Information about Trove user: maurielyn

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

RankCorrectorLines corrected
1 JohnWarren 3,307,882
2 NeilHamilton 2,334,124
3 annmanley 2,080,457
4 noelwoodhouse 1,895,041
5 maurielyn 1,511,502
6 John.F.Hall 1,499,384
7 JudyClayden 1,197,350

1,511,502 lines corrected.

Corrections by month

July 2015 4
June 2015 9,102
May 2015 39,756
April 2015 26,402
March 2015 26,337
February 2015 30,109
January 2015 13
December 2014 1,991
November 2014 4,733
October 2014 25,113
September 2014 28,719
August 2014 46,848
July 2014 54,325
June 2014 10,647
May 2014 15,795
April 2014 16,770
March 2014 3
February 2014 92
January 2014 36
December 2013 4,433
November 2013 6,312
October 2013 40,154
September 2013 26,891
August 2013 19,229
July 2013 30,238
June 2013 35,889
May 2013 34,599
April 2013 5,953
March 2013 4,178
February 2013 60
December 2012 122
November 2012 6,412
October 2012 9,007
September 2012 2,074
August 2012 13,001
July 2012 8,995
June 2012 41,702
May 2012 10,728
April 2012 4,423
March 2012 12,588
February 2012 9,171
January 2012 2,655
December 2011 22,428
November 2011 29,308
October 2011 28,340
September 2011 20,977
August 2011 22,871
July 2011 20,215
June 2011 11,018
May 2011 7,946
April 2011 45,102
March 2011 14,791
February 2011 30,582
January 2011 36,679
December 2010 14,510
November 2010 15,639
October 2010 25,076
September 2010 35,694
August 2010 38,196
July 2010 31,494
June 2010 42,660
May 2010 42,984
April 2010 33,196
March 2010 26,158
February 2010 21,768
January 2010 23,693
December 2009 14,169
November 2009 13,910
October 2009 8,721
September 2009 5,101
August 2009 5,707
July 2009 6,083
June 2009 5,576
May 2009 30,715
April 2009 8,466
March 2009 21,801
February 2009 7,575
January 2009 5,156
December 2008 7,165
November 2008 6,402
October 2008 24,538
September 2008 28,111
August 2008 5,372

Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
COASTERS OUTWARD.—APRIL 10. (Detailed lists, results, guides), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Tuesday 10 April 1894 page Detailed lists, results, guides 2015-07-01 14:22 Minora, brig. Captain *\V. Gallant, for Newcastle ; Ocean
Rover, bngautme, CiptninThomas Hughes, fer Newcastle ,
Victoria, schooner, Captain J. Donovan, for Poit Stephens.
TIASTU"! OUTN ArD - ai-im 10
Minora, brig. Captain W. Gallant, for Newcastle ; Ocean
Rover, brigantine, Captain Thomas Hughes, for Newcastle ;
Victoria, schooner, Captain J. Donovan, for Port Stephens.
COASTERS OUTWARD.—APRIL 10.
ATTEMPTED SUICIDE. (Article), The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), Tuesday 13 March 1894 page Article 2015-06-21 09:18 Monday morning that Benhardt Schfitte.
him, had attempted to commit tmade
with a razor. J>r. Lukowitz, who was
sent for, after etitobing up the wounds
dangerous. Sobiitte, who is said to be in the
Monday morning that Benhardt Schutte.
him, had attempted to commit suicide
with a razor. Dr. Lukowitz, who was
sent for, after stitching up the wounds
dangerous. Scbutte, who is said to be in the
OLD-FASHIONED PUNISHMENTS. FROM A JUDGE'S NOTEBOOK. An Appendix to "The Flogging Parson." (No. IV.) (Article), Truth (Sydney, NSW : 1894 - 1954), Sunday 28 September 1913 page Article 2015-06-12 15:51 v drew Eenyon, John Green, Thomas
' . ? »hy. . .
: end, and -putting him- in bodily fear. —
V JaraeB - Murphy — Shooting at Mr. 'Wil-
» ?-, mon kt this jtime to call for a detailed
if report, and were disposed of by a few
-.-? prisoners at this inferno, 'are .no longer
?s lives; so that every hope is gone of .ever
,.v: -od, a ,-ew years since, that he would
-?'. xnake . transportation worse than death,
L ? jthat his cruel end -diabolical purpose is
' fee doing such unfortunate inen -a kind
grate, and Ed-war 4 Townsend — Stealing in
Oie. dwelling bouse of Robert Culter, and
fear.— Death.
An Appendix to '-The Flogging Parson.'
- Copy ot letter from His Excellency Sir,
Horbes: —
Government House, Pan-am at ta.
Your letter of the 27th instant, trans
. taken at the trial of the following
t prisoners, convicted of capital crimes
.death, viz: — Bryan Smith and Tiiomas
T.vncXi. John Fell. John Woodgute, Wil
liam An eon, Edward Townsend, An- '
Burns, John Wright, and James Mur
? I am glad to perceive that these
notes exhibit no circumstances of ag
gravation in the grulJt of any of these
dbrsons. X am therefore happy to con
cur in opinion with you as to the ex
of the said named prisoners to trans- ,
death is ? recorded.
Bryan Smith and Thomas Lynch —
stealing two bullocks. — Death.
John Fell, William Anson, John 'Wood
Andrew ' Kenyon and John Green —
?Stealing' in the house of James Towns
' lines of reference, accompanied by the
Thomas Burns. John 'Wright; and
liam Ikin.— Death.
Crimes such as these were too com
JVorfoik Island, a punishment, it may
well be asked, -whether. In severity, it
did not exceed death 'itself. Certain it is
* Island preferred to die. and murdered
one another, with the certainty of de
tection, for the purpose of escaping, al
though upon the scaffold, from their in
tolerable captivity. '-Whoever goes to
PJorfolk Island,' writes one of the
there is a hope springs up -In the mind
and that, at a future period, however re
xnote that period may be, you -will be
x-estored again to your- friends. Not so
art Norfolk Island; . for all who are sent
obtaining deliverance, or of enjoying any,
other, society, or. seeing any other but
?wretchedness, pad -woe. Thus they are
until death ends their sufferings.'
'I can Assure my Lord Stanley,' writes
George loveless, wrongfully transported,
-a-nd subsequently pardoned, 'who boast
more than accomplished;, for it would
ness— a. favor; it would be granting them
FROM a JUPPE'S NOTEBOOK.
30th June. 1825.
to .the cruelties, miseries, and wretched
of transportation to . the Australian
colonies.' '
Here also Is a story told by a visitor
''Next day, when I was on my way to
the Commandant's house, I had to' pass
licking the', blood off the triangles, and
the ? ants were carrying away pieces of
about the ground. The scourgeris toot
had worn a deep -hole in the ground by
the violence with which he whirled him
going on in the full blaze of it. How
ever, they had ajpalr of scourgers, who
gav.e each other spell and spell about,
like a couple of butchers.'
and during the years which - followed,
while It remained a place of punishment;
and who Bhali say that death, even by the
the Royal Advance In 1793 are the follow
ing: 'Alexander Dempster, aged 15, seven
years; Stephen Feachman, 19 years, trans
ported lor life; William Collins, Thomas
years of age, seven years; Ann WHson,
15 years of age; Ann Holmes, 15 years. of
age; and Thomas Scott, 13 years of age —
transported for lifer'
What 'crimes, it may he asked, could
these unfortunate ' children have been
guilty of to merit such punishments? '
(To-be continued.)
drew Kenyon, John Green, Thomas
phy.
end, and putting him in bodily fear.—
James Murphy—Shooting at Mr. Wil-
mon at this time to call for a detailed
report, and were disposed of by a few
prisoners at this inferno, "are no longer
lives; so that every hope is gone of ever
ed, a few years since, that he would
make transportation worse than death,
that his cruel and diabolical purpose is
be doing such unfortunate men a kind-
grate, and Edward Townsend—Stealing in
the dwelling house of Robert Culter, and
fear.—Death.
An Appendix to "The Flogging Parson."
Copy of letter from His Excellency Sir
Forbes:—
Government House, Parramatta.
Your letter of the 27th instant, trans-
taken at the trial of the following
prisoners, convicted of capital crimes
death, viz:—Bryan Smith and Thomas
Lynch, John Fell, John Woodgate, Wil-
liam Anson, Edward Townsend, An-
Burns, John Wright, and James Mur-
I am glad to perceive that these
notes exhibit no circumstances of ag-
gravation in the guilt of any of these
persons. I am therefore happy to con-
cur in opinion with you as to the ex-
of the said named prisoners to trans-
death is recorded.
Bryan Smith and Thomas Lynch—
stealing two bullocks.—Death.
John Fell, William Anson, John Wood-
Andrew Kenyon and John Green—
Stealing in the house of James Towns-
lines of reference, accompanied by the
Thomas Burns, John Wright, and
liam Ikin.—Death.
Crimes such as these were too com-
Norfolk Island, a punishment, it may
well be asked, whether, in severity, it
did not exceed death itself. Certain it is
Island preferred to die, and murdered
one another, with the certainty of de-
tection, for the purpose of escaping, al-
though upon the scaffold, from their in-
tolerable captivity. "Whoever goes to
Norfolk Island," writes one of the
there is a hope springs up in the mind
and that, at a future period, however re-
mote that period may be, you will be
restored again to your friends. Not so
at Norfolk Island; for all who are sent
obtaining deliverance, or of enjoying any
other society, or seeing any other but
wretchedness, and woe. Thus they are
until death ends their sufferings."
"I can Assure my Lord Stanley," writes
George Loveless, wrongfully transported,
and subsequently pardoned, "who boast-
more than accomplished; for it would
ness—a favor; it would be granting them
FROM A JUDGE'S NOTEBOOK.
30th June, 1825.
to the cruelties, miseries, and wretched-
of transportation to the Australian
colonies."
Here also is a story told by a visitor
"Next day, when I was on my way to
the Commandant's house, I had to pass
licking the blood off the triangles, and
the ants were carrying away pieces of
about the ground. The scourger's foot
had worn a deep hole in the ground by
the violence with which he whirled him-
going on in the full blaze of it. How-
ever, they had a pair of scourgers, who
gave each other spell and spell about,
like a couple of butchers."
and during the years which followed,
while it remained a place of punishment;
and who shall say that death, even by the
the Royal Advance in 1793 are the follow-
ing: "Alexander Dempster, aged 15, seven
years; Stephen Peachman, 13 years, trans-
ported for life; William Collins, Thomas
years of age, seven years; Ann Wilson,
15 years of age; Ann Holmes, 15 years of
age; and Thomas Scott, 13 years of age—
transported for life!"
What crimes, it may he asked, could
these unfortunate children have been
guilty of to merit such punishments?
(To be continued.)
OLD-FASHIONED PUNISHMENTS. FROM A JUDGES NOTEBOOK. An Appendix to "The Flogging Parson." (No. III.) EDWARD BATES. (Article), Truth (Sydney, NSW : 1894 - 1954), Sunday 21 September 1913 page Article 2015-06-12 15:36 ? J ?CWPr,
' FROM A JUDGE'S NOTEBOOK.
An Appendix to 'The Floggiijg Parson.'
: By; GEORGE FORBES.
Thomas Brisbane, to ' Chief Justice
Forbes: —
Sir,— I have just been favored witli
with- it your notes, on the trial of
' wife/on the 26th.. of : December last; as
'X regret to find no favorable clrcum
. stances In these notes, herewith re
turned ; X lament that It leaves me hut
the painful -alternative of directing
the sentence of the law to he carried
-'into effect at such day as you shall be
. pleased to flx. — I .have the honor, etc.,
. . The Honble Chief Justice Forbes.
This ease was heard in the Supreme
- Criminal Court at Sydney on; April Sth,
ior- the wilful murder of his wife, Julia
Sales;, at Kissing Point, on 25tli Decem
? The learned Attorney-General, In open
iing the case, said; 'The prisoner at the
'bar is charged with the murder of his
twjfe. .. It ? will he seen . In evidence that
THjlii' parties were intoxicated; and there
rls-mo means of; jjidglng'-1f there- was bnj
'previous malice against the woman; hut
-the circumstances of death show that
he was not so far intoxicated as to he
' Incapable of. knowing' what he was about;
his being drunk' wpuld be ho excuse for
him, -If the death' had 'occurred from or
. dlnary blows; but here it will be seen
- that the. blows were frequently repeat
ed. . It does. not appear that there was
. any provocation given, and even, from
,tbe difference of strength,- one would
» conceive „ that there could be none. _ .It
, 'the deatlv.had-occurred from hne blow
/provocation; hut here, as, I have already
eaid.-'the blows-were frequently repeal
led, and It. is,: next to Impossible to con
/.eelve that atnjr , adequate _ cause cohld
J have arisen, .It. is not exactly known
yrlth what instrument the ldm™ were
.given; the indictment lays them to have
been given with; an axe: --but:- I
submit that to be a matter of indiffer
ence,' .After - the murder the prisoner
, confessed -hls guilt; or, at least, that
l ?the blows were given by. his band.'! .
; .When the medical evidence as to the
oause of death' of the murdered woman
Tbad-heon given, Hloltard Porter ' depo'sed
? 'i, that/he lived near ' the 'residence of the
;:7 prisoner, .where the. murder was qoipmit
S ted. jAbout S -o'clock on the '.evening, of
'Christmas Day, the prisoner requested
. 'the witness.: to come over to his house,
? for/that hls wife was killed, or burnt to.
death;- He- then went over, taking with
htm. a cutlass, .and found the women' Ty
???''' -I Ing-neor the fire, on the; left; side. Wlt
. ness hxclalmed to. Bates, 'The .longlook
' eS-foh has come at' last,' to Which the
1 /'pipmner,. replied,.. 'Do youthinkl liave
/ Wllbdjmy Wife?: If I Jtad killed her l
. - would have put 'her where you nor no
one else would have found her- ior these
! sli months.' The prlsoner then said he
- observing If he did he would go with
f-' but his head. The constable of the dle
' - trict was then, sent for, and Bates was
'i given Snhharge. y -
/Charles ClArke; Also living ..at Kissing
Point, -depbsea that he was drinking with
£ the deceased, add ip man: named CoCh
/ f rane, dn Christmas-Day. He ieft them
j at/A^o'clock in the -af temoon, having all
,;i|d , ?' ? drank three
i:v;S ?o3K^f^m'»aieiweien ,tbe. four. . - ?
3ffigj®et the prisoher:Eaid .he,'haa-been
t '«-oa wh® .''him,' aha ,'.hls , IsMes ./were', jtfwjy
J- -j& '. ? ?; ' ''' 7*'.. p.- r~
Kf feseniuel SfeaH»dspowd*tliflt ;he
° - liig constable at 'the time the murder
- taoiieokplaee;:'' He' apprehended the prisoner.
J : - Bates said that his Wife had been quar
'iellinif-'bith hlm-ln the morning; but that
Edward bates.
- THO. BRISBANE.
P.; Ikbprert Jye waa
ymbraings, '-/which i was
on -Christmas
(No. III.) .
he -was
he would hot quarrel with her, and that
if he killed her, It .must have been when
Mr. John Thorn, chief constable of Par
ramatta, deposed -that Bates had ac
knowledged to lifm, while in custody, that
Tile only -evidence called on trie part of
the prisoner by ills counsel (William
Charles -WSent worth) by wnom he was '
ably defended, was that or Mr Thomas
Itowe, who gave the prisoner an excel
lent character. 'He had known him for
nine or ten years,' so he said, 'and had
always thought, him- a -quiet; hardwork
ing, industrious man.'
The Chief Justice,' In his charge to the
Jury, said; 'This is an information
against the prisoner ut the bar for the
wilful murder of his wife, Julia Bates,' on
sets forth, that she came-Kv )i»r
In consequence of blows inflicted ,by the
prisoner with an axe. . The precise cir
death, Is not in evidence before you. on
the morning after, the murder she was
round lying near the fire, with several
wounds In her body. The exact instru
ment with wlilch the wounds were in
flicted does mot appear in evidence;: brit,
gentlemen of the Jury, it is not necessary
thai the precise Instrument with which
Hie murder was committed snould be
proved, though it Is necessary to state
It, as near as possible, In the indictment.
The defence- set -up is drunkenness. Gen
tlemen; drinking Is ho ' excuse' ;for ? that
acls-as-those before you. The law says
that drunkenness. Is: no excuse for crime;
but cven lf -it were, it cannot be found
?n r-viuciiov umi me prisoner was in a
State of. 'intoxication . which would 'render
him- insensible -to the -enormlty„ i)f _th.e
crime he-Pas perpetrating. Gentlemen,
tliere are : various name's for .various/grades
for ? 'tills 'frightful ? propensity to- Intoxica
tion, ? It .-it hail heeii -proved that the
prisoner-war actually druhknt would
liave been no legal excuse; but no such
evidence Is 'before -you; and It is my duty
to state to you that/Jn my mlna, there
Is no doubt of tlie -guilt- of the prisoner/'
- : . VERDICT— GUILTY.
' 'The awful sentence or the law.' says
tlie report, 'was then passed . ppon the
upliappy ; man, by which he was doomea
to expiate hls dreadful crime on Monday,
the Htli instant,, ahd his body afterwards
to he glven'over .for dissection.' '
As has already been sqen, no reprieve
was. granted by 'the Governor, and so
little 'was, thought of the death penalty
in those days that . the' matter is finally
disposed of . by the following brief an
nouncement— ,
'On Monday last, pursuant to hts een
tenee, , -Edward - Bates underwent the
punishment of death at: the usual place
ol, execution.' .. .'
.. iTo he continued.)' ' '
Day. The last thing he remembered was placing some roast beef on the table. They all drank a great deal of grog out of a tea-cup. He saw Mrs.
FROM A JUDGE'S NOTEBOOK.
An Appendix to "The Flogging Parson."
By GEORGE FORBES.
Thomas Brisbane, to Chief Justice
Forbes:—
Sir,—I have just been favored with
with it your notes, on the trial of
wife on the 25th of December last; as
I regret to find no favorable circum-
stances in these notes, herewith re-
turned, I lament that it leaves me but
the painful alternative of directing
the sentence of the law to be carried
into effect at such day as you shall be
pleased to fix.—I have the honor, etc.,
The Honble Chief Justice Forbes.
This case was heard in the Supreme
Criminal Court at Sydney on April 8th,
for the wilful murder of his wife, Julia
Bates, at Kissing Point, on 25th Decem-
The learned Attorney-General, in open-
ing the case, said: "The prisoner at the
bar is charged with the murder of his
wife. It will be seen in evidence that
both parties were intoxicated; and there
is no means of judging if there was any
previous malice against the woman; but
the circumstances of death show that
he was not so far intoxicated as to be
incapable of knowing what he was about;
his being drunk would be no excuse for
him, if the death had occurred from or-
dinary blows; but here it will be seen
that the blows were frequently repeat-
ed. It does not appear that there was
any provocation given, and even, from
the difference of strength, one would
conceive that there could be none. If
the death had occurred from one blow
provocation; but here, as, I have already
said, the blows were frequently repeat-
ed, and it is next to impossible to con-
ceive that any adequate cause could
have arisen. It is not exactly known
with what instrument the blows were
given; the indictment lays them to have
been given with an axe; but I
submit that to be a matter of indiffer-
ence. After the murder the prisoner
confessed his guilt; or, at least, that
the blows were given by his hand."
When the medical evidence as to the
cause of death of the murdered woman
had been given, Richard Porter deposed
that he lived near the residence of the
prisoner where the murder was commit-
ted. About 8 o'clock on the evening of
Christmas Day, the prisoner requested
the witness to come over to his house,
for that his wife was killed, or burnt to
death. He then went over, taking with
him a cutlass, and found the women ly-
ing near the fire, on the left side. Wit-
ness exclaimed to Bates, "The long-look-
ed-for has come at last," to which the
prisoner replied, "Do you think I have
killed my wife?: If I had killed her I
would have put her where you nor no
one else would have found her for these
six months." The prisoner then said he
observing if he did he would go with-
out his head. The constable of the dis-
trict was then sent for, and Bates was
given in charge.
Charles Clarke, also living at Kissing
Point, deposed that he was drinking with
the deceased, and a man named Coch-
rane, on Christmas-Day. He left them
at 4 o'clock in the afternoon, having all
dined together. They drank three
quarts of rum between the four.
Bates dead next morning, which was all he could remember, with the exception that the prisoner said he had been
kicking him, and his sides were very
sore."
Samuel Small deposed that he was act-
ing constable at the time the murder
took place. He apprehended the prisoner.
Bates said that his wife had been quar-
relling with him in the morning, but that
EDWARD BATES.
THO. BRISBANE.
employed by Bates as a laborer; he was
ness, and the deceased on Christmas
drinking with the prisoner, the last wit-
(No. III.)
John Cochrane deposed that he was
he would not quarrel with her, and that
if he killed her, it must have been when
Mr. John Thorn, chief constable of Par-
ramatta, deposed that Bates had ac-
knowledged to him, while in custody, that
The only evidence called on the part of
the prisoner by his counsel (William
Charles Wentworth) by whom he was
ably defended, was that of Mr Thomas
Rowe, who gave the prisoner an excel-
lent character. "He had known him for
nine or ten years," so he said, "and had
always thought him a quiet, hard-work-
ing, industrious man."
The Chief Justice, in his charge to the
jury, said: "This is an information
against the prisoner at the bar for the
wilful murder of his wife, Julia Bates, on
sets forth, that she came by her death
in consequence of blows inflicted by the
prisoner with an axe. The precise cir-
death, is not in evidence before you. On
the morning after the murder she was
found lying near the fire, with several
wounds in her body. The exact instru-
ment with which the wounds were in-
flicted does not appear in evidence; but,
gentlemen of the jury, it is not necessary
that the precise instrument with which
the murder was committed should be
proved, though it is necessary to state
it, as near as possible, in the indictment.
The defence set up is drunkenness. Gen-
tlemen, drinking is no excuse for that
acts as those before you. The law says
that drunkenness is no excuse for crime:
but even if it were, it cannot be found
in evidence that the prisoner was in a
State of intoxication which would render
him insensible to the enormity of the
crime he was perpetrating. Gentlemen,
there are various names for various grades
for this frightful propensity to intoxica-
tion. If it had been proved that the
prisoner was actually drunk, it would
have been no legal excuse; but no such
evidence is before you; and it is my duty
to state to you that, in my mind, there
is no doubt of the guilt of the prisoner."
VERDICT—GUILTY.
"The awful sentence or the law," says
the report, "was then passed upon the
unhappy man, by which he was doomed
to expiate his dreadful crime on Monday,
the 11th instant, and his body afterwards
to be given over for dissection."
As has already been seen, no reprieve
was granted by the Governor, and so
little was thought of the death penalty
in those days that the matter is finally
disposed of by the following brief an-
nouncement—
"On Monday last, pursuant to his sen-
tence, Edward Bates underwent the
punishment of death at the usual place
of execution."
(To be continued.)
OLD-FASHIONED PUNISHMENTS. FROM A JUDGE'S NOTEBOOK. An Appendix to "The Flogging Parson." (No. II.) THE MURDER OF JOHN BRACKFIELD. (Article), Truth (Sydney, NSW : 1894 - 1954), Sunday 14 September 1913 page Article 2015-06-12 15:00 humanely observed to the , court, as ne
was not prepared at -the moment, to go
af his own penning; and .as the case was
of the utmost importance to the puotic
interest, and equally affected the prison^
ers at the' bar, he had no .wish to oppose
the Objection stated in arrest of judg-.
ment— more particularly should ft appear
to. the court necessary that the present
Indictment ? must fall, it was still within,
the power and discretion of tue law officer
prisoners upon a new Information. The
part of tlie Attorney-General, deferred
On c?aturday, January 22nd, 1825, the
prisoners were again brought up for sen
stated it was now bis painful duty to
.pray the judgment of the court upon the
the learned Attorney-General dted seve
these discussions, observed that he bad
looked into the authorities, and that he,
i would now only refer to one, whose high
moral ..character; would be sufficient to
to I^ord Hale, who had held that the
particular day. on which a crime was
committed need not be mentioned In the
escheats of the\ Crown are involved,
day recorded in the information be be
fore or after the commission of the of
fence — so that the fact itself was proved.
sentence of th| law upon the prisoners,
who. with the exception of the female
prisoner, appeared but little aftected at
'That you, Martin Benson, James Coo
gan, John Sprolc, Anthony Rodney, and
from thence he drawn on a hurdle to the
tne Lord have mercy on your souls.'
A# previously stated, his Excellency
this sentence, and on Monday. January
24lh, 1825. the five prisoners underwent
'The unhappy creatures.' says the re
cord of the execution, 'gave every symp
tom of unfeigned penitence, and acknow
by an ignominious death. Rodney (anj
five years ago. Sprolc (a Scotsman), had
been out. four years. Benson and Coo
Eliza Campbell had been resident seve
ral years in the colony, and was a wo
man of more than ordinary understand
Sproie to etoporate her from any know
ledge of tlt'e murder; she acknowledged
she knew that they were goi^g to murder
her master. 'Sproie' said that he strang
led Brac-kfield, whilst Benson hastened
confession of dying penitents.'
humanely observed to the court, as he
was not prepared at the moment, to go
af his own penning; and as the case was
of the utmost importance to the public
interest, and equally affected the prison-
ers at the bar, he had no wish to oppose
the objection stated in arrest of judg-
ment—more particularly should it appear
to the court necessary that the present
indictment must fall, it was still within
the power and discretion of the law officer
prisoners upon a new information. The
part of the Attorney-General, deferred
On Saturday, January 22nd, 1825, the
prisoners were again brought up for sen-
stated it was now his painful duty to
pray the judgment of the court upon the
the learned Attorney-General cited seve-
these discussions, observed that he had
looked into the authorities, and that he
would now only refer to one, whose high
moral character; would be sufficient to
to Lord Hale, who had held that the
particular day on which a crime was
committed need not be mentioned in the
escheats of the Crown are involved,
day recorded in the information be be-
fore or after the commission of the of-
fence—so that the fact itself was proved.
sentence of the law upon the prisoners,
who, with the exception of the female
prisoner, appeared but little affected at
"That you, Martin Benson, James Coo-
gan, John Sprole, Anthony Rodney, and
from thence be drawn on a hurdle to the
the Lord have mercy on your souls."
As previously stated, his Excellency
this sentence, and on Monday, January
24th, 1825, the five prisoners underwent
"The unhappy creatures," says the re-
cord of the execution, "gave every symp-
tom of unfeigned penitence, and acknow-
by an ignominious death. Rodney (an
five years ago. Sprole (a Scotsman), had
been out four years. Benson and Coo-
Eliza Campbell had been resident seve-
ral years in the colony, and was a wo-
man of more than ordinary understand-
Sprole to exoporate her from any know-
ledge of the murder; she acknowledged
she knew that they were going to murder
her master. Sprole said that he strang-
led Brackfield, whilst Benson hastened
confession of dying penitents."
OLD-FASHIONED PUNISHMENTS. FROM A JUDGE'S NOTEBOOK. An Appendix to "The Flogging Parson." (No. II.) THE MURDER OF JOHN BRACKFIELD. (Article), Truth (Sydney, NSW : 1894 - 1954), Sunday 14 September 1913 page Article 2015-06-12 14:54 An Appendix to 'The Flogging Parson.'
THE MURDER OF JOHfcl BRACKFIELD.
Brisbane, confirming sentence of deatli on
five prisoners: —
Sir,— I have Just now been favoured
acquainting me of the capital con
viction of the five following persons —
John Sprolc, Anthony Kodney, and
Eliza Campbell, for the muraer or cneir
late master, John Brackfleld, a settler
the cases of these unhappy indivi
? fs no alternative left but to deefde
eurh day and time as you may be
pleased to tlx.
The Honbte. Chief Justice Forbes.
This ciw;e had been heard in the
Supreme Court, Sydney, Criminal Juris
diction, on January ,21st, 1825. and some
peculiar Interest- '
to the Jury; and the various circum
satisfied that the Jury must return a
verdict of 'guilty' against the several
prisoners at the bar. 'It was not only
an ofTence/' said the learned Solicitor
General, 'of the utmost magnitude in
was also an act of such Intense enor
mity as to elicif the declaration of the
Divine law. which solemnly testifies
'whoso sheddeth man's blood, hy man
shall his blood be Rhed,.,,
given that' the deceased, had met his
death by strangulation, and aJso the evi
dence of the arresting constable; Nic
holas Ravne. an annrnvw. was called.
who gave the following remarkable ac
count of the occurrence: —
'He was a fellow servant,' he said,
'with the prisoners ^.t the bar, and slept
In tho same hut. When he left his work
prisoner fEIiza Campbell) against giving j
any alaVm. through what she might see
or hear during tho course of the night:
had not been long in the hut before RMza
and murder him. Hiiza Campbell then
do so. he had threatened to send her to
had found In her box; and that she would
thought fit. The whole then went In
tlie hut, and consulted upon the best
that the easiest way would be to choke,
him; upon which Benson, replied that his
box. and went into the house, followed
by Sproule, Rodney., and Coogan.'
The witness (ICayne) placed Jiimself
for the hut, in which she continued fon
went 'to the shifting pannel facing the
evening. 'In less than a quarter of an
hour, Rodney came forth from the house;
that was tho only tim,e), a noise like
where he was soon joined by Eliza Camp
bell and Rodney. These three men re
the store-door, which was a short dis
brought some beer in 'a tin pot, ^which
was drunk in th« yard. Eliza Campbell,
observing the witness (Kayne) then In
vited him to drink, with which lie com
with Benson, revisiting the store, .wnich
seen some or the property since, and*
recognised It to form part ut ^is late
master's goods. Benson, Rodnev, and
Sprote, having laden . his master's three
them. YVibile the latter prisoners were
absent, he, the approver, saw the pnspn
dish filled with papers, which were com
jnitted to the flames in- the hut.''
Ample evidence being adduced In cor
roboration or this statement, and the
Chief Justice having. summed up strongly
against the prisoners, the Jury retired
of guilty. -The prisoners were then, in
say wny sentence of death should not
he passed upon them according to law?
The mafe prisoners were silent; but Mr.
Rowe, the , solicitor for the female pris
oner. moved an arrest of judgment, prin
cipally upon the ground,, of tlie indict-,
the' wrong day being substituted for the
day on which the murder actually ' oc-*
X have the honor, etc..
22nd January, 1S25.
(No. II.) * '
An Appendix to "The Flogging Parson."
THE MURDER OF JOHNl BRACKFIELD.
Brisbane, confirming sentence of death on
five prisoners:—
Sir,—I have just now been favoured
acquainting me of the capital con-
viction of the five following persons—
John Sprole, Anthony Rodney, and
Eliza Campbell, for the murder of their
late master, John Brackfield, a settler
the cases of these unhappy indivi-
is no alternative left but to decide
such day and time as you may be
pleased to fix.
The Honble. Chief Justice Forbes.
This case had been heard in the
Supreme Court, Sydney, Criminal Juris-
diction, on January 21st, 1825, and some
peculiar interest.
to the jury; and the various circum-
satisfied that the jury must return a
verdict of "guilty" against the several
prisoners at the bar. "It was not only
an offence," said the learned Solicitor-
General, "of the utmost magnitude in
was also an act of such intense enor-
mity as to elicit the declaration of the
Divine law, which solemnly testifies
'whose sheddeth man's blood, by man
shall his blood be shed,' "
given that the deceased, had met his
death by strangulation, and also the evi-
dence of the arresting constable; Nic-
holas Kayne, an approver, was called,
who gave the following remarkable ac-
count of the occurrence:—
"He was a fellow servant," he said,
"with the prisoners at the bar, and slept
in the same hut. When he left his work
prisoner (EIiza Campbell) against giving
any alarm, through what she might see
or hear during the course of the night:
had not been long in the hut before Eliza
and murder him. Eliza Campbell then
do so, he had threatened to send her to
had found in her box; and that she would
thought fit. The whole then went in
the hut, and consulted upon the best
that the easiest way would be to choke
him; upon which Benson replied that his
box, and went into the house, followed
by Sproule, Rodney, and Coogan."
The witness (Kayne) placed himself
for the hut, in which she continued for
went to the shifting pannel facing the
evening. "In less than a quarter of an
hour, Rodney came forth from the house,
that was the only time), a noise like
where he was soon joined by Eliza Camp-
bell and Rodney. These three men re-
the store-door, which was a short dis-
brought some beer in a tin pot, which
was drunk in the yard. Eliza Campbell,
observing the witness (Kayne) then in-
vited him to drink, with which he com-
with Benson, revisiting the store, which
seen some or the property since, and
recognised it to form part of his late
master's goods. Benson, Rodney, and
Sprote, having laden his master's three
them. While the latter prisoners were
absent, he, the approver, saw the prison-
dish filled with papers, which were com-
mitted to the flames in the hut."
Ample evidence being adduced in cor-
roboration of this statement, and the
Chief Justice having summed up strongly
against the prisoners, the jury retired
of guilty. The prisoners were then, in
say why sentence of death should not
be passed upon them according to law?
The male prisoners were silent; but Mr.
Rowe, the solicitor for the female pris-
oner, moved an arrest of judgment, prin-
cipally upon the ground, of the indict-
the wrong day being substituted for the
day on which the murder actually oc-
I have the honor, etc.,
22nd January, 1825.
(No. II.)
OLD-FASHIONED PUNISHMENTS. FROM A JUDGE'S NOTEBOOK, An Appendix to "The Flogging Parson." FOR STEALING THREE SPANISH DOLLARS. (Article), Truth (Sydney, NSW : 1894 - 1954), Sunday 7 September 1913 page Article 2015-06-12 14:40 An Appendix to 'The Flogging Parson.'
FOR STEALING THREE SPANISH |
Brisbane to Chief Justice Forbes, miti
gating sentence passed on Ann Duffy: —
'Government House, Sydney,
Sir, — It affords me much pleasure, ?
tn compliance with your recommendation
of Ann Daffy, tried at the late Sessions j
of the Supreme Court, and sentenced to j
transDortatlon for seven years fori
feloniously stealing three Spanish dol
to three, years, and I shall give in
Seven years for' stealing three Spanish
dollars! and mitigated to three ?years!
Duffy — on illiterate girl, in all probability,
aud one among hundreds similarly pun
Ann Duffy . was an ' assigned servant,
larceny in England, . an offence which
would now be dealt with by flue or im
prisonment for a feu' weeks. But in
On first lnndintr. the nosltlon of tlie
1 them out and that, Irom all accounts,
was bad enough. 'Nq lodgings were pro
to seek the 'protection' of one ot the
tbem shelter.
The male'- convicts also, on ticket of
leave, were allowed to marry, and the j
newly-arrived female convicts '-Would be
drawn up. in ranks, for the inspection of
'This is the modus operandi.' writes one
of tlie early settlers on the subject of
convict marriages: Tne convict goes up
one that takes his' fancy, he makes a
motion to her, and- she steps1 on one. side.
refuse to 'stand out' having no wish
conversation together, and '.if the woman
not like the; tone of her conversation, she
-steps back,, and -the same ceremony goes
? - on -until the applicant is suited- with a
. 'male.'' Belpg, .at- length,, suited, how
ever, the tlcket-of-leave , man knocks up
a hut . for himself and his newly-^nade
wife, and the pair live together, .^nd take
their chances as to cbmpatibility -of
temper,*1 ' 'V.' - ?* ? '
? - Ann ' iluffy, however/ appears. ;J%jt t0
have been, married, but to ,haye;heen; as
slgned,: as - a servant to
who brought- her ,to trial ^for tt^^tgajlas
The factory at Parramatta, to 'which
Ann Duffy 'was consigned, possessed some
forbidding aspects.' It was' the seat of
idleness, for the. female convicts Impris
oned there- did little or no work, and the
atjnosphero was polluted by the fumes of
?- tobacco smoked by tiie women, whilst the
-walls echoed with shrieks of passion, and
- feolB-ot foolish, laughter. ? , '
The severest form iOf punishment, to
solitary confinement in tlie cells, with
only bread and water diet, and -having
their , heads shaved.
'Seven days' cells, bread and water, and
to have bead shaved.'
would be at -first apparent Building
houses by the growing- population. Mor
stones, and hair was required to make;
were too scarce to furnish the requisite '
supply, and hair, from the heftds of the |
factory girls became a marketable com- i
and plasterers 'being tlie purchasers; and
standing: in Parramatta and Sydney. the
'strong' by the hair from the shorn
heads ofthe girls at the factory.
on females was the placing of an Iron
collar round their necks, oh each aide of
with this head-dress they were com
pelled to attend church, and sit in dis
An Appendix to "The Flogging Parson."
FOR STEALING THREE SPANISH
Brisbane to Chief Justice Forbes, miti-
gating sentence passed on Ann Duffy:—
"Government House, Sydney,
Sir,—It affords me much pleasure,
in compliance with your recommendation
of Ann Duffy, tried at the late Sessions
of the Supreme Court, and sentenced to
transportation for seven years for
feloniously stealing three Spanish dol-
to three years, and I shall give in-
Seven years for stealing three Spanish
dollars! and mitigated to three years!
Duffy—on illiterate girl, in all probability,
and one among hundreds similarly pun-
Ann Duffy was an assigned servant,
larceny in England, an offence which
would now be dealt with by fine or im-
prisonment for a few weeks. But in
On first landing, the position of the
them out and that, from all accounts,
was bad enough. No lodgings were pro-
to seek the "protection" of one of the
them shelter.
The male convicts also, on ticket of
leave, were allowed to marry, and the
newly-arrived female convicts would be
drawn up in ranks, for the inspection of
"This is the modus operandi," writes one
of the early settlers on the subject of
convict marriages: "The convict goes up
one that takes his fancy, he makes a
motion to her, and she steps on one side.
refuse to "stand out" having no wish
conversation together, and if the woman
not like the tone of her conversation, she
steps back, and the same ceremony goes
on until the applicant is suited with a
"male." Being, at length, suited, how-
ever, the ticket-of-leave man knocks up
a hut for himself and his newly-made
wife, and the pair live together, and take
their chances as to compatibility of
temper."
Ann Duffy, however, appears not t0
have been married, but to have been as-
signed, as a servant, to her mistress
who brought her to trial for the stealing
The factory at Parramatta, to which
Ann Duffy was consigned, possessed some
forbidding aspects. It was the seat of
idleness, for the female convicts impris-
oned there did little or no work, and the
atmosphere was polluted by the fumes of
tobacco smoked by the women, whilst the
walls echoed with shrieks of passion, and
peals of foolish laughter.
The severest form of punishment, to
solitary confinement in the cells, with
only bread and water diet, and having
their heads shaved.
"Seven days' cells, bread and water, and
to have head shaved."
would be at first apparent. Building
houses by the growing population. Mor-
stones, and hair was required to make
were too scarce to furnish the requisite
supply, and hair, from the heads of the
factory girls became a marketable com-
and plasterers being the purchasers; and
standing in Parramatta and Sydney, the
"strong" by the hair from the shorn
heads of the girls at the factory.
on females was the placing of an iron
collar round their necks, on each side of
with this head-dress they were com-
pelled to attend church, and sit in dis-
CHAPTER XXI. THE STORY OF RICHARD HALE AND THE NARRATIVE CONCLUDED. (Article), Truth (Sydney, NSW : 1894 - 1954), Sunday 31 August 1913 page Article 2015-06-12 14:28 TUT STOBY Or BICHABD KALE AITS
TBX WABBATTVB CONCLUDED.
'On the 28th of December, 1809,' con
tinues Richard Hale, 'three ships hove
in sight of Sydney — the Dromedary, tbe
Indostan, and a store Bhip, which came
ug to tho Cove with every preparation
to fire « broadside if they saw the oc
casion. The account which bad been
sent to England by Governor Bligh re
presented the country in a state of In
Macquarie thought that he and his bat
'Two days after the arrival of the
ships the troops began io1 disembark,
arms, to salute His Excellency. I wait
ed to see the Whole battalion land with
Advocate; the Rev. Mr. Cowper, chap
'The old soldiers kept their ranks un
til all the 73rd Regiment, Which came
The Governor and his Lieutenant (Rich
commissions read by the Judge Advo
Inhabitants; after which ceremony tlie
J3rd marched out of the town, and
from the barracks. '
'Order was soon restored, and great
now began to appear In tho countenances
of all the inhabitants. Governor Mac- !
quarie lowered the price of food, and i
was of great service to the poor, and j
Injured no one but those who could;
bear it, and had too long enjoyed an un
fair profit. His Excellency issued a pro- '
clamation directing everyone who had I
received a. free pardon, or a gfant of ]
laad, since the arrest of Governor Bligh,
to deliver up such pardon, or grant,: to
the Secretary, Mr, John Thomas Camp
'This news did not please 'me much,
as I had obtained both a pardon and 'a
of Major Johnston; but I did as direct
ed and delivered them both up at tlie
Governor's office: nor did l malje any
inquiries about them for a'yekr after
Wards. I then memorialised bis Excel
lency on thp subject, and I procured the
memorialist deserved the favorable at-'
tention Of Governor Macquarie.* ?
?The Governor then informed me that
as my character was as had been re
recalled, and he promised to make fur
'I assured his Excellency I felt satis
fied. the answers to every inquiry he
was pleafiefl to make 'about me would
tp his notice, and would fully confirm
subject until I' received a note from the
free pardon. .
'On receiving' my pardon, I went
and then -drew out a notice of my stock
and estates to be sold by private con
tract, and stated that 10 .months' credit
would be given oh approved security. I
printer, and detired lilm to put It In
the 'Weekly Gazette/ which was done
accordingly,
'The Governor was very Much Sur
prised when be saw this advertisement
for the dlspocal of my stock, and
marked that It was much to be re
'But I had witnessed so tnuch,tyranny
and oppression In the colony, and had
been the victim of such unjpst treat
ment during the long period of my resi
dence, that I remained ufisbbken In my
I was leaving a land of wonderful pos
become the home of freedom, when des
potism and tyranhy should he - swept
away, and when free Institutions should
take the place of autocratic government
'And so to 'Australia Felix,' happy
land that was to he;. I badelong fare
well.'
„CThe End.) ? '
THE STORY OF RICHARD HALE AND
THE NARRATIVE CONCLUDED.
"On the 28th of December, 1809," con-
tinues Richard Hale, "three ships hove
in sight of Sydney—the Dromedary, the
Indostan, and a store ship, which came
up to the Cove with every preparation
to fire a broadside if they saw the oc-
casion. The account which had been
sent to England by Governor Bligh re-
presented the country in a state of in-
Macquarie thought that he and his bat-
"Two days after the arrival of the
ships the troops began to disembark,
arms, to salute His Excellency. I wait-
ed to see the whole battalion land with
Advocate; the Rev. Mr. Cowper, chap-
"The old soldiers kept their ranks un-
til all the 73rd Regiment, which came
The Governor and his Lieutenant (Rich-
commissions read by the Judge Advo-
inhabitants; after which ceremony the
73rd marched out of the town, and
from the barracks.
"Order was soon restored, and great
now began to appear in the countenances
of all the inhabitants. Governor Mac-
quarie lowered the price of food, and
was of great service to the poor, and
injured no one but those who could
bear it, and had too long enjoyed an un-
fair profit. His Excellency issued a pro-
clamation directing everyone who had
received a free pardon, or a grant of
land, since the arrest of Governor Bligh,
to deliver up such pardon, or grant, to
the Secretary, Mr. John Thomas Camp-
"This news did not please me much,
as I had obtained both a pardon and a
of Major Johnston; but I did as direct-
ed and delivered them both up at the
Governor's office: nor did I make any
inquiries about them for a year after-
wards. I then memorialised his Excel-
lency on the subject, and I procured the
memorialist deserved the favorable at-
tention of Governor Macquarie.*
"The Governor then informed me that
as my character was as had been re-
recalled, and he promised to make fur-
"I assured his Excellency I felt satis-
fied the answers to every inquiry he
was pleased to make about me would
to his notice, and would fully confirm
subject until I received a note from the
free pardon.
"On receiving my pardon, I went
and then drew out a notice of my stock
and estates to be sold by private con-
tract, and stated that 10 months' credit
would be given on approved security. I
printer, and desired him to put it in
the 'Weekly Gazette,' which was done
accordingly.
"The Governor was very much sur-
prised when he saw this advertisement
for the disposal of my stock, and re-
marked that it was much to be re-
"But I had witnessed so much tyranny
and oppression in the colony, and had
been the victim of such unjust treat-
ment during the long period of my resi-
dence, that I remained unshaken in my
I was leaving a land of wonderful pos-
become the home of freedom, when des-
potism and tyranny should be swept
away, and when free institutions should
take the place of autocratic government.
"And so to 'Australia Felix,' happy
land that was to be, I bade long fare-
well."
(The End.)
THE FLOGGING PARSON (Article), Truth (Sydney, NSW : 1894 - 1954), Sunday 31 August 1913 page Article 2015-06-12 14:19 ARREST OF GOVEBHOB BLIGH.
Hale as follows: —
soldiers paid twenty; and if they object
'The new order of things, however, did
'The Major then marched his regi-
'Ttie Governor had been entertaining

land. Tbe Governor promised to do
mand ; writing from there to England
'Upon the receipt of this alarming in-
immediately embarked for Sydney.'
ARREST OF GOVERNOR BLIGH.
Hale as follows:—
soldiers paid twenty; and if they object-
"The new order of things, however, did
"The Major then marched his regi-
"The Governor had been entertaining
——ooOoo——
land. The Governor promised to do
mand; writing from there to England
"Upon the receipt of this alarming in-
immediately embarked for Sydney."
THE FLOGGING PARSON CHAPTER XIX. AT A CONVICT'S MERCY. (Article), Truth (Sydney, NSW : 1894 - 1954), Sunday 24 August 1913 page Article 2015-06-12 14:11 Author of 'An 'Australian Peer, ' ' 'Free Institutions, ' '
. there, and stood guard over her with a
nor sought to barm you.'
'Australia's Most Remarkable Criminal,'' &c.
in the main 'The Flogging Parson' is true history,).
AT A CONVICT'S MEECY.
In a rock cavern, upon ono of the hills
on the North Shore of Sydney Harbor, Mu
seeming relish in the task he had set him
escaped ' convict Murphy must have lurked
about the grounds at 'ftookwood' until the
dusk of the -afternoon when Muriel had
-started towards the gate to sec if her hue
~ he had suddenly appeared before her. Tak*
iug advantage of the terror which the sight
of him occasioned, and which, for the mo
went, deprived her of the power to cry for
he had placed 'her, in a fainting condition,
for, on regaining consciousness, -she had
with her captor watching her with an ex
'So I've got ye at last,' he said, at
length, with a hoarse chuckle, 'alone, and
all to; myself, to do as I like with in this
never find ye.'
'Why have you brought me here?' an
swered Muriel. 'I have never injured yon,
'Why have X brought ye here?' repeated
the convict. 'I'll tell ye. I've brought ye
that's why ; and I've swore to have yer life.
, drove off in yer kerridge, an' left me to be
lashed in the streets.'
'If you mean, by the parson',, the Rev.
Mr. Carden,' replied Muriel, despair giving
her courage to speak, 'I am no child of his,
punishment . to which you had been sub
home. Ton are a man, and I doubt not
an injured one,' she continued, gently, 'but'
that I am sore?'
'Would I not?' snarled Murphy. 'You'll
. see. It's 'like you and your breed to think
before I've done with yer What I've been
was good for me. You'll' know what I
Mean . presently,' he continued, showing her
- a knife which he held in his hand, and
which he bade her take notice of. 'But
first,' he added, 'you'll hear what I have
to say, and then if you think -I'm likely to
show mercy you'll know me better than 1
know ineselL'
'1 was fourteen when I first got into
trouble,, and before that I lived at Hulme.
her' living by going ont for to mind a child.
Ever Since my father died I went with bad
lads. Who else had. I to go with? The
'a Window, and taking things. I got a
Month for that, and when I came ont I
Went with bad lads, 'Thou'lt get transport
ed, be put in chains, and tbou will suffer
when itg too late to repent.' But what was
so as to get something ter eat. Eve known
. boys who knew no father nor mother, and
' some 'who didn't know their names. If
? wouldn't have always been, in gaol, . Well,
? ' ?' ?. .
Cor years I was chained, and shut up in
dark cells, and . whipped, and kept on bread
wauled for ter live, until I was sent out
so be said, but he was drunk when he did
bad to get over it as best I could. Later
see me now. Bat even then I had some
I was given fifty lashet, and in another :
month 1 was given fifty more, after being
kept fourteen days before the- flogging in a
I was taken Into the public streets and
lathed again worse than before. That day
X swore to pay bade some of what the par
sob had give' me, so at last I've got ye,
Its savage raised his eyes as he thought
to find his victim cowering at his feet, hut
at the recital H oriel had ceased to tremble,
Instead of the shrinking girl he had expect
ed to. find, a woman ptood before him, with
pity instead of fear in the' glance with
'Poor fellow,' was- all she said, and, on
ttie impulse of the moment, she laid her
band gently upon his arm.
The desperate convict stood for a.moment
bin) at the sound of kindly ' words, and the
knife, he raised hie arms above his head as
ho Muriel to go. As She passed him, with
bad received the news of Muriel's disappear
ance, were attracted by . a boat coming
across the bay from tbe North Shore of the
barber. In- a fever of excitement James
put off in another boat to meet it, and pre
capture the desperado, but. on reaching the
found that ono convict at least had escaped
for ever from the lash, the chain, the pri
son, and the, solitary cell. The knife, which
he had intended Tor Muriel, he had passed
through his own heart — 'ohe^syed Murphy'
was dead. ' '
Author of "An Australian Peer," "Free Institutions,"
there, and stood guard over her with a
nor sought to harm you."
"Australia's Most Remarkable Criminal," &c.
in the main "The Flogging Parson" is true history.)
AT A CONVICT'S MERCY.
In a rock cavern, upon one of the hills
on the North Shore of Sydney Harbor, Mu-
seeming relish in the task he had set him-
escaped convict Murphy must have lurked
about the grounds at "Rookwood" until the
dusk of the afternoon when Muriel had
started towards the gate to see if her hus-
he had suddenly appeared before her. Tak-
ing advantage of the terror which the sight
of him occasioned, and which, for the mo-
ment, deprived her of the power to cry for
he had placed her, in a fainting condition,
for, on regaining consciousness, she had
with her captor watching her with an ex-
"So I've got ye at last," he said, at
length, with a hoarse chuckle, "alone, and
all to myself, to do as I like with in this
never find ye."
"Why have you brought me here?" an-
swered Muriel. "I have never injured you,
"Why have I brought ye here?"repeated
the convict. "I'll tell ye. I've brought ye
that's why; and I've swore to have yer life.
drove off in yer kerridge, an' left me to be
lashed in the streets."
"If you mean, by the parson, the Rev.
Mr. Carden," replied Muriel, despair giving
her courage to speak, "I am no child of his,
punishment to which you had been sub-
home. You are a man, and I doubt not
an injured one," she continued, gently,"but
that I am sure?"
"Would I not?" snarled Murphy. "You'll
see. It's like you and your breed to think
before I've done with yer what I've been
was good for me. You'll know what I
mean presently," he continued, showing her
a knife which he held in his hand, and
which he bade her take notice of. "But
first," he added, "you'll hear what I have
to say, and then if you think I'm likely to
show mercy you'll know me better than I
know meself."
"I was fourteen when I first got into
trouble, and before that I lived at Hulme.
her living by going out for to mind a child.
Ever since my father died I went with bad
lads. Who else had I to go with? The
a window, and taking things. I got a
month for that, and when I came out I
went with bad lads, 'Thou'lt get transport-
ed, be put in chains, and thou will suffer
when its too late to repent.' But what was
so as to get something ter eat. I've known
boys who knew no father nor mother, and
some who didn't know their names. If
wouldn't have always been in gaol. Well,
——ooOoo——
for years I was chained, and shut up in
dark cells, and whipped, and kept on bread
wanted for ter live, until I was sent out
so he said, but he was drunk when he did
had to get over it as best I could. Later
see me now. But even then I had some
I was given fifty lashes, and in another
month I was given fifty more, after being
kept fourteen days before the flogging in a
I was taken into the public streets and
lashed again worse than before. That day
I swore to pay back some of what the par-
son had give me, so at last I've got ye,
The savage raised his eyes as he thought
to find his victim cowering at his feet, but
at the recital Muriel had ceased to tremble,
Instead of the shrinking girl he had expect-
ed to find, a woman stood before him, with
pity instead of fear in the glance with
"Poor fellow," was all she said, and, on
the impulse of the moment, she laid her
hand gently upon his arm.
The desperate convict stood for a moment
him at the sound of kindly words, and the
knife, he raised his arms above his head as
to Muriel to go. As she passed him, with
had received the news of Muriel's disappear-
ance, were attracted by a boat coming
across the bay from the North Shore of the
harbor. In a fever of excitement James
put off in another boat to meet it, and pre-
capture the desperado, but, on reaching the
found that one convict at least had escaped
for ever from the lash, the chain, the pri-
son, and the solitary cell. The knife, which
he had intended for Muriel, he had passed
through his own heart —"one-eyed Murphy"
was dead.

Counts updated hourly

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

  1. BARRY, John Arthur
    List
    Public

    65 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2011-08-02
    User data
  2. KIPLING, Rudyard
    List
    Public

    10 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2011-01-08
    User data
  3. OXENHAM, John
    List
    Public

    1 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2011-01-09
    User data
  4. The Will Forgeries
    List
    Public

    16 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2010-08-14
    User data

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.