Information about Trove user: maurielyn

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

RankCorrectorLines corrected
1 JohnWarren 2,859,819
2 annmanley 2,008,563
3 NeilHamilton 1,849,712
4 noelwoodhouse 1,451,995
5 maurielyn 1,367,687
6 John.F.Hall 1,323,982
7 mrbh 1,146,315

1,367,687 lines corrected.

Corrections by month

October 2014 19,745
September 2014 28,719
August 2014 46,848
July 2014 54,325
June 2014 10,647
May 2014 15,795
April 2014 16,770
March 2014 3
February 2014 92
January 2014 36
December 2013 4,433
November 2013 6,312
October 2013 40,154
September 2013 26,891
August 2013 19,229
July 2013 30,238
June 2013 35,889
May 2013 34,599
April 2013 5,953
March 2013 4,178
February 2013 60
December 2012 122
November 2012 6,412
October 2012 9,007
September 2012 2,074
August 2012 13,001
July 2012 8,995
June 2012 41,702
May 2012 10,728
April 2012 4,423
March 2012 12,588
February 2012 9,171
January 2012 2,655
December 2011 22,428
November 2011 29,308
October 2011 28,340
September 2011 20,977
August 2011 22,871
July 2011 20,215
June 2011 11,018
May 2011 7,946
April 2011 45,102
March 2011 14,791
February 2011 30,582
January 2011 36,679
December 2010 14,510
November 2010 15,639
October 2010 25,076
September 2010 35,694
August 2010 38,196
July 2010 31,494
June 2010 42,660
May 2010 42,984
April 2010 33,196
March 2010 26,158
February 2010 21,768
January 2010 23,693
December 2009 14,169
November 2009 13,910
October 2009 8,721
September 2009 5,101
August 2009 5,707
July 2009 6,083
June 2009 5,576
May 2009 30,715
April 2009 8,466
March 2009 21,801
February 2009 7,575
January 2009 5,156
December 2008 7,165
November 2008 6,402
October 2008 24,538
September 2008 28,111
August 2008 5,372

Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
THE MAXWELLS OF BREMGARTEN. A STORY OF TASMANIA. [Founded on Facts.] (ALL RIGHTS ARE RESERVED.) (Continued from Saturday, 10th October.) CHAPTER LIX.—CONCLUSION. (Article), Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 - 1899), Saturday 17 October 1868 page Article 2014-10-23 07:39 Ride, Edwin, ride I 'tli:dawi is in tihe
sky, the darkness fast disalpcarihe, and the
world, in spite of our sins, not yet' destroyed :
your horseo is i young, strdng, and full of
spirit i he is ,no firo-worslipper
either, and will ,not bury his : nose
in the dust when' the red sun makes hIis
appearance above the smoky,horizon. Ride
ride, for.your life, across thie nearest ford in
the Lake River-over the grassy uplandsiund
throughl, the nearet ford ntlhe Mncquarie
River--up .upon the rising ground on tilme
parched plains-past the palatial residences
of our nobility not yet erected-under the
railway viaducts not yet built, Draw rein
1n0o, andl lot ybur stood blow as he wades
through the deep sand ' on the skirts of
Eppinlg Ioret. On again along the gravelled
ltruc, under the shadow1s of ulmnllageons
trees, Olmerging upon tlll rich011 marse that
m11Iulk t1he course of the well-reme1 bered
river, whler tihe echoes of a hostile trumpetI
lhave not yet distIurbed the innlocnt sheil
and their sporting lahbs. Ride, Edwin,
ride I
letween t.lhree lln foulr o'clock lie enterled
the lawn of ll3relgarten, and upprllllched thile
hl)luse where dwe1t-lassulinig himl to ILbe
P'etarch-his idolized L]aura. 110 was yet
about twenty yards fronl the door when it
iopened, mnd Chllrl's Maxwell caneo out
yawlning, for lol had been asleep for the last,
three boirs on the parlor sotll. When he saw
Edwin he lifted up his hlands in great a ze11 0.
Inent, and 1id--"Why, Edwin, is it your
selI, or a wicked goblin bearing your mein
and fceatures 7-speal', I chargo, thee I"
"It is 1, certainly, Charles," said Edwin,
alighting, fi'om his pantlng 1101e. " How
are youl"
"O, l'm jolly," said Charles, "right as a
riplo pealch in a schoolboy's pocket. How did
you leave lmy fair friends, Rose and Augusta I
Lather's gone to Launceston, and luIther too
-they're going to bolt, I hear, to nmke a
runaway match of it at last. Comoe round to
the stable and I'11 show youe such a beautiful
litter 'of puptpies."
" You Imust excuse lme," said Edwin,
" Where is Glrislda?7-I want to speak to
her 7"
"lSho's in there, thumpling away at that
eternal piano. IBut won't you come and see
toy dogs first-such real beauities I"
" Not 1, thank you," said Edwin, as lie
where lie knew the lpiano used to be was
sllhut : he knocked, but without waiting for
Griselda w1as there, gazing at the door with
her blue eyes wido open. When she saw
lier fice, which had been pale and delicate
before, becane ilstlantly sutlilsed with a
" Grisolda, my sweet love," said Edwin.
" 0 Edwin !" she fdltered, " how-why
what is the meaning of this 1"
the honored wife of my bosom-tthe mistress
" But mly father," said Griselda, " doesnot
know: I cannot-he forbade me to think of
" lIe does know," said Edwin; " I saw him
last night, and lie bade me tell you that his
oplposition is withdtlmwn."
" Is it true 1" asked Griselda.
"It is true," replied Edwin. "He said
that you m0ust yourself be the arbitress of my
filte-tlhe words of your own lips must m1ake
" What must 1 say " soaid the bewildered
" You lmay repeat what I say," said
Edwin,"-- Dear Edwin-I- am happy to tell
you that-go on--I love you, and do hereby
wife : but you arenot repeating the words-"
As lie spoke lie most artfully extended his
arms, and she, poor innocent fly, advanced I
stoep and en'ered the magic circle, was folded
up in 1an instant, and sullbred her forehead to
It was ia happy and ia merry wedding.
There was a grand ball at Blremgarten in
honor of the event, wlhere upwards of sixty
danced until the next day's sun0 was high in
the heavens. In the course of tle festivities
our friend Charles formally proposed for tle
that is he was o'er young to larry yet, lihe
must wait until lhe lhad a house of his own.
Augusta was honored with the unremlitting
attentions of poor Buffer ; but her heart re
mained an obdurate as ever, so that he g ive
up the pursuit in despair, and soIme time
may imagine but dare not describe; let it
suflicd to say that his sut was eminently
upon revisiting Great Britain, thle formelr
taking his wife and famrily with him0, the
Eugene-who eventually Ibecame the bus' an I
of Augusta?-in partnerslhip, in which state
they have both gr'own excleedigly rich, an I
The estates of Clifton Hall and Brellgarten
have long since clanged owners, and the
names of their foromer proprietors are
scarcely now remembered in tle thriving
Our story must end here, for we have no.
thing more to say; unless we thought it wise
exhibit Edwin and lis fair wifesurrounded by
five or six of thle rosiest, noisiest, hungriest,
most troub-, but no, we do not think it
lands when you close these pages tlink kindly
have our political and literary Singlowoods,
who trumpet all our little filults to the
world with hypocritical blasts; but we lhave
won their independence with indomnitable
fidelity and couragc, and. also our Elizbbetho
nd OGriseldans, witbout whom the homes
whilch tllhey adorn and make happy would be
RoaaN CATHOLb C0Ounc.--Tho Lrgusl giVes
thefollowing in reforereoncto thiscburch:--Nows
THE NTD.
Ride, Edwin, ride ! the dawn is in the
sky, the darkness fast disappearing, and the
world, in spite of our sins, not yet destroyed :
your horse is young, strong, and full of
spirit ; he is no fire-worshipper
either, and will not bury his nose
in the dust when the red sun makes his
appearance above the smoky horizon. Ride
ride, for your life, across the nearest ford in
the Lake River--over the grassy uplands and
through the nearest ford in the Macquarie
River--up.upon the rising ground on the
parched plains--past the palatial residences
of our nobility not yet erected--under the
railway viaducts not yet built. Draw rein
now, and let your steed blow as he wades
through the deep sand on the skirts of
Epping Forest. On again along the gravelled
track, under the shadow1s of umbrageous
trees, emerging upon the rich marshes that
mark the course of the well-remembered
river, where the echoes of a hostile trumpet
have not yet disturbed the innocent sheep
and their sporting lambs. Ride, Edwin,
ride !
Between three and four o'clock he entered
the lawn of Bremgarten, and approached the
house where dwelt--assuming him to be
Petarch--his idolized Laura. He was yet
about twenty yards from the door when it
opened, and Charles Maxwell came out
yawning, for he had been asleep for the last
three hours on the parlor sofa. When he saw
Edwin he lifted up his hands in great amaze-
ment, and sad--"Why, Edwin, is it your-
self, or a wicked goblin bearing your mein
and features ?--speak, I charge, thee !"
"It is I, certainly, Charles," said Edwin,
alighting, from his panting horse. " How
are you ?"
" O, I'm jolly," said Charles, " right as a
ripe peach in a schoolboy's pocket. How did
you leave my fair friends, Rose and Augusta ?
Father's gone to Launceston, and mother too
--they're going to bolt, I hear, to make a
runaway match of it at last. Come round to
the stable and I'll show you such a beautiful
litter of puppies."
" You must excuse me," said Edwin,
" Where is Griselda ?--I want to speak to
her ?"
" She's in there, thumping away at that
eternal piano. But won't you come and see
my dogs first--such real beauties ?"
" Not I, thank you," said Edwin, as he
where he knew the piano used to be was
slhut : he knocked, but without waiting for
Griselda was there, gazing at the door with
her blue eyes wide open. When she saw
Her face, which had been pale and delicate
before, became instantly suffused with a
" Griselda, my sweet love," said Edwin.
" O Edwin !" she faltered, " how--why--
what is the meaning of this ?"
the honored wife of my bosom--the mistress
" But my father," said Griselda, " does not
know : I cannot--he forbade me to think of
" He does know," said Edwin; " I saw him
last night, and he bade me tell you that his
opposition is withdrawn."
" Is it true ?" asked Griselda.
" It is true," replied Edwin. " He said
that you must yourself be the arbitress of my
fate--the words of your own lips must make
" What must I say ?" said the bewildered
" You may repeat what I say," said
Edwin,"-- Dear Edwin--I--am happy to tell
you that--go on--I love you, and do hereby
wife : but you are not repeating the words--"
As he spoke he most artfully extended his
arms, and she, poor innocent fly, advanced a
step and entered the magic circle, was folded
up in an instant, and suffered her forehead to
It was a happy and a merry wedding.
There was a grand ball at Bremgarten in
honor of the event, where upwards of sixty
danced until the next day's sun was high in
the heavens. In the course of the festivities
our friend Charles formally proposed for the
that is he was o'er young to marry yet, he
must wait until he had a house of his own.
Augusta was honored with the unremitting
attentions of poor Buffer ; but her heart re-
mained an obdurate as ever, so that he gave
up the pursuit in despair, and some time
may imagine but dare not describe ; let it
suffice to say that his suit was eminently
upon revisiting Great Britain, the former
taking his wife and family with him, the
Eugene--who eventually became the husband
of Augusta?--in partnership, in which state
they have both grown exceedingly rich, and
The estates of Clifton Hall and Bremgarten
have long since changed owners, and the
names of their former proprietors are
scarcely now remembered in the thriving
Our story must end here, for we have no-
thing more to say ; unless we thought it wise
exhibit Edwin and his fair wife surrounded by
five or six of the rosiest, noisiest, hungriest,
most troub--, but no, we do not think it
lands when you close these pages think kindly
have our political and literary Singlewoods,
who trumpet all our little faults to the
world with hypocritical blasts ; but we have
won their independence with indomitable
fidelity and courage, and also our Elizabeths
and Griseldas, without whom the homes
which they adorn and make happy would be
ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH.--The Argus gives
the following in reference to this church:--News
THE END. =======
THE MAXWELLS OF BREMGARTEN. A STORY OF TASMANIA. [Founded on Facts.] (ALL RIGHTS ARE RESERVED.) (Continued from Saturday, 10th October.) CHAPTER LIX.—CONCLUSION. (Article), Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 - 1899), Saturday 17 October 1868 page Article 2014-10-22 22:41 b? y 'some of whom an unfortuinate hawker,
named Miles-Canroless, was barbarously numlir
dored., We hope we do no itnjstico to the
memory of Bill by esiuasecting hIim to have
been the very.man who murdered Miles
a-: : reless. -
. .Chirles iMaxwell rodo over occasionally to
B5 Belle Park- to see hIis ftiend Edwin, salute
:' ,sfrst Herbart, and spend an agreeable ovening
tU 5"with h]is fair and lively relatives. His friend
ship and esteem for tlhe charming Rose al
ready bade fair to ripen into love. . Heo
;- - :would laugh and tell funny stories,: and sing
...." I'm o'er young to marry yet," and lother
songsewith great glee, while Roso would
"-" smile and blush, and Augustawitl?ka pouting
systomatically snub Mr. Buffer, whb wvas
.-2 ,frowu,'·but-not an ill-natured:frown, would
~Edwii rarely spoke to Charles about Gri
..l
solda' exxoopt to' ask after her Ihetlth,: Hoe
fatller, though a loss scrupulous young man
would probably have thought that .hll im
pediments to a successful wooing w~ore re.
moved, not exactly by Hounry Arnott's mid
the hanids of the fair charmer. Perhlips
I1dwin's scruples would vanish, too, in time,
but at present hie felt It little sore against
of Grisolda with unabated ardor. He was
hurt, in fret, that Maxwoell had not either by
letter or pursonal visit, or even by a verbal
message through his son, welconed Mrs. Holr
hart, his relative by iarriago, to thie colony.
'I One would have thought (said Edwin to
himnself) that he would at least acknowledge
my mnothor's presence by bringing Mrs. Max
well to see her; or if he could 'not manage
to do so, write a civil note, and state his rea
sons for the omission. He cannot be aoraid
of poor accommodation, for I have a comfort
aIble bedroom for straneers." In his'mental
conuentaries upon this subject, Edwin ac
heard repeated in con;versation-that-tho set
tiers oft Tasmanin, taken as a whole, are a
in grappling with the ditllcultios of colonial
punctilios of reofinoeent, which often render
and social manners donot, accod exactly
with thibso of persons of equal rank in the
absent for dozens of years, is a great and so
rious error. To condemonin the society of any
of upper rank found walking in it unblush
folly, and demands some apology from a cor
tain great Duke,* high in the councils of Ihis
Sovereign. We fearlessly assort that Max
well, who is the typo of many, was a conusci
treachery, or scandalous immorality; and
that he never turned away a poor follow
froom his door without something to help
hisu on his journey, though so backward in
Better, perhaps, for him that hie was not so
nice if Swifto's aphorism be true-that nice
Meanwhile Edwin prospered in his farm
ing. He had had two very successful sea
per bushel-so that lie had the satisfaction of
lie owed them, and of possessing a balancoe at
tihe latter of considerable amount. His stock
respectable; ihe saw himself possessed of
of-property sufficient to render him in a
few years an independent man. Tie value
fiarm not a bit bletter than Edwin's was put
fonder of either money or comfort, and some
times of both combined. 'Edwin was not
money, as of a faithful servant whom?h hd
no intention of allowing .to become Ihis
cannot possibly do; but ihe also had a
wont to Launcestun with wheat and wool,
additions tol his stock of furniture or books,
or sundry other etcoteras which, 'next to an
agreeable wife, render home a' pleasant
be determined to make it more permanent,
and having money as well as, credit he
forthwith commenced to build a now house.
on a carefully digested plan, and superin
Tihe colony at .this period really began to
which has won praise froml many visitors.
The diisquietudo once caused by the
internal peace of the island is not often dis
turbed by bushlragers. Within the last two
arms and committing robberies in tie bush,
his-musket. Viewing it from the position we
appears to be no romance in bushlranging, and
first; indeed, there are very few fresh
arrivals who do. However ardently Tas
who have dwelt in the country for years hnd
to escape from the dangers of the. sea; ibut
when the remembrance of the voyage fides
brighter memory of-- the OLD coUTnTY,
which steeps many a spirit in sadness-and
wraps many a heart in the mantle of desola
been troubled with home-sickness I Who
Ias not wished to walk the old familiar path
again even though it mayabe buried in snow,
or see the dear kind faces so longadmired and
beloved-some of them, alas I never to be
seen more on earth 1 But patient resigna.
tion is the only cure for this disease.- . Ho is
wise who can eradicata all unavailing regroats,
and witls steady determination endeavor to
succeed in thie line of lifo for which he feels
himselffitted by nature and hIabits.
While their new house -was in course of
erection theo residents at Belle Park' lived
their immediate neighbors and thoirneighbors
were few. .They took pleasant walks by tice
banks of the river and over the adjacent hills,'
tlhbughl never wandering very far from the
house. The first winter which, the ladies
esient in Tasmsnia came and went, and Mrs.
Horbart praised its iexcessive mildness, sb
different from the snows, the thlaws,; and tihe
* This was written before the .eoath of the
late Duke of Nescastle. If a whole community
was to be condemned because of thbe slns u a
portion, what did his Grace think of Lone
tha I'_
uttlug blastes of an English winter. The
rlch yellow blossmns, and beautifying the
ilowors. The stunmer caune, redolent with
thl now mownn hay; bringing an atmosphlcere
of sonlko from dihtont regions; masking the
green grass appear yellow and withered, fraom
deprived of their flcces, derive sufflicient
in the sky a burning sun compels- oven the
hardy horso and panting steer to take
spreading houghs. Autumn came with its
and still tho. smoke of raying fires in the
made thle setting sun look like
It great glass globe full of red wine with a
strong light behind it. On the 6tl day of
al most overpowering all day, and now a dense
than that of a thunder-cloud, and' a strange
saw and breathed in it will ever bo able to
dreadful ;-perhaps an earthquake I perhaps
a tornado I The fice of the earth was
supposing that a neighboring planet had sud
horse and gig of. respect-inspiring presenco
stopped at the garden-gate of Edwin's rosi
dence,and the gentleman who drove, handing
the reins to tile lady by whom lie was ac
who was reading' in the parlor, supposing
the visitor- was his, neighbor Buffer, said,
(Romeo and Juliet), "Come in, the door is
not looked." Thle door opened and there
haste, and exclaimed-" Is it possible-Mr.
excellent lady with you T'
" I lhave, Edwin, and I suppose you think
our heio's hand. '
Edwin rushed out to-welcome Griselda's
mother; he bade her webome and expressed
his happiness in a few. a:dent words, as he
assisted her from the gig; and after calling
Frank to tell the groom 1t come and take the
horse, hlie gave his arm to Mrs. Maxwell aiid
conducted her to the horse. Mrs. Herbart
their appearance, and ftiter the salutations
into the garden and about tlhe grounds. A
long nd mnast interesting conversation com
moencod, too long indeed for us to think of
olserivations aboit' the great heat and the
oppressive state of-the atmosphere, and won
cloud tliat had so suddenly darkened the air,
enthusiastic terms than became, a man so
tihe lakes, the quality of the soil, the produce
of the corn fields, the plan of the neow house
and farm buildings-all of these, and more,
the unqualified praises they so well deserved;
"I am glad to perceive," said Maxwell,
"tlhat your young establishment here bears
alundant evidence of the industry and care
then, sit in yoor room all day and write
verses " ??
ing and smiling; "if I ever give way to that
tihe world sometimes during the day, as you
can testify, for you surprised ine in the act of
reading Shakespero."
" Poetry," said"Maxwell, " is very well for
established yourself con your estate, an indo
pendent man-and I have no doubt that if
ifnot a,wealthy mano-you can then try a
your ambition will be gratified; if you fail,
of books will soon say so. Some:of these gentle.
by telling him that there is too much litora
better, say 1, when I can take my choice of
what-I read; besides employment is provided
for compositors and bookbinders, and some
You are not writing a novell" -
" No," said Edwin, "nor thinking of one.
I only wish I could write o'a good one that
would have the effree of even in thle twentiethl
it is."'
"I am not fond of. them," said Maxwell;
"and yet I will not be too cynical. Shak
spere's plays are all.fiction, or nearly so, and
vyet Iamvery fond of Shakepero. Paradisti
Lost is.a mere offspring. of Milton's imagina
tion, and yet. how sublime andl beautiful it
"It would be a miserable world," said
Edwin, "if.wve could .not get books-if we
could not converse in solitudle with thle gireaht
.living and the mighty dead:'
- " agree with you in that," said Maxwell,
"altloughtour tastes may differ. I.lave no
patience with that stapid-egotist whoo con
damns in others that for whiahi hoe hlas -no.
taste himself. -Dr. Jolohnson once said that he
wishled there was silenecfor- aieneration---a
so great a man. Buta trace to the subject.
You are certainly very comfortable hero, and
it pains me to think lthat I, your father's
relativu and frilend, contributed the lert?t of
all men in this island to makoo you No."
1 How can you mtako that iout 1" said
Edwin, "D)id 1 not palrtllto of your hos
pitality for many montlti Am 1. not in
debted to you for the loau of money without
whioch I would not have these cosIfbrts ?"
" Still," replied MTaxwell, " the alannco is
I had your services, antld inolney yeiit cloutld
have procured lsowhllereu. ow have I re
warded you for saving ,ay lilfe--t least I
give you fidl credit for having done so a The
rufllan might have missed his aiut, and his
ballut might have gone through mlly stomach,
btit it was you who, under Providence, arresuted
its flight at tile outset."
" And then you were shllot yourself," con.
tinled Maxwell. " What could I havo said
to your respected tmother if you had tien
shot through thie heart while in the act of
preserving my life I How have I repaid you
-how can I repay you for all this 7"
bIy asking him for his daughter flashed upon
attempt, and he stood still in silenlce.
S" If you know of anything in which I can
possibly assist you," said Mnlxwell, " you
have only but to mention it, and it will 'afford
do how little I have ahready done. You hlave
done wonders for yourself and your frieudsl
that the opportunity of repaying mny obliga
"O, M: Mraxwell, you have always been a
straightforward and a kind friendl: can I
mention without ofluding you a subject upon
tell.you that 1 love your amiable and beau
tiful daughter I That I always didl love her
since we were children, and that I will con
tinuo to love her, even should my bold
avowal involve the loss of your valued friend.
excellent Griselda thiniks with tenderness of
so hutmble an individual as I amt-and I
Ihave tlought, I have dreamed that she does
-why should you, Sir, oppose our union I
without your consent; and on your consent
all my happiness depends. Inmgino yourself
" I remember on a former occasion, Edwint,"
"speaking to you on thie subject which you
liid a strict injunction upon you not to renew
think of you inl any other light than that of
has obeyeil me to this hour. Why I was so
particle of the past. Whether Oriselda thinks
tenderly of you or not is to me only a mat
ter of conjecture; but you can go and ascer
from me that her father's opposition is with
drawn." -
'" This very 'hour I will go," said Edwin
starting off like one insane, but' recollecting
himself hb stopped, and continued--" Mr.
Maxwell, I havenot language to thank you
my weak breath' is incapable of thanking
you as it should, but-"
"Stay, my young friend," interrupted
or protestations-I might become unreason
with you,; then your self-defence will be
branded as ingratitude. And, further-con
tent yourself where you are for to.night. If
you rode all niglit you miight be at Brem
garten to breakfast, but why such haste I It
miss' a foid or ride into' a. lake you may
Providence'; many an impatientman has lost
a rich' inheritance."
They now entered the .cottage and .tho
parlor. where the ladies, with faces rich in
pleissed with each other, the young ladies
were merry : Maxwell 'was in an easy con
versiblo humor, andasked Frank a great many
aloite was in a state of bewildered abstraction.
His'mother was surprised at him : his sisters
and the guests retired, after accepting a press
rest after their fatiguing journey from Brem
gasrten to Launceston, and from Launceston
to Belle Park. Ed win retired to rest, too,
as Maxwell had'foreseen, blacker than Erebus
What sort of a horse wasit 1 0 do you
describing like the novelists "the .animal
which our Ihero bestrode I' Like thlat'of
Young Loclhinvar, his steed was undoubtedly
tile best in the country just 'becaunsoeib
happens to carry ourhero. Consult blundy's
'Our Antipodes,' wlhere you will find somo
thing about Tasmanian horsces: but we our
solves have ildden one (we cannot say moro
than one) whichl it would have given us
demoniacal pleasaro to alight from delibe
rately, back to tile nearest ditch,. kick hime
into it and leave him there, walking uway
with what gratification we might caioylng thle
saddle on our ownr back.
by some of whom an unfortunate hawker,
named Miles Careless, was barbarously mur-
dered. We hope we do no injustice to the
memory of Bill by suspecting him to have
been the very man who murdered Miles
Careless.
Charles Maxwell rode over occasionally to
Belle Park to see his friend Edwin, salute
Mrs. Herbart, and spend an agreeable evening
with his fair and lively relatives. His friend-
ship and esteem for the charming Rose al-
ready bade fair to ripen into love. He
would laugh and tell funny stories, and sing
" I'm o'er young to marry yet," and other
songs with great glee, while Rose would
smile and blush, and Augusta with a pouting
systematically snub Mr. Buffer, who was
frown, but not an ill-natured frown, would
Edwin rarely spoke to Charles about Gri-

selda except to ask after her health. He
father, though a less scrupulous young man
would probably have thought that all im-
pediments to a successful wooing were re-
moved, not exactly by Henry Arnott's sud-
the hands of the fair charmer. Perhaps
Edwin's scruples would vanish, too, in time,
but at present he felt a little sore against
of Griselda with unabated ardor. He was
hurt, in fact, that Maxwell had not either by
letter or personal visit, or even by a verbal
message through his son, welcomed Mrs. Her-
bart, his relative by marriage, to the colony.
" One would have thought (said Edwin to
himself) that he would at least acknowledge
my mother's presence by bringing Mrs. Max-
well to see her ; or if he could not manage
to do so, write a civil note, and state his rea-
sons for the omission. He cannot be afraid
of poor accommodation, for I have a comfort-
able bedroom for strangers." In his mental
commentaries upon this subject, Edwin ac-
heard repeated in conversation--that the set-
tlers of Tasmania, taken as a whole, are a
in grappling with the difficulties of colonial
punctilios of refinement, which often render
and social manners do not accord exactly
with those of persons of equal rank in the
absent for dozens of years, is a great and se-
rious error. To condemn the society of any
of upper rank found walking in it unblush-
folly, and demands some apology from a cer-
tain great Duke,* high in the councils of his
Sovereign. We fearlessly assort that Max-
well, who is the type of many, was a consci-
treachery, or scandalous immorality ; and
that he never turned away a poor fellow
from his door without something to help
him on his journey, though so backward in
Better, perhaps, for him that he was not so
nice if Swifte's aphorism be true--that nice
Meanwhile Edwin prospered in his farm-
ing. He had had two very successful sea-
per bushel--so that he had the satisfaction of
he owed them, and of possessing a balance at
the latter of considerable amount. His stock
respectable ; he saw himself possessed of
of--property sufficient to render him in a
few years an independent man. The value
farm not a bit better than Edwin's was put
fonder of either money or comfort, and some-
times of both combined. Edwin was not
money, as of a faithful servant whom he had
no intention of allowing to become his
cannot possibly do ; but he also had a
went to Launceston with wheat and wool,
additions to his stock of furniture or books,
or sundry other etceteras which, next to an
agreeable wife, render home a pleasant
he determined to make it more permanent,
and having money as well as credit he
forthwith commenced to build a new house.
on a carefully digested plan, and superin-
The colony at this period really began to
which has won praise from many visitors.
The disquietude once caused by the
internal peace of the island is not often dis-
turbed by bushrangers. Within the last two
arms and committing robberies in the bush,
his musket. Viewing it from the position we
appears to be no romance in bushranging, and
first ; indeed, there are very few fresh
arrivals who do. However ardently Tas-
who have dwelt in the country for years and
to escape from the dangers of the sea ; but
when the remembrance of the voyage fades
brighter memory of the OLD COUNTRY,
which steeps many a spirit in sadness and
wraps many a heart in the mantle of desola-
been troubled with home-sickness ? Who
has not wished to walk the old familiar path
again even though it may be buried in snow,
or see the dear kind faces so long admired and
beloved--some of them, alas ! never to be
seen more on earth ! But patient resigna-
tion is the only cure for this disease. He is
wise who can eradicate all unavailing regrets,
and with steady determination endeavor to
succeed in the line of life for which he feels
himself fitted by nature and habits.
While their new house was in course of
erection the residents at Belle Park lived
their immediate neighbors and their neighbors
were few. They took pleasant walks by the
banks of the river and over the adjacent hills,
though never wandering very far from the
house. The first winter which the ladies
spent in Tasmania came and went, and Mrs.
Herbart praised its excessive mildness, so
different from the snows, the thaws, and the
* This was written before the death of the
late Duke of Newcastle. If a whole community
was to be condemned because of the sins of a
portion, what did his Grace think of Lon-
don ?
cutting blasts of an English winter. The
rich yellow blossoms, and beautifying the
flowers. The summer came, redolent with
the new mown hay ; bringing an atmosphere
of smoke from distant regions ; making the
green grass appear yellow and withered, from
deprived of their fleeces, derive sufficient
in the sky a burning sun compels even the
hardy horse and panting steer to take
spreading boughs. Autumn came with its
and still the smoke of raging fires in the
made the setting sun look like
a great glass globe full of red wine with a
strong light behind it. On the 6th day of
almost overpowering all day, and now a dense
than that of a thunder-cloud, and a strange
saw and breathed in it will ever be able to
dreadful ;--perhaps an earthquake ! perhaps
a tornado ! The face of the earth was
supposing that a neighboring planet had sud-
horse and gig of respect-inspiring presence
stopped at the garden-gate of Edwin's resi-
dence, and the gentleman who drove, handing
the reins to the lady by whom he was ac-
who was reading in the parlor, supposing
the visitor was his neighbor Buffer, said,
(Romeo and Juliet), " Come in, the door is
not looked." The door opened and there
haste, and exclaimed--" Is it possible--Mr.
excellent lady with you ?"
" I have, Edwin, and I suppose you think
our hero's hand.
Edwin rushed out to welcome Griselda's
mother ; he bade her welcome and expressed
his happiness in a few ardent words, as he
assisted her from the gig ; and after calling
Frank to tell the groom to come and take the
horse, he gave his arm to Mrs. Maxwell and
conducted her to the house. Mrs. Herbart
their appearance, and after the salutations
into the garden and about the grounds. A
long and most interesting conversation com-
menced, too long indeed for us to think of
observations about the great heat and the
oppressive state of the atmosphere, and won-
cloud that had so suddenly darkened the air,
enthusiastic terms than became a man so
the lakes, the quality of the soil, the produce
of the corn fields, the plan of the new house
and farm buildings--all of these, and more,
the unqualified praises they so well deserved.
" I am glad to perceive," said Maxwell,
" that your young establishment here bears
abundant evidence of the industry and care
then, sit in your room all day and write
verses "
ing and smiling ; " if I ever give way to that
the world sometimes during the day, as you
can testify, for you surprised me in the act of
reading Shakespere."
" Poetry," said Maxwell, " is very well for
established yourself on your estate, an inde-
pendent man--and I have no doubt that if
if not a wealthy man--you can then try a
your ambition will be gratified ; if you fail,
of books will soon say so. Some of these gentle-
by telling him that there is too much litera-
better, say I, when I can take my choice of
what I read ; besides employment is provided
for compositors and bookbinders, and some-
You are not writing a novel ?"
" No," said Edwin, " nor thinking of one.
I only wish I could write a good one that
would have the effect of even in the twentieth
it is."
" I am not fond of them," said Maxwell ;
" and yet I will not be too cynical. Shak-
spere's plays are all fiction, or nearly so, and
yet I am very fond of Shakepere. Paradise
Lost is a mere offspring of Milton's imagina-
tion, and yet how sublime and beautiful it it."
" It would be a miserable world," said
Edwin, " if we could not get books--if we
could not converse in solitude with the great
living and the mighty dead."
" I agree with you in that," said Maxwell,
" although our tastes may differ. I have no
patience with that stupid egotist who con-
demns in others that for which he has no
taste himself. Dr. Johnson once said that he
wished there was silence for a generation--a
so great a man. But a true to the subject.
You are certainly very comfortable here, and
it pains me to think that I, your father's
relative and friend, contributed the least of
all men in this island to make you so."
" How can you make that out ?" said
Edwin. " Did I not partake of your hos-
pitality for many months ? Am I not in-
debted to you for the loan of money without
which I would not have these comforts ?"
" Still," replied Maxwell, " the balance is
I had your services, and money you could
have procured elsewhere. How have I re-
warded you for saving my life--at least I
give you full credit for having done so ? The
ruffian might have missed his aim, and his
bullet might have gone through my stomach,
but it was you who, under Providence, arrested
its flight at the outset."
" And then you were shot yourself," con-
tinued Maxwell. " What could I have said
to your respected mother if you had been
shot through the heart while in the act of
preserving my life ? How have I repaid you
--how can I repay you for all this ?"
by asking him for his daughter flashed upon
attempt, and he stood still in silence.
" If you know of anything in which I can
possibly assist you," said Maxwell, " you
have only but to mention it, and it will afford
do how little I have already done. You have
done wonders for yourself and your frieuds
that the opportunity of repaying my obliga-
" O, Mr. Maxwell, you have always been a
straightforward and a kind friend : can I
mention without offending you a subject upon
tell.you that I love your amiable and beau-
tiful daughter ? That I always did love her
since we were children, and that I will con-
tinue to love her, even should my bold
avowal involve the loss of your valued friend-
excellent Griselda thinks with tenderness of
so humble an individual as I am--and I
have thought, I have dreamed that she does
--why should you, Sir, oppose our union ?
without your consent ; and on your consent
all my happiness depends. Imagine yourself
" I remember on a former occasion, Edwin,"
" speaking to you on the subject which you
had a strict injunction upon you not to renew
think of you in any other light than that of
has obeyed me to this hour. Why I was so
particle of the past. Whether Griselda thinks
tenderly of you or not is to me only a mat-
ter of conjecture ; but you can go and ascer-
from me that her father's opposition is with-
drawn."
'" This very hour I will go," said Edwin
starting off like one insane, but recollecting
himself he stopped, and continued--" Mr.
Maxwell, I have not language to thank you--
my weak breath is incapable of thanking
you as it should, but--"
" Stay, my young friend," interrupted
or protestations--I might become unreason-
with you, then your self-defence will be
branded as ingratitude. And, further--con-
tent yourself where you are for to-night. If
you rode all night you might be at Brem-
garten to breakfast, but why such haste ? It
miss a ford or ride into a lake you may
Providence ; many an impatient man has lost
a rich inheritance."
They now entered the cottage and the
parlor where the ladies, with faces rich in
pleased with each other, the young ladies
were merry : Maxwell was in an easy con-
versible humor, and asked Frank a great many
alone was in a state of bewildered abstraction.
His mother was surprised at him : his sisters
and the guests retired, after accepting a press-
rest after their fatiguing journey from Brem-
garten to Launceston, and from Launceston
to Belle Park. Edwin retired to rest, too,
as Maxwell had foreseen, blacker than Erebus
What sort of a horse was it ? O do you
describing like the novelists "the animal
which our hero bestrode ?" Like that of
Young Lochinvar, his steed was undoubtedly
the best in the country just because it
happens to carry our hero. Consult Mundy's
'Our Antipodes,' where you will find some-
thing about Tasmanian horses: but we our-
selves have ridden one (we cannot say more
than one) which it would have given us
demoniacal pleasure to alight from delibe-
rately, back to the nearest ditch, kick him
into it and leave him there, walking away
with what gratification we might carrying the
saddle on our own back.
THE MAXWELLS OF BREMGARTEN. A STORY OF TASMANIA. [Founded on Facts.] (ALL RIGHTS ARE RESERVED.) (Continued from Saturday, 10th October.) CHAPTER LIX.—CONCLUSION. (Article), Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 - 1899), Saturday 17 October 1868 page Article 2014-10-22 21:50 THE MAXWELLS UO 1inBmtARTEN.
Sthe name of the Nile Gang-fir thie river
A STORY OF1 TASMANIA,
I[ounded on Facts,]
(ALa sUonTrs Ans UaItiiVnaa,)
OHAPTERI LIX,-CoNoLusloN.
grace his pages with a imoral sontimeont or
philouophit remark without incurrinsg the
himself what has boen said sorles, of timnes
since the days of Homer. So painfully ini
nvoided as much as possible the laying down
of" wise saws aud modern instances" lent it
gardens of the Bacons and Shakspures of
adory ago and nation for this or that peculiar
gean, and adopting it as our own, had un
blushingly set it down without acknowled, -
mbnt in the hope of gulling a publio which is
notoriously too discorning to be gulled. If,
for instance, we tell you that Timelu flies by
with "healing in his wings-that immaedicablo
wounds, both of mind and body, are in
variably closed up by'lin either to the killing
or the curing of the patient; that the nys.
tories of true love are flar beyond the ken of
more humana vision; that partial and harsh
criticism in litunary circles is as rare to as bad
gonoralshilp in military,-tho learned reader
will probably toll us to our face, " I can show
Xenophon's OyropRedia" (which we never
looked into); or, "You stole that from
COhateaubriand"' (a totally unknown author to
lamontabld state of things, but still thero.nro
Worse evils in the world. We would sooner
have a good thing cribbed fromn our book,
provided we got our legitimate profit, thian a
valuhable watch from'our waistcoat pocket.
thing hasl appeared on our paper. While,
however, we contemplate to ihe brilliant idea
with its now local name and habitation, and
,plume ourselves upon the richness of our
-that we lhave picked it up somewhere in the
course of our promiscuous reading; but if we
Ssteel pens from a critical catapult, we cannot
-thus in every-day life. We live upon the
"Weo must hasten on. Our respected friend
a .summary, Yankee fashion, clean right
away),. Mr. Johnson Juniper, of Skittle-Ball
H- ill, was married to Miss Arabella Leary at
Sthe time appointed. Charles Maxwell did not
alias egg pie. Ho sold his farm shortly after
;wards, and entered into arrangements with
'latter's property on the Dorwent. The land
-event should happen, was placed above
-full value, but Juniper managed in the course
'of three years to pay off all demands upon it.
v adheres to his original sober and industrious
o- habits. Arabella is the happy mother of four
S:children. Juniper sits by the fireside in the
evenings with a son and daughter on eaclh
i .'knee, sings his merry songs, and, when tired
- of singing, relates to his delighted offspriug
, war, and their venerable grandsire's pleasant
reminiscences of Daveoy.
The widow of the unfortunato Baxter soon
recovered from the effects of- her husband's
. untimely death, and after an interval of two
.,. months she thought her condition would be
improved by marrying again. Her new lihuts
wife with him: her daughter Mary fled for
protection to her former preserver, Miss Max
- well, who, with her fitther's permission, imn
maid of superior rank. Mary was a fiue
buxom girl then, endowed with ta considerable
share of her father's lhumor; and so great was
- the affection she had for her young mistress
- ; that we have no hesitation in saying that she
Sserve her.
-Jorgen Jorgenson finished his remarkable
can judge from the small portion of his lite
'be was certainly gifted with a'considorablo
share of talent; and had he carefully studied
tlie styls of great writers, been less afflicted
tliereulion may serve to point a moral, if not
to adorn a tale, and - all we can - ope for is
t . that the moral may not be thrown away.
' Baxter's inveterate an'tipathy to Bill Jin
:-lins was not, certainly, without some primi
'- 'tivdbthough unknown cause, and leads us to
. He died miserably not long ago of a cancer
in the lip, ' supposed to hIave been induced by
excessivo smoking.' He was strongly sus
: ganig of sheepatealers, commonly known by
. Nile ?runs in TasmaInia as well as in Egypt
THE MAXWELLS OF BREMGARTEN.
the name of the Nile Gang--for the river
A STORY OF TASMANIA,
[Founded on Facts.]
(ALL RIGHTS ARE RESERVED.)
CHAPTER LIX.--CONCLUSION.
grace his pages with a moral sentiment or
philosophic remark without incurring the
himself what has been said scores, of times
since the days of Homer. So painfully im-
avoided as much as possible the laying down
of " wise saws and modern instances" lest it
gardens of the Bacons and Shaksperes of
every age and nation for this or that peculiar
gem, and adopting it as our own, had un-
blushingly set it down without acknowledg-
ment in the hope of gulling a public which is
notoriously too discerning to be gulled. If,
for instance, we tell you that Time flies by
with healing in his wings--that immedicable
wounds, both of mind and body, are in-
variably closed up by him either to the killing
or the curing of the patient ; that the mys-
teries of true love are far beyond the ken of
mere human vision ; that partial and harsh
criticism in literary circles is as rare as bad
generalshilp in military,--the learned reader
will probably tell us to our face, " I can show
Xenophon's Cyropædia" (which we never
looked into) ; or, " You stole that from
Chateaubriand"' (a totally unknown author to
lamentable state of things, but still there are
worse evils in the world. We would sooner
have a good thing cribbed from our book,
provided we got our legitimate profit, than a
valuable watch from our waistcoat pocket.
thing has appeared on our paper. While,
however, we contemplate to the brilliant idea
with its new local name and habitation, and
plume ourselves upon the richness of our
that we have picked it up somewhere in the
course of our promiscuous reading ; but if we
steel pens from a critical catapult, we cannot
thus in every-day life. We live upon the
We must hasten on. Our respected friend
a summary, Yankee fashion, clean right
away), Mr. Johnson Juniper, of Skittle-Ball
Hill, was married to Miss Arabella Leary at
the time appointed. Charles Maxwell did not
alias egg pie. He sold his farm shortly after-
wards, and entered into arrangements with
latter's property on the Derwent. The land
event should happen, was placed above
full value, but Juniper managed in the course
of three years to pay off all demands upon it.
adheres to his original sober and industrious
habits. Arabella is the happy mother of four
children. Juniper sits by the fireside in the
evenings with a son and daughter on each
knee, sings his merry songs, and, when tired
of singing, relates to his delighted offspring
war, and their venerable grandsire's pleasant
reminiscences of Davey.
The widow of the unfortunate Baxter soon
recovered from the effects of her husband's
untimely death, and after an interval of two
months she thought her condition would be
improved by marrying again. Her new hus-
wife with him : her daughter Mary fled for
protection to her former preserver, Miss Max-
well, who, with her father's permission, im-
maid of superior rank. Mary was a fine
buxom girl then, endowed with a considerable
share of her father's humor ; and so great was
the affection she had for her young mistress
that we have no hesitation in saying that she
serve her.
Jorgen Jorgenson finished his remarkable
can judge from the small portion of his lite-
he was certainly gifted with a considerable
share of talent ; and had he carefully studied
the style of great writers, been less afflicted
thereupon may serve to point a moral, if not
to adorn a tale, and all we can hope for is
that the moral may not be thrown away.
Baxter's inveterate antipathy to Bill Jin-
kins was not, certainly, without some primi-
tive though unknown cause, and leads us to
He died miserably not long ago of a cancer
in the lip, supposed to have been induced by
excessive smoking. He was strongly sus-
gang of sheepstealers, commonly known by
Nile runs in Tasmania as well as in Egypt--
THE MAXWELLS OF BREMGARTEN. A STORY OF TASMANIA. [Founded on Facts.] (ALL RIGHTS ARE RESERVED.) (Continued from Saturday, 26th September.) CHAPTER LVIII. THE CATASTROPHE. (Article), Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 - 1899), Saturday 3 October 1868 page Article 2014-10-22 21:29 l lowed to go at his-favorito pace, a brisk in
Stiir:i All ?sael'i' gaibEf'hid tetfiifted to ldei
SI and she lauigled-and-chatted as the cart jolted
ii dver the staetsmi~ausing :lierslf.thelithile ly
g ply in' her~reticulo; . ':: . ,., '
r :ating almonds,'of which 'sheohad a f6ai sup
a - You did, noet loll me,?H"lenry, 'bv the
race came off," she said ;i'how minsnyitlo5
Ssandls did you lose or huidreds did yoa wi P'
n carelessness-
. Aperoeptibloashode flittled,. nerossi Henfys
is '..Oh I..Rousalbinsisted upon postjninlthe
Ii .featires?a hoe joplied, i with eq affeotatioh of
y match as. one,of thoe:.animala was a littlf
r touohed,in tho wind; but it is flxedl to
a come off early next week,. and I- mean-.to b
I, some P"' , ', :,',.:,.) 7:u- rIa',1 lr|
SL?hiere. Whlnt are :you!esting F'); ,1 r-i
S "Ailmonds," said hhil sister; "will yoi iavo
I i I. uyil,", replied Hen.ry, ?o lad toe
s them; i tpntfoewsin tlosieblkiofo??nun ;mhie
ti:hqose:nis, afrald, yOerwill u'pinoeelIhieiihbnoe;;
a ''Be careful, for goodnesl sake,' said
Isabel, nH Sfll' plleO'- i "n?:lnll- fll 0lf tile ,onil-W
on the gun-itolik aH requtCed. ]]it nil; whatl
g.niatl pro?iding in thu allnirs of ma101
plronp1ted the horsi to stuImble violently at
Ihalt angnigllrdd 1no11101ot, o 0 aH nal'ly to throw
his rider ovel his head ? . lenry drew Iho10
reinii Ind Pripped tho gun tlighlir-thOe iu?k
m n'tr ] . heavily ng ni tnt tho l noe n the c iharg , a
ex lode, d ! the falial uIll entred Ihto unfortn- I
au (young 1nan's left ohek and pinsd I
through hit hend; and with un nidinibshe,
Ijuculaiontl of "0, lny God!" hlu (ll to the
I Y.oug lEul loy, Iflter cheeking II Ih ullt hnI
start tIbI I Is h1rsup1 Hin fsl'rg rolnhi ?t elt, an,, hi.
HioHlOr, I'01O upl 0et'Olanll g with t'lerrolr. l sat of
--struck with trot'mlndusIwo-pl'railyz 1d and
cuonllluded-Hat still; but awaking to the
lerribil reality of hlie scene, she lelped froml
I thro vhiile, klolt down Istido the body,
I buried her filc in the still warm bosorm, n1nd
called upon Henry to spoeak to her. Buit
i perceiving he was dead abli turned her taen
iLupward and rent the air with her orio0; and1
Sin her groat agony-' O, my do tr Henry I my
iin the intorvals of her cerenming cried Illlld
I io4t nnd murdered brother I-0 unllappy andI
l wretched ! wretclhed I wretched I IHllhl."
fatl coluntry !--bathd in blood-shocking,
fearlul drnearll-O, unfortunato Itenry 1-0,
t eveti suIhse quont to this great catlatrophce.
It is scarcely necessiary to dwell upon the
I breathle'a haste, ind guz d upon the lifelenss
i [low EIgeno and O ha los rodel up inl
- clay no lately full of hiolth 11nd manly vigr,l,
, the wor lil hofore him, the mInlter of i1
Splenllid inheritnuce; how the body wanscon
, voyod to thle noerest firm-holns to awnit n1
horne to thile little church-yard to riost besido
I ias venorable eire; how Isobel was taken back
to Camden Hlnll ' where she lay att-nded by
Iand (ldeal for many weeks; how she even
her faithful Grisrlda, hovering between life
tually recovered and1 left the colony to rejoin
her solo guo rdia, her cld,-r brother under the
protection of Eugenc; and how Griheldi re
turned to Brenomgrten in' maiden mleditation
fanocy free,' haviog decline/l with thankful
firmnoss the honor of becoming the wife of
SHerman Stapleton.
In the afternoon of tihe day on which the
-filtalnccident happoened a lorsemnon whose steed
3 betrayed symptonms of having travelled with
0 great rapidity, knocked loudly at the door of
Edwion' ' cotloge fn11d hlanded in a letter
Ssecaled with black wax ; then without waiting
I to bo questioned rode away as quickly as Ihe
'-iButler. Esq., Bello Park,' and Edwin sent
gonllleman. In about half-nu-hour Buffor
Sburset inlo the garden waving the open letter
t met him at the door-He's dead-the poor
"over his hoead, and shouted to Edwin, who
0 devil is dend-and won't trouble you, my
, boy. any more."
1 Edwin, in great surprise, took the letter and
read as follows:
--- luff.'r,.Esq.,
Ban,--The painlal duty devolves upon me of
m akipg 'yell :acquainted with the pal11ul
fat t hat further piroceedings In the
cause of Arnott _. versus Ilerbart are
ucessalhrifiytayed by order of the great Arbiter
in:the affdre of mankind-Destiny. 'The plnil
s till Ilic th?tioi l has inirahi'e dictu h·comne cputl
Smortuum hsving shot hlmsell by accident at a
e- I remains for you, Sir, to acquaint 'your prilci
.:p) . with the: andden termination thus put to an
tfilr' so highly naireeablo to a gentleman of your
p ofoanld 'discrimination jnd superior p)lish-and
Spermt mIo tbhe honor ol subscribing mnyself,
C . YnYur bumble and obliged servant,
said Boffe?r.. : ,
r dwelling upon his late fiery antagonist," h"ad
s' try IT would hlives enviod him his death-but
s" whait does it mean ?" .
' "'I knowv'tht," saitd Baffer. "' This othber
0 staff?". . ??' ' '
it - 'r. W LLesLr IRouasA'.
S "Can you 'translate his infernal latin ?"
• "Poor follow,". said Edwin, his thoughts
Ihe aedi his blood intbo defence of his coun
: it should never have been .shed.by'me."
" About this banbarous latin," said Bafler;
'" Terlcsa means i against," said Edwini.
"" t Weoll, if I' riemniber rightly, mrirabile
Yi' dict fielU o 's oib6rfol': thlng to tell, and
s caput niorturun alludes to the dead body, the
: remains."
" " OCbifoaiad himu he might have said as
much in Enngli~b, but really the pedantio
d assumption of leuaringi by sumo curious folk
is mlost extraordinary, but I am 'never
y decoivod'by suab people, saI flatter myself I
s am a shrewd obsorver of passing events:'
" If it did not scem" too much like inditfer.
ene on to the untimely death of my foe, that
y misgbided 'young man, Henry Arnott," said
' Edwin;:" I would beg to recall to your recal.
1 leetion, Buffer, a certain mope-hawk and the
Sname of Ir. Ph?lobus Cowslip, whuo congramu.
a lted you alnoon onb occasion on keepibg
Svinegar for your friends to drink." -
"Oh'!" said Buffer, "haven little 'nircy,
d oro-hre'the'lsdlds retotrnifig from their walk
--letb by goiese' b'gugies,: and don't mention,
id that hbrrid wistlch's donime.' :;'"
as (To be continued.). , ' i
;.Sir,
t Friday, noon.
lowed to go at his favorite pace, a brisk can-
ter. All Isabel's gaiety had returned to her,
and she laughed-and-chatted as the cart jolted
over the stones, amusing herself the while by
ply in her reticule.
eating almonds, of which 'she had a fair sup-
" You did not tell me, Henry, how the
race came off," she said ; " how many thou-
sands did you lose or hundreds did you win ?"
carelessness--
A perceptible shade flitted across Henry's
" Oh ! Rousal insisted upon postponing the
features as he replied with an affectation of
match as one of the animals was a little
touched in the wind ; but it is fixed to
come off early next week, and I mean to be
some ?"
there. What are you eating ?"
"Almonds," said his sister ; " will you have
" I will," replied Henry, " and glad to get
them ; put a few in the stock of m gun ; this
horse is afraid you will pinch his nose ; enough."
'' Be careful, for goodness sake," said
Isabel, as she placed a handful of the almonds
on the gun-stock as requested. But all ; what
genius presiding in the affairs of men
prompted the horse to stumble violently at
that unguarded moment, so as nearly to throw
his rider over his head ? Henry drew the
reins and grasped the gun tighter--the stock
struck heavily against the stones-- the charge
exploded ! the fatal ball entered the unfortu-
nate young man's left cheek and passed
through his head ; and with an unfinished
ejaculation of " O, my God !" he fell to the ground a corpse !
Young Earlsely, after cheeking the sudden
start of his horse spring from his seat, and his
sisters rose up screaming with terror. Isabel
--struck with tremendous awe--paralyzed and
confounded--sat still ; but awaking to the
terrible reality of the scene, she leaped from
the vehicle, knelt down beside the body,
buried her face in the still warm bosom, and
called upon Henry to speak to her. But
perceiving he was dead she turned her face
upward and rent the air with her cries ; and
in her great agony--' O, my dear Henry ! my
in the intervals of her screaming cried aloud
lost and murdered brother !--O unhappy and
wretched ! wretched ! wretched ! Isabel."
fatal country !--bathed in blood--shocking,
fearlul dream---O, unfortunate Henry !--O,
events subsequent to this great catastrophe.
It is scarcely necessary to dwell upon the
breathless haste, and gazed upon the lifeless
How Eugene and Charles rode up in
clay no lately full of health and manly vigor,
the world before him, the master of a
splendid inheritance ; how the body was con-
veyed to the nearest farm-house to await an
borne to the little church-yard to rest beside
his venerable sire ; how Isobel was taken back
to Camden Hall where she lay attended by
and death for many weeks ; how she even-
her faithful Griselda, hovering between life
tually recovered and left the colony to rejoin
her sole guardian, her elder brother under the
protection of Eugene ; and how Griselda re-
turned to Bremgarten in ' maiden meditation
fancy free,' having declined with thankful
firmness the honor of becoming the wife of
Herman Stapleton.
In the afternoon of the day on which the
fatal accident happened a horseman whose steed
betrayed symptoms of having travelled with
great rapidity, knocked loudly at the door of
Edwin's cottage and handed in a letter
sealed with black wax ; then without waiting
to be questioned rode away as quickly as he
'--Buffer. Esq., Belle Park,' and Edwin sent
gentleman. In about half-an-hour Buffer
burst into the garden waving the open letter
met him at the door--He's dead--the poor
over his head, and shouted to Edwin, who
devil is dead--and won't trouble you, my
boy, any more."
Edwin, in great surprise, took the letter and
read as follows :--
----Buffer, Esq.,
SIR,--The painful duty devolves upon me of
making you acquainted with the painful
fact that further proceedings in the
cause of Arnott versus Herbart are
necessarily stayed by order of the great Arbiter
in the affairs of mankind--Destiny. The plain-
tiff in the action has mirabile dictu become capul
mortuum having shot himself by accident at a
It remains for you, Sir, to acquaint your princi-
pal with the sudden termination thus put to an
affair so highly agreeable to a gentleman of your
profound discrimination and superior polish--and
permit mo the honor of subscribing myself,
Your humble and obliged servant,
said Buffer.
dwelling upon his late fiery antagonist, " had
try it would have envied him his death--but
" what does it mean ?"
" I know that," said Buffer. " This other
stuff ?"
T. WELLESLY ROUSAL.
" Can you translate his infernal latin ?"
" Poor follow," said Edwin, his thoughts
he shed his blood in the defence of his coun-
it should never have been shed by me."
" About this barbarous latin," said Buffer ;
" Versus means against," said Edwin.
" Well, if I remember rightly, mirabile
dictu means a wonderful thing to tell, and
caput mortuum alludes to the dead body, the
remains."
" Confound him, he might have said as
much in English, but really the pedantic
assumption of learning by some curious folk
is most extraordinary, but I am never
deceived by such people, as I flatter myself I
am a shrewd observer of passing events."
" If it did not seem too much like indiffer-
ence on to the untimely death of my foe, that
misguided young man, Henry Arnott," said
Edwin, " I would beg to recall to your recol-
lection, Buffer, a certain mope-hawk and the
name of Mr. Phœbus Cowslip, who congratu-
lated you upon one occasion on keeping
vinegar for your friends to drink."
" Oh !" said Buffer, " have a little mercy,
here are the ladies returning from their walk
--let bygones be bygones, and don't mention
that horrid wretch's name."
(To be continued.)
Sir,
Friday, noon.
THE MAXWELLS OF BREMGARTEN. A STORY OF TASMANIA. [Founded on Facts.] (ALL RIGHTS ARE RESERVED.) (Continued from Saturday, 26th September.) CHAPTER LVIII. THE CATASTROPHE. (Article), Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 - 1899), Saturday 3 October 1868 page Article 2014-10-22 20:00 in Pardon our emotion, and ";-this digression,
kind readcher :we will.hiayry to a close. It is
I folly to linger over a tale already too long,
an- id suffiieutly tedious, we areafraid, how
Spntince' to ,the utmost.i. Heniy'A~rnotti as
r ever pleasing it -may be to iis tu tax -you
- we have:said, rdoebehlind tli Jspring-cart' in
- which. lhis sister and the Fingtl magistrate's
daughters woere seated, his horse champig
Shis: hbit/imptltidiitly, 'voxed'l!t not bcingd.
Pardon our emotion, and this digression,
kind reader : we will hurry to a close. It is
folly to linger over a tale already too long,
and sufficiently tedious, we are afraid, how-
patience to the utmost. Henry Arnott, as
ever pleasing it may be to us to tax your
we have said, rode behind the spring cart in
which his sister and the Fingal magistrate's
daughters were seated, his horse champing
his bit impatiently, vexed at not being al-
THE MAXWELLS OF BREMGARTEN. A STORY OF TASMANIA. [Founded on Facts.] (ALL RIGHTS ARE RESERVED.) (Continued from Saturday, 26th September.) CHAPTER LVIII. THE CATASTROPHE. (Article), Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 - 1899), Saturday 3 October 1868 page Article 2014-10-22 19:56 The hero of the evening, Mrs. Ile-man I p
St1pldeto, a well-looking, but saieiiwhat
brsllque youth, began to take his rounds in I
search ofa partnoer, atlll thiesie imomenIIt his tieo r
sitelrs, sweet girls of seventeeno and nIlil'IeteIn,
in lavender colored silks with wreaths of,
flowers in their hair, seated thIemselves at the i
piano and connenloecd to play a dashing I
quadrille. Fairy cups of tea an1d oilt?e luln
just beonhanded round acconllmniel by wafersl
of. cake, glnsta. of small saInwiehei, iIdi
sllhadows of bIred and butter, and the buzz Iof
conversation, deep and uniiversal, lal ireacell
i'e olihnx.. Now, however, it was whispered -
along the serried ranks of cherry-lips thalt
I-Ierlllan was going to chooso his ipartner, and, I
according to his lady mnotheICs expressed
wish, whatever fair one he would happen to I
choose should be hailed by general, but not c
loud acclamations, as the belle or beauty of 1
the bull-roonm. The cherry-lips were no uto
accordingly,. whyn the impoltant lersonagL o
his father's, a jovial captain in the navy, who Ij
•iapiprehced; attended by a staunch friend of
constituted himself usater of the ceremonies. f
With measured stops lie sauntered half list- f
lessly around the occupied seats, until making v
a sudden pause lie pluctked the captain by thel
sleeve and begged to be introduced to the e
fair young lady with thablue eyes. The captain I
sinied Iiaterually, bowed politely, and craved I
perinission to introduce Mr. 1-Leruan Staple- c
toi to-whot, could it be, smiling reader, t
but Grisoldsl of course it was Griselda,- s
who, coloring up ,vith sudden surprise, arose, i
courtsied, and accepted the proffered arm- I
to open the ball with the happy hero. But I
before ihe took his place at the .lhead of the I:
room he led his partner to where his lady t
mother was.- eCted, who, rising fi'rom her I
chair, advanced.a step or two, kissed Griselda iI
,witlh a maternal smile, and said-"I Herman, t
I commend your taste--I ,am glad, to wel- I
come to-night the fair .rose of reomgarten."
Such uAupxpectot honargwas too much for our I
heroine,- a mis?, swam bef'ore her eyes, the I
lighis danced confusedly, she grew suddenly I
pale, mand fell bjick' into the arms of the I
alarmed raptaitn-=lid had. fainted.
- The whole rootp:was, at once :in commo
tion, and all th9 gguests. thronged .up to the I
scene of the unfortutate tocatlrrence.; The
question "What is -the ,mnptter ;.with Miss
Maxwell I" was l'indiedfroemn'lip; to lip, but I
nobody thoughtpf ?answering it. Eugene I
and Olarles ran up halstily, one sprinkled her 1
faco with water, the other held: a smelling
bottle to her -uose, but they might have I
saved .tlhemselves .th; :,trouble. . It. was
nothing but a moero, fainting fit, and would I
be soon over.,, ,Un~g r tirs. Stapleton's di-"
rection her brthlers carried her into a quiet
apartment` and laid 'hoi' onr a sofa where
she so6n' recovered, and ,little Adri
".arlhloy volunteered to 'sit? ' with'
and . takoe care of her. .Mr. ,Her
nian' forthwith choseo anothr '"partner,
and the festivitiei" pioceeded.. We must
withdraw ourselves from abiongst' tho grace
fill dancers, and close oueaic?is. to the ravish
ing musicand, hh'rdest tablk.of "ill; rudely.?
tear ourselves away, froiithie teintliigpupper
table, whioh 'groiian with ¢agory' meats and
choice delicacies. Cohime nublo bread and
clheso,and ihyfilliiig bot hungry stomachs
bimnish the voluptuous visions of tho brain:
tlhere is work to be done to.morrow1l
f t6ocetlo weryrsvallersproliaring to retnrn to
At sogen o'clgoe thc.rising.ain was in time
their honi; i.Scoros.aef prancng steeds awar d,'
in the care of not duly-qualified or very so-bor
ostlers, the coning of their masters? Ctrriages,.
dog carts, and 'gigs were rPeady, and one or
a respectful distance.;- Forth came, :after
affectionate ' leave-takings; the matrOtis
:lscortedd by their .sons, 'the young mothers,
soothing their tender charges, by their atten
tive' husbandsi, aridithe: niaidens-,by their
r Isabel and thli'two Misses Earlsley:-got into
L the spring cart; which was driven by Arthur
Earlsley, junior; and Henry mounted his
Shorse to rido behind thhem, carrying a loaded
r gun in his lhand.'" Griselda wasa nsot- with
them, having gladly'acceplted an invitation to
remain'at Camden Hall for a week "at least;
its she felt t?o mtuhclindiposed?o trivl-iearly,
fifty niilesthi t day;. Eutgene n icLd OClirlts
t leave of the retiringinaidens ,they?said-.they
I being on horsobick, were in s'I hurry to take
f would soon overtake Honurv and the ladies,
who could be jogging steadiy' on. i
I spangled with a copious dow; and the yelldw
recent showers and a:'second spring, was
flowers withk whiihK- the sdirrboindiig slolpes
J the most faitolious stay- t-liome;in lippy
a to the air, which would not .boedespised by
and plains were covered imparted a fragranco
t England itself. Oh; oiowi that.eord ExqxND
t thrills through our beal tlinka"ali offleof
trio fire i. When .shall we. se" tlih .e ndprass
I thy soil again, thou great and, glorious land
- thou fiir anud, happy hom of liberty and
e level Long mayest thou reign supreme and;
role the ocean waves, dlestined, we Jhope, Ito
be greater than thol i hast ever been. Ahd
thou, "too,' sweet' Irelind ,'whic we h ]ilias
part of Einglsnd,, horrified.ihitcholls and,
o thee again,- ourdear- birthplaco -tlhe-ho-me
" O'Brious notwithstanding, whdnl shall' we iee
r of our childhood--ibsent indeed 'to our eyes
a for nineteen long years, but ever, overpte
sent in-our tlhoughts.. n-.-, . -,-o . -
The hero of the evening, Mr. Herman
Stapleton, a well-looking, but somewhat
brusque youth, began to take his rounds in
search of a partner, at the same moment his two
sisters, sweet girls of seventeen and nineteen,
in lavender colored silks with wreaths of
flowers in their hair, seated themselves at the
piano and commenced to play a dashing
quadrille. Fairy cups of tea and coffee had
just been handed round accompanied by wafers
of cake, ghosts of small sandwiches, and
shadows of bread and butter, and the buzz of
conversation, deep and universal, had reached
its climax. Now, however, it was whispered
along the serried ranks of cherry-lips that
Herman was going to choose his partner, and,
according to his lady mother's expressed
wish, whatever fair one he would happen to
choose should be hailed by general, but not
loud acclamations, as the belle or beauty of
the ball-room. The cherry-lips were mute
accordingly when the important personage
his father's, a jovial captain in the navy, who
approached, attended by a staunch friend of
constituted himself master of the ceremonies.
With measured stops he sauntered half list-
lessly around the occupied seats, until making
a sudden pause he plucked the captain by the
sleeve and begged to be introduced to the
fair young lady with the blue eyes. The captain
smiled paternally, bowed politely, and craved
permission to introduce Mr. Herman Staple-
ton to--whom could it be, smiling reader,
but Griselda ? of course it was Griselda,--
who, coloring up with sudden surprise, arose,
courtsied, and accepted the proffered arm--
to open the ball with the happy hero. But
before he took his place at the head of the
room he led his partner to where his lady
mother was seated, who, rising from her
chair, advanced a step or two, kissed Griselda
with a maternal smile, and said--" Herman,
I commend your taste--I am glad to wel-
come to-night the fair rose of Bremgarten."
Such unexpected honor was too much for our
heroine,--a mist swam before her eyes, the
lights danced confusedly, she grew suddenly
pale, and fell back into the arms of the
alarmed captain--she had fainted.
The whole room was at once in commo-
tion, and all the guests thronged up to the
scene of the unfortunate occurrence. The
question "What is the matter with Miss
Maxwell ?" was bandied from lip to lip, but
nobody thought of answering it. Eugene
and Charles ran up hastily, one sprinkled her
face with water, the other held a smelling
bottle to her nose, but they might have
saved themselves the trouble. It was
nothing but a mere fainting fit, and would
be soon over. Under Mrs. Stapleton's di-
rection her brothers carried her into a quiet
apartment and laid her on a sofa where
she soon recovered, and little Ada
Earlsley volunteered to sit with
and take care of her. Mr. Her-
man forthwith chose another partner,
and the festivities proceeded. We must
withdraw ourselves from amongst the grace-
ful dancers, and close our ears to the ravish-
ing music, and, hardest task of all, rudely
tear ourselves away, from the tempting supper-
table, which groans with savory meats and
choice delicacies. Some humble bread and
cheese, and by filling our hungry stomachs
banish the voluptuous visions of the brain :
there is work to be done to-morrow !
to see the weary revellers preparing to return to
At seven o'clock the rising sun was in time
their homes. Scores of prancing steeds awaited,
in the care of not duly-qualified or very sober
ostlers, the coming of their masters. Carriages,
dog carts, and gigs were ready, and one or
a respectful distance. Forth came, after
affectionate leave-takings; the matrons
escorted by their sons, the young mothers,
soothing their tender charges, by their atten-
tive husbands, and the maidens by their
Isabel and the two Misses Earlsley got into
the spring cart, which was driven by Arthur
Earlsley, junior ; and Henry mounted his
horse to ride behind them, carrying a loaded
gun in his hand. Griselda was not with
them, having gladly accepted an invitation to
remain at Camden Hall for a week at least,
as she felt too much indiposed to travel nearly
fifty miles that day. Eugene and Charles
leave of the retiring maidens ; they said they
being on horseback, were in no hurry to take
would soon overtake Henry and the ladies,
who could be jogging steadily on.
spangled with a copious dew ; and the yellow
recent showers and a second spring, was
flowers with which the surrounding slopes
the most fastidious stay-at-home in happy
to the air, which would not be despised by
and plains were covered imparted a fragrance
England itself. Oh, how that word ENGLAND
thrills through our heart like a flash of elec-
tric fire ! When shall we see thee and press
thy soil again, thou great and glorious land--
thou fair and, happy home of liberty and
love ? Long mayest thou reign supreme and
rule the ocean waves, destined, we hope, to
be greater than thou hast ever been. And
thou, too, sweet Ireland, which we hail as
part of England, horrified Mitchells and
thee again, our dear birthplace ?--the home
O'Briens notwithstanding, when shall we see
of our childhood--absent indeed to our eyes
for nineteen long years, but ever, over pre-
sent in our thoughts.
THE MAXWELLS OF BREMGARTEN. A STORY OF TASMANIA. [Founded on Facts.] (ALL RIGHTS ARE RESERVED.) (Continued from Saturday, 26th September.) CHAPTER LVIII. THE CATASTROPHE. (Article), Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 - 1899), Saturday 3 October 1868 page Article 2014-10-22 15:46 "If you are Mr. I"ellrbart's friold, Sir," II
interrupted lsouan, " Oad will ccopt at tihl'
hands of that gentlieanu lIOIper credentialk
anthlorising you to not in his bhohalf in this I
moltter, I shall be happy to come to anil
arrangdInent with you, iandl appoinit 0place of
moeeting whero, undisturbed by the inequali i.
ties of our resl!etive principals' ardent Wto1 - (I
peiraienits, bitter anilmlosities, awl llutUnal
llellancoA and reorimninationn, we can argul, I
delate, resolve, anid pironouion as aforesaid-" Ji
"'II light yo both," roared Buffer, clench- o
Ing his right hand and striking it( 'iniO1'ly
upon bis loft paln ; " I'll light ye both for th" c
honor of Ioello 1Park, and'I'll toll yo what I'll i
do-you shalil tie imy loft handl. bohindl my I
back, and then, by the inmortal tlhunder of I
Jupiter (his favorito oath when exolted), I'll II
light ye both," ' .
"I understood, Arnott," said the lawyer,
" that all the savages had boon removed from i
the country, but it appeais we Ilavo got into t
a still highly favored locality," .
"I'11 light ye both," bellowed Benjamin, '
" with pistol, sword, or fist, or, :bllnderbuss, Ii
"I entreat you, Buffer,: to keep yourself
qulet," said Edwin; 1" this i not your affiir, I
'tie milne, and I will decide it -,allow me to a
fliend, Mr. Rousal, and on my 'behalf I etl
power you to muake what arrangements you a
think proper." 1.
" I'll take a cattle whip," said Buffer aside t
to Edwin, "and give tlem a .thrashing that I
as Old Parr." ..c
"' Hush, you will do nothing of the kind-- t
Mr. Rousal, my friend Mr. Buffer will confer I
with you wien and where you may thisik fit l
to appoint." -
" Then you do consent to meet icmy princi- c
pal I" said Rousal.
"I do, but he need not sulposoe he has i
frightened me by his threats which I despise, ori
goaded lee by his false asporsions, at whlich I f
can afford to smile. I consent lest one miden, I
and only''oho in'Tasmania,' should think I I
was unmanned by fear-she would never say I
so, bitslshe might think it-lind thlequestion a
" Then, Sir," said Rousal, "I am happy tp I
returityour compliment-you are a gentle
man; and for the present we tender tdyo
our respectful adi6us: . Mr.' Buffer, w 1??tll
meet, if perfectly suitable to the convenience a
hnd 'polite attainments, at the Marlborough.
Hotel, Longford, to-morrouv, at nobonspre- I
cisely, to arrange the preliminaries and dis
couirse upon the probable subsequentialities of I
this afllfair if I'may be allowehd to use the x- I
liression, which is' merely'colloquia, you' will 1
"I will certainly .be there," said Buffer,
"if my horse holds good in wind and li;6b"
"And ,I suppose," continued Ronusal, (
'"there is nothing- else, Arnott, to be: com-'
mented upon at present, except that you con- I
important business-until Mrs. Stapleton's ball
British colonial: history, to be. repeated, as
often as you and I can.persuade suchfortue
nate individuals as ;Mr.: Stapleton to call
together in a whirl; of rapturous enjoyment
the votaries of ruddy. Bacolhus and the fair
worshippers -of. the. feather-footed. Terpsi
ehore.'
" Arrange what you like," said H?enry,,o'
lie mounted his horse and rode off.
"'Well, eaurevoir, gentlemen," said Rousal,
and .he climbed into his saddle,: and dis
appeared. . :.
Edwin reraced. his steps to,his: cottage,
having invited Buffer to accomplpny him and,
remain to dinner. .
" I could bring abeautifil plan to maturity
now, if 'you woulud only let me," said the
latter as they. walked along. " I could get
Ihose popinjay jackdaws well soused in a
been tlrboughlit, and it would not cost me a
Edwin,' however, Would not listen .to any
"pound."
such , xpedients, •and exacted a -promise
from Buffer tht lihe would not sa'y anything
Sabout the' affair to his mothier or either of his
sisters.'
The ball-rdom of Caideon HAll'is brilliantly
lighted with; candles fixed in burnished
sconces, each . ornamented with either . a
r fresh flowers. It is filled with a happy com
canopy of green biughls,"or a garluld of
over villainous roads to celebrate the comling
I of age of Herman, the heir' (so report said,
r acres of 'Tasmanian hill and valley. 'Tle
a large room, and kindly wetcome .their guests
I battled almost single-handed 'with the "forest
S'primevial" in its most forbidding aspects, sit
I around in the revered dignity [of snowy locks,
I their days. of trouble and care gone by for
a ever. Ladies of middle age sit there, and re
call with blushes and.smiles.of:pleasure tlhe
a memory of their youthful., days, i Young
Smothers with tender, charges ,'dreaming
o ments, arid .maidens in the bloom of woman
dreams of innodent infitncy in adjacent apart
o hood are there, the gayest:of thegay, the
a brightesat of the bright, decked out in the
1 artless and niodest' finery in which their
I adorned. Fair young girls, laughing, beauti
t ful young girls, just opening upon ;the world
like the rosebuds of the spring,, are there,
'chatting" merrily ,with eaoch. other, tind
1 criticising with rosy roguishlglances the move
, ,ment~hof, the.youthfid bquaux, who hover
aI oult like bees from flower to flower. Happy
- creatures I long may; your joys. continuOe 'un
disturbed by .care and heart-withering sor
e tWe see in that gAy ad,trulJy :respectable'
assembly ,,our fair hleroinoi; andl, her fribnd
II Isabel, aud seated neir them we perceive
M- ,?is Caroline Earisley'and her interesting
sister Atda. "liseldil has rather a sad and
y dejected, look,. hlier lhee sotowhat peler
d tltn usual, and hb?er genril bloue eyds voatsug
a careworn, unlhnppy expressionr. Isib'l1) on
a tle contrary is in hitIzh spirits,'h and sepsjde
II terminedito .enjoy tile floetiug momentk as
'P tlhey fly, for sucht happyr re-unions wereo in
aher opinion to0 rarojn a practical outlandish,
t colony: not to be enjoyed,nyith full cest when
. they came. iHenry Arnott is there, his
t, handsomne fitfe'ailttlai?r sfigured by a haughty
and stern aspect,--while his dark eyes peer
g 'rod l'dlld room feasting sthemselvpe!upon
each prettydfapo si its turn. Mr. Rousalis
y hnd hair; oiledi and ,'crcted,
, thlere with a. cnrlet fice, a. white cravat,
it lying downthe lawin a maNuiloquent ipeechl
o A ,?Peputy-Commisary, eneraml. Now
y and again could be lieabid in thle thlrong thts
.e merry laugh.~of Ohlarlee Maxwell, and seen
I1 the solemn visage of Eugene which only
wanted a pair of slecutach l0 induce the I
vulgar to mnistako hiMa for a profe~imsor of o
heathen imythology. g
" If you are Mr. Herbart's friend, Sir,"
interrupted Rousal, " and will accept at the
hands of that gentleman proper credentials
authorising you to not in his behalf in this
matter, I shall be happy to come to an
arrangement with you, and appoint a place of
meeting where, undisturbed by the inequali-
ties of our respective principals' ardent tem-
peraments, bitter animosities, and mutual
defiances and recriminations, we can argue,
debate, resolve, and pronounce as aforesaid--"
" I'll light ye both," roared Buffer, clench-
ing his right hand and striking it furiously
upon his left palm ; " I'll fight ye both for the
honor of Belle Park, and I'll tell ye what I'll
do--you shall tie my left hand behind my
back, and then, by the immortal thunder of
Jupiter (his favorite oath when excited), I'll
fight ye both."
" I understood, Arnott," said the lawyer,
" that all the savages had been removed from
the country, but it appears we have got into
a still highly favored locality."
" I'll fight ye both," bellowed Benjamin,
" with pistol, sword, or fist, or blunderbuss,
" I entreat you, Buffer, to keep yourself
quiet," said Edwin ; " this is not your affair,
'tis mine, and I will decide it --allow me to
friend, Mr. Rousal, and on my behalf I em-
power you to make what arrangements you
think proper."
" I'll take a cattle whip," said Buffer aside
to Edwin, " and give them a thrashing that
as Old Parr."
" Hush, you will do nothing of the kind--
Mr. Rousal, my friend Mr. Buffer will confer
with you when and where you may think fit
to appoint."
" Then you do consent to meet my princi-
pal ?" said Rousal.
" I do, but he need not suppose he has
frightened me by his threats which I despise, or
goaded me by his false aspersions, at which I
can afford to smile. I consent lest one maiden,
and only one in Tasmania, should think I
was unmanned by fear--she would never say
so, but she might think it--and the question
" Then, Sir," said Rousal, " I am happy to
return your compliment--you are a gentle-
man ; and for the present we tender to you
our respectful adieus. Mr. Buffer, we will
meet, if perfectly suitable to the convenience
and polite attainments, at the Marlborough
Hotel, Longford, to-morrow, at noons pre-
cisely, to arrange the preliminaries and dis-
course upon the probable subsequentialities of
this affair if I may be allowed to use the ex-
pression, which is merely colloquial, you will
" I will certainly be there," said Buffer,
" if my horse holds good in wind and limb."
" And I suppose," continued Rousal,
" there is nothing else, Arnott, to be com-
mented upon at present, except that you con-
important business until Mrs. Stapleton's ball
British colonial history, to be repeated as
often as you and I can persuade such fortu-
nate individuals as Mr. Stapleton to call
together in a whirl of rapturous enjoyment
the votaries of ruddy Bacchus and the fair
worshippers of the feather-footed. Terpsi-
chore."
" Arrange what you like," said Henry, as
he mounted his horse and rode off.
" Well, au revoir, gentlemen," said Rousal,
and he climbed into his saddle, and dis-
appeared.
Edwin retraced his steps to his cottage,
having invited Buffer to accomplpny him and
remain to dinner.
" I could bring a beautiful plan to maturity
now, if you would only let me," said the
latter as they walked along. " I could get
those popinjay jackdaws well soused in a
been through it, and it would not cost me a
Edwin, however, would not listen to any
pound."
such expedients, and exacted a promise
from Buffer that he would not say anything
about the affair to his mother or either of his
sisters.
The ball-room of Camden Hall is brilliantly
lighted with candles fixed in burnished
sconces, each ornamented with either a
fresh flowers. It is filled with a happy com-
canopy of green boughs, or a garland of
over villainous roads to celebrate the coming
of age of Herman, the heir (so report said,
acres of Tasmanian hill and valley. The
a large room, and kindly welcome their guests
battled almost single-handed with the "forest
primeval" in its most forbidding aspects, sit
around in the revered dignity of snowy locks,
their days of trouble and care gone by for
ever. Ladies of middle age sit there, and re-
call with blushes and smiles of pleasure the
memory of their youthful days. Young
mothers with tender charges dreaming
ments, and maidens in the bloom of woman-
dreams of innocent infancy in adjacent apart-
hood are there, the gayest of the gay, the
brightest of the bright, decked out in the
artless and modest finery in which their
adorned. Fair young girls, laughing, beauti-
ful young girls, just opening upon the world
like the rosebuds of the spring, are there,
chatting merrily with each other, and
criticising with rosy roguish glances the move-
ment of the youthful beaux, who hover
about like bees from flower to flower. Happy
creatures ! long may your joys continue un-
disturbed by care and heart-withering sorrow.
We see in that gay and truly respectable
assembly our fair heroine and her friend
Isabel, and seated near them we perceive
Miss Caroline Earlsley and her interesting
sister Ada. Griselda has rather a sad and
dejected look, her face somewhat paler
than usual, and her gentle blue eyes wearing
a careworn, unhappy expression. Isabel, on
the contrary is in high spirits, and seems de-
termined to enjoy the fleeting moments as
they fly, for such happy re-unions were in
her opinion too rare in a practical outlandish
colony not to be enjoyed with full zest when
they came. Henry Arnott is there, his
handsome face a little disfigured by a haughty
and stern aspect, while his dark eyes peer
round the room feasting themselves upon
each pretty face in its turn. Mr. Rousal is
and hair oiled and scented,
there with a scarlet face, a. white cravat,
laying down the law in a magniloquent speech
to a Deputy-Commisary General. Now
and again could be heard in the throng the
merry laugh of Charles Maxwell, and seen
the solemn visage of Eugene which only
wanted a pair of spectacles t0 induce the
vulgar to mistake him for a professor of
heathen mythology.
THE MAXWELLS OF BREMGARTEN. A STORY OF TASMANIA. [Founded on Facts.] (ALL RIGHTS ARE RESERVED.) (Continued from Saturday, 26th September.) CHAPTER LVIII. THE CATASTROPHE. (Article), Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 - 1899), Saturday 3 October 1868 page Article 2014-10-22 14:07 •. 4Toio ?.Ztpgie'"'replied Edwin, "is a sharp
] - weapon, and its greatest disadvantage is tlhat
it stings as shlarlply-from- the mouth of a fool
Ih)·,ns Aitdoes' ifrom thet of a phlilosophsller."
0: ?:shbuted:lenry,: nearly beside. himself ivith
V , :, Villain li do youl dare to call mo a fool I"
SSoftly, Arnott, softly,"' said Rousal, seiz-.
ingllilenty'by .the ' arm; "you, must rually
allow me to makofuse use of the power and
,"rMauthorityImperforeo and of necessity whicb,
touching thle affair:nowson.thb:tapliyou
thought proper to-placotin .oy.hands, else if
I cannot do.thi~t-=I say it with respect and,
Sdeferene--I will just get into my saddle
again anil wash my Lhnilh of the Whole con- I
ern ; for' if you will portiiit me to point it out
to you, you will not be likely to gain any.
thlng by establishing or promoting an arou. i
soentumi ad homnie Iuher in tlitl phi c, I
because do you perceive it is my decided n
opinillion that you have, ill your colulotlndablu i
eagerness to got this painful matter settled aut n
once, commenced with onega instead of with I
alpha, tlihat is at the wrong und, nind taken up t
ia position which, upon patient ivesigatiogat I
will, I doubt not, be fouund perfeootly unten
able and hIopulessly insecure : I allude to the
and respected name of Mlis Maxwell, which, I
is I last night intiumted, Aruott, and will
still maiintin against any amllount of odds, Ias I
no shadow of business to be introduced intod
it t alnl."
"Sir," said Edwin, "I am but slightly .
acquainted with you, but I beg to express ly I
opinion that you are aR perfect gentlemun, and
quite right.'
Rousal bowed, and repliod-" Sir, in tll
muattem where omnnol ratiocination is ro uI
quired lily friends do ano the justice to say
more clearly through a diltlioulty; as to being
a gontleman, I was not awaro that the fact
admuitted of any dispute, and I hope IT may
venture, whoen the present affair is' satisfac
torily settled, to returl that compliment. i
But to the business in hand. My friend f
Arnott, on mly recommendation consenting to I
waive all mlatters in which Miss Maxwell t
nay be directly or indirectly conicerned,
demands an explanation through mna of t
auotlher and, as it appears to me, a far more t
important transotilon, and I could really n
wilsh to see you reetus in curia, ; as we
other. 1'o be brief: my principal, Mr. a
Arnott, distinctly olharges, you, Mr. Edwin t
Hlerbart, with having,, within the compass of
one week last past, written, Onclsed, ad- I
dressed, and trannmitted a letter, upon which
the constrnction of gross impertinence can be f
placed, to lno less a personago than his sister, F
ai spinster, and a lady of superior rank, c
enviable wealth,, elegant :acconlplislhmnnts, n
and great perional attractions."
" 1 certainly did eonclose, address, andd
tlansalit a letter to Miss Arnott," replied i
Edwin, "but her brother here can inform
you, if he thinks proper, by whom that letter I
was written." - -
"Why, I undorstood'you wrote it your elf," c
said RIousal, in surprise.
"T did nothing of the kind," said Edwin;
the letter was written by a cortain party, and
transmitted by me to bliss Arnott according I
"Have you any objection to name the t
party who wrote it 1" said'Rousal.
" The greatest in tile world; I am not at I
" And do you say that Mr. Arnott knows I
the person who actually wrote the letter 1"
"Certainly," answered Edwin, "I do say i
knows who wrote it. I only enclosed it to i
the lady, and by so doing I intended no im. I
pertlience. The letter'itself was the reverse
of impertinent. I wrote .a few words ex- r
plaining why I sent her.:.the letter, as It
thought it was ily duty to do so."
"This is very strange," said .Rousal, "there
is some mystery here. Why, Atlnott, Mr.
Horbart acknowledges sending the letter i
but denies having written it; and says,
mIoreover, that you are well acquainted with
the party who did write it I"
"To cut this matter short," said Henry, i
awaking apparently from a dark reverie, i
" this person has crossed miy path and
blighted one of my fairest hopes-has thrust I
himself uncalled for between me and the ob
familiar manner to mny sister, whom I am
bound to protect : and I will not rest upon I
my bed until I get satisfaction for these un
"And I will prove to the satisfaction of
all reasonable people," said Edwin, "tthat
I never thrust myself between you and'the
object of your love: she was free to choose,
and I would never think of disputing' the
correctness of her judgment. I .never spoke
lady for whom I had too profound-a respect.
fairest hopes intentionally, and. I am sorry
to acsee your valor is not displayed in-a holier
"And what satisfaction am I to have for
being .called a liatr" demanded Henry with
fiase honor will justify you," replied Ed
win. " But be careful, my hearkis not the
heart of a craven; and if any man lifts his
spurn him to the ground; if, holvever, you
think to frighten uie into mleeting you in a
not go: I do not seek your life, and have
given you no reason to seek mine; and be
sides my duty to God, T iavo this also to
consider-that my mother and twvo sisters
look to me for protection, and would'not ac
cept yours if you killed me. A duelist' isCno
better' than a imurderer; at'least, one Who
comes as you do- to. disturb tile peace of a
tranquil home by fastening a bloody qua rel
upon a man who ieoverinjured ydu."
" You are a coward and a liar 1" shouted
Henry, giving rapid utterance to hi unjust
and blind. rage. " A venomous, iespecable
worm-a,loney-moutsed;contemptible hypo,
crite-- a fidse, dastardly poltroon, vlio 'would
hido himself firom his just punishmoiitl be,
neath any wolman's mantle l By the blood of
Kuy'father, if yon do not give lme'thle mbet
ihg I require,. I will proclaim you and 'adfr
tiso yod. to be all hliiv6 said for several
tinides every year, as long aiis' I brhetlio ;the
breathli of life."
"' Halloo - hIhlloo'-- what tile deil's i all
i thlls?'" aidl ~Mr.l Benjamin Buffer, who uidex
l side of the fence, anid now clambered qitidkly
fectdly made his appearnnee on tlid other
over it. If ever thel mlakerel eyes opiened
their widest and gazed their fiereest theyjdid
so then,las ]B3ffer jimped doown from the
fence and itomrted--" What the devil's all
this; twoagainst one, chs l:You shotildrhave
Speace.; strong and mighlty. Words, iSir,:.off a
lsent for me, Herbar:, Imthe fellow to make
you've had breakfast.l What is itall about,
I e O, 'tis notlli"g/ roplied: Edwin, nothing
-,very partioular;.only this gentleman, who is
endowed witll.more passion than, patience,
I has como'here tb'o provoke: an unnecessary
Squarrel,nnd isLvexou bedai:I won't fight
f .". Won't fight :him l" said Buffor; "my
dear fe?eowJyou must.1ghtg4Jiaim?aftert the
Slanguage I heard'him address to you it will
nIveor Io to lot him got oIl' scot fieeo-you caln'
get ant of it."
" The tongue," replied Edwin, " is a sharp
weapon, and its greatest disadvantage is that
it stings as sharply from the mouth of a fool
as it does from that of a philosopher."
shouted Henry, nearly beside himself with rage.
" Villain ! do you dare to call me a fool ?"
" Softly, Arnott, softly," said Rousal, seiz-
ing Henry by the arm ; " you must really
allow me to make use use of the power and
authority perforce and of necessity which,
touching the affair now on the tapis, you
thought proper to place in my hands, else if
I cannot do that--I say it with respect and
deference--I will just get into my saddle
again and wash my hands of the whole con-
ern ; for if you will permit me to point it out
to you, you will not be likely to gain any-
thing by establishing or promoting an argu-
mentum ad hominem here in this place,
because do you perceive it is my decided
opinion that you have, in your commendable
eagerness to get this painful matter settled at
once, commenced with omega instead of with
alpha, that is at the wrong end, and taken up
a position which upon patient investigation
will, I doubt not, be found perfectly unten-
able and hopelessly insecure : I allude to the
and respected name of Miss Maxwell, which,
as I last night intimated, Arnott, and will
still maintain against any amount of odds, has
no shadow of business to be introduced into
it at all."
" Sir," said Edwin, " I am but slightly
acquainted with you, but I beg to express my
opinion that you are a perfect gentleman, and
quite right."
Rousal bowed, and replied--" Sir, in
matters where common ratiocination is re-
quired my friends do me the justice to say
more clearly through a difficulty ; as to being
a gentleman, I was not aware that the fact
admitted of any dispute, and I hope I may
venture, when the present affair is satisfac-
torily settled, to return that compliment.
But to the business in hand. My friend
Arnott, on my recommendation consenting to
waive all matters in which Miss Maxwell
may be directly or indirectly concerned,
demands an explanation through me of
another and, as it appears to me, a far more
important transaction, and I could really
wish to see you reetus in curia, as we
other.To be brief : my principal, Mr.
Arnott, distinctly charges, you, Mr. Edwin
Herbart, with having, within the compass of
one week last past, written, enclosed, ad-
dressed, and transmitted a letter, upon which
the construction of gross impertinence can be
placed, to no less a personage than his sister,
a spinster, and a lady of superior rank,
enviable wealth, elegant accomplishments,
and great personal attractions."
" I certainly did enclose, address, and
transmit a letter to Miss Arnott," replied
Edwin, " but her brother here can inform
you, if he thinks proper, by whom that letter
was written."
" Why, I understood you wrote it yourself,"
said Rousal, in surprise.
" I did nothing of the kind," said Edwin ;
" the letter was written by a certain party, and
transmitted by me to Miss Arnott according
" Have you any objection to name the
party who wrote it ?" said Rousal.
" The greatest in the world ; I am not at
" And do you say that Mr. Arnott knows
the person who actually wrote the letter ?"
" Certainly," answered Edwin, " I do say
knows who wrote it. I only enclosed it to
the lady, and by so doing I intended no im-
pertinence. The letter itself was the reverse
of impertinent. I wrote a few words ex-
plaining why I sent her the letter, as I
thought it was my duty to do so."
" This is very strange," said Rousal, " there
is some mystery here. Why, Arnott, Mr.
Herbart acknowledges sending the letter
but denies having written it ; and says,
moreover, that you are well acquainted with
the party who did write it !"
" To cut this matter short," said Henry,
awaking apparently from a dark reverie,
" this person has crossed my path and
blighted one of my fairest hopes--has thrust
himself uncalled for between me and the ob-
familiar manner to my sister, whom I am
bound to protect : and I will not rest upon
my bed until I get satisfaction for these un-
" And I will prove to the satisfaction of
all reasonable people," said Edwin, " that
I never thrust myself between you and the
object of your love : she was free to choose,
and I would never think of disputing the
correctness of her judgment. I never spoke
lady for whom I had too profound a respect.
fairest hopes intentionally, and I am sorry
to see your valor is not displayed in a holier
" And what satisfaction am I to have for
being called a liar ?" demanded Henry with
false honor will justify you," replied Ed-
win. " But be careful, my heart is not the
heart of a craven ; and if any man lifts his
spurn him to the ground ; if, however, you
think to frighten me into meeting you in a
not go : I do not seek your life, and have
given you no reason to seek mine ; and be-
sides my duty to God, I have this also to
consider--that my mother and two sisters
look to me for protection, and would not ac-
cept yours if you killed me. A duelist is no
better than a murderer ; at least, one who
comes as you do to disturb the peace of a
tranquil home by fastening a bloody quarrel
upon a man who never injured you."
" You are a coward and a liar !" shouted
Henry, giving rapid utterance to his unjust
and blind rage. " A venomous, despicable
worm--a honey-mouthed, contemptible hypo-
crite--a false, dastardly poltroon, who would
hide himself from his just punishment be-
neath any woman's mantle ! By the blood of
my father, if you do not give me the meet-
ing I require,. I will proclaim you and adver-
tise you to be all I have said for several
times every year, as long a I breathe the
breath of life."
" Halloo-- halloo-- what the devil's all
this ?'" said Mr. Benjamin Buffer, who unex-
side of the fence, and now clambered quickly
pectedly made his appearance on the other
over it. If ever the mackerel eyes opened
their widest and gazed their fiercest they did
so then, as Buffer jumped down from the
fence and iterated--" What the devil's all
this ; two against one, eh ? You should have
peace ; strong and mighty words, Sir, off a
sent for me, Herbart, I'm the fellow to make
you've had breakfast. What is it all about, Herbart ?"
" O, 'tis nothing replied Edwin, " nothing
very particular ; only this gentleman, who is
endowed with more passion than patience,
has come here to provoke an unnecessary
quarrel, and is vexed because I won't fight him."
" Won't fight him !" said Buffer ; " my
dear fellow you must fight him ; after the
language I heard him address to you it will
never do to let him got off scot free--you can't
get out of it."
THE MAXWELLS OF BREMGARTEN. A STORY OF TASMANIA. [Founded on Facts.] (ALL RIGHTS ARE RESERVED.) (Continued from Saturday, 26th September.) CHAPTER LVIII. THE CATASTROPHE. (Article), Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 - 1899), Saturday 3 October 1868 page Article 2014-10-22 13:32 ihalf abloien more woods and you shall have,
the business all to yourself. Mr. Herbart, "I
require ypi to renounce for over all preton
siona, to tlhe hand of blissMmaxwcll,or give me
instant satisfaction." -
* If ' you l'id inot speak," said Edwin " 1.like
asober man I would say you were drunk, and
if I,did not know, you to be sMr. Arnoit 1
would say you were mad; but 1 protest:your
attitude, from whatever cause it iassunied,
i dictatorial and unwartantable; and I treat
. ,your ,proposal with infinite contemplt." '
" ,ou h?t ir, Rodsal," said Henry, " tlhe
w iill have paufation.''? h -"
at, _ e.bully,' saidEdgin, "uatl assassinatetme
" I fTOuo mean to tiur cut-throat as well
.:thiic to ,nmake,me. :astndl out' beford thdi
,, Meebk, yP,. u may, iwvhen yo3u like; 'iumtif you
:"3imuzzlo of your pitoi to hbe shot at like a
3;c:F~y,: yqu tire.,nuistal, n. I'will not come." '
, ,'You hear tllat IOtos l," caid IHenry; " a
r:, icdcowadrd, by all that's uufortunate i
"'sls~ ifgmoiuthbc 'f miserble verses, but Il
S.bntambggr idef ue, but by Heaven I
, ne :was an Irih 1Ceggabl; and i tear
did nq, tilnk .he 5 was a c~oivardi."
half a dozen more words and you shall have
the business all to yourself. Mr. Herbart, I
require you to renounce for over all preten-
sions to the hand of Miss Maxwell, or give me
instant satisfaction."
" If you did not speak," said Edwin " like
a sober man I would say you were drunk, and
if I did not know you to be Mr. Arnott I
would say you were mad ; but I protest your
attitude, from whatever cause it assumed,
is dictatorial and unwarrantable ; and I treat
your proposal with infinite contempt."
" You hear, Rousal," said Henry, " the
will have satisfaction."
as bully," said Edwin, " and assassinate me
" If you mean to turn cut-throat as well
think to make me stand out before the
in secret you may when you like ; but if you
muzzle of your pistol to be shot at like a
crow, you are mistaken ; I will not come."
" You hear that Rousal," said Henry ; " a
rank coward, by all that's unfortunate : I
shedding mouther of miserable verses, but I
bantam beggar defies me ; but by Heaven I
knew he was an Irish beggar, and a tear-
did not think he was a coward."
THE MAXWELLS OF BREMGARTEN. A STORY OF TASMANIA. [Founded on Facts.] (ALL RIGHTS ARE RESERVED.) (Continued from Saturday, 26th September.) CHAPTER LVIII. THE CATASTROPHE. (Article), Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 - 1899), Saturday 3 October 1868 page Article 2014-10-22 13:04 TIHE M1AXWELLS 11 DItEMIUAITIiN.
A STORiY O [ TASMANIA.
weathllor.
When ha judged that they had gone far t
enough to be tolerably secure fiom inter- I
ruation Henry Arnott turned round to I
Edwin and said :
should be nadoi acquainted without nu
naecessary preasntlo with the business wlich I
his led to the Ipresent visit."
Edwin bowedr, and intimated that h] wis i
quite ready to hear it. t
" Then [ conceive it to be my duty to in- I
• form you that your amiable relative, this c
",.Maxwell, whom I singled out fromi a crowd I
of other ladies far mtor?e worthy of the liono, I
has thought proper, up1on my putting the c
question in a decided manner, to refuse Itas
decidedly to accept mly hallnd i marriage." t
" "Well," said Edwin, foldiu, his arms upon
his breast and looking the last speaker a
steadily in the fileo, for he saw at once that i
it was Henry's ipurplo to pick a quarrel a
with hini, and thought it best to assume a
-determinel attitude; " nil I responsible for t
Sliss'Maxwell's decisionl" I
If you alre not in1 a moral sense," said y
Heonry, warming to his work, "it is my de- i
termination to mnake you resplonsiblo for it.
It was oil your account I ami well assured
I lhad it from one who hail every opportuunity
of discoverimg the truth--that it is on your t
account I stand here a dishonored, despised, t
and insulted mn I and [ have sworn that t
you shall not enjoy your victory until you f
Da2eenda eat Carthago." I
"Craving your pardon, Arnott," said Mr.
Rousal, "snd begging yon in a friendly I
cholor in this matter, T insist upon may right t
to speak. You have honored mile, Arnott, c
act as your friend or second, to which request a
I acceded upon the iusual conditions, viz., that I
it being as much of the laws of the dnello as t
I ever did understand, the two principals I
having had a row or a difference, do forth- t
with naule a friend or a second each, and I
thien stand apart in dignified magnanimity
while the seconds being madile acquainted by i
their respective principals with the ramifica- I
tions of the subject under discussion, ido. 1
without vexations delay lay their heads to- t
on three distinct points--fist, whethcr
quarrelling at all ; secondly, if so, to submit 5
proposals for the re-establishlnent of pleace;
thirdly, if so, and if the re-cstablishment of 1
peace is impracticable, to see their plrincipals
through the business fairly dealt with at the I
" Why, weo know all that, Rousal," said
Henry, ifllatiently; "you will have plenty of
time to confer with Mr. Herbarts friend when
h'o chooses to name him."
"Yes-yes, certainly," replied Rousn;
"but with your leave and with the greatest
amourit of deference, Arnott, I take the
liberty of reminding you shat in our confer
once. on the subject last night before we re
have, in conjunction with whatevergentlemnan
this lMr. Herbart might think proler to name
as liis friend, thie entire and complete man
nagement of this.affair from beginning to end,
"which is as I take it quite correct and iproper;
LFoaunded on Facts.f
(AI.r. ounrITe Atnn nIcsanViDn.)
(Conlinsedclfram Stardayq, 2(ith Septembler'.)
EDNx 'was nilost struck duInlb with
astonishment when ]to beoULto aware that
his humble dwelling was visited by so g'eat
It al nu l- isenry Arllott, and lie no sooner I
looked oeuefully into his visitor's ftic than i
ha diiovered by its pletlis'r expression that
there was soimetlling wrong. He smiled,
ihowver, and told the two gentleunon that I
htu was glad to seo theml , inviting them at
the satlu titla to walk in ; but they desired i
to habe excused fron doing so, and in, their
turn invited Mr. luerbart to favor- thlon with t
his company for a short distanco from the
house, as they had some .important intolli- t
gence to comnunicatu to hin). lie accordingly
walked with them dowin towards the "road
along one of his paddlock fences which cols
coaled them from view, they leading their I
horses and replying in monosyllables to t
Edwiu's commonplaco observations about the u
but, my. dear fellow, when the world gets
hold of thliis' piece of business-as, indeed, in
-it will be alit to provoke a smile when it
is said that tile crime or first principal, Henry
" Arnott, Iosq., did appoint Thomas \Wellesley
Rousal, hsq., his second, abiddid nevertheless
out of thile hands of the aforesaid second, and
did act front first to last on his own footing.
and did ziot keep himself aloof until the
final and tragical denoueentt, is hath been
in all suh 0caus0s dilly made and provided."
OHlAPl'EIt LVIlI.
TIIU CATABFIrOI'IIR,
THE MAXWELLS OF BREMGARTEN.
A STORY OF[ TASMANIA.
weather.
When he judged that they had gone far
enough to be tolerably secure from inter-
ruption Henry Arnott turned round to
Edwin and said :--
should be made acquainted without un-
necessary preamble with the business which
his led to the present visit."
Edwin bowed, and intimated that he was
quite ready to hear it.
" Then I conceive it to be my duty to in-
form you that your amiable relative, Miss
Maxwell, whom I singled out from a crowd
of other ladies far more worthy of the honor,
has thought proper, upon my putting the
question in a decided manner, to refuse as
decidedly to accept my hand in marriage."
" Well," said Edwin, folding his arms upon
his breast and looking the last speaker
steadily in the face, for he saw at once that
it was Henry's purpose to pick a quarrel
with him, and thought it best to assume a
determined attitude ; " am I responsible for
Miss Maxwell's decision ?"
" If you are not in a moral sense," said
Henry, warming to his work, " it is my de-
termination to make you responsible for it.
It was on your account I am well assured--
I had it from one who had every opportunity
of discovering the truth--that it is on your
account I stand here a dishonored, despised,
and insulted man ! and I have sworn that
you shall not enjoy your victory until you
Delenda est Carthago."
" Craving your pardon, Arnott," said Mr.
Rousal, " and begging you in a friendly
choler in this matter, I insist upon my right
to speak. You have honored me, Arnott,
act as your friend or second, to which request
I acceded upon the usual conditions, viz., that
it being as much of the laws of the duello as
I ever did understand, the two principals
having had a row or a difference, do forth-
with name a friend or a second each, and
then stand apart in dignified magnanimity
while the seconds being made acquainted by
their respective principals with the ramifica-
tions of the subject under discussion, do
without vexations delay lay their heads to-
on three distinct points--first, whether
quarrelling at all ; secondly, if so, to submit
proposals for the re-establishment of peace ;
thirdly, if so, and if the re-establishment of
peace is impracticable, to see their principals
through the business fairly dealt with at the
" Why, we know all that, Rousal," said
Henry, impatiently ; " you will have plenty of
time to confer with Mr. Herbart's friend when
he chooses to name him."
" Yes--yes, certainly," replied Rousal ;
" but with your leave and with the greatest
amount of deference, Arnott, I take the
liberty of reminding you that in our confer-
ence on the subject last night before we re-
have, in conjunction with whatever gentleman
this Mr. Herbart might think proper to name
as his friend, the entire and complete man-
agement of this affair from beginning to end,
which is as I take it quite correct and proper ;
[Founded on Facts.]
(ALL RIGHTS ARE RESERVED.)
(Continued from Saturday, 26th September.)
EDWIN was almost struck dumb with
astonishment when he became aware that
his humble dwelling was visited by so great
a man as Henry Arnott, and he no sooner
looked carefully into his visitor's face than
he discovered by its peculiar expression that
there was something wrong. He smiled,
however, and told the two gentlemen that
he was glad to see them , inviting them at
the same time to walk in ; but they desired
to be excused from doing so, and in their
turn invited Mr. Herbart to favor them with
his company for a short distance from the
house, as they had some important intelli-
gence to communicate to him. He accordingly
walked with them down towards the road
along one of his paddock fences which con-
cealed them from view, they leading their
horses and replying in monosyllables to
Edwin's commonplace observations about the
but, my dear fellow, when the world gets
hold of this piece of business--as, indeed, in
--it will be apt to provoke a smile when it
is said that the crime or first principal, Henry
Arnott, Esq., did appoint Thomas Wellesley
Rousal, Esq., his second, and did nevertheless
out of the hands of the aforesaid second, and
did act from first to last on his own footing.
and did not keep himself aloof until the
final and tragical denouement, as hath been
in all such causes duly made and provided."
CHAPTER LVIII.
THE CATASTROPHE.

Counts updated hourly

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

  1. BARRY, John Arthur
    List
    Public

    64 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2011-08-02
    User data
  2. KIPLING, Rudyard
    List
    Public

    10 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2011-01-08
    User data
  3. OXENHAM, John
    List
    Public

    1 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2011-01-09
    User data
  4. The Will Forgeries
    List
    Public

    16 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2010-08-14
    User data

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.