November 2010 15,639
October 2010 25,076
September 2010 35,694
August 2010 38,196
July 2010 31,494
June 2010 42,660
May 2010 42,984
April 2010 33,196
March 2010 26,158
February 2010 21,768
January 2010 23,693
December 2009 14,169
November 2009 13,910
October 2009 8,721
September 2009 5,101
August 2009 5,707
July 2009 6,083
June 2009 5,576
May 2009 30,715
April 2009 8,466
March 2009 21,801
February 2009 7,575
January 2009 5,156
December 2008 7,165
November 2008 6,402
October 2008 24,538
September 2008 28,111
August 2008 5,372

Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
ASSIGNED TO HIS WIFE OR, The Adventures of George Flower. CHAPTER I. (Article), National Advocate (Bathurst, NSW : 1889 - 1954), Thursday 21 August 1890 page Article 2014-10-30 18:01 The issuo of this marriage was numer
mi-l SmnnWl rllorl
O . -V,.J juni.Q,
thirteenth year, Mr. Oxford, who repre
seated his eouuty, resigned his seat in
the Continent. For four years and up
Emily was very pretty, and had re
graceful. The sweetness of her dis
position might he seea in her soft hazel
formed mouth, and the intoaatioas of
her musical aad unaffected voice. She
who visited at Oxford Hall was a hand
to pay Miss Orford the most marked '
with delight. At length lie proposed
she acknowledged she liked him ex
vicinity, and pro«eeded to London, where
The nex^ person whose attentions
seemed far 'from disagreeable to Miss
barrister, in whose 'circuit' MrOrford's
'a very rising man,' and Mr Orford,
Sessions, would frequently invite hiin to
Mr Orford was about to stand once
his friend the barrister volunteered to can
011 this occasion the barrister remained
Emily, with whom lie became passionately
Through the exertions of Mr' Hast
ings, Mr Orford was returned by a very
largo aiajority ; and Emily naturally
shared her father's joy oa this event.
Her lover observing this, made a declar
ation of his attachment ia tho most
eloquent terms. Bat it is one thing to
mysterious feeling, called 'love,' in a
liked Mr. Hasting, just as she hadjliked
Charles Everest ; but then sho added,
' T could never think of marrying him,
because I do not love him.'
on,
The issue of this marriage was numer-
girl. Some had died very young, others

thirteenth year, Mr. Oxford, who repre-
sented his county, resigned his seat in
the Continent. For four years and up-
Emily was very pretty, and had re-
graceful. The sweetness of her dis-
position might be seen in her soft hazel
formed mouth, and the intonations of
her musical and unaffected voice. She
who visited at Oxford Hall was a hand-
to pay Miss Orford the most "marked"
with delight. At length he proposed
she acknowledged she liked him ex-
vicinity, and proceeded to London, where
The next person whose attentions
seemed far from disagreeable to Miss
barrister, in whose "circuit" Mr. Orford's
"a very rising man," and Mr Orford,
Sessions, would frequently invite him to
Mr. Orford was about to stand once
his friend the barrister volunteered to can-
on this occasion the barrister remained
Emily, with whom he became passionately
Through the exertions of Mr. Hast-
ings, Mr. Orford was returned by a very
large majority ; and Emily naturally
shared her father's joy on this event.
Her lover observing this, made a declar-
ation of his attachment in the most
eloquent terms. But it is one thing to
mysterious feeling, called "love," in a
liked Mr. Hasting, just as she had liked
Charles Everest ; but then she added,
"I could never think of marrying him,
because I do not love him."
OR,
Chapter XXXI.—Cobber o' Mine. (Article), The World's News (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 1955), Saturday 5 July 1919 page Article 2014-10-30 17:47 token of victory; but, while different section®
of the crowd vied with each other in shout
ing the names of Toorak and Muski, who wer®
battling strenuously in the middle of th«
the rails with a run that held the omooKers
A hoarse voice shouted the words, loudiy
and emphatically. Nethie squeezed her hus
band's arm, and, smiling down at her, he re
left field 'ind set out after the two game
horses fighting it out in front. At the L«eger
roar from the multitude of excited omookera
yards from Lome the top-weight's head was in
or a veteran, and to every call Cobber re
as game as >hij| opponents, did not falter for
an instant, but gave of his best. So the gal
lant trio Sashed across the judge's line of
'.Cobber," shouted by a thousand throats, told
for all to see, and Cobber o* Mine itfas
first, with Muski and Toorak sharing secona
on his. admirers. And, if Chilla was happy,
Tfteir bright, beaming faces also told of the
joy that was theirs, as tbey came down from
mhich had carried the Murrubee colors to
beth, but it was but a beginning of the joy
' them.
token of victory; but, while different sections
of the crowd vied with each other in shout-
ing the names of Toorak and Muski, who were
battling strenuously in the middle of the
the rails with a run that held the onlookers
A hoarse voice shouted the words, loudly
and emphatically. Nethie squeezed her hus-
band's arm, and, smiling down at her, he re-
left field and set out after the two game
horses fighting it out in front. At the Leger
roar from the multitude of excited onlookers
yards from home the top-weight's head was in
of a veteran, and to every call Cobber re-
as game as his opponents, did not falter for
an instant, but gave of his best. So the gal-
lant trio flashed across the judge's line of
"Cobber," shouted by a thousand throats, told
for all to see, and Cobber o' Mine itfas
first, with Muski and Toorak sharing second
on his admirers. And, if Chilla was happy,
Their bright, beaming faces also told of the
joy that was theirs, as they came down from
which had carried the Murrubee colors to
both, but it was but a beginning of the joy
them.
Chapter XXXI.—Cobber o' Mine. (Article), The World's News (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 1955), Saturday 5 July 1919 page Article 2014-10-30 17:43 <*ooper Collisor. and his handsome wife were
weigh heavily on his mind. What he was con
be happy Indeed, for he would be a big winner,
taken back, after her wanderings in the under
world, would be assured. It would be but a fe»
that had caused his downfall, was running to
having been sold to find money for Hugh's up-,
Still as she sat on the strnd with her husband,
the big mile event, she could Dot avoid dwelling
"Here comes Cobber," cried Mackie. as the
the course. "Doesn't Chilla fancy himself to
"I should think t so.** smiled Nethie. "It's
a bit different to Royglen, isn't It?"
treated te that day."
handicapped at Sst., and carrying the leading
o* Mine had hosts of backers, but the fact of
his being ridden by a country stable-boy, in
liberal prif-e. The public did not know Chilla
Farley, but Mafckie had no misgivings on the
hold his own with the public idols of the pig
harrier to-day. Twenty-five of them altogether,
and not an unruly one amongs^ them. "Go."
tut the outsider had few backers, for hardened
raceeoera knew that he would not s°e the
heels could be seen Kerbel, Muski. and Ou^ah,
an accuracy puzzling to a casual visitor at tha
and Macfcie Mason's heart fell when he noted
"Got ba^ly away, I suppose. Never mind; you
most of them. He's moving up a bit. T think."
He handed his glasses to Nethie. "Oh. dear!
hack? Oh, no, that's another red cap I've been
?watching. I can see him now; he's passing
some of them, hut there are such a lot in
"My word," interrupted Mason. "He is get
Epsom's ours."*
Binghi was te front now, but as they swung
Into the straight the top weight, Toorak, gal
lojring brilliantly on the outside, gained the
manv throats, hut the top-weight was. not to
hare a run-away victory by any means. Another
Cooper Collison and his handsome wife were
weigh heavily on his mind. What he was con-
be happy indeed, for he would be a big winner,
taken back, after her wanderings in the under-
world, would be assured. It would be but a few
that had caused his downfall, was running to-
having been sold to find money for Hugh's up-
Still as she sat on the strand with her husband,
the big mile event, she could not avoid dwelling
"Here comes Cobber," cried Mackie, as the
the course. "Doesn't Chilla fancy himself to-
"I should think so," smiled Nethie. "It's
a bit different to Royglen, isn't it?"
treated to that day."
handicapped at 8st., and carrying the leading
o' Mine had hosts of backers, but the fact of
his being ridden by a country stable-boy, in-
liberal price. The public did not know Chilla
Farley, but Mackie had no misgivings on the
hold his own with the public idols of the pig-
barrier to-day. Twenty-five of them altogether,
and not an unruly one amongst them. "Go."
but the outsider had few backers, for hardened
racegoers knew that he would not see the
heels could be seen Kerbel, Muski, and Oudah,
an accuracy puzzling to a casual visitor at the
and Mackie Mason's heart fell when he noted
"Got badly away, I suppose. Never mind; you
most of them. He's moving up a bit, I think."
He handed his glasses to Nethie. "Oh, dear!
back? Oh, no, that's another red cap I've been
watching. I can see him now; he's passing
some of them, but there are such a lot in
"My word," interrupted Mason. "He is get-
Epsom's ours."
Binghi was in front now, but as they swung
into the straight the top weight, Toorak, gal-
loping brilliantly on the outside, gained the
many throats, but the top-weight was not to
have a run-away victory by any means. Another
Chapter XXXI.—Cobber o' Mine. (Article), The World's News (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 1955), Saturday 5 July 1919 page Article 2014-10-30 17:32 - Chapter XXXI.-Cobber o' Mine.
As. it was In the past, and will be in the £
future, Randwick was crowded to over- )
flowing on the opening day of the Spring meet- >
ing. <
Several things had happened in the few )
weeks that had elapsed since Mackie Mason had s
come into his own. The most interesting $
event was the wedding of the gallant D.C.M. >
and pretty Nethie Newlett, of Millungra, whose ^
romantic courtship had had a beginning In a (
chance letter written in far-off Egypt, in the >
early days of the war. Just back from their }
honeymoon, the couple were a centre of at- <
traction as they walked the lawn or conversed ,
with their many acquaintances. Mackie, for <
one,- did not mind the publicity in the least, >
He was the luckiest man in that huge crowd ?
to-day, and he lpew it. Consequently, he was j
not a bit surprised when his old friend Blue »
Blazes scored the ftrst prize of the meeting i
Chapter XXXI.--Cobber o' Mine.
AS it was in the past, and will be in the
future, Randwick was crowded to over-
flowing on the opening day of the Spring meet-
ing.
Several things had happened in the few
weeks that had elapsed since Mackie Mason had
come into his own. The most interesting
event was the wedding of the gallant D.C.M.
and pretty Nethie Newlett, of Millungra, whose
romantic courtship had had a beginning in a
chance letter written in far-off Egypt, in the
early days of the war. Just back from their
honeymoon, the couple were a centre of at-
traction as they walked the lawn or conversed
with their many acquaintances. Mackie, for
one, did not mind the publicity in the least.
He was the luckiest man in that huge crowd
to-day, and he knew it. Consequently, he was
not a bit surprised when his old friend Blue
Blazes scored the first prize of the meeting
A GAME OF CHANCE. Chapter XXX.—(Continued.) (Article), The World's News (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 1955), Saturday 5 July 1919 page Article 2014-10-30 17:28 the bank's warrant. Finding that Dick Greg- j
ory, the jockey's blackboy, was suspected of 5
the murder, he said nothing, but now, iealis- ?
ing^that an innocent man was in danger of j
feeing convicted, he could remain silent no <
longer. It was he that killed Lytell, and |
Hugh Youll was innocent. {
sworn to by Larnock, the jury could not doubt |
its truth. As this edition goes to press, .
Hugh Youll is a free man, after months of |
illness and suspense." '
of YouII's trial. Snuch an ending was a sur- .
prise indeed, and no one seemed inclined to |
comment on it. Hurley was the first to speak. !
"Dead lucky, wasn't he, to have*a bloke come j
from the clouds ^almost on th' death knock. 1
and get htm out of it, but the way things are J
with him, I don't think it matters much." j
"I agree with you there," said Collison; "poor !
?devil, he may have done wrong in some things,
"Weil, I've got no softness in my heart J
for him," declared Hed, "although I ain't ,
exactly overjoyed now he is down and out. '
I'd sooner have met him man to man, over on j
the other side, and fought it to a finish. Ah, >
well, It's over now, as far as I'm concerned, f
whether he lives or dies. Now, Mr. Brolin, if I
yoi; can spare the time, we'll go into the |
affairs of Hed Hurley, alias Mackie Mason, (
and let these gentlemen get away home." 1
When Collison arrived home, accompanied by )
Mason and Captain Lonyl, he ushered the young j
man into his cwn private den, and took th® )
captain along to present him to his wife j
and daughter. They were anxious to hear the v
news, and. after the squatter had tol<% them of >
Hugh Youll's acquittal, he acquainted Nethie <
of the fact that a friend was In the house )
end wished to see her. Nethie at once left the j
room, and her mother looked after her with a 1
sigh. i
"What's the use of Mason coming to see 1
Nethie now?" she said. "He's too late. He was 5
*the hero of her dreams, but Dick Dengate has )
1 roved a bolder lover." (
Mackie heard the soft footfall of the girl \
he loved, as she entered the room, and %ept his (
back towards the door, until she was close uj?on )
him; then he turned to her with smiling face >
and expectant eyes. >
For a moment she paused; then, with a cry )
ol "Dick," she nestled in the arms held out to j
receive her. "Why dM you treat me so?" she )
said, reproachfully. ^'Surely you could have )
trusted me with your secret." <
"They've told you, then?" said Mason. |
"No; I've been told nothing; I found out <
for myself, yesterday that you were Mackie j
Mason, and I hated you for making such a fool \
of me." j
"I never meant to do that," declared Mackie. 3
"When I have told you everything you will (
forgive me, I know. i am all the )
^.ppier for the way in which I have ^
won your love, for it proves that it is myself J
you love, and a name - does not matter after )
all. See, I have got your precious photo back, i
and all your letters. We can have a real long S
yarn about the oM days now, can'£ we, dear? \
And I needn't talk as if Mackie Mason was <
somebody else, as I have been doing for so )
long." ?
He led her out Into the garden, and in a <
cosy corner they had their talk, but somehow $
th% past was mentioned very little. They were >
too full of the happiness of the present, and j
to dwell on the past'. v )
the bank's warrant. Finding that Dick Greg-
ory, the jockey's blackboy, was suspected of
the murder, he said nothing, but now, realis-
ing that an innocent man was in danger of
being convicted, he could remain silent no
longer. It was he that killed Lytell, and
Hugh Youll was innocent.
sworn to by Larnock, the jury could not doubt
its truth. As this edition goes to press,
Hugh Youll is a free man, after months of
illness and suspense."
of Youll's trial. Such an ending was a sur-
prise indeed, and no one seemed inclined to
comment on it. Hurley was the first to speak.
"Dead lucky, wasn't he, to have a bloke come
from the clouds almost on th' death knock,
and get him out of it, but the way things are
with him, I don't think it matters much."
"I agree with you there," said Collison; "poor
devil, he may have done wrong in some things,
"Well, I've got no softness in my heart
for him," declared Hed, "although I ain't
exactly overjoyed now he is down and out.
I'd sooner have met him man to man, over on
the other side, and fought it to a finish. Ah,
well, it's over now, as far as I'm concerned,
whether he lives or dies. Now, Mr. Brolin, if
you can spare the time, we'll go into the
affairs of Hed Hurley, alias Mackie Mason,
and let these gentlemen get away home."
When Collison arrived home, accompanied by
Mason and Captain Lonyl, he ushered the young
man into his own private den, and took the
captain along to present him to his wife
and daughter. They were anxious to hear the
news, and, after the squatter had told them of
Hugh Youll's acquittal, he acquainted Nethie
of the fact that a friend was in the house
and wished to see her. Nethie at once left the
room, and her mother looked after her with a
sigh.
"What's the use of Mason coming to see
Nethie now?" she said. "He's too late. He was
the hero of her dreams, but Dick Dengate has
proved a bolder lover."
Mackie heard the soft footfall of the girl
he loved, as she entered the room, and kept his
back towards the door, until she was close upon )
him; then he turned to her with smiling face
and expectant eyes.
For a moment she paused; then, with a cry
of "Dick," she nestled in the arms held out to
receive her. "Why did you treat me so?" she
said, reproachfully. "Surely you could have
trusted me with your secret."
"They've told you, then?" said Mason.
"No; I've been told nothing; I found out
for myself, yesterday that you were Mackie
Mason, and I hated you for making such a fool
of me."
"I never meant to do that," declared Mackie.
"When I have told you everything you will
forgive me, I know. I am all the
happier for the way in which I have
won your love, for it proves that it is myself
you love, and a name does not matter after
all. See, I have got your precious photo back,
and all your letters. We can have a real long
yarn about the old days now, can't we, dear?
And I needn't talk as if Mackie Mason was
somebody else, as I have been doing for so
long."
He led her out into the garden, and in a
cosy corner they had their talk, but somehow
the past was mentioned very little. They were
too full of the happiness of the present, and
to dwell on the past.
A GAME OF CHANCE. Chapter XXX.—(Continued.) (Article), The World's News (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 1955), Saturday 5 July 1919 page Article 2014-10-30 17:20 HE handed a eopy of ail evening paper >
his shoulder, he read:
being called, the man who entered the wit
Was Hedley Hurley, and that he had been im
.wife, fainted when she saw him in the box,
bordering dk hysteria, had declared, in spite
he entered the room, when word was con
Riven to a man serving a sentence for em
bezzlement tc gi^e evidence in the case.
amount of money belonging to the Queens
teller. He had been in the habit of back
ing horses heavily and losing. The de
7 good win. He backed the horse heavily
with the bank's money-and lost- Convinced
the public, be went to the jockey's rooms.
the bank, and he was desperate. He m£ant
enable him to leavo Sydney and escape the
consequences of his folly. Lytell, be de
"Waihine, but that he would give him nothing.
Jockey down. Taking a key from bis victim's
lie heard someone approaching; hurriedly
. knob. Creeping to an open window, he clam
presently the light went Up again. He
. looked and saw Hugh Youll standing staring
the ledge, he entered the window of an ad
Joining empty apartment, and from there
he reached the stairs and the street unob
detectives waiting, and be was arrested o»
Chapter XXX.-(Continued.)
finding the item of information re
HE handed a copy of an evening paper
his shoulder, he read:--
being called, the man who entered the wit-
was Hedley Hurley, and that he had been im-
wife, fainted when she saw him in the box,
bordering on hysteria, had declared, in spite
he entered the room, when word was con-
given to a man serving a sentence for em-
bezzlement to give evidence in the case.
amount of money belonging to the Queens-
teller. He had been in the habit of back-
ing horses heavily and losing. The de-
good win. He backed the horse heavily
with the bank's money--and lost. Convinced
the public, he went to the jockey's rooms.
the bank, and he was desperate. He meant
enable him to leave Sydney and escape the
consequences of his folly. Lytell, he de-
Waihine, but that he would give him nothing.
jockey down. Taking a key from his victim's
he heard someone approaching; hurriedly
knob. Creeping to an open window, he clam-
presently the light went up again. He
looked and saw Hugh Youll standing staring
the ledge, he entered the window of an ad-
joining empty apartment, and from there
he reached the stairs and the street unob-
detectives waiting, and he was arrested on
Chapter XXX.--(Continued.)
finding the item of information re-
Chapter XXX.—The Game Ends. (Article), The World's News (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 1955), Saturday 28 June 1919 page Article 2014-10-30 17:15 devil put you in my way at last. I took on 'the
me, and what pleased me most was that It
when I knew he was alive, but when I mad®
until I swung the knock out on to you. To
I'm not done with you yet. I "
snarl of a tortured animal than a sound pro
the two men were in bolts, Youll, in a frenzy,
striving to claw and bite the other, who, how
What would happen next.
"I think we owe Captain I<onyl an apology,"
In, If he will be good enough to dine with us,
I will try to explain everything,"
declared Collison."
Strangely quiet."
clear of this, stunt, if she gets right, and Cobber
asked Mackie. "I came straight in from Rand
wick, without knowing a thing that had hap
"I'm quite at a lose also," said Collison.
there was a "
devil put you in my way at last. I took on the
me, and what pleased me most was that it
when I knew he was alive, but when I made
until I swung the knock out on to you. To-
I'm not done with you yet. I----"
snarl of a tortured animal than a sound pro-
the two men were in holts, Youll, in a frenzy,
striving to claw and bite the other, who, how-
what would happen next.
"I think we owe Captain Lonyl an apology,"
in. If he will be good enough to dine with us,
I will try to explain everything."
declared Collison.
strangely quiet."
clear of this stunt, if she gets right, and Cobber
asked Mackie. "I came straight in from Rand-
wick, without knowing a thing that had hap-
"I'm quite at a loss also," said Collison.
there was a----"
Chapter XXX.—The Game Ends. (Article), The World's News (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 1955), Saturday 28 June 1919 page Article 2014-10-30 17:10 is a witness on a case at the Criminal Court. j
But if he is likely to be detained *0: will sure-'. :
Ijr be informed. The manager of hi# station is
feeing tried for murder "
"1 read something of the case," remarked
Lonyl. "Not a nice thing to he mixed up with.
always was, 1 hope; it would be a pity if tjfee
war had altered his sunny disposition." v
"Yon will no'doubt find him somewhat
changed." ventured Collison. "He's older, of
course, and-but no doubt he is here now to
answer for himsalf. I hear the lift coming
From outside came the sound of the lift being,
stopped; then iu a moment a hand was on the
men stood in the room, and neither was Mac
kie Mason. Brolin was one, the other a sal
sight of him. "God!" he gasped. "It's Youli.
You got out of It?"
into a chair, and the lawyer hastened to !
revive him with a glass of brandy. "Yes, things ?
went right lor him at last," said Brolin. "He's j
been punished cruelly, but he'll be amply com
pensated after all- Surprising things have hap- i
pened, Collison. You were right about Mason. ;
He was a fraud." \
"He wasn't Mackie Mason?" cried Collison ;
incredulously. j
"It was a clever deception," continued the <
sailing under false colors " .
"And, Mackie . Mason being dead, I will own
Murrubee after alt."
come out on top in spite of everything, Collison. i
Nethie will " He clutched at his throat, for !
the raw spirit was irritating, and a fit of cougti- <
ing shook him badly. <
A firm knock at the door, towards which \
Brolin stepped briskly, intending to prevent \
any addition to those already in his room, but )
lie was too late. The door flew open and a J
young man in the uniform of the A.I.P., smiling
expectantly, stood revealed. One glance at tne
"Youll!" he gasped. "Is the trial over?**
"Mackie Mason? What the devil are you talk
but I know that this ife young Mason."
* "But why all the deception?" cried Collison.,
"Why did you not tell us long ago that "
"It's too long a story to tell just now," de
clared Mackie. "I went, to Millungra to expose
were, for certain reasons, and I-in a weak mo
ment, I suppose-did so, but now I mean to
assume my rightful name and "
otherwise. I'll fight you in every
"Cqt it out, Youll; you're blown out for k66pa. .
enemy faced- him. ' .
"You got th' shock of y' life" to-day,' wfcen
is a witness on a case at the Criminal Court.
But if he is likely to be detained we will sure-:
ly be informed. The manager of his station is
being tried for murder."
"I read something of the case," remarked
Lonyl. "Not a nice thing to be mixed up with.
always was, I hope; it would be a pity if the
war had altered his sunny disposition."
"You will no doubt find him somewhat
changed," ventured Collison. "He's older, of
course, and--but no doubt he is here now to
answer for himself. I hear the lift coming up."
From outside came the sound of the lift being
stopped; then in a moment a hand was on the
men stood in the room, and neither was Mac-
kie Mason. Brolin was one, the other a sal-
sight of him. "God!" he gasped. "It's Youll.
You got out of it?"
into a chair, and the lawyer hastened to
revive him with a glass of brandy. "Yes, things
went right for him at last," said Brolin. "He's
been punished cruelly, but he'll be amply com-
pensated after all. Surprising things have hap-
pened, Collison. You were right about Mason.
He was a fraud."
"He wasn't Mackie Mason?" cried Collison
incredulously.
"It was a clever deception," continued the
sailing under false colors----"
"And, Mackie Mason being dead, I will own
Murrubee after all."
come out on top in spite of everything, Collison.
Nethie will----" He clutched at his throat, for
the raw spirit was irritating, and a fit of cough-
ing shook him badly.
A firm knock at the door, towards which
Brolin stepped briskly, intending to prevent
any addition to those already in his room, but
he was too late. The door flew open and a
young man in the uniform of the A.I.F., smiling
expectantly, stood revealed. One glance at the
"Youll!" he gasped. "Is the trial over?"
"Mackie Mason? What the devil are you talk-
but I know that this is young Mason."
"But why all the deception?" cried Collison.
"Why did you not tell us long ago that----"
"It's too long a story to tell just now," de-
clared Mackie. "I went to Millungra to expose
were, for certain reasons, and I--in a weak mo-
ment, I suppose--did so, but now I mean to
assume my rightful name and----"
otherwise. I'll fight you in every----"
"Cut it out, Youll; you're blown out for keeps.
enemy faced him.
"You got th' shock of y' life to-day, when
Chapter XXX.—The Game Ends. (Article), The World's News (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 1955), Saturday 28 June 1919 page Article 2014-10-30 17:02 Chapter XXX.-The Game Ends.
A LONE) in Donald Erolin's office, Cooper Col- >
iug of Captain Lonyl, who was to meet Mackie <
Mason in his presence. >
the expected interview. It wanted a quarter to ]
the master of the Arihi entered and looked in
here. A boy back from the Var." j
tain. My name is Collison, and I am respon- :
lison waited for one o'clock and the com- \
The lawyer and his clerk were engaged at )
the court, and Collison had been given the \
use of the private office for the purpose of >
the hour when a knock sounded on the door, j
. "Captain Lonyl, I believe," said the squatter,
"Yes, I know," said Collison. "Sit down, Cap- <
'piione this morning. Mr. Mason unfortunately
Chapter XXX.--The Game Ends.
ALONE in Donald Brolin's office, Cooper Col-
iug of Captain Lonyl, who was to meet Mackie
Mason in his presence.
the expected interview. It wanted a quarter to
the master of the Arihi entered and looked in-
here. A boy back from the war."
tain. My name is Collison, and I am respon-
lison waited for one o'clock and the com-
The lawyer and his clerk were engaged at
the court, and Collison had been given the
use of the private office for the purpose of
the hour when a knock sounded on the door,
"Captain Lonyl, I believe," said the squatter,
"Yes, I know," said Collison. "Sit down, Cap-
'phone this morning. Mr. Mason unfortunately
A GAME OF CHANCE. Chapter XXIX.—(Continued.) (Article), The World's News (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 1955), Saturday 28 June 1919 page Article 2014-10-30 17:01 wer.e moved to words and action by the up
"What do you. mean?" demanded the Pro
secutor of Hurley. "Are you not Mackie Ma
"I was called that uo till to-day. but T'm
under oath now. My name Is Hedley Hurley.
with this case. If it's ail the same to every
body, I'll get on with the evidence." ,
There was an argument then between the ]
opposing barristers and the judge, but finally >
, Hed was allowed to proceed, and in his own /
way. >
"The dead man's sister. was my wife. Youll )
enticed her away from me, and left her to die <
when he tired of,her. I swore to get him, {
followed him to the war. but he never got )
to the front. Brickey Lytell also sworo to <
get the man who wronged his sister, but she )
.would never tell the man's name. I came back J
under the name of Mackie Mason, and met Youll {
as my manager. He did not know me, of )
course. 4 found Lytell was riding for him, j
little dreaming that he was the man who had >
Tuined his sister. I told Lytell. He was mad >
when he heard the truth, and to ruin Youll, (
who had backed Muski for the Doncaster and I
Cup, he took hold of the horse. Youll woke j
up to it after the Cup, and said publicly that >
he 'ought to blow Lytell's brains out.' I left )
"That's so," answered Hed. "On the Satur
day. Doncaster day, I backed Waihine-the ,
winner-to win five thousand pounds for Lytell \
I "What did you do with Lytell's share of the
"I took them to him,- and he told nw to put
them in Jjis safe, as he did not wait to pay
teller to back Muski, he salt! the fellow would
, for embezzlement soon after Easter?"
Hed shookJpiis head. "I don't know he
said, "but I slrouldn't wonder. There were some
I made a note of the numbers on a-piece of
paper. I--" He paused and looked at Youll,
but he "Would not listen. Presently his power
of speech returned. "I will speak," he al
that night- I wanted money. He robbed me,
and I was not able to settle. I found him ly
money, and I took it, and that's the Clod's
while Hed. waiting to be questioned further,
the judge; h© was whispering with his asso
ciate, and counsel paused wonderingly. Pre
sently the judge spoke. "Something has hap
were moved to words and action by the un-
"What do you mean?" demanded the Pro-
secutor of Hurley. "Are you not Mackie Ma-
"I was called that up till to-day, but I'm
under oath now. My name is Hedley Hurley.
with this case. If it's all the same to every-
body, I'll get on with the evidence."
There was an argument then between the
opposing barristers and the judge, but finally
Hed was allowed to proceed, and in his own
way.
"The dead man's sister, was my wife. Youll
enticed her away from me, and left her to die
when he tired of her. I swore to get him,
followed him to the war, but he never got
to the front. Brickey Lytell also swore to
get the man who wronged his sister, but she
would never tell the man's name. I came back
under the name of Mackie Mason, and met Youll
as my manager. He did not know me, of
course. I found Lytell was riding for him,
little dreaming that he was the man who had
ruined his sister. I told Lytell. He was mad
when he heard the truth, and to ruin Youll,
who had backed Muski for the Doncaster and
Cup, he took hold of the horse. Youll woke
up to it after the Cup, and said publicly that
he 'ought to blow Lytell's brains out.' I left
"That's so," answered Hed. "On the Satur-
day, Doncaster day, I backed Waihine--the
winner--to win five thousand pounds for Lytell
"What did you do with Lytell's share of the
"I took them to him, and he told me to put
them in his safe, as he did not wait to pay
teller to back Muski, he said the fellow would
for embezzlement soon after Easter?"
Hed shook his head. "I don't know," he
said, "but I shouldn't wonder. There were some
I made a note of the numbers on a piece of
paper. I----" He paused and looked at Youll,
but he would not listen. Presently his power
of speech returned. "I will speak," he al-
that night. I wanted money. He robbed me,
and I was not able to settle. I found him ly-
money, and I took it, and that's the God's
while Hed, waiting to be questioned further,
the judge; he was whispering with his asso-
ciate, and counsel paused wonderingly. Pre-
sently the judge spoke. "Something has hap-

Counts updated hourly

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

  1. BARRY, John Arthur
    List
    Public

    64 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2011-08-02
    User data
  2. KIPLING, Rudyard
    List
    Public

    10 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2011-01-08
    User data
  3. OXENHAM, John
    List
    Public

    1 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2011-01-09
    User data
  4. The Will Forgeries
    List
    Public

    16 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2010-08-14
    User data

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.