Information about Trove user: maurielyn

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

RankCorrectorLines corrected
1 JohnWarren 3,262,340
2 NeilHamilton 2,288,879
3 annmanley 2,059,659
4 noelwoodhouse 1,857,543
5 maurielyn 1,492,925
6 John.F.Hall 1,481,260
7 JudyClayden 1,190,627

1,492,925 lines corrected.

Corrections by month

May 2015 30,285
April 2015 26,402
March 2015 26,337
February 2015 30,109
January 2015 13
December 2014 1,991
November 2014 4,733
October 2014 25,113
September 2014 28,719
August 2014 46,848
July 2014 54,325
June 2014 10,647
May 2014 15,795
April 2014 16,770
March 2014 3
February 2014 92
January 2014 36
December 2013 4,433
November 2013 6,312
October 2013 40,154
September 2013 26,891
August 2013 19,229
July 2013 30,238
June 2013 35,889
May 2013 34,599
April 2013 5,953
March 2013 4,178
February 2013 60
December 2012 122
November 2012 6,412
October 2012 9,007
September 2012 2,074
August 2012 13,001
July 2012 8,995
June 2012 41,702
May 2012 10,728
April 2012 4,423
March 2012 12,588
February 2012 9,171
January 2012 2,655
December 2011 22,428
November 2011 29,308
October 2011 28,340
September 2011 20,977
August 2011 22,871
July 2011 20,215
June 2011 11,018
May 2011 7,946
April 2011 45,102
March 2011 14,791
February 2011 30,582
January 2011 36,679
December 2010 14,510
November 2010 15,639
October 2010 25,076
September 2010 35,694
August 2010 38,196
July 2010 31,494
June 2010 42,660
May 2010 42,984
April 2010 33,196
March 2010 26,158
February 2010 21,768
January 2010 23,693
December 2009 14,169
November 2009 13,910
October 2009 8,721
September 2009 5,101
August 2009 5,707
July 2009 6,083
June 2009 5,576
May 2009 30,715
April 2009 8,466
March 2009 21,801
February 2009 7,575
January 2009 5,156
December 2008 7,165
November 2008 6,402
October 2008 24,538
September 2008 28,111
August 2008 5,372

Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
Story Column. THE DEATH SHIP, A STRANGE STORY. AN ACCOUNT OF A CRUISE IN THE FLYING DUTCHMAN, COLLECTED FROM THE PAPERS OF THE LATE MR. GEOFFREY FENTON, OF POPLAR, MASTER MARINER. [ALL QUEENSLAND RIGHTS RESERVED.] CHAPTER 1.—I SAIL AS SECOND MATE IN TEH SARACEN. (Article), The Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947), Wednesday 9 October 1889 page Article 2015-05-24 12:02 .' AfteraliWe;tho,English,cnsignwag soon to
Aflutter at aor foretopgallact-mast-head To
4bis Bignal woinstantiy replied, by hoisting oiir
.;.-oolour; and rfihortly after midday, acriving
? fltreastof eaeh other, wo backed our topsiiil
t ;;y«rd,' she doing ithe like.; wideowe lay steady
,,|i-P5n the oalm'Bea.and bo close,' that we eould
:: Beerfhe faoea^of ier peojplo bvor, the rail.ind
'?hear the sound, ihough not the words, of fche ,
\ 'master giving his .orders. '
After a little the English ensign was seen to
flutter at her foretopgallant-mast-head. To
this signal we instantly replied, by hoisting our
colour; and shortly after midday, arriving
abreast of each other, we backed our topsail
yard, she doing the like; and we lay steady
upon the calm sea, and so close, that we could
see the faces of her people over the rail, and
hear the sound, though not the words, of the
master giving his orders.###
Story Column. THE DEATH SHIP, A STRANGE STORY. AN ACCOUNT OF A CRUISE IN THE FLYING DUTCHMAN, COLLECTED FROM THE PAPERS OF THE LATE MR. GEOFFREY FENTON, OF POPLAR, MASTER MARINER. [ALL QUEENSLAND RIGHTS RESERVED.] CHAPTER 1.—I SAIL AS SECOND MATE IN TEH SARACEN. (Article), The Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947), Wednesday 9 October 1889 page Article 2015-05-24 11:57 . W.e,wait»d with^nuoh oipestation. and some
anxiety .for thenetranger ta approaoh.noar
, enough .to enable .us to gather her Character,
..jbr eTenlher^nationsJily ; for.t^e.Yexperianoed
'neye will always observe a spiaething..in,,.the
'. shipa ,of the Butch and French naiioas
'to- diatingmisk the ,3ags they beloqg.fo.
. .,- it w«a .soon. erident. -iat that sbe waaatand
. ing dincbtly.foc us. shown by the speed with
? yhioh her '.sails -JBe;.. but When bar , hull ^ai
,lan-ly eaposed, Captain Skevingtan, after .a
, careful elimination .of her, declared hor to baa
vessel of about 100! tons,, probably a auow— hor
..,,, mainmast boinjr inline .with her forefiaast— .and'
v ,,80 we 6toQd.«n,. lowing it to her to be wary if
^she bhose. . ' '
We waited with much expectation and some
anxiety for the stranger to approach near
enough to enable us to gather her character,
or even her nationality; for the experienced
eye will always observe a something in the
ships of the Dutch and French nations
to distinguish the flags they belong to.
It was soon evident that she was stand-
ing directly for us shown by the speed with
which her sails rose; but when her hull was
fairly exposed, Captain Skevington, after a
careful examination of her, declared her to be a
vessel of about 100 tons, probably a snow— her
mainmast being in one with her foremast— and
so we stood on, leaving it to her to be wary if
she chose.
Story Column. THE DEATH SHIP, A STRANGE STORY. AN ACCOUNT OF A CRUISE IN THE FLYING DUTCHMAN, COLLECTED FROM THE PAPERS OF THE LATE MR. GEOFFREY FENTON, OF POPLAR, MASTER MARINER. [ALL QUEENSLAND RIGHTS RESERVED.] CHAPTER 1.—I SAIL AS SECOND MATE IN TEH SARACEN. (Article), The Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947), Wednesday 9 October 1889 page Article 2015-05-24 11:51 . .. For days and days after, we had oleared tto
. Hihanneland entered upon those deep waters,
. ; which, off ; soundings, away in brilliant bice
? .billows, sometimes paling into faint azure or
-?weltering in dyes as purely dark as the -violet,
, . according as the mood of the sky; is, nothing
? whatever of consequence befell. We were [46
? of a company. Captain Bkevington was a stout
. Irat sedate Bailor, who had used the sea for
, many years, i and had -confronted so many
i perils there waB scaroely an ocean danger
; you could name about which he could not talk
.i. from personal .experience. iH« was, likewise,
,' ,. »,man of cdaoation and intelligenoe, with [a
-,t,manner about him at timesaot very intolligibjo,
,' i tho,ogh his temper .was always exoellont,,-and
, I his, skill as a seaman equal to every call made
v^j.npon it. We carried -sir 12-poundera and
.. ,i.lonr braea swivels and a,, plentiful store! of
.imall arms and ammunition. Our ship was five
, . jjrears- old, a good Bailer, handsomely found is
-l-all r^specte of sails and taokling. so that any
' j.jiirjqspeot we might contemplate of falling in
,.,\-'with,lprivateers and eueh ^ontry troubled us
'-, Dtttle; since with a bca-ve ship and nimble
, -hee]e, high hot hearts, English cannon, and
.,,;jjollj British beef for the workiug of them, the
. ' , ?imariner need never doubt 4hat the Lord will
-«wn him, wherever ho may go. and whatever he
.maydo.
, (We. oroseed Jthe equator .in longitude 80
-.degrees west, then braoed upito tkS trade wind
. ithati.heeled as with a. brisk ^jalo, in 5 degrees
-south latitude, and we skirted the sea in that
, ,jrreat Afnoan bight- 'twi^t Oape Palmaa
. . ,J«id,1thQ.:Cape of Good Hops, i formerly oalled
., -and . very prcperly, I think, the Ethiopie
♦Ocoan; for, though to be -auro it is all
^jAtlantio Ocean, yet, metWuka,,it.i8 aa fully
.entitled to a, .distinctive appellation aB is
... ttheiBay. of Biscay, that is equally ,one~uea will
.' ithat which rolJitinto it.
j.: . 'OnOiinorning^ July, weboiog than aome
. ' 'xibat south of the latitude of the island of St.
' Helena, a-aeaman, who wasou.theitopsail-yard,
tailed thodook,. acd cried oat that thero waa a
aa&iTJght»abead. ?
For days and days after we had cleared the
channel and entered upon those deep waters,
which, off soundings, away in brilliant blue
billows, sometimes paling into faint azure or
weltering in dyes as purely dark as the violet,
according as the mood of the sky is, nothing
whatever of consequence befell. We were 40
of a company. Captain Skevington was a stout
but sedate sailor, who had used the sea for
many years, and had confronted so many
perils there was scarcely an ocean danger
you could name about which he could not talk
from personal experience. He was, likewise,
a man of education and intelligence, with a
manner about him at times not very intelligible,
though his temper was always excellent, and
his skill as a seaman equal to every call made
upon it. We carried six 12-pounders and
four brass swivels and a plentiful store of
small arms and ammunition. Our ship was five
years old, a good sailer, handsomely found in
all respects of sails and tackling, so that any
prospect we might contemplate of falling in
with privateers and such gentry troubled us
little; since with a brave ship and nimble
heels, high hot hearts, English cannon, and
jolly British beef for the working of them, the
mariner need never doubt that the Lord will
own him, wherever he may go and whatever he
may do.
We crossed the equator in longitude 30
degrees west, then braced up to the trade wind
that heeled us with a brisk gale, in 5 degrees
south latitude, and we skirted the sea in that
great African bight 'twixt Cape Palmas
and the Cape of Good Hope, formerly called
and very properly, I think, the Ethiopie
Ocean; for, though to be sure it is all
Atlantic Ocean, yet, methinks, it is as fully
entitled to a distinctive appellation as is
the Bay of Biscay, that is equally one sea with
that which rolls into it.
One morning in July, we being then some-
what south of the latitude of the island of St.
Helena, a seaman, who was on the topsail-yard,
hailed the deck, and cried out that there was a
sail right ahead.
Story Column. THE DEATH SHIP, A STRANGE STORY. AN ACCOUNT OF A CRUISE IN THE FLYING DUTCHMAN, COLLECTED FROM THE PAPERS OF THE LATE MR. GEOFFREY FENTON, OF POPLAR, MASTER MARINER. [ALL QUEENSLAND RIGHTS RESERVED.] CHAPTER 1.—I SAIL AS SECOND MATE IN TEH SARACEN. (Article), The Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947), Wednesday 9 October 1889 page Article 2015-05-24 11:24 '?'?' Chapibb II. — We Mebt and Spbak thi
LovatT NiKor, Show . ;
CHAPTER II.--WE MEET AND SPEAK THE
LOVELY NANCY, SNOW.
Story Column. THE DEATH SHIP, A STRANGE STORY. AN ACCOUNT OF A CRUISE IN THE FLYING DUTCHMAN, COLLECTED FROM THE PAPERS OF THE LATE MR. GEOFFREY FENTON, OF POPLAR, MASTER MARINER. [ALL QUEENSLAND RIGHTS RESERVED.] CHAPTER 1.—I SAIL AS SECOND MATE IN TEH SARACEN. (Article), The Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947), Wednesday 9 October 1889 page Article 2015-05-24 11:20 .. i ;i When my apprenticeship term ?was expired, I
. ? made two voyages as second mate, and then
. . i -obtained an appointment to that, post in a ship
; named the Saraoen, for a voyage to the East
. {Indies. This was a.d. 179G. 'I was then 22
: .. .years of J age, a tall, well built young fellow
-.,-.. -with tawny hair, of the mariner's complexion
. .. 'from the high suns I had sailed vnder aad the '
-., 'hardening gales I had stared'into, with dark
\ 'bine eyes filled with the light of an easy and
. naturally merry heart, wfeite teeth, very regular,
? and a glad expression, as though, forsooth, I
i found something gay and to like in all that I
i looked at. Indeed, it was a -saying with my
?mother that ' GtfE ' (meaning Qeoflrey),
, i that 'Gefi's appearance waa-as though a very
; little joke woujd set the 'fall measure of his
,'.', spirits oveiflowing.' ? ? ' i
' The master of the Saracen was one Jacob
, ?Skeviugion, and the mate's- name Christopher
1 , Hall. We Bailed from- Graveaend— for with
'. :Whitby I was now -done — in the month of
?..April, 1798. We were told to look to cur
t , Selves when we should arrive in the neighbour
? hood of the Cape of -Good Hope, for it was
.,., Renoh, were likely to send a squadron to
reoover Cape Town, that had fallen into the
, . hands of the British in-the previous September.
- However, at the time'Of our lifting anohor o£
Gravesend, the Cape settlement lie on the
other tide of the globe. Whatever danger
' least faint shadow -upon ub. Besides the
' sailor was so used to the perils of the enemy
' ' and the chase that nothing could put an element
of uneasiness into his -plain, shipboard life,
,. short of the assurance of -his own or his captain's
eyes that the sail had 'hauled his wind and nes
faBt growing upon the -sea line was undeniably
. enough to cannonadchim into staves.
So with resolved ^spirits, which many of cs
' had cheered and beartaned' by a few farewell
' .^ drams— for of all parts of the seafaring life
1 ; the saying good-bye 'to those we love, and
whom the God of hea-ven- alone* knowa whether
we shall ever clasp to our breasts again, is tlie
? hardest — we plied the 'Capstan with a will,
' : raising the anohor to a-oborus that fetched en
echo from the 'river's banks up and down the
' . reach; and then sheeting home our topsaiU,
dragging up the halliards with pieroing, f ar
. Bounding songs, we gathered the weight of the
j pleasant sunny wind into those spacioua hol
lows, and in a few minutes had started up en
? our long journey.
When my apprenticeship term was expired, I
made two voyages as second mate, and then
obtained an appointment to that post in a ship
named the Saracen, for a voyage to the East
Indies. This was a.d. 1796. I was then 22
years of age, a tall, well built young fellow
with tawny hair, of the mariner's complexion
from the high suns I had sailed under and the
hardening gales I had stared into, with dark
blue eyes filled with the light of an easy and
naturally merry heart, white teeth, very regular,
and a glad expression, as though, forsooth, I
found something gay and to like in all that I
looked at. Indeed, it was a saying with my
mother that "Geff" (meaning Geoffrey),
that "Geff's appearance was as though a very
little joke would set the full measure of his
spirits overflowing.
The master of the Saracen was one Jacob
Skevington, and the mate's name Christopher
Hall. We sailed from Gravesend—for with
Whitby I was now done — in the month of
April, 1796. We were told to look to our-
selves when we should arrive in the neighbour-
hood of the Cape of Good Hope, for it was
French, were likely to send a squadron to
recover Cape Town, that had fallen into the
hands of the British in the previous September.
However, at the time of our lifting anchor off
Gravesend, the Cape settlement lay on the
other side of the globe. Whatever danger
least faint shadow upon us. Besides the
sailor was so used to the perils of the enemy
and the chase that nothing could put an element
of uneasiness into his plain, shipboard life,
short of the assurance of his own or his captain's
eyes that the sail had hauled his wind and was
fast growing upon the sea line was undeniably
enough to cannonade him into staves.
So with resolved spirits, which many of us
had cheered and heartened by a few farewell
drams— for of all parts of the seafaring life
the saying good-bye to those we love, and
whom the God of heaven alone knows whether
we shall ever clasp to our breasts again, is the
hardest — we plied the Capstan with a will,
raising the anchor to a chorus that fetched an
echo from the river's banks up and down the
reach; and then sheeting home our topsails,
dragging up the halliards with piercing, far-
sounding songs, we gathered the weight of the
pleasant sunny wind into those spacious hol-
lows, and in a few minutes had started upon
our long journey.
Story Column. THE DEATH SHIP, A STRANGE STORY. AN ACCOUNT OF A CRUISE IN THE FLYING DUTCHMAN, COLLECTED FROM THE PAPERS OF THE LATE MR. GEOFFREY FENTON, OF POPLAR, MASTER MARINER. [ALL QUEENSLAND RIGHTS RESERVED.] CHAPTER 1.—I SAIL AS SECOND MATE IN TEH SARACEN. (Article), The Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947), Wednesday 9 October 1889 page Article 2015-05-24 11:09 ? u . J will paf s by nil the explanat ons concerning
, ?? .the reasons oi my going, to sea, as I do not
... desiro to forfeit your kind: patience by letting
. i this story stand. Enough if Iisay that after l
--. ;- had beep fairly well grounded in Eaglwh,
? ,: : arithmetic, end tho like, ,whiuhi plain eduoatln
v I have never wearied of improving oy reading
:'-. /everything good -that patne in my way, I was
- ?! .hound apprentice to a ! respebtable man named
? '?-,! .Joshua Cox, of Whitby, and served my time in
- ;- his vessel, the iLanshing Susan.' a brave, tumble
'.? ' brigantine.
We traded -to Riga, Stockholm; aud Baltio '
: ? ? ? iports, and often to Rotterdam, where, having
. j'a'Ouiok ear, -whioh has sometimes served me
;-, 'for playing upon the fiddle for ray mates to
- ?dance or fcrag to, I picked up enoughof Butch to
i: ?enable me to' hold my own in conversing with
? . :-a Hollander, or Hans Butter- bos as these
.- ^people used to be oallcd : that is to say, I had
- ??sufficient -words at command to qualify me to
. . follow what was said and to answer so as to be
. intelligible ; the easier, sinoe uncouth as that
i; ? language is, there is so much of it resembling
ouis in 'sound that many words in it might
? «aeily ipass for portions of occ tongue grossly
- .and ludicrously articulated. Why I mention
.? . this will hereafter appear.
I will pass by all the explanations concerning
the reasons of my going to sea, as I do not
desire to forfeit your kind patience by letting
this story stand. Enough if I say that after I
had been fairly well grounded in English,
arithmetic, and the like, which plain education
I have never wearied of improving by reading
everything good that came in my way, I was
bound apprentice to a respectable man named
Joshua Cox, of Whitby, and served my time in
his vessel, the Laughing Susan, a brave, nimble
brigantine.
We traded to Riga, Stockholm, and Baltic
ports, and often to Rotterdam, where, having
a quick ear, which has sometimes served me
for playing upon the fiddle for my mates to
dance or sing to, I picked up enough of Dutch to
enable me to hold my own in conversing with
a Hollander, or Hans Butter-bos as these
people used to be called; that is to say, I had
sufficient words at command to qualify me to
follow what was said and to answer so as to be
intelligible; the easier, since uncouth as that
language is, there is so much of it resembling
ours in sound that many words in it might
easily pass for portions of our tongue grossly
and ludicrously articulated. Why I mention
this will hereafter appear.
Story Column. THE DEATH SHIP, A STRANGE STORY. AN ACCOUNT OF A CRUISE IN THE FLYING DUTCHMAN, COLLECTED FROM THE PAPERS OF THE LATE MR. GEOFFREY FENTON, OF POPLAR, MASTER MARINER. [ALL QUEENSLAND RIGHTS RESERVED.] CHAPTER 1.—I SAIL AS SECOND MATE IN TEH SARACEN. (Article), The Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947), Wednesday 9 October 1889 page Article 2015-05-24 10:49 [?]
THE I)EATtt SHIP,
.' AN ACCOUNT OF A, ORCIBB , IN THE rLTIKO
;' DtrrOHXAN, 00LUB0TBD': FBOK THB PAPEES
??'.'???'.' ' OP TBB LATB MR. ' GEOFFEE* FBNT01J, OF
.1'; .1 - POPLAB, HASTEB KABrNKB.
??-???-???? BY W- CLARK RUSSELL, '
'?' ' '' Author p£ '' The Wreck of tho Grosvenor,' ' The
''??'?- ? ' Golden Hope,' &a, &o.
i .-.(. ? ;[ATiT, QSJEENSLAND. RIGHTS RESEBVBD.]
. .,.;C.hapibb I. — I Pail as Seojnd Math ik the
i Saeaoen.
A'STR^GE STOBY.

THE DEATH SHIP,
AN ACCOUNT OF A CRUISE IN THE FLYING
DUCHMAN, COLLECTED FROM THE PAPERS
OF THE LATE MR. GEOFFREY FENTON, OF
POPLAR, MASTER MARINER.
BY W. CLARK RUSSELL,
Author of "The Wreck of the Grosvenor," "The
Golden Hope," &c, &c.
[All Queensland Rights Reserved.]
CHAPTER I.--I SAIL AS SECOND MATE IN THE
SARACEN.
A STRANGE STORY.
CHAPTER VI. FRANK HARRISON. (Article), Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904), Saturday 21 December 1889 page Article 2015-05-23 21:00 cheeks and filling his eonl with blackest
despair. He hnrried on, soaroely heeding the
woman at bis side in his eagerness to get
past bis rival and old sweetheart. He only
missed her from his side when be beard her
uaok and sawniB late oompanion addressing,
herself to the loverB. " Excuse me, hut oon
So'tell me if amon named Frank Harrison
ves—".Then these was a low, pieroing
soream, and the woman's voioe rang oat
again, load and vehement now. " Frank I
Frank? afa.ve fo'nd thee at last I"
"Mary I" buret hoarsely from Bradford's
glanced about him uneasily as if- he contem
"Who 1b hoo, George!" Nancy Somera
"His name's not George 1" the woman
—my busban'!"
" Yo'e nusban' 1" Nancy Somers oried with
the man's side as if ho were a leper. The
fallen senseless in the snow had- not the
" Yo' soamp 1" Levi thundered at his rival,
his eyeB ablaze with indignant fire. " Thie
woman is yo're wahfe, an' yet yo'd ha' mar
ried this simple truBtin' wench an'rained her
for ever. Hied ah known aa thah war sioh a
finger to save thee! Goo oway, mon 1 Goo
away, or ah may target maysel' an' God an'
kill tfiee!"
Without a word Frank Harrison tamed
away and went qnlckly towards the village,
his wife following at nis heels. He left his
When Nanoy Somers cams to her senses
his rongh faoe and deep, honest eyeB fixed
upon her, her confusion was piteous to
"Is it true,Levi?" she asked, faintly, an
she straggled to her feet.
"Trae anaff," he answered. "He's wed,
an' that woman's his wife, Yo' owt to thank
" Ah do thank God !" she answered, fer
vently, "Oh, Levi! Levi! oon yo' ever
f orgie me for what ah've done ?"
"Forgle thee, wench 1" he oried, hnskily.
" Ay, fro my heart ah do ? Let us booath
forget what's gone. Yo' are mahne neaw ?'
her sweet face on hia breast, sad sobbed oat
her gladness in a woman's way, And aeoure
The next day all the village goBBipa were
Bumonr had It that Nanoy Somers had
whisper of the tenth ever got abroad.
Prophet and Nanoy were married.
Poverty-strioken Nephew—" Yon don't
know what anxiety is, yon are so well off."
Rich Unole—"I rather guess I do know what
A drugglBt the other day oommitted a fatal
poisoned the patient, When the terrible
quite a handful of fate hair and remarked,
" Well, that was unlucky 1 It wan my beat
The Ebd.
cheeks and filling his soul with blackest
despair. He hurried on, scarcely heeding the
woman at his side in his eagerness to get
past his rival and old sweetheart. He only
missed her from his side when he heard her
back and saw his late companion addressing
herself to the lovers. "Excuse me, but con
yo' tell me if a mon named Frank Harrison
lives----" Then there was a low, piercing
scream, and the woman's voice rang out
again, loud and vehement now. "Frank!
Frank? ah've fo'nd thee at last!"
"Mary!" burst hoarsely from Bradford's
glanced about him uneasily as if he contem-
"Who is hoo, George!" Nancy Somers
"His name's not George!" the woman
—my husban'!"
"Yo'e husban'!" Nancy Somers cried with
the man's side as if he were a leper. The
fallen senseless in the snow had not the
"Yo' scamp!" Levi thundered at his rival,
his eyes ablaze with indignant fire. "This
woman is yo're wahfe, an' yet yo'd ha' mar-
ried this simple trustin' wench an' ruined her
for ever. Had ah known as thah wur sich a
finger to save thee! Goo oway, mon! Goo
away, or ah may furget maysel' an' God an'
kill thee!"
Without a word Frank Harrison turned
away and went quickly towards the village,
his wife following at his heels. He left his
When Nancy Somers came to her senses
his rough face and deep, honest eyes fixed
upon her, her confusion was piteous to witness.
"Is it true, Levi?" she asked, faintly, as
she struggled to her feet.
"True unuff," he answered. "He's wed,
an' that woman's his wife. Yo' owt to thank
"Ah do thank God!" she answered, fer-
vently, "Oh, Levi! Levi! con yo' ever
forgie me for what ah've done?"
"Forgie thee, wench!" he cried, huskily.
"Ay, fro my heart ah do? Let us booath
forget what's gone. Yo' are mahne neaw?"
her sweet face on his breast, and sobbed out
her gladness in a woman's way, And secure
The next day all the village gossips were
Rumour had it that Nancy Somers had
whisper of the truth ever got abroad.
Prophet and Nancy were married.
Poverty-stricken Nephew—"You don't
know what anxiety is, you are so well off."
Rich Uncle—"I rather guess I do know what
A druggist the other day committed a fatal
poisoned the patient. When the terrible
quite a handful of his hair and remarked,
"Well, that was unlucky! It was my best
The End.
CHAPTER VI. FRANK HARRISON. (Article), Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904), Saturday 21 December 1889 page Article 2015-05-23 20:51 It was Christmas Eve, and the big fleeoy
anowflakes were again filling the air. Bnt
the night waa not n feBtal one at MUIIngham.
The fearfnl disaster at the Squire Fit had
filled many a home with direst woe, whioh
wonld otherwise have been the Boene of the
greatest rejoioing that night; and the
pale facea, and spoke only in awe-filled
tl e Prophet wan trudging quickly homeward,
t> rough the crisp mow. He had bees to
Chapel, and had afterwarde dropped in at a
brother religioniit'e to ehat oyer the terrible
hieing him home, there to Bit up with hie
mother until tne belle of Melliugham
Chriet'e natal day.
feeing thoughtfully along the lane jaifc
outride the village, near the cross-roads, Levi
" Con yo' tell me th' road to Idellfngham?
she asked. sa ehe adjusted her thin shawl
more closely aronnd the Bleeping baby.
" That's it," said the Prophet aa he paused
Christmas Eve with some friends ia the
"Dan yo' live in't village?" she next asked
an they moved on together.
"Aye,"
"Heaw long han yo' lived heer 5"
•' A* may lahfe.'.
"Don yo' know annybody o't' name o*
Frank Harrison abeawt heer?' she queried
with some ooneern in her tone.
"Harrison—Harrison!" the Prophet mur
"A ooaler. He laft Owdham fonr or
fahve months sin—ran away fro' me an' his
chalt, an' ah heard to'ther day ne he'd come
to this place, an waz workin heer."
"Ab dunnut know him." Levi said in a
sympathetic tone. " F'raphs somebody may
know him in't village. Yo' man ax at The
Booar's Yed. Th' landlord may hsply know
him. Han' yo' friends in't village ?"
" Well, if yo' dnnnnt fahnd him yo osn ha'
" Thank yo', sir 1 Thank yo 1" the cried,
warmly. Bat the Prophet heard her not.
At that moment hia eyes and mind were
fixed on two figures—those of George Brad
ford and Nsnoy Somera—who were standing
were to be married to-morrow 1 Married to
morrow !
It was Christmas Eve, and the big fleecy
snowflakes were again filling the air. But
the night was not a festal one at Millingham.
The fearful disaster at the Squire Pit had
filled many a home with direst woe, which
would otherwise have been the scene of the
greatest rejoicing that night; and the
pale faces, and spoke only in awe-filled
the Prophet was trudging quickly homeward,
through the crisp snow. He had been to
Chapel, and had afterwards dropped in at a
brother religionist's to chat over the terrible
hieing him home, there to sit up with his
mother until the bells of Mellingham
Christ's natal day.
Pacing thoughtfully along the lane just
outside the village, near the cross-roads, Levi
"Con yo' tell me th' road to Mellingham?"
she asked, as she adjusted her thin shawl
more closely around the sleeping baby.
"That's it," said the Prophet as he paused
Christmas Eve with some friends in the
"Dun yo' live in't village?" she next asked
as they moved on together.
"Aye."
"Heaw long hau yo' lived heer?"
"A' may lahfe."
"Dun yo' know annybody o't' name o'
Frank Harrison abeawt heer?" she queried
with some concern in her tone.
"Harrison—Harrison!" the Prophet mur-
"A coaler. He laft Owdham four or
fahve months sin'—run away fro' me an' his
chalt, an' ah heerd to'ther day us he'd come
to this place, an wuz workin' heer."
"Ah dunnut know him," Levi said in a
sympathetic tone. "P'raphs somebody may
know him in't village. Yo' mun ax at The
Booar's Yed. Th' landlord may haply know
him. Han' yo' friends in't village?"
"Well, if yo' dunnut fahnd him yo can ha'
"Thank yo', sir! Thank yo!" she cried,
warmly. But the Prophet heard her not.
At that moment his eyes and mind were
fixed on two figures—those of George Brad-
ford and Nancy Somers—who were standing
were to be married to-morrow! Married to-
morrow!
CHAPTER VI. FRANK HARRISON. (Article), Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904), Saturday 21 December 1889 page Article 2015-05-23 20:43 CHAPTER VL
IHAUK HABBISON.
CHAPTER VI.
FRANK HARRISON.

Counts updated hourly

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

  1. BARRY, John Arthur
    List
    Public

    65 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2011-08-02
    User data
  2. KIPLING, Rudyard
    List
    Public

    10 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2011-01-08
    User data
  3. OXENHAM, John
    List
    Public

    1 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2011-01-09
    User data
  4. The Will Forgeries
    List
    Public

    16 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2010-08-14
    User data

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.