Information about Trove user: maurielyn

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

RankCorrectorLines corrected
1 JohnWarren 2,864,572
2 annmanley 2,008,563
3 NeilHamilton 1,852,376
4 noelwoodhouse 1,459,945
5 maurielyn 1,368,221
6 John.F.Hall 1,324,060
7 mrbh 1,146,315

1,368,221 lines corrected.

Corrections by month

October 2014 20,279
September 2014 28,719
August 2014 46,848
July 2014 54,325
June 2014 10,647
May 2014 15,795
April 2014 16,770
March 2014 3
February 2014 92
January 2014 36
December 2013 4,433
November 2013 6,312
October 2013 40,154
September 2013 26,891
August 2013 19,229
July 2013 30,238
June 2013 35,889
May 2013 34,599
April 2013 5,953
March 2013 4,178
February 2013 60
December 2012 122
November 2012 6,412
October 2012 9,007
September 2012 2,074
August 2012 13,001
July 2012 8,995
June 2012 41,702
May 2012 10,728
April 2012 4,423
March 2012 12,588
February 2012 9,171
January 2012 2,655
December 2011 22,428
November 2011 29,308
October 2011 28,340
September 2011 20,977
August 2011 22,871
July 2011 20,215
June 2011 11,018
May 2011 7,946
April 2011 45,102
March 2011 14,791
February 2011 30,582
January 2011 36,679
December 2010 14,510
November 2010 15,639
October 2010 25,076
September 2010 35,694
August 2010 38,196
July 2010 31,494
June 2010 42,660
May 2010 42,984
April 2010 33,196
March 2010 26,158
February 2010 21,768
January 2010 23,693
December 2009 14,169
November 2009 13,910
October 2009 8,721
September 2009 5,101
August 2009 5,707
July 2009 6,083
June 2009 5,576
May 2009 30,715
April 2009 8,466
March 2009 21,801
February 2009 7,575
January 2009 5,156
December 2008 7,165
November 2008 6,402
October 2008 24,538
September 2008 28,111
August 2008 5,372

Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
Our New Serial. HER ASSIGNED HUSBAND. A Tale of Early Australia (founded on fact) Chapter I.—A Family Conclave. (Article), The World's News (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 1955), Saturday 5 December 1914 page Article 2014-10-24 20:58 was."###
was."
SYDNEY IN THE BEGINNING. CAMP AT THE COVE. AFTER SEVEN DAYS. (Article), The Scone Advocate (NSW : 1887 - 1954), Tuesday 24 August 1937 page Article 2014-10-24 16:12 which Captain Hunter led the trans
If old .Baron Alf, the Surveyor of
Lands, could leave St. John's Church
land lying about the head of this sym
metrical inlet running into the wilder
ness of stone and 'bricks-and-mortar
liow. It differs as greatly from what
across the Darling River from. Bourke
ar.,1 another — but it is doubtful if he
ever saw any- place destined to alter
(just now in the hands of busy up
rooters of its being, preparing a foun
railway), with the narrow streets be
rearing themselves in serrated- out
waters; rocky shores, and dense, im
low water, and the silence of undis
a sleep, rugged line of hill, reaching
the Bridge support their burdens to
In the scrub-covered hollow be
tween these ridges tinkled and splash
ed a little brook — 'a run of fresh
water,' as David Collins puts it,
'which stole silently along through a
the vude sound of the labourer's axe,
and the downfall of its ancient in
place to the voice of labour, the con
busy hum of its new possessors.'
was moored, and as soon as the con
to clearing ground for the several en
the first Uovernment House — a small
the headquarters of British Govern
over which Captain Phillip had au
Phillip's own word, for it that this
badly . and failed to keep out the
?By 'the end of the first week of
from a map in Lieut. Bradley 's diary,
able to realise how the little encamp
ment was pitched in the wooded val
known, as the Tank Stream.
The tents. of the main detachment
this camp the main body of the con
yet were the* majority of the female
.other side of the valley, -.. south of
headquarters. According to Brad
ley's plan, our freind Baron Alt's
marque was the most southerly resi
dence in the settlement.'. Almost as
?valley, the Lieut.-Governor, Major
By the beginning- of March, when
observatory on.Dawes Point had be
the bay, close- to the location of the
main guard. Another guard was es
tablished near the Governor's quar
AN EXACT MAPi
ters, and there was one by the hos
ws.tehed over the outskirts of the can
wns built near the flagstaff on the
id laiiding stores, and near it was
bitt.ated the blacksmith's shop, where
Supply a little farther on. South
the ? Borrowdale, storeship, were
off the western side, and by the oppo
the transports Friendship . and Scar
than 1000 inhabitants had been plant
ed on the eastern side of a huge con
tinent about which no one knew any
befoie them, and the sense of lonely
Such was Sydney after an exist
which Captain Hunter led the trans-
If old Baron Alf, the Surveyor of
Lands, could leave St. John's Church-
land lying about the head of this sym-
metrical inlet running into the wilder-
ness of stone and bricks-and-mortar
now. It differs as greatly from what
across the Darling River from Bourke
and another — but it is doubtful if he
ever saw any place destined to alter
(just now in the hands of busy up-
rooters of its being, preparing a foun-
railway), with the narrow streets be-
rearing themselves in serrated out-
waters; rocky shores, and dense, im-
low water, and the silence of undis-
a steep, rugged line of hill, reaching
the Bridge support their burdens to-
In the scrub-covered hollow be-
tween these ridges tinkled and splash-
ed a little brook — "a run of fresh
water," as David Collins puts it,
"which stole silently along through a
the rude sound of the labourer's axe,
and the downfall of its ancient in-
place to the voice of labour, the con-
busy hum of its new possessors."
was moored, and as soon as the con-
to clearing ground for the several en-
the first Government House — a small
the headquarters of British Govern-
over which Captain Phillip had au-
Phillip's own word for it that this
badly and failed to keep out the
By the end of the first week of
from a map in Lieut. Bradley's diary,
able to realise how the little encamp-
ment was pitched in the wooded val-
known as the Tank Stream.
The tents of the main detachment
this camp the main body of the con-
yet were the majority of the female
other side of the valley, south of
headquarters. According to Brad-
ley's plan, our friend Baron Alt's
marque was the most southerly resi-
dence in the settlement. Almost as
valley, the Lieut.-Governor, Major
By the beginning of March, when
observatory on Dawes Point had be-
the bay, close to the location of the
main guard. Another guard was es-
tablished near the Governor's quar-
AN EXACT MAP.
ters, and there was one by the hos-
watched over the outskirts of the can-
was built near the flagstaff on the
of landing stores, and near it was
situated the blacksmith's shop, where
Supply a little farther on. South-
the Borrowdale, storeship, were
off the western side, and by the oppo-
the transports Friendship and Scar-
than 1000 inhabitants had been plant-
ed on the eastern side of a huge con-
tinent about which no one knew any-
before them, and the sense of lonely
Such was Sydney after an exist-
A GAME OF CHANCE. (Article), The World's News (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 1955), Saturday 1 March 1919 page Article 2014-10-24 11:47 A Hipping Australian Story, will be
A Ripping Australian Story, will be
New Australian Serial. A GAME OF CHANCE, Chapter L.—An Unknown Correspondent. (Article), The World's News (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 1955), Saturday 22 March 1919 page Article 2014-10-24 11:45 Chapter L-An Unknovru Correspondent.
* * gazed out across the Millungra paddocks,
"When Nuggets Glistened," TThe Outlaw's Daughter,"
OLJ-.1NG near the window of a room in
Chapter I.--An Unknown Correspondent.
gazed out across the Millungra paddocks,
"When Nuggets Glistened," The Outlaw's Daughter,"
LOLLING near the window of a room in
The Eye of the Camera (Article), Mudgee Guardian and North-Western Representative (NSW : 1890 - 1954), Thursday 13 May 1909 page Article 2014-10-24 11:42 had passed in the doorway. Ho mut
A queer sort of cry escaped Kear
handed up to the Bench a glass ne
He use which was absolutely felt.
for inspection. In' the background
were the rugged cm'ffs with the spur
old .man had staggered back, almost
his fingers. A spontaneous and star
not the slightest difficulty in recogni
sing the reeling figure of Lord Mor
nington, or in making out the fea-.
which had excited vfie whole of Eng
Windsor's lawyer looked appealing
l.v at the Bench and shrugged his
anti-climax now for him to say any
his hands to his throat, as if some
qi'eer, strangled cry he fell to the
ground and lay there still and un
conscious ?
'A close call that,' said Windsor's
Professor. 'Altogether it was a
here.'
'Lucky!' the Professor cried.
'I should call it a direct interven
tion of Providence.'
had passed in the doorway. He mut-
A queer sort of cry escaped Kear-
handed up to the Bench a glass ne-
House which was absolutely felt.
for inspection. In the background
were the rugged cliffs with the spur
old man had staggered back, almost
his fingers. A spontaneous and star-
not the slightest difficulty in recogni-
sing the reeling figure of Lord Mor-
nington, or in making out the fea-
which had excited the whole of Eng-
Windsor's lawyer looked appealing-
ly at the Bench and shrugged his
anti-climax now for him to say any-
his hands to his throat, as if some-
queer, strangled cry he fell to the
ground and lay there still and un-
conscious. . . . . .
"A close call that," said Windsor's
Professor. "Altogether it was a
here."
"Lucky!" the Professor cried.
"I should call it a direct interven-
tion of Providence."
The Eye of the Camera (Article), Mudgee Guardian and North-Western Representative (NSW : 1890 - 1954), Thursday 13 May 1909 page Article 2014-10-24 11:38 i tie time ago, by the aid of my glas
! ses, I saw that a pair of Swallow
jj tailed Kites were actually nesting
I; ' upon Steeple Crag. I determined by
i hook or by crook, to get a photo
i graph of those birds.'
!j. 'How did you manage it?' coun
| sel asked. _
1 'I am just coming to that. Ha
lf ving located the exact nesting spot,
ii these photographs. The Kites were
\ shutter would be released and a suc
| cessful exposure made.'
a string to the shutter of my spec
, try and snap them myself. There
fore, I hid my . camera in a buncli of
gorse bushes, with all my mechani
that directly one of the birds drop
ped upon . one of the strings the
'Where was the camera placed?'
'In a patch of gorse bushes some
'Leaving plenty of room for any
body to pass by, of course?'
'Oh, certainly; you see I had to
i'rom the ground, and anybody who
had goue that way might have stum
bled over it.'
'And thus released the shutter,
v, Inch possibly might have ended in
the passer-by taking his own pho
tograph.'
'Frecisely,' the Professor said in
quiet tones. 'Any wanderer kick
easily have taken his owr. photo
graph. If he liao. fallen heavily on
polled the jamara down, and there
would have been an end of my ex- ?
peiiments for 'the time being.'
'And did anything of the kind
happen?' asked counsel.
'Something- of the kind did take
place,' the Professor said solemnly.
' 'When I went to regain possession of
downwards in the bushes, and tho
had come to my ears in the mean
thiow a light on the tragic death
bushes where I had planted my spe
go!'
tle time ago, by the aid of my glas-
ses, I saw that a pair of Swallow-
tailed Kites were actually nesting
upon Steeple Crag. I determined by
hook or by crook, to get a photo-
graph of those birds."
"How did you manage it?" coun-
sel asked.
'I am just coming to that. Ha-
ving located the exact nesting spot,
these photographs. The Kites were
shutter would be released and a suc-
cessful exposure made."
a string to the shutter of my spec-
try and snap them myself. There-
fore, I hid my camera in a bunch of
gorse bushes, with all my mechani-
that directly one of the birds drop-
ped upon one of the strings the
"Where was the camera placed?"
"In a patch of gorse bushes some
"Leaving plenty of room for any-
body to pass by, of course?"
"Oh, certainly; you see I had to
from the ground, and anybody who
had gone that way might have stum-
bled over it."
"And thus released the shutter,
which possibly might have ended in
the passer-by taking his own pho-
tograph."
"Precisely," the Professor said in
quiet tones. "Any wanderer kick-
easily have taken his own photo-
graph. If he had fallen heavily on
pulled the camera down, and there
would have been an end of my ex-
periments for the time being."
"And did anything of the kind
happen?" asked counsel.
"Something of the kind did take
place," the Professor said solemnly.
"When I went to regain possession of
downwards in the bushes, and the
had come to my ears in the mean-
throw a light on the tragic death
bushes where I had planted my spe-
go!"
The Eye of the Camera (Article), Mudgee Guardian and North-Western Representative (NSW : 1890 - 1954), Thursday 13 May 1909 page Article 2014-10-24 11:33 9 prosecution imu utitui tt.nuun.v;u u.hii.j,
t' and that the Crown case was con
^ siderablv weakened. Everybody lis
' toned closely now.
\ 'I don't' think that will be.neces
\ sary,' counsel went on. 'I under
| ^ stand, Professor, that you can tell
I ^ us a good deil more about this mat
| ter. You have formed a theory ? '
I 'I beg your pardon,' the Profes
I sor interrupted. 'I have no theor
. ies at all. What I shall lay before
I the Court is actual fact. I wish to
j 'One moment,' Windsor's lawyer
| said. 'Touching this photograph, is
j it one that you took yourself?'
I 'Well, more or less,' the Profcs
| si-r explained. 'But perhaps I had
1 better go into details. I have been
| fortunate, enough since I have been
j here to otbain photographs of many
§??? rare birds that nest on the crags and
I spin' just off the mainland. These
| birds are perfectly safe where they
\ '?!' are, for they can lay their eggs with
i|i impunity, a fact which doubtless
h brings so many of them here. A l.it
Bench, a photograph which will es
prosecution had been knocked away
and that the Crown case was con-
siderably weakened. Everybody lis-
tened closely now.
"I don't think that will be neces-
sary," counsel went on. "I under-
stand, Professor, that you can tell
us a good deal more about this mat-
ter. You have formed a theory----"
"I beg your pardon," the Profes-
sor interrupted. "I have no theor-
ies at all. What I shall lay before
the Court is actual fact. I wish to
"One moment," Windsor's lawyer
said. "Touching this photograph, is
it one that you took yourself?"
"Well, more or less," the Profes-
sor explained. "But perhaps I had
better go into details. I have been
fortunate enough since I have been
here to obtain photographs of many
rare birds that nest on the crags and
spurs just off the mainland. These
birds are perfectly safe where they
are, for they can lay their eggs with
impunity, a fact which doubtless
brings so many of them here. A lit-
Bench, a photograph which will es-
The Eye of the Camera (Article), Mudgee Guardian and North-Western Representative (NSW : 1890 - 1954), Thursday 13 May 1909 page Article 2014-10-24 11:29 ,, ''Well, yes, sir. He is a most in
. behalf of a relative of mine that Mr.
K siiruld have the sum of three liun
'I believe you are a friend of
the accused9' counsel asked.
i ' dred pounds placed in his hands
'I know him very well, indeed,'
'And you have formed some esti
mate of his character, I suppose?'
I cannot speak too highly of him.
'You have found him trustworthy
and reliable?' ,
'Oh, dear me, yes. Unfortuna
tely, Mr. Windsor has iio inclination
He lias been brougnt up to do noth
he is the loafer that Lord Morning
the highest opinion of his integrity.
'For instance, you would trust
him with money ?' .
' Windsor took his trip to St. Peters
'I have already done so, sir, the
Professor said calmly. 'It was on
into details. As I could not under
j\Jr. Windsor to do so. The money
by me, -and I can produce the cheque
Hull, if the 'Court would care to
Se3 it. For obvious reasons I. must,
decline to give the name of tho
' 'drawer.' . '
"Well, yes, sir. He is a most in-
behalf of a relative of mine that Mr.
should have the sum of three hun-
"I believe you are a friend of
the accused?" counsel asked.
dred pounds placed in his hands
"I know him very well, indeed,"
"And you have formed some esti-
mate of his character, I suppose?"
I cannot speak too highly of him."
"You have found him trustworthy
and reliable?"
"Oh, dear me, yes. Unfortuna-
tely, Mr. Windsor has no inclination
He has been brought up to do noth-
he is the loafer that Lord Morning-
the highest opinion of his integrity."
"For instance, you would trust
him with money ?"
Windsor took his trip to St. Peters-
"I have already done so, sir," the
Professor said calmly. "It was on
into details. As I could not under-
Mr. Windsor to do so. The money
by me, and I can produce the cheque
Hull, if the Court would care to
see it. For obvious reasons I must
decline to give the name of the
drawer."
The Eye of the Camera (Article), Mudgee Guardian and North-Western Representative (NSW : 1890 - 1954), Thursday 13 May 1909 page Article 2014-10-24 11:26 i ' Oh, indeed ' You didn't go oi
F-,; ther way by motor, I supposed You
't ? ddxn't hire a motor in the tirsu in
stance to take you to Scotland?'
'In that case,' the counsel went
on. 'jrou have never heard ot'
\ Messrs. (Jreatorex, of IJuil, the mo
* tor-garage people?'
i speech. He wiped his spectacles
i for me Call Professor Stewart,
! everybody was on the tip tee of ex
'I have no further questions to
ask for the present,' the counsel
said. 'I shall be able to prove to
your Worships later on that the wit
„ if I place Professor Stewart in the
box without furthoc delay. I rely
please.' „
pectation. It was felt thai here was
chauge the whole current of public
was nothing ' in his manner to indi
cate what was going to take pli.ee.'
"Oh, indeed! You didn't go ei-
ther way by motor, I suppose? You
didn't hire a motor in the first in-
stance to take you to Scotland?"
"In that case," the counsel went
on. You have never heard of
Messrs. Greatorex, of Hull, the mo-
tor-garage people?"
speech. He wiped his spectacles
for me Call Professor Stewart,
everybody was on the tiptoe of ex-
"I have no further questions to
ask for the present," the counsel
said. "I shall be able to prove to
your Worships later on that the wit-
if I place Professor Stewart in the
box without further delay. I rely
please."
pectation. It was felt that here was
change the whole current of public
was nothing in his manner to indi-
cate what was going to take place."
The Eye of the Camera (Article), Mudgee Guardian and North-Western Representative (NSW : 1890 - 1954), Thursday 13 May 1909 page Article 2014-10-24 10:59 Stewart returned, when' he got into I
his_ rooms, he found Eric Kearton
waiting for liim. The latter appear- \ ;
ed-to. be somewhat nervous and ex
from time to time and wiped them, I
as if the beads of moisture thereon |
interfered with hib sight. j
'I came to see you, Professor,'
he said ' in response to your tele
been fishing eve* 'since.' J, ,
'One can never tell,' the Profes- - ;
sor said cheerfully. 'You see, I f
happen to know something, and I '
don't agree with you. Between our- j
selves, we shall manage to get WincU
sor off with flying colors. Now, you l|
see if I don't prove a true prophet.' |
Once more Kearton wiped his spec
tacles nervously. I
Naturally enough the little court . |
house was crammed to suffocation f
'?wher. Guy Windsor surrendered to ? |
his bail on Tuesday morning. Peo
Most of the leading newspapers sent ~i
special reporters. The expectation . f
of something out of the common Si
did riot .appear likely to be gratified -i
by the calling of Eric Kearton. ! =' |
Anything less like tragedy or any- jj
thing more like middle-class medi- y.
The shy little man stood in the wit*-' ? _ |
noes box wiping his spectacles ner- |
yously. The reporters leant back in ? |
their seats and studied _ the quaint ; i
rafters of the old Sessions House. I
Here was more material for descrip
As a matter of fact, Eric Kear
testify to the fact that Lord Morn
ingon and Guy Windsor were not on
present, and had heard most of the I
quarrel between the deceased and ' !
Crown waved the witness aside with .
on his face, Kearton prepared-., to
leave the witness box. I
'One moment, please,' the defen
ding barrister said, suavely. '1 ' '
should like to ask you a few ques
tions. For instance, are you a sin- ,
gJe or a married man?' .\
A sudden hush fell upon the _ as- !
sembled jspectators. Some instinct
reporters took up their pencils ag
ain. \
'I — I beg your pardon,' Kearton
'I asked you a plain . question.
Ars you married or not?'
'I don't see,' the witness said - -
hesitatingly, 'why ? '
'Are you married or not?' coun
— 1 +1 — ?
stjj uii uiiirci eu. «
The witness was understood to say ' ;
that he was. He glanced in a tim- ' .
ed, apprehensive way at his tormen
tor. ' .
'Very good,' the latter went on.
'You are a married man. I put it ??
to you that yours is a secret maiV
to 5'ou that you had good reason
Mornington.'
'I deemed it wiser,' Kearton
'Very good. I understand that
your wife is a variety actress?'
'That is so,' the witness replied.
'Ah, well, now we understand.
kept from your relative. You natu
fact that you had made a mesalli- .
o/nce of this kind you would have
r.ever been under your uncle's roof
again?'
'There .is no harm in it,' the wit
ness pleaded. -,«i
'Oh, certainly not,' counsel said,
drily. 'Are you on friendly terms ?-{
with your wife? Haven't you ra- V ij.'
ther neglected her of late?' And I
didn't she threaten to write to Lord f
Mornington? As a matter of fact, 1
)iow? didn't a letter from her to I
Lorci Mornington arrive the day be- ? §
fore his death ? Now, please be , If
talking about, aner I want a, plain
answer.'
'I — I believe so,' Kearton con
'Thank vou. Now, we shall go a
little further. Early on the niorn
irig cf Lord _M--rnington's death, cr
late ' the night before, you went
you i did not return to this neighbor
you prepared to swear that yon were
IV? Uiliere in tlle neighbourhood on '
the day the crime was committed?' ?*.
'Certainly, I was not,' the wit
'Very well. Now, how did vou
you travel?'
''Why, In the ordinary wav. By
tram, of course.' '
II.- |
Stewart returned, when he got into
his rooms, he found Eric Kearton
waiting for him. The latter appear-
ed to be somewhat nervous and ex-
from time to time and wiped them,
as if the beads of moisture thereon
interfered with his sight.
"I came to see you, Professor,"
he said, "in response to your tele-
been fishing ever since."
"One can never tell," the Profes-
sor said cheerfully. "You see, I
happen to know something, and
don't agree with you. Between our-
selves, we shall manage to get Wind-
sor off with flying colors. Now, you
see if I don't prove a true prophet."
Once more Kearton wiped his spec-
tacles nervously.
Naturally enough the little court
house was crammed to suffocation
when Guy Windsor surrendered to
his bail on Tuesday morning. Peo-
Most of the leading newspapers sent
special reporters. The expectation
of something out of the common
did not appear likely to be gratified
by the calling of Eric Kearton.
Anything less like tragedy or any-
thing more like middle-class medi-
The shy little man stood in the wit-
ness box wiping his spectacles ner-
vously. The reporters leant back in
their seats and studied the quaint
rafters of the old Sessions House.
Here was more material for descrip-
As a matter of fact, Eric Kear-
testify to the fact that Lord Morn-
ington and Guy Windsor were not on
present, and had heard most of the
quarrel between the deceased and
Crown waved the witness aside with
on his face, Kearton prepared to
leave the witness box.
"One moment, please," the defen-
ding barrister said, suavely. "I
should like to ask you a few ques-
tions. For instance, are you a sin-
gle or a married man?"
A sudden hush fell upon the as-
sembled spectators. Some instinct
reporters took up their pencils ag-
ain.
"I — I beg your pardon," Kearton
"I asked you a plain question.
Are you married or not?"
"I don't see," the witness said
hesitatingly, "why----"
"Are you married or not?" coun-

sel thundered.
The witness was understood to say
that he was. He glanced in a tim-.
id, apprehensive way at his tormen-
tor.
"Very good," the latter went on.
"You are a married man. I put it
to you that yours is a secret mar-
to you that you had good reason
Mornington."
"I deemed it wiser," Kearton
"Very good. I understand that
your wife is a variety actress?"
"That is so," the witness replied.
"Ah, well, now we understand.
kept from your relative. You natu-
fact that you had made a mesalli-
ance of this kind you would have
never been under your uncle's roof
again?"
"There is no harm in it," the wit-
ness pleaded.
"Oh, certainly not," counsel said,
drily. "Are you on friendly terms
with your wife? Haven't you ra-
ther neglected her of late? And
didn't she threaten to write to Lord
Mornington? As a matter of fact,
now, didn't a letter from her to
Lord Mornington arrive the day be-
fore his death ? Now, please be
talking about, and I want a plain
answer."
"I — I believe so," Kearton con-
"Thank you. Now, we shall go a
little further. Early on the morn-
ing of Lord Mornington's death, or
late the night before, you went
you did not return to this neighbor-
you prepared to swear that you were
no where in the neighbourhood on
the day the crime was committed?"
"Certainly, I was not," the wit-
"Very well. Now, how did you
you travel?"
''Why, in the ordinary way. By
tram, of course."
II.

Counts updated hourly

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

  1. BARRY, John Arthur
    List
    Public

    64 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2011-08-02
    User data
  2. KIPLING, Rudyard
    List
    Public

    10 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2011-01-08
    User data
  3. OXENHAM, John
    List
    Public

    1 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2011-01-09
    User data
  4. The Will Forgeries
    List
    Public

    16 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2010-08-14
    User data

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.