Information about Trove user: maurielyn

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

RankCorrectorLines corrected
1 JohnWarren 2,689,166
2 annmanley 1,933,739
3 NeilHamilton 1,676,734
4 John.F.Hall 1,308,153
5 maurielyn 1,271,918
6 noelwoodhouse 1,240,119
7 mrbh 1,129,587

1,271,918 lines corrected.

Corrections by month

July 2014 53,868
June 2014 10,647
May 2014 15,795
April 2014 16,770
March 2014 3
February 2014 92
January 2014 36
December 2013 4,433
November 2013 6,312
October 2013 40,154
September 2013 26,891
August 2013 19,229
July 2013 30,238
June 2013 35,889
May 2013 34,599
April 2013 5,953
March 2013 4,178
February 2013 60
December 2012 122
November 2012 6,412
October 2012 9,007
September 2012 2,074
August 2012 13,001
July 2012 8,995
June 2012 41,702
May 2012 10,728
April 2012 4,423
March 2012 12,588
February 2012 9,171
January 2012 2,655
December 2011 22,428
November 2011 29,308
October 2011 28,340
September 2011 20,977
August 2011 22,871
July 2011 20,215
June 2011 11,018
May 2011 7,946
April 2011 45,102
March 2011 14,791
February 2011 30,582
January 2011 36,679
December 2010 14,510
November 2010 15,639
October 2010 25,076
September 2010 35,694
August 2010 38,196
July 2010 31,494
June 2010 42,660
May 2010 42,984
April 2010 33,196
March 2010 26,158
February 2010 21,768
January 2010 23,693
December 2009 14,169
November 2009 13,910
October 2009 8,721
September 2009 5,101
August 2009 5,707
July 2009 6,083
June 2009 5,576
May 2009 30,715
April 2009 8,466
March 2009 21,801
February 2009 7,575
January 2009 5,156
December 2008 7,165
November 2008 6,402
October 2008 24,538
September 2008 28,111
August 2008 5,372

Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
SYDNEY CO[?] A Romance of the First Fleet. Chapter XI.—(Continued). (Article), The World's News (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 1955), Saturday 17 July 1920 page Article 2014-07-31 21:22 line the orderly he says 'twas his Kxc'leucy's )
wishes ye wus to go to him so soon- as ye >
wass come back. I haf told him ye was* a- <
dining with Dr. Bowes, sir. Yes. indeed." \
"All right-thank yon, Morgan. I'll not want )
you again to-night-yon may go where yon )
please. Keep away from the women's lines, X
though. You know the order." j
"Oh, indeed, yes. sir. I'd not dream of any !
such a thing, y'r honor," responded the vir
tMos Mr. Morgan, saluting, and disappearing
Into the darkness.
with him at such a time. Patrick turned his
steps towards the canvas house by the flag
staff. which was the temporary vice-regal
frame, that had been brought out from Eng
and erected for the Governor's accommoda
for it in the all-pervading scrub, it stood
close by the waterside, just about where Lof
tus Street runs into the Circular Quay, be
the other side of the roadway-but it wis
then at some considerable distance from tbc )
head of the Cove, which narrowed into a peak \
and the mouth of the Tank Stream, a little J
pn the harbor side of where Pitt and Bridge >
Streets now intersect. |
Patrick found his Excellency seated at a j
s>mall camp-table, busily engaged over the (
preparation of his first despatch to Lord Syd- /
uey-that one which ie dated May 15, 1788. |
"Lieutenant Cartwright. y'r Ex'lency." an- <
nounced the Marine, holding aside the flimsy J
door as Patrick passed into the larger of the )
two rooms that composed the headquarters of |
government in New South Wales. (
Phillip looked up. and nodded without smil- )
Ins. bo that Patrick knew there was some- \
thing amiss. ;
Indicating a camp-stool with his pen, the )
Governor requested the young officer to be ^
seated, looking at him curiously as be saluted, (
removed his shako, and sat down. j'
For a few moments there was an uncomfort- >
able pause, during which the head of the State -
drummed gently on the table with his finger?, t
and continued to scan the face of his subor
of annoyance and sorrow. Patrick felt un- t
comfortable, but could not rail to mind any
reason for his having incurred the vice-regal j
displeasure. There tod been one or two late >
nights in the mess-but nothing more serious <!
than a little singing and sky-larking, when (
the Marine officers bad entertained the officers >
of the Sirius and the Supply. Nothing to be /
apprehensive about. (
Past middle age, Arthur Phillip was still an '
active, athletic man. capable of great physical ;
exertion and sustained endurance. Thought- ^
ful eyes, a bold, aggressive noce. a square I
jaw and determined chin, and a kindly, sensi- j
rive mouth, gave his face that distinction >
which is common to the countenances of men }
who can get things done and are not dls- <
couraged by any adverse circumstance. He )
wore his hair brushed back from a high, broad )
forehead, and plaited into a short queue be- ^
striking features of his physiognomy-hut )
there could be sternness and severity also. It .
was with something of the latter attributes ((
that he regarded Patrick this evening, as he (
sat before him in the light of the dim ship's (
lantern swinging from the ridge-pole, whose J
faint illumination was eked out by a couple )
of candles on the writing-table. /
"Mr. Cartwright." at length began the Gov- ]
ernor. "I have been requesting your attendance }
here all the afternoon. Where have you )
been?" \
"Aboard the lady Penrhyn, your Excel- (
lency-dining with Doctor Bowes." S
"Ah-a good man, Bowes. I trust be Is <
well?" \
Patrick wished that the Governor would re
"I have sent for you. Mr. Cartwright* to have
I could wish there were no necessity of al
luding. You know, I was well
with your late uncle. Colonel Cartwright-Cor
whom 1 had a very high regard indeed. It
friend who is no
time the orderly he says 'twas his Exc'lency's
wishes ye wass to go to him so soon as ye
wass come back. I haf told him ye wass a--
dining with Dr. Bowes, sir. Yes, indeed."
"All right--thank you, Morgan. I'll not want
you again to-night--you may go where you
please. Keep away from the women's lines,
though. You know the order."
"Oh, indeed, yes, sir. I'd not dream of any
such a thing, y'r honor," responded the vir-
tuous Mr. Morgan, saluting, and disappearing
into the darkness.
with him at such a time, Patrick turned his
steps towards the canvas house by the flag-
staff, which was the temporary vice-regal
frame, that had been brought out from Eng-
and erected for the Governor's accommoda-
for it in the all-pervading scrub. It stood
close by the waterside, just about where Lof-
tus Street runs into the Circular Quay, be-
the other side of the roadway--but it was
then at some considerable distance from the
head of the Cove, which narrowed into a peak
and the mouth of the Tank Stream, a little
on the harbor side of where Pitt and Bridge
Streets now intersect.
Patrick found his Excellency seated at a
small camp-table, busily engaged over the
preparation of his first despatch to Lord Syd-
ney--that one which is dated May 15, 1788.
"Lieutenant Cartwright, y'r Ex'lency," an-
nounced the Marine, holding aside the flimsy
door as Patrick passed into the larger of the
two rooms that composed the headquarters of
government in New South Wales.
Phillip looked up, and nodded without smil-
ing, so that Patrick knew there was some-
thing amiss.
Indicating a camp-stool with his pen, the
Governor requested the young officer to be
seated, looking at him curiously as be saluted,
removed his shako, and sat down.
For a few moments there was an uncomfort-
able pause, during which the head of the State
drummed gently on the table with his fingers,
and continued to scan the face of his subor-
of annoyance and sorrow. Patrick felt un-
comfortable, but could not call to mind any
reason for his having incurred the vice-regal
displeasure. There had been one or two late
nights in the mess--but nothing more serious
than a little singing and sky-larking, when
the Marine officers had entertained the officers
of the Sirius and the Supply. Nothing to be
apprehensive about.
Past middle age, Arthur Phillip was still an
active, athletic man, capable of great physical
exertion and sustained endurance. Thought-
ful eyes, a bold, aggressive nose, a square
jaw and determined chin, and a kindly, sensi-
tive mouth, gave his face that distinction
which is common to the countenances of men
who can get things done and are not dis-
couraged by any adverse circumstance. He
wore his hair brushed back from a high, broad
forehead, and plaited into a short queue be-
striking features of his physiognomy--but
there could be sternness and severity also. It
was with something of the latter attributes
that he regarded Patrick this evening, as he
sat before him in the light of the dim ship's
lantern swinging from the ridge-pole, whose
faint illumination was eked out by a couple
of candles on the writing-table.
"Mr. Cartwright." at length began the Gov-
ernor. "I have been requesting your attendance
here all the afternoon. Where have you
been?"
"Aboard the lady Penrhyn, your Excel-
lency--dining with Doctor Bowes."
"Ah--a good man, Bowes. I trust be is
well?"
Patrick wished that the Governor would re-
"I have sent for you. Mr. Cartwright, to have
I could wish there were no necessity of al-
luding. You know, I was well acquainted
with your late uncle, Colonel Cartwright--for
whom I had a very high regard indeed. It
friend who is no more."
SYDNEY CO[?] A Romance of the First Fleet. Chapter XI.—(Continued). (Article), The World's News (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 1955), Saturday 17 July 1920 page Article 2014-07-31 21:13 Such were the sorroundiaga of the young
officer as he sauntered slowly from the land
kng it would be before the settlement became
It waa growing dude as he beat his steps
towards the encampment of the Marinee-fer
they were still under canvas, and were a coed
prisoners in their flimsy huts constructed oC
green timber, daubed with clay, and the tele <1
He had only waited a few paces when he
heard himself balled out of the uncertain light,
"Isa it your own self; Mr. Oartwrtghtr*
He recognised the voice and accent aa be
longing to his Hartne servant, n Welshman
named Owea Morgan.
"Tea, Morgan," he aalled hack. "Here I
am-<what*s the matterf
The nmn hastened op to him.
'Tr hneMh' Governor htmselTa been a
sendlag for ye all the afternoon. Indeed, yea.
He waaa wishing for to see na, sli^-ferry
particular, I think it isa* y'r honor. The kut
Such were the surroundings of the young
officer as he sauntered slowly from the land-
long it would be before the settlement became
It was growing dusk as he bent his steps
towards the encampment of the Marines--for
they were still under canvas, and were a good
prisoners in their flimsy huts constructed of
green timber, daubed with clay, and thatched
He had only walked a few paces when he
heard himself hailed out of the uncertain light,
"Ise it your own self, Mr. Cartwright?"
He recognised the voice and accent as be-
longing to his Marine servant, a Welshman
named Owen Morgan.
"Yes, Morgan," he called back. "Here I
am--what's the matter?"
The man hastened up to him.
"Y'r honor--th' Governor himself's been a--
sending for ye all the afternoon. Indeed, yes.
He wass wishing for to see you, sir--ferry
particular, I think it iss, y'r honor. The last
SYDNEY CO[?] A Romance of the First Fleet. Chapter XI.—(Continued). (Article), The World's News (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 1955), Saturday 17 July 1920 page Article 2014-07-31 21:06 (Jo to the wildest part of the great harbor to
some inlet of the many ecores that are available
not yet bean interfered with, and remain in
bo a little hay of about the size of the area
sctnery that they landed amidst from the First
Fleet, in January, 1748. Rocky shores, and
bearh-half mud and half sand at low water
forest over all. Tilers are many such places
still to be found in the mouth of the Hawkes
the most faithful representation of what Syd
book-"The Story of George Street," by C. H.
Bertie-in which there is an excellent and
Captain Hunter's sketch. Mr. Bertie is pos
sibly the best living authority on Early Syd
ney, and one' is greatly indebted to him for
the following passage in his book:
what earns to be known as Dawes Battery
hill, at first with an abrupt rise from tfc»
water, then changing to a gentler slops as
the northward-Broken Bay-and select
"OB his right hand, as he entered the Cove,
as it ru to the south. In the hollow between
these hills ran a little purling brook-'a ium
of fresh water wfeich stole silently along
which had then for the first tune mm, tho
of the laborer's axe and the downfall ct its
uetent Inhabitants; a stillness and tranquillity
which from that day were to five place to tho
voice of labor, the confusion of camps ut
towns, and the busy hum of its new posses
sions.' Thus wrote a man-David Cotlius
who landed from the First Fleet and saw U
hills were thickly wooded, la the woods must
hare grown some giant trees, for in the "Syd
ney Gasette' of August 7, 1803, it is announced
in their respective districts. They hare re
moved from their places of nativity IS stamps
circumference measured nine yards, and em
ployed 1$ men six days to loosen and bury It
to the spot on which it grew.* The tree re
quired 90 men to roll tt into the 'gulph.' This
giant stood In the George Street of to-day."
GO to the wildest part of the great harbor to
some inlet of the many scores that are available
not yet been interfered with, and remain in
be a little bay of about the size of the area
scenery that they landed amidst from the First
Fleet, in January, 1788. Rocky shores, and
beach--half mud and half sand at low water
forest over all. There are many such places
still to be found in the mouth of the Hawkes-
the most faithful representation of what Syd-
book--"The Story of George Street," by C. H.
Bertie--in which there is an excellent and
Captain Hunter's sketch. Mr. Bertie is pos-
sibly the best living authority on Early Syd-
ney, and one is greatly indebted to him for
the following passage in his book:--
what came to be known as Dawes Battery
hill, at first with an abrupt rise from the
water, then changing to a gentler slope as
the northward--Broken Bay--and select
"On his right hand, as he entered the Cove,
as it ran to the south. In the hollow between
these hills ran a little purling brook--'a run
of fresh water which stole silently along
which had then for the first time since the
of the laborer's axe and the downfall of its
ancient inhabitants; a stillness and tranquillity
which from that day were to give place to the
voice of labor, the confusion of camps and
towns, and the busy hum of its new posses-
sions.' Thus wrote a man--David Collins---
who landed from the First Fleet and saw in
hills were thickly wooded. In the woods must
have grown some giant trees, for in the 'Syd-
ney Gazette' of August 7, 1803, it is announced
in their respective districts. They have re-
moved from their places of nativity 33 stumps
circumference measured nine yards, and em-
ployed 16 men six days to loosen and bury it
to the spot on which it grew.' The tree re-
quired 90 men to roll it into the 'gulph.' This
giant stood in the George Street of to-day."
ERTHA SHELLEY. The Lily of the Hunter Valley! Australian Story of Forty Years Ago.] CHAPTER XXX.—(Continued). (Article), The Newcastle Chronicle (NSW : 1866 - 1876), Saturday 27 November 1875 page Article 2014-07-31 20:57 4 You be blowed !' exclaimed the ex sailor,
bin valour getting the better of his discretion,
'You be blowed! Talk about tinning tail !
tie a tifty-six pounder to yer beeU and heave
you overboard. Look here, Cjptxia, if it's
wouldn't turn tail for any man afloat !'
' Constables or runaways, they're asleep ;
w- we'll take them as they are,' replied Darby,
resolutely. ' Slip off your boots, and spread
out, bo as we can come at 'em from every side.
Take out yout kaivea ; I don't want pistols
to be used if we can avoid 'em ; and if we
just stick a few inch«s of cold steel between
their rib.''. But we'll take ''om alive if wo
danger, the tired fugitives slept ou, while the
and hate, and their ruthless lucids, so deoply
manacled securely with thongs of greeuhide.
soon as they wete firmly secured, Darby
Grogson woke his prisoners up by roughly
shaking them. ' Halloa, what dxt matter V
asked Jerry, attempting to rub bis eyes, and
plank in a crack!' said the ex -sailor, with a
Jarry shut up immediately, ai advised,; but
their fullest extent and ataring. at the speaker.
Percy'* first thought on finding. himtteli.. a
prisoner was, that he. had -.been' pursued by
the.cooBtableH and recapturedrupd recollecting
he wu filled with-tenSorse a£ having permitted
.t?ie noblb' fellowr to encounter so great a
lo^garl and without looking up he sullenly
I 'V ur^ )-iaiie-t *° ''? f*te*
I ' '*;''-«ang me, if I haven't leen this -sove
Ibtforej' awpiined the captain of tba gang,
' You needn't, be troubled abont that
Darby ! You'U be hanged right enough yet,
see if you don't,' returned Bow, gazing un
4 Bow ! Hem ! Well, I'm glad to meet au
old pal, anyhow !' exclaimed Darby, giving
eniphusix.
Bow did not answer for a few minute. Ha
sure to displease Darby, but feeling how com
words of defiance that rose tojbi* li|)s. ' Yes,
Darby, it's me,' he said at last. ' We havWt
met befoie, ma and you, for rather a long
Bow sbuddeied at the recollection of those
terrible 'old times' of crime and dissipation,
but he prudently concealed his abhorrence'
of the past associations, nnd tried to con
had fallen, as the only prospact of saving the
lives of himself and companion;).
' Yes, Bow, we meets us old friends «» yon
say — at least we do if you aren't above joining
na ; but this nigger here we'll hang up as a
warning to other blacknkins not to go
in for tracking. And this other, cove — .'
He paused, and looked at, Percy at
tentively for a second or so. * Yes !' he con
tinued, 'It's bira ! It'.i the ahap that fired a
of his hide now, or my n*m« isn't Darby
Gregeon; There's plenty of dry wood here
'You be blowed!' exclaimed the ex sailor,
his valour getting the better of his discretion,
'You be blowed! Talk about turning tail!
tie a fifty-six pounder to yer heels and heave
you overboard. Look here, Captain, if it's
wouldn't turn tail for any man afloat!'
'Constables or runaways, they're asleep;
so we'll take them as they are,' replied Darby,
resolutely. 'Slip off your boots, and spread
out, so as we can come at 'em from every side.
Take out your knives; I don't want pistols
to be used if we can avoid 'em; and if we
just stick a few inches of cold steel between
their ribs. But we'll take 'em alive if we
danger, the tired fugitives slept on, while the
and hate, and their ruthless hands, so deeply
manacled securely with thongs of greenhide.
soon as they were firmly secured, Darby
Gregson woke his prisoners up by roughly
shaking them. 'Halloa, what dat matter?'
asked Jerry, attempting to rub his eyes, and
plank in a crack!' said the ex-sailor, with a
Jerry shut up immediately, as advised; but
their fullest extent and staring at the speaker.
Percy's first thought on finding himself a
prisoner was, that he had been pursued by
the constables and recaptured and recollecting
he was filled with remorse at having permitted
the noble fellow to encounter so great a
danger; and without looking up he sullenly
resigned himself to his fate.
'Well, hang me if I haven't seen this cove
before!' exclaimed the captain of the gang, recognizing Bow, as their eyes met.
'You needn't be troubled about that
Darby! You'll be hanged right enough yet,
see if you don't,' returned Bow, gazing un-
'Bow! Hem! Well, I'm glad to meet an
old pal, anyhow!' exclaimed Darby, giving
emphasis.
Bow did not answer for a few minutes. He
sure to displease Darby, but feeling how com-
words of defiance that rose to his lips. 'Yes,
Darby, it's me,' he said at last. 'We haven't
met before, me and you, for rather a long
Bow shuddered at the recollection of those
terrible "old times" of crime and dissipation,
but he prudently concealed his abhorrence
of the past associations, and tried to con-
had fallen, as the only prospect of saving the
lives of himself and companions.
'Yes, Bow, we meets as old friends, as you
say—at least we do if you aren't above joining
us; but this nigger here we'll hang up as a
warning to other blackskins not to go
in for tracking. And this other, cove—.'
He paused, and looked at Percy at-
tentively for a second or so. 'Yes!' he con-
tinued, 'It's him! It's the chap that fired a
of his hide now, or my name isn't Darby
Gregson. There's plenty of dry wood here
SYDNEY CO[?] A Romance of the First Fleet. Chapter XI.—(Continued). (Article), The World's News (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 1955), Saturday 17 July 1920 page Article 2014-07-31 20:54 Chapter XI.-(Continued).
BY J.
BOTT.
Chapter XI.--(Continued).
SYDNEY COVE,
BY J.H.M. ABBOTT.
Chapter XI.—The Village of Sydney. (Article), The World's News (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 1955), Saturday 10 July 1920 page Article 2014-07-31 20:53 rHnrfl to tain stock of the situation u It <
embodied itself in tl>« curious little Tilbta
la which 1M found himself. <
If yon enter Sydney Core to-day. aid took I
VP the valley of the <rid Tank Stream-which, (
i -say. from the upper deck of a Manly steamer,-;
you will not, by any possibility, be able to <
form a picture, from what you see before you, <
of Sydney as it looked one hundred and thirty- |
two years ago. The busy Quay, with its roar
pedestrians hurrying like black ants acre- and
up the gentle slope to the heart of the great j
city, the high, roofs rearing themselves in }
serrated outline against the blue of the sky- <
there can bo no suggestion whatever in its
surrounded Patrick Cortwright on that even- J
tag in Hay so long ago. Everything is <
changed beyond all recognition. Nothing rep <
Bains as it looked from the deck of the Strfns, j
as she lay at anchor in the spot where your ,
suburban passenger steamer stops her engines I
opposite to the wharf of the P. and O. Com- j
fmBj, as she slows down to enter her berth.
On an August day in that first year of 8yd- j
Bey's existence, from a ship's deck in the <
aaouth of the Qove, Captain John Hunter, of j
M M s. Sirius, and afterwards to succeed Phillip j
In the Governorship of the colony, made a <
drawing of the scene that lay before him as <
he looked towards the south. It is a quaintly <
inartistic effort-something of the 'sort that a j
child of seven or eight might have done-hut it <
has an historic value to-day that it would bo :
difficult to over-estimate. Even if some of the <
objects in the picture almost require such j
labels as "This is a tree," or "This is a house," ,
a component part of civilisation. Without ft :
we could gather to-day hardly the remotest ,
Idea of what the place was like.
(To be continued next -week. Com
menced In low 968.)
clined to take stock of the situation as it
embodied itself in the curious little village
in which he found himself.
If you enter Sydney Cove to-day, and look
up the valley of the old Tank Stream--which,
--say, from the upper deck of a Manly steamer,
you will not, by any possibility, be able to
form a picture, from what you see before you,
of Sydney as it looked one hundred and thirty-
two years ago. The busy Quay, with its roar-
pedestrians hurrying like black ants across and
up the gentle slope to the heart of the great
city, the high roofs rearing themselves in
serrated outline against the blue of the sky---
there can be no suggestion whatever in its
surrounded Patrick Cartwright on that even-
ing in May so long ago. Everything is
changed beyond all recognition. Nothing re-
mains as it looked from the deck of the Sirius,
as she lay at anchor in the spot where your
suburban passenger steamer stops her engines
opposite to the wharf of the P. and O. Com-
pany, as she slows down to enter her berth.
On an August day in that first year of Syd-
ney's existence, from a ship's deck in the
mouth of the Cove, Captain John Hunter, of
H.M.S. Sirius, and afterwards to succeed Phillip
in the Governorship of the colony, made a
drawing of the scene that lay before him as
he looked towards the south. It is a quaintly
inartistic effort--something of the sort that a
child of seven or eight might have done--but it
has an historic value to-day that it would be
difficult to over-estimate. Even if some of the
objects in the picture almost require such
labels as "This is a tree," or "This is a house,"
a component part of civilisation. Without it
we could gather to-day hardly the remotest
idea of what the place was like.
(To be continued next week. Com-
menced in No. 968.)
Chapter XI.—The Village of Sydney. (Article), The World's News (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 1955), Saturday 10 July 1920 page Article 2014-07-31 20:47 QN an evening early in Mar of that first
year of Australia, Mr. Patrick Cartwrigftt
stepped ashore near the head ot the Cove
lying out in the. stream, almost ready to com
surgeon, and had found Dr. Bower in high
of . the wilderness.
to where the ragged tops ot the dark forest
stcod up against the skyline on the higher
ground behind the settlement-"it almost
makes me shudder to think what may lie be
to seem « «.roaker, Patrick, my friend--but it
lcoks to me as if you're going to have a devil
much as 1 esteem the worthy Governor. He's
the one to do it. But-Great George-look at
it. "Tis enough to sour the most cheerful op
timist, when one looks yonder, at this miser
able little encampment, ana thinks over what
"Oh, well." laughed Patrick. "You know,
vast, unknown continent-nothing hut a pre
An epidemic of sickness-such as had destroyed
two centuries before-might have swept away
its queer population in a week. It had no
thing about tt that had any suggestion of per
than any community of outcasts in all Burope
.r Asia. Its contemplation appalled more
But thye was one lion-hearted man who
country Drill hereafter prove a most valuable
acquisition to Great Britain, though at pre
sent no country can afford 1MS support to the
first settlers, or be more disadvantageous^
placed for receiving support from the w»th*r
country, on which it must for a tine depend.
paused a while to look about him. His friend's J
words were fresh is his ears, aad fee Ml Ir- '
ON an evening early in May of that first
year of Australia, Mr. Patrick Cartwright
stepped ashore near the head of the Cove
lying out in the stream, almost ready to com-
surgeon, and had found Dr. Bowes in high
of the wilderness.
to where the ragged tops of the dark forest
stood up against the skyline on the higher
ground behind the settlement--"it almost
makes me shudder to think what may lie be-
to seem a croaker, Patrick, my friend--but it
looks to me as if you're going to have a devil
much as I esteem the worthy Governor. He's
the one to do it. But--Great George--look at
it. "'Tis enough to sour the most cheerful op-
timist, when one looks yonder, at this miser-
able little encampment, and thinks over what
"Oh, well," laughed Patrick. "You know,
vast, unknown continent--nothing but a pre-
An epidemic of sickness--such as had destroyed
two centuries before--might have swept away
its queer population in a week. It had no-
thing about it that had any suggestion of per-
than any community of outcasts in all Europe
or Asia. Its contemplation appalled more
But there was one lion-hearted man who
country will hereafter prove a most valuable
acquisition to Great Britain, though at pre-
sent no country can afford less support to the
first settlers, or be more disadvantageously
placed for receiving support from the mother
country, on which it must for a time depend.
paused a while to look about him. His friend's
words were fresh is his ears, and he felt in-
ERTHA SHELLEY. The Lily of the Hunter Valley! Australian Story of Forty Years Ago.] CHAPTER XXX.—(Continued). (Article), The Newcastle Chronicle (NSW : 1866 - 1876), Saturday 27 November 1875 page Article 2014-07-31 20:44 BRTHA SHELLEY.
The Lily of . the . Euntar Valley !
it Australian 'Story of Forty Tears Ayo.]
By William Aubrey Burnage.
CHAPTER XXX.— (Continued J.
?ercy bit his lip with vexation. She had
t. him ? naesrage — perhaps an important
, ? and through the cureleasnes* of the con
ince-stricken black boy before him, he could
; learn it. A severe reprimand rose to hi?
s; but, renieniherinsc the past *emc»s of
idol's faith fn I attendant, he repressed his
;er, and aaid mildly, ' It, in » bitter disap
intraent to me, your hiving forgotten
insta Beita'a message. \na must try to le
lect it. It may be something very irr
itant.'
Jerry readily promised to recollect overy
ing as hood ash* could, nnd returned to the
e to chew the cud of reflection and finish his
ef and damper at one and the same time. He
complishedthe latter portion of hi* task with
ccess and evident satisfaction, but he could
tt recollect a word of the message, though
i brown-studied ovor it vigorously.
' Thought «f it yet, Jrrry V Percy inquired
ixiounly, rising at the moment from the
Duldcr, upon which he had been eeatnd.
' Bal* -'at me can think at all, Misaer Sin
ir !' replied Jerry, hopelessly.
' I think we'd better he makiDg ? start,
ir. We may lose some time in the hlackboy's
nding the track again,' augmented Bow.
n early start, and in a quarter of an hour
hey had passed out of sight of the gully
vhere they had spent a few very uncoiofort*
ible hours. The morning was fine, and a
:risp, bracing wind was blowing. Every
thing around teemed to vie in leading their
Noughts ftora their forlorn condition ; but
:he wet clothe*, that felt icy cold ia the fresh
breez*, were more than a match for the beauty of
nature — and the swaying of the tall trees, or
the chatter of the magpies and ' laughing
jackasses' could not draw the attention of tho
drenched and shireriog fugitives from the
incident oi importance occurred during the
lay's ride through the dreary foie.it of
gim and ironbark. Their route lay through
hi'ils, and up almost ioaocmairile mountains,
their view now bounded at half a dozeu
yard* Wy dense barriers of underwood, und
?non from the towering ridge of a stw.p kill,
aitni.0' *n'J 8ort P9rcePt'b'' t° oiviliztd eyes,
., ,,ll» Jerry assured then* they were on
on wfthl Sfc* *'. y« tb.W-ck.boy W them
JlikVk. fHiflfiPioC preowion. of.au Indian,
I i tt.. foSl5in^ of iarage life. At
uowc, ana naTins an ?*-».?.* . ? -? „- ?'
1 Here's, a ?tannin* camping; Kroft&aju-t*
obserred Bow, reining in and «lan«ing rb.sj ,
approvingly, ? We're far enough off aowjl
tjtep safe for one night anyhow 1'
Bow'a proposition b«ing approved of, tha
trio dismounted, unsaddltd and hobbled (heir
-lwniai. and th«m -t abont Drenaration for
rubbing two .sticks together again proving I
siiccessfulf^nd ia plentiful snppljr of water
being found in a hole in aome. rocks closa by, '
the tea was soon , boiling and the hungry
travelers seated round at their midday raeui.
'This is about tb» bo»t place for a camp '
that I've seea,' said Bow, noting the peculiar
advantage* of the situation for that purpose, nnd
startling Parcy from a reverie. ' Tho soldiers
couldn't Kiienk upon you unawares here. You
can nee down the clear slopes on both sides |
for hnlf .a mile, and there's scarcely a tree
. Percy not replying to the observation, and
Jerry having beeu asleep for at least five
minutes,1 Bow did not care to keep up tha
half a dnzc!n gulps, he rolled hinnnlf up in his
'possum clonk, and was noon snoring in chorus
with the ti'nklij of the horse- bells, leaving
Percy nlone with hit ever present and crnsh
ing giief. An hour passed, and all subduing
sorrows of tha miserable Percy. His head
drooped upon his breast, npd he saulc back
npon the cold earth, freed for a few hours from
the agony of existence.- :
Three houri' mote had passed, ' and the three
ware «till asleep by the dyffelg' ambers of their
tire. The sun was sinking behind the dense
brushes by the .distant river, and sheddfrg in
its departing glory a peacliblossoui mantle
pver the opposite hilla.. The calmness of the
still evening scene was' suddenly disturbed by
the dull th'nd'of hriraes*- hoofs' galloping along
the ridge, from the direc'.ioo of thu Hawkes
the camp they abruptly pulled np and rode
along at a walking pace. ' Fifty miles aiuce
six o'clock last night ! Not a bad run, that,
Darby,' said a tall, wiry fellow, with )oag,
shaggy, black hair and bt:nrdle.ss face. If the
horses hold out: we'll reach the Hunter to
quart they're poking about looking for uh yet
among the nettlers, within five mile* of Wind
sor ! If we could only get away out of the
we'd have enough to sat us up for life !'
?Ah! get away? That's the difficulty !'
aaid a little, buvhy bearded, round fthouldeied,
red faced, old man, whaso general awkward
aspect on horseback poiuted him out as an
?x sailor. ? If we could only slip our cables
and leave this inn-blasted, God-forgotten, and
generally smashed-up colony in our wake !
But how 1 That's where we're grounded '.'
' One thing at a tine, gentlemen !' said
Darby, who, since hia election, to the cap
taincy of bis band, had grown wonderfully
courteous in his inanntr. ' Let's settle one
thine; at a time ! HhnV. wo raako our debut
[great stress on tha ' t'. at, the top and work
down the river, or bag our game at the New
castle end V
called upon to support his own private judge,
tnent upon the subject with as much energy
' One at a time ! One atja time 1' exclaimed
Darby, angrily. ' What do you say, D*vis V
The tall man — he of the lantornjaws —
who had first spoken, advocated bogianing
the case, it wan settled to roh the ' place' of a
Mr. Eiward Fairing several miles above Mait
land. ,
'By George, Grngdon, look there!' exclaimed
the direction of the cam p. 'Three men lying
upon the ground 1' All eyes were anxiously
turned' to Wards the spot in anticipation of see
ing a band of the dreaded mounted patrola.
'Halt! Just wait hen; and I'll ride nearer and
see !' said Darby in a whisper. He cautiously
approached the sleeping, fugitives, and in a few
minutes returned. - Touching his lips to ' mo
tion for silence lie slowly dismounted. The
all were upon their feet, he vuid in an under
tone, ' There'* two men and a blackboy ;
they're all asleep ; and, as I didn't see no arois
? One of 'em a bltckbray 1 Then he's a
we're safe. They're police' in di^uwe as sure
as tato. Thnre's moie of 'em about too. or they
wouldn't sleep thero so securely,' said Jonn
ingH.
?? ???'? - ? ? :?
BERTHA SHELLEY.
The Lily of the Hunter Valley!
[An Australian Story of Forty Years Ago.]
By WILLIAM AUBREY BURNAGE.
CHAPTER XXX.— (Continued)..
Percy bit his lip with vexation. She had
sent him a message—perhaps an important
one—and through the carelessness of the con-
science-stricken black boy before him, he could
not learn it. A severe reprimand rose to his
lips; but, remembering the past services of
his idol's faithful attendant, he repressed his
anger, and said mildly, 'It is a bitter disap-
pointment to me, your having forgotten
Missie Berta'a message. You must try to re-
collect it. It may be something very im-
portant.'
Jerry readily promised to recollect every-
thing as soon as he could, and returned to the
fire to chew the cud of reflection and finish his
beef and damper at one and the same time. He
accomplished the latter portion of his task with
success and evident satisfaction, but he could
not recollect a word of the message, though
he brown-studied over it vigorously.
'Thought of it yet, Jerry?' Percy inquired
anxiously, rising at the moment from the
boulder, upon which he had been seated.
'Bale dat me can think at all, Misser Sin-
lar!' replied Jerry, hopelessly.
'I think we'd better he making a start,
sir. We may lose some time in the blackboy's
finding the track again,' suggested Bow.
an early start, and in a quarter of an hour
they had passed out of sight of the gully
where they had spent a few very uncomfort-
able hours. The morning was fine, and a
crisp, bracing wind was blowing. Every-
thing around seemed to vie in leading their
thoughts from their forlorn condition; but
the wet clothes, that felt icy cold in the fresh
breeze, were more than a match for the beauty of
nature—and the swaying of the tall trees, or
the chatter of the magpies and "laughing
jackasses" could not draw the attention of the
drenched and shivering fugitives from the
incident of importance occurred during the
day's ride through the dreary forest of
gum and ironbark. Their route lay through
hills, and up almost inaccessible mountains,
their view now bounded at half a dozen
yards by dense barriers of underwood, and
anon from the towering ridge of a steep hill,
mark of any sort perceptible to civilized eyes,
although Jerry assured them they were on
the "black track;" yet the black boy led them
on with the unerring precision of an Indian,
with the faultless instinct of savage life. At
noon they found themselves upon the summit of a large hill, but sparsely clothed with timber, and having an area of several as level; as the "flat" they had crossed at its base.
'Here's a stunning camping ground, sir!'
observed Bow, reining in and glancing round,
approvingly. 'We're far enough off now to
sleep safe for one night anyhow!'
Bow's proposition being approved of, the
trio dismounted, unsaddled and hobbled their
horses, and then set about preparation for
rubbing two sticks together again proving
successful, and a plentiful supply of water
being found in a hole in some rocks close by,
the tea was soon boiling and the hungry
travelers seated round at their mid-day meal.
'This is about the best place for a camp
that I've seen,' said Bow, noting the peculiar
advantages of the situation for that purpose, and
startling Percy from a reverie. 'The soldiers
couldn't sneak upon you unawares here. You
can see down the clear slopes on both sides
for half a mile, and there's scarcely a tree
Percy not replying to the observation, and
Jerry having been asleep for at least five
minutes, Bow did not care to keep up the
half a dozen gulps, he rolled himself up in his
'possum cloak, and was soon snoring in chorus
with the tinkle of the horse-bells, leaving
Percy alone with his ever present and crush-
ing grief. An hour passed, and all subduing
sorrows of the miserable Percy. His head
drooped upon his breast, and he sank back
upon the cold earth, freed for a few hours from
the agony of existence.
Three hours more had passed, and the three
were still asleep by the dying embers of their
fire. The sun was sinking behind the dense
brushes by the distant river, and shedding in
its departing glory a peachblossom mantle
over the opposite hills. The calmness of the
still evening scene was suddenly disturbed by
the dull thud of horses' hoofs galloping along
the ridge, from the direction of the Hawkes-
the camp they abruptly pulled up and rode
along at a walking pace. 'Fifty miles since
six o'clock last night! Not a bad run, that,
Darby,' said a tall, wiry fellow, with long,
shaggy, black hair and beardless face. 'If the
horses hold out we'll reach the Hunter to-
quart they're poking about looking for us yet
among the settlers, within five miles of Wind-
sor! If we could only get away out of the
we'd have enough to set us up for life!'
'Ah! get away? That's the difficulty!'
said a little, bushy bearded, round shouldered,
red faced, old man, whose general awkward
aspect on horseback pointed him out as an
ex sailor. 'If we could only slip our cables
and leave this sun-blasted, God-forgotten, and
generally smashed-up colony in our wake!
But how! That's where we're grounded!'
'One thing at a time, gentlemen!' said
Darby, who, since his election to the cap-
taincy of his band, had grown wonderfully
courteous in his manner. 'Let's settle one
thing at a time! Shall we make our debut
[great stress on the "t"] at the top and work
down the river, or bag our game at the New-
castle end?'
called upon to support his own private judge-
ment upon the subject with as much energy
'One at a time! One at a time!' exclaimed
Darby, angrily. 'What do you say, Davis?'
The tall man—he of the lantern jaws—
who had first spoken, advocated beginning
the case, it was settled to rob the 'place' of a
Mr. Edward Fairing several miles above Mait-
land.
'By George, Gregson, look there!' exclaimed
the direction of the camp. 'Three men lying
upon the ground!' All eyes were anxiously
turned towards the spot in anticipation of see-
ing a band of the dreaded mounted patrols.
'Halt! Just wait here and I'll ride nearer and
see!' said Darby in a whisper. He cautiously
approached the sleeping fugitives, and in a few
minutes returned. Touching his lips to mo-
tion for silence he slowly dismounted. The
all were upon their feet, he said in an under-
tone, 'There's two men and a blackboy;
they're all asleep; and, as I didn't see no arms
'One of 'em a blackboy! Then he's a
we're safe. They're police in disguise as sure
as fate. There's more of 'em about too, or they
wouldn't sleep there so securely,' said Jenn-
ings.
dinner. Jerry's plan of igniting wood by
Chapter XI.—The Village of Sydney. (Article), The World's News (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 1955), Saturday 10 July 1920 page Article 2014-07-31 20:42 Chapter XI.-The Village of Sydney.
Chapter XI.--The Village of Sydney.
Chapter X.—The Voyage. (Article), The World's News (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 1955), Saturday 10 July 1920 page Article 2014-07-31 20:32 "Ah, Mr. Cartwright-Patrick," she- faltered,
"you forget-I am the wife of another. Of
a wicked villain, 'tis only too true-but he is
my husband. God help us-my own love!" she
help us-that I feel certain of."
They were gloomy, miserable months for Pat
kindly surgeon, be was sure that he would have
gone mad with grief. Sometimes such an ac
cess of blind fury against the cruel Ate that
capable of clasping her in hit arms and Jump
dropped anchor in Botany Bay-two days after
the arrival there of Governor Phillip In H.M.S.
Supply. Dr. Bowes' prediction as to the futil
latt*r ship had proved correct.
"Ah, Mr. Cartwright--Patrick," she faltered,
"you forget--I am the wife of another. Of
a wicked villain, 'tis only too true--but he is
my husband. God help us--my own love!" she
help us--that I feel certain of."
They were gloomy, miserable months for Pat-
kindly surgeon, he was sure that he would have
gone mad with grief. Sometimes such an ac-
cess of blind fury against the cruel fate that
capable of clasping her in hit arms and jump-
dropped anchor in Botany Bay--two days after
the arrival there of Governor Phillip in H.M.S.
Supply. Dr. Bowes' prediction as to the futil-
latter ship had proved correct.

Counts updated hourly

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

  1. BARRY, John Arthur
    List
    Public

    64 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2011-08-02
    User data
  2. KIPLING, Rudyard
    List
    Public

    10 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2011-01-08
    User data
  3. OXENHAM, John
    List
    Public

    1 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2011-01-09
    User data
  4. The Will Forgeries
    List
    Public

    16 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2010-08-14
    User data

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.