Information about Trove user: maurielyn

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 3,929,656
2 NeilHamilton 2,809,059
3 noelwoodhouse 2,334,165
4 annmanley 2,183,995
5 John.F.Hall 1,849,650
6 maurielyn 1,616,482
7 culroym 1,436,878
8 C.Scheikowski 1,359,350

1,616,482 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

July 2016 8,393
June 2016 35
May 2016 789
April 2016 215
March 2016 10,393
February 2016 4,991
January 2016 4,856
December 2015 3,718
November 2015 23,784
October 2015 23,715
September 2015 8,676
August 2015 1,500
July 2015 13,919
June 2015 9,102
May 2015 39,756
April 2015 26,402
March 2015 26,337
February 2015 30,109
January 2015 13
December 2014 1,991
November 2014 4,733
October 2014 25,113
September 2014 28,719
August 2014 46,848
July 2014 54,325
June 2014 10,647
May 2014 15,795
April 2014 16,770
March 2014 3
February 2014 92
January 2014 36
December 2013 4,433
November 2013 6,312
October 2013 40,154
September 2013 26,891
August 2013 19,229
July 2013 30,238
June 2013 35,889
May 2013 34,599
April 2013 5,953
March 2013 4,178
February 2013 60
December 2012 122
November 2012 6,412
October 2012 9,007
September 2012 2,074
August 2012 13,001
July 2012 8,995
June 2012 41,702
May 2012 10,728
April 2012 4,423
March 2012 12,588
February 2012 9,171
January 2012 2,655
December 2011 22,428
November 2011 29,308
October 2011 28,340
September 2011 20,977
August 2011 22,871
July 2011 20,215
June 2011 11,018
May 2011 7,946
April 2011 45,102
March 2011 14,791
February 2011 30,582
January 2011 36,679
December 2010 14,510
November 2010 15,639
October 2010 25,076
September 2010 35,694
August 2010 38,196
July 2010 31,494
June 2010 42,660
May 2010 42,984
April 2010 33,196
March 2010 26,158
February 2010 21,768
January 2010 23,693
December 2009 14,169
November 2009 13,910
October 2009 8,721
September 2009 5,101
August 2009 5,707
July 2009 6,083
June 2009 5,576
May 2009 30,715
April 2009 8,466
March 2009 21,801
February 2009 7,575
January 2009 5,156
December 2008 7,165
November 2008 6,402
October 2008 24,538
September 2008 28,111
August 2008 5,372

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 3,929,655
2 NeilHamilton 2,809,059
3 noelwoodhouse 2,334,165
4 annmanley 2,183,995
5 John.F.Hall 1,849,650
6 maurielyn 1,616,482
7 culroym 1,436,802
8 C.Scheikowski 1,359,343

1,616,482 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

July 2016 8,393
June 2016 35
May 2016 789
April 2016 215
March 2016 10,393
February 2016 4,991
January 2016 4,856
December 2015 3,718
November 2015 23,784
October 2015 23,715
September 2015 8,676
August 2015 1,500
July 2015 13,919
June 2015 9,102
May 2015 39,756
April 2015 26,402
March 2015 26,337
February 2015 30,109
January 2015 13
December 2014 1,991
November 2014 4,733
October 2014 25,113
September 2014 28,719
August 2014 46,848
July 2014 54,325
June 2014 10,647
May 2014 15,795
April 2014 16,770
March 2014 3
February 2014 92
January 2014 36
December 2013 4,433
November 2013 6,312
October 2013 40,154
September 2013 26,891
August 2013 19,229
July 2013 30,238
June 2013 35,889
May 2013 34,599
April 2013 5,953
March 2013 4,178
February 2013 60
December 2012 122
November 2012 6,412
October 2012 9,007
September 2012 2,074
August 2012 13,001
July 2012 8,995
June 2012 41,702
May 2012 10,728
April 2012 4,423
March 2012 12,588
February 2012 9,171
January 2012 2,655
December 2011 22,428
November 2011 29,308
October 2011 28,340
September 2011 20,977
August 2011 22,871
July 2011 20,215
June 2011 11,018
May 2011 7,946
April 2011 45,102
March 2011 14,791
February 2011 30,582
January 2011 36,679
December 2010 14,510
November 2010 15,639
October 2010 25,076
September 2010 35,694
August 2010 38,196
July 2010 31,494
June 2010 42,660
May 2010 42,984
April 2010 33,196
March 2010 26,158
February 2010 21,768
January 2010 23,693
December 2009 14,169
November 2009 13,910
October 2009 8,721
September 2009 5,101
August 2009 5,707
July 2009 6,083
June 2009 5,576
May 2009 30,715
April 2009 8,466
March 2009 21,801
February 2009 7,575
January 2009 5,156
December 2008 7,165
November 2008 6,402
October 2008 24,538
September 2008 28,111
August 2008 5,372

No text corrections for 'Government Gazettes'


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
IN THE WAKE OF FORTUNE. (COPYRIGHT.) AN AUSTRALIAN ST0RY. CHAPTER XXIV.--CONTINUED. (Article), The Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947), Friday 25 May 1894 [Issue No.6741] page 3 2016-07-29 18:12 IN THE . WAKE OF
' FORTUNE.
(COPYEIOHT.) '
All AUSTBAUAN ST0R1
. ' ' "
m
CHAPTER XXIV.— Continued.
IN THE WAKE OF
FORTUNE.
(COPYRIGHT.)
AN AUSTRALIAN STORY.
BY

CHAPTER XXIV.— Continued.###
IN THE WAKE OF FORTUNE. AN AUSTRALIAN STORY. CHAPTER XXII.--CONTINUED. (Article), The Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947), Wednesday 23 May 1894 [Issue No.6739] page 3 2016-07-29 18:10 SHATTERED HOPES.###
the whole story of . his terrible wanderings.
He' listened for more than an hour with
said: .
your mates?" ,
" I have not been in a position to find ant
wheie I have been, biit'I hope to do so
now. In faot,! will make it my firtt duty
to do so,
" I rooliy do riot think yon will have far to
bim.
"Have you -heard anything?" queried
Edwaid, in a tone of alarm.
" Yes ; it is publio property now, as it has
appeared in tbe press. I may as well tell
supposed to have perished on the plain vhich
Ah 1" -gasped Trenoweth, " Jaok Long told
me so." '
Barr opened a /desk and toox out a favr
newspaper slips, which ho handed to his
Irlond. They were beaded, " Warriblo
Deaths From -Thirst," nnd gave a cirouin-
stantlal account of the finding of -threo
skeletons, the details of which aro familiar
to the reader, which had been fairly identl.
fled as those of Grey and two brothers named
' The accounts concluded with a few lines to
the effect that although the remains of tho
fourth member of tbe prospecting party, one
no'doubt that he also hod perished mise
whelmed with the news, though to Bome
extent it was not nnexpeoted ; then he sud
I " You have hot sent my mo.ther. this new,
hare you ?"-> ,7ry (i
SHATTERED HOPES.
the whole story of his terrible wanderings.
He listened for more than an hour with
said:
your mates?"
"I have not been in a position to find out
where I have been, but I hope to do so
now. In fact, I will make it my first duty
to do so."
"I really do not think you will have far to
him.
"Have you heard anything?" queried
Edward, in a tone of alarm.
"Yes; it is public property now, as it has
appeared in the press. I may as well tell
supposed to have perished on the plain which
"Ah!" gasped Trenoweth, "Jack Long told
me so."
Barr opened a desk and took out a few
newspaper slips, which he handed to his
friend. They were headed, "Terrible
Deaths From Thirst," and gave a circum-
stantial account of the finding of three
skeletons, the details of which are familiar
to the reader, which had been fairly identi-
fied as those of Grey and two brothers named
The accounts concluded with a few lines to
the effect that although the remains of the
fourth member of the prospecting party, one
no doubt that he also had perished mise-
whelmed with the news, though to some
extent it was not unexpected ; then he sud-
"You have not sent my mother this news,
have you?"
IN THE WAKE OF FORTUNE. AN AUSTRALIAN STORY. CHAPTER XXII.--CONTINUED. (Article), The Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947), Wednesday 23 May 1894 [Issue No.6739] page 3 2016-07-29 18:06 CHAPTER. XXIV,
SHATTERED HOPES.
CHAPTER. XXIV.
SHATTERED HOPES.###
IN THE WAKE OF FORTUNE. AN AUSTRALIAN STORY. CHAPTER XXII.--CONTINUED. (Article), The Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947), Wednesday 23 May 1894 [Issue No.6739] page 3 2016-07-29 18:05 ChristmaB day was kept in that far-off
region as merrily bb in the old land.
Trenoweth had undergone suoh a trial that
On the 3rd of Jnnuary, 1872, a team left
Poole for the Darling river, and it convoyed
Trenoweth from his friends. They accom
and gave him a most enthusiastic Bend-
off;
to Wentwortb. OtOBsing over to Swan Hill,
he took ooach to Inglewood ; and it occurred
to him that he wonld visit the address whioh
tne NortonB had given him as the residence
of their parents, fie found it after some
he could get no information ae to whoro
the old couple had. migrated to from anyone
around.'
This seemed a favorable omen, for pro
.ueir parents away with them.
opened, and next morning he' had to take
tne coach again over the intervening thirty
Ho felt somowhat fatigued with the long
and dusty journey, and remained in Sand
straight to the office of / his friend, John
Barr. <
accumulation of letters- from St. Oolumb's
the railway station and Bail's place of holi
was standing petoio the open door of his
friefld'a offlce.' . . 'T.LL- .
Barr waa "sitting" inside with" his head
bent, deeply oogitatiDgpvor some correspon
dence,
' "A happy now year to yon, my dear
friend 1" Trenoweth oried, in the fulness of
bis heart at the aigbt of Barr.
. If a pint of nito-glycerine had exploded at
Barr's feet he could not have Deen more
astonished, though he might have been mora
seriously hurt, -
became livid.'
least, how did you-gst here 1" he gasped.
" By ooach and rail and a little boating,'
his friend's arm, and he aoucluded a domes-
'tic bereavement had fallen npon him. "Ah,
I see, I am very torry indeed for your
' My trouble I" rejoined tho latter. " My
tronble has only been about you. It has
been officially reported that yon ' were dead,
that,'! Trenoweth replied, in a tone of vexa
tion. " Of .cousoIihave been dead to the
Barr stood upi and, seizing bis friend's
baud, wrung It as though he would shako it
Christmas day was kept in that far-off
region as merrily as in the old land.
Trenoweth had undergone such a trial that
On the 3rd of January, 1872, a team left
Poole for the Darling river, and it conveyed
Trenoweth from his friends. They accom-
and gave him a most enthusiastic send-
off.
to Wentworth. Crossing over to Swan Hill,
he took coach to Inglewood ; and it occurred
to him that he would visit the address which
the Nortons had given him as the residence
of their parents. He found it after some
he could get no information as to where
the old couple had migrated to from anyone
around.
This seemed a favorable omen, for pro-
their parents away with them.
opened, and next morning he had to take
the coach again over the intervening thirty
He felt somewhat fatigued with the long
and dusty journey, and remained in Sand-
straight to the office of his friend, John
Barr.
accumulation of letters from St. Columb's
the railway station and Barr's place of busi-
was standing before the open door of his
friend's office.
Barr was sitting inside with his head
bent, deeply cogitating over some correspon-
dence.
"A happy new year to you, my dear
friend!" Trenoweth cried, in the fullness of
his heart at the sight of Barr.
If a pint of nitro-glycerine had exploded at
Barr's feet he could not have been more
astonished, though he might have been more
seriously hurt.
became livid.
least, how did you get here?" he gasped.
"By coach and rail and a little boating,
his friend's arm, and he concluded a domes-
tic bereavement had fallen upon him. "Ah,
I see, I am very sorry indeed for your
"My trouble!" rejoined the latter. "My
trouble has only been about you. It has
been officially reported that you were dead,
that," Trenoweth replied, in a tone of vexa-
tion. "Of course I have been dead to the
Barr stood up, and, seizing his friend's
hand, wrung it as though he would shake it
IN THE WAKE OF FORTUNE. AN AUSTRALIAN STORY. CHAPTER XXII.--CONTINUED. (Article), The Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947), Wednesday 23 May 1894 [Issue No.6739] page 3 2016-07-29 17:55 morning.###
for bis discovsrera to satisfy him in that
" What could havo become of your mates,
The queition almost startled Edward,
"I should think— at least, I hope- that
We bOeains aoparated-somohow, and I have
no idea in what diroction they went. Grey,
I believe, bad some knowlcdge'ot the dijs£
-mu«r "onu'tne- DrotneWr OblBg together,
wanderer, I must have gone in ttfo wrong
direction to have reaohc'.jAc spot I did,'
Edward concluded. ' \
"Well, lotus hope so. "wouldn't liko
to bet tbey got back to the station, for they
muat have boen delirious to have left you as
they did. That is sure sign the mind is
gone, Are you sure it was not you who
went from them ?" Long sBked,
I can remember Grey left the three of
me under the shade of the tent tbe follow
ing day. Yes,", the young man' added,
thoughtfully, " I recollect ' leaving the tent
behind me, and thera ..was no one in or
around it. I called out their same: but got
no answer,"
" Oh, then, It's touoh and go with tbem,"
In the morning the preparations for de
parture did not take long ; and, at tbe time
Thirty-six hours previously be had been
heart,
Before leaving Long made plentiful dis
That was ths only thing tboy seemed to
care for, se Kallakoo was a f a'vorito at Poole
station, and could have bad anything in
reason for the asking. ' -
- Before getting -into the eart in which he
bode good-bye to each of tbo blaoki,old and
yonng.
kindest wishes in a manner the - black could
uot mlsundeistscd.
Never amongst white people bad more
real kindness been shown bim then by ths
untntored savages he wbi leaving.
given no causa to be classed omongit brutal
. Eellakoo and his few followers stood and
watched tbe departure of.th men until a
bend in the road hid ths party from their
Vi'ew, '
look at his dusky friends With a suppressed
" You almost seem sorry to lssva the oamp,
old man," Long said, bantsringly. .
" It ia not exactly that, but when a man
Cor six months, it 1b impossible sot to feel
regret at leavlng.hlm in suoh a wilderness
towarde the camp.
".Yob, you are right, in one way: But
don't let those thoughts grieve you. It you
.wished to do him tbe worst injury, the way
to do it wonld be to bring him out of yon
der wilderness and take him \o Melbourno.
His natural hocue is the wilderness," Long
Tbe truth of this was so apparent that the
yonng Oorniahman recognised it at once and
ceased to griove over his blaok friend.
Eaoh mile thai brought him nearer to
Poole station -made him feol' more anxious
to get baok to settlement.
He did not presont suuh an uncouth ap
pearance in tho cart as bo did when first
inch . .
A sort oi general levy was made upon the
station bands, add enough .clothes gathered
to make him comfortable until the home
This journey alone would uccupy . four
ThiB period was but a fleeting minute to
solitary wanderings from Lake Eyrie;
was scarcely felt, and wben the station was
reached he had almost recovered bis former
It was within a weok ol Ohristmaa time,
and as no one would think' of leaving until
scissors his unkempt bair and ragged beard
were brought into aomething like sub
jection, and there was also an ample ward
robe at the station to provida him with an
outfit. .
Ho had some of tho money left with
whioh he started from Farina; but, after
morning.
for his discoverers to satisfy him in that
"What could have become of your mates,
Grey and the two Nortons?"
The question almost startled Edward.
"I should think— at least, I hope—that
We became separated somohow, and I have
no idea in what direction they went. Grey,
I believe, had some knowledge of the dis-
tricts, and the brothers, being together,
wanderer. I must have gone in the wrong
direction to have reached the spot I did,"
Edward concluded.
"Well, let us hope so. I wouldn't like
to bet they got back to the station, for they
must have been delirious to have left you as
they did. That is a sure sign the mind is
gone. Are you sure it was not you who
went from them?" Long asked.
"I can remember Grey left the three of
me under the shade of the tent the follow-
ing day. Yes," the young man added,
behind me, and there was no one in or
around it. I called out their names but got
no answer."
"Oh, then, it's touch and go with them,"
In the morning the preparations for de-
parture did not take long ; and, as the time
Thirty-six hours previously he had been
heart.
Before leaving Long made plentiful dis-
That was the only thing they seemed to
care for, as Kallakoo was a favorite at Poole
station, and could have had anything in
reason for the asking.
Before getting into the cart in which he
bade good-bye to each of the blacks, old and
young.
kindest wishes in a manner the black could
not misunderstand.
Never amongst white people had more
real kindness been shown him then by the
untutored savages he was leaving.
given no cause to be classed amongst brutal
Kallakoo and his few followers stood and
watched the departure of the men until a
bend in the road hid the party from their
view.
look at his dusky friends with a suppressed
"You almost seem sorry to leave the camp,
old man," Long said, banteringly.
"It is not exactly that, but when a man
for six months, it is impossible not to feel
regret at leaving him in such a wilderness
towards the camp.
"Yes, you are right, in one way. But
don't let those thoughts grieve you. If you
wished to do him the worst injury, the way
to do it would be to bring him out of yon-
der wilderness and take him to Melbourne.
His natural home is the wilderness," Long
The truth of this was so apparent that the
young Cornishman recognised it at once and
ceased to grieve over his black friend.
Each mile that brought him nearer to
Poole station made him feel more anxious
to get back to settlement.
He did not present such an uncouth ap-
pearance in the cart as he did when first
met.
A sort of general levy was made upon the
station hands, and enough clothes gathered
to make him comfortable until the home-
This journey alone would occupy four
This period was but a fleeting minute to
solitary wanderings from Lake Eyrie.
was scarcely felt, and when the station was
reached he had almost recovered his former
It was within a week of Christmas time,
and as no one would think of leaving until
scissors his unkempt hair and ragged beard
were brought into something like sub-
jection, and there was also an ample ward-
robe at the station to provide him with an
outfit.
He had some of the money left with
which he started from Farina; but, after
IN THE WAKE OF FORTUNE. AN AUSTRALIAN STORY. CHAPTER XXII.--CONTINUED. (Article), The Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947), Wednesday 23 May 1894 [Issue No.6739] page 3 2016-07-29 16:13 and began to load them.###
Meanwhile, Long had gone to the provi
sion cert nnd taken out a huge damper, ft large
pieoo of which ho handed to Trenoweth and
another to the black,
said to Edward, who waa greedily devouring
the dampor.
He had not tasted bread for efght months
and the sodden damper was to htm an in
conceivable luxury. _
Within fire minntss he bald a pint of hot
tin in his hands; and, as he sipped tho
delicious nectar, he folt that, after all, life
waa worth living,
" ration "—better known as ' post-and-rail "
—tea. It waa milklesB, and the sugar was
to the man who for so long bad to put np
Plenty of meat was cooked over tbe fire
completed; everyone— black and white, old
and young — sat down to what, In Edward's
opinion, was tbe most cheerf ul/nenl he ever
had,
Loug had decided not to go farther down
bad discovered a "wild white man," The
carte were already well filled, and, as no
to make a return start on tbe following
morning.
and began to load them.
Meanwhile, Long had gone to the provi-
sion cart and taken out a huge damper, a large
piece of which he handed to Trenoweth and
another to the black.
said to Edward, who was greedily devouring
the damper.
He had not tasted bread for eight months
and the sodden damper was to him an in-
conceivable luxury.
Within five minutes he held a pint of hot
tea in his hands; and, as he sipped the
delicious nectar, he felt that, after all, life
was worth living.
"ration"—better known as "post-and-rail"
—tea. It was milkless, and the sugar was
to the man who for so long had to put up
Plenty of meat was cooked over the fire
completed, everyone— black and white, old
and young — sat down to what, in Edward's
opinion, was the most cheerful meal he ever
had.
Long had decided not to go further down
had discovered a "wild white man." The
carts were already well filled, and, as no
to make a return start on the following
morning.###
IN THE WAKE OF FORTUNE. AN AUSTRALIAN STORY. CHAPTER XXII.--CONTINUED. (Article), The Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947), Wednesday 23 May 1894 [Issue No.6739] page 3 2016-07-29 15:31 name is Long — Jack Long."###
The burly man spoko this with great volu-
| bllity, and.with an expression of sympathy
on his faee for the awful Bufferings through
which ho knew the young man must have
ccme from Poole Station, which is abont
spend the Christmas with uo, and we can
pass you on to Wentworch. There are good
being lost, I know," hs added, apologeti
you have been lately, it mskea him feel a bit
" I think I shalt recover myself in suoh
company as yours,. Mr. Long," Trenoweth
" I hops so ; and now 1st as to work, boys-
I'll look aftor our friends, here," Long called
oat.
At this the men, nssiBted by all the blaoka
save Kallakoo, at once mada for the bides
and bsgan to load tbem.
name is Long — Jack Long."
The burly man spoke this with great volu-
bility, and with an expression of sympathy
on his face for the awful sufferings through
which he knew the young man must have
come from Poole Station, which is about
spend the Christmas with us, and we can
pass you on to Wentworth. There are good
being lost. I know," he added, apologeti-
you have been lately, it makes him feel a bit
"I think I shalt recover myself in such
company as yours, Mr. Long," Trenoweth
"I hope so ; and now let us to work, boys.
I'll look after our friends, here," Long called
out.
At this the men, assisted by all the blacks
save Kallakoo, at once made for the hides
and began to load them.###
IN THE WAKE OF FORTUNE. AN AUSTRALIAN STORY. CHAPTER XXII.--CONTINUED. (Article), The Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947), Wednesday 23 May 1894 [Issue No.6739] page 3 2016-07-29 14:30 name is Long — Jack Long."
name is Long — Jack Long."###
IN THE WAKE OF FORTUNE. AN AUSTRALIAN STORY. CHAPTER XXII.--CONTINUED. (Article), The Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947), Wednesday 23 May 1894 [Issue No.6739] page 3 2016-07-29 14:30 - In truth Edward Trenoweth did not recog-
" llse that his personal appearance aeemed
- "outre," until the station hands stood
around bim.
- Tbe general reader will know that dudlah
dress is pot held -in high estimation by sta.
lion bands m the interior, but the new
-. the world ia really a matter of comparison,
and tha lost Oorniahman had only his black
; these he wr.s certainly entitled to regard
ix himself with a considerable amount of com-
J plaisance, but he now saw his naif esteem
V was rather out of place.
!| Ia spite of the almost solemn position in
% whioh be was then, a momentary thought
. .v - passed through his mind aa to what Neily
. -jr."- Ryan would bava said had she seen him in
j " this attire; \
/'- (east, had fulfilled its purpose. , x
"i Bee you bare not boen idle, Kallakoo,"
" the horseman said, ss his eyes fellupon the
"'bides-' '
1 Tbe words roussd Edward from liis revohe
and he said; . t >
. . " I forgot to tell you, My name is Ed-
ward Trsuoweth. 1 left Adelaide's long
t ; ... time ago-r-yo'i it must bo a long lima ago—
- . ,n company with -three others, to go pros-.
peottng In the north, but we lost our horses
,y -v/ und; then thirst fell upon us. T don't
j\ - . remember very much unitil my kind friend,
'SA - allakoo, found mc," and h looked grnte-
fli'S- ?'?> ' ' fully at tho black.
. -." Whew I you must bare bad a time of
- - ft to get this far. When did you leave Ada-
" il laldo fquerlgd the leader.
' . i "It was komswrhcre about Ohrutmaa time,
iciuK Ajwutr-!! ....
" tYsll, we'll have another Ohrismaa bore
him then. He tells toe he found you at tho
Barrier. That is a long wny from hete,to tbe
south, It is fortunate that you met bo good
s fellow a9 Kallakoo, He was chiefly in
Burke died, ten years ago. By the way, tny
name is Long — Jacs Long.''
In truth Edward Trenoweth did not recog-
nise that his personal appearance seemed
"outre," until the station hands stood
around him.
The general reader will know that dudish
dress is not held in high estimation by sta-
tion hands in the interior, but the new
the world is really a matter of comparison,
and the lost Cornishman had only his black
these he was certainly entitled to regard
himself with a considerable amount of com-
plaisance, but he now saw his self esteem
was rather out of place.
In spite of the almost solemn position in
which he was then, a momentary thought
passed through his mind as to what Nelly
Ryan would have said had she seen him in
this attire.
least, had fulfilled its purpose.
"I see you have not been idle, Kallakoo,"
the horseman said, as his eyes fell upon the
hides.
The words roused Edward from his reverie
and he said:
"I forgot to tell you. My name is Ed-
ward Trenoweth. I left Adelaide a long
time ago—yes it must be a long time ago—
in company with three others, to go pros-
pecting in the north, but we lost our horses
and then thirst fell upon us. I don't
remember very much until my kind friend,
Kallakoo, found me," and he looked grate-
fully at the black.
"Whew! you must have had a time of
it to get this far. When did you leave Ade-
laide?" queried the leader.
"It was somewhere about Christmas time,
I know."
"Well, we'll have another Chrismas here
him then. He tells me he found you at the
Barrier. That is a long way from here, to the
south. It is fortunate that you met so good
a fellow as Kallakoo. He was chiefly in-
Burke died, ten years ago. By the way, my
name is Long — Jack Long."
IN THE WAKE OF FORTUNE. AN AUSTRALIAN STORY. CHAPTER XXII.--CONTINUED. (Article), The Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947), Wednesday 23 May 1894 [Issue No.6739] page 3 2016-07-29 14:21 j - CHAPTER XXIII;
. ONC1S MORE.
CHAPTER XXIII.
ONCE MORE.

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

  1. BARRY, John Arthur
    List
    Public

    65 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2011-08-02
    User data
  2. BOOTH, Lancelot
    List
    Public

    Australian Author
    (24 September 1845 – 20 May 1913)

    4 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2016-06-11
    User data
  3. KIPLING, Rudyard
    List
    Public

    10 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2011-01-08
    User data
  4. OXENHAM, John
    List
    Public

    1 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2011-01-09
    User data
  5. The Will Forgeries
    List
    Public

    16 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2010-08-14
    User data

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.