Information about Trove user: maurielyn

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

RankCorrectorLines corrected
1 JohnWarren 2,769,903
2 annmanley 1,978,838
3 NeilHamilton 1,776,402
4 noelwoodhouse 1,357,029
5 maurielyn 1,333,477
6 John.F.Hall 1,318,468
7 mrbh 1,143,427

1,333,477 lines corrected.

Corrections by month

September 2014 14,254
August 2014 46,848
July 2014 54,325
June 2014 10,647
May 2014 15,795
April 2014 16,770
March 2014 3
February 2014 92
January 2014 36
December 2013 4,433
November 2013 6,312
October 2013 40,154
September 2013 26,891
August 2013 19,229
July 2013 30,238
June 2013 35,889
May 2013 34,599
April 2013 5,953
March 2013 4,178
February 2013 60
December 2012 122
November 2012 6,412
October 2012 9,007
September 2012 2,074
August 2012 13,001
July 2012 8,995
June 2012 41,702
May 2012 10,728
April 2012 4,423
March 2012 12,588
February 2012 9,171
January 2012 2,655
December 2011 22,428
November 2011 29,308
October 2011 28,340
September 2011 20,977
August 2011 22,871
July 2011 20,215
June 2011 11,018
May 2011 7,946
April 2011 45,102
March 2011 14,791
February 2011 30,582
January 2011 36,679
December 2010 14,510
November 2010 15,639
October 2010 25,076
September 2010 35,694
August 2010 38,196
July 2010 31,494
June 2010 42,660
May 2010 42,984
April 2010 33,196
March 2010 26,158
February 2010 21,768
January 2010 23,693
December 2009 14,169
November 2009 13,910
October 2009 8,721
September 2009 5,101
August 2009 5,707
July 2009 6,083
June 2009 5,576
May 2009 30,715
April 2009 8,466
March 2009 21,801
February 2009 7,575
January 2009 5,156
December 2008 7,165
November 2008 6,402
October 2008 24,538
September 2008 28,111
August 2008 5,372

Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
MYRTLE [ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.] CHAPTER II.—(Continued.) (Article), Daily Telegraph (Launceston, Tas. : 1883 - 1928), Tuesday 6 September 1910 page Article 2014-09-16 17:00 head, an' that's a fact," she observed.
npnorediher^vii?; -v^M'fS - :^'P ^ *??& :M
nuir^d - fcumMyy , [-%--'. '^? l-'Jf^. Y*:-v * , r&- ;«
:7''Humph^''.^6!hfini£6ed^ '??^?^:^yi-:i-m
?^«^:^myi:ne^:;'ffiu|pA3^^^%^?^?? -M
m'eiited. : ;lT'&iFi/hf ten ..ffi^f&f ?'&»-?- ?.?? ;#Ka
caddishly. v ; Buif-'^Mn .^aU';;*«CT^?^t»?^-t ii^M
day..-1 ?' ???f-..'-.?../^'^^^-'''1''*^.rv-pm^tvV;''^S
'_ Mrs-Sdam^.;O^6ar^tle';!mce?l^9l^:-:i^l^
head, an' that's a fact," she observed. On general principles she was in arms
to defend her sex. I understood and honored her for it.
"No doubt I was a beast," I murdered humbly.
"Humph," she sniffed.
"It's my nerves, I suppose," I la-
mented. "I don't often behave so
caddishly. But I'm all nerves to-
day.
Mrs Soames's queer little face broke
MYRTLE [ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.] CHAPTER II.—(Continued.) (Article), Daily Telegraph (Launceston, Tas. : 1883 - 1928), Tuesday 6 September 1910 page Article 2014-09-16 14:49 CHAPTER in— MATES. : :
I was still endeavoring to - piece to
gether .the fragmentary impressions, of,
my interview when Mrs Soames '-. ,ap-'
peared and a stranger whom. I guessed\
for Mrs -Twomy because. ' she wore .7a,;
widow's bonnet. I ' was ? right/ -. She'
was rather. :a; pretty .woman .waiji ,a
somewhat prfedacious cast of face, hut
fat and figurelfess. Her eves; were bold
and full- 'of , sex appeal— Tint j ^lasr! «he
had a double chin. I thought as '1
looked at her of a hawk's soul incar
nate in- the body of a' pouter .pigeon;
She enclosed the hand I 'offered her ^in ;
two. soft intensely female -paws,' Valid
she patted it and sighed and simper^!
over me. I was :a :'pore deatj3' ?? and
she 'felt for me.' ; She understood:
my loneliness— wasn't she lonely ? And
she gave me ' /a bottle -of raspberry j
brandy she had made herself:- ' Mrs'
Soames opened it there and* then, arid
glassful to let me see it wasn't poisph
ous. .So did Mrs. Twomey. The
Mrs Soames she had no mental indi
vMualty at all. There was not a,' re
lieving _ feature, not a .contrast in her
composition^ She 'was fourteen stone
of sex sentiment: and crude feminine
craving for masculine dominion; In
twenty I detested her. In half an:
hour I had tn dlOOSB lutharatm hnnrish
given her the courage and imperti
nence to confess1 her ^conviction' that it
was not good for either man ?or.' woman
tn live alone. In sheer desperation'!
behaved like a savage. .' -. ?; .:.
'Ah 3' said I; ' 'It's a crying shame
for a sweet lovely creature uke you to
remain a widow.'? . : , ; . ?
'Dear man,' she sighed.
^ 'You owe it to- yourself — and the;
race — to mend your state,' I declared.'
'She uttered an amorous guffaw and
oast down her bold eyes in an impu
dent pretence. of modesty. .'.,.'''
'But husbands don't srrow nii pn-n
bush,3' she muttered, then she ogled'
'Have you got any money?':1 I brut
'Fifty pounds in the bank, and J
own my house I live in,' replied the
widow eagerly, 'n-jt to speak of a
piano, a cow— and three of the best
Angora, milkin's goats in these parts.'
'And yet with all these possessions
— and your beauty — I repeat, Mrs Two
niy, your beauty — you've been twelve
months a widow.'
'Every day of it,' she groaned.
'You must be very hard to please,'
. She was silent, but her eyes spoke
volumes. ' .
'Very hard to please,' I repeated
'I've been waiting for Mr Right,'
le whispered and giggled like an
It was the chance I had been wait
ing for. 'Ahi but you shouldn't
wait.' I earnestly admonished her.
''The poor fellow may not be able to
come to you. You should be gener
ous, Mrs Twomy, and go to him.'
'Where?' she demanded, plainly
I shook my head. 'I'm not a
wizard, madam— but I should say in
Africa. I hear the women are scares
in both those places and far outnum
wouldn't wait a day. I would con
Right and make the dear man happy —
as I'm very sure you can.'
T!-* silence thnt followed was broken
bv tho straiifipfl lrm.rMm- n( ' Mr»
Soames I had meanwhile Ji»en star
Twomv lind risen and was standing in
ihe middle of the room. ' Tnvolutarily
I turned a?id glanced at her. She
ind she was eyeing me like a wild ani
'?Vedy funny — aren't ye— Mister Joe
^Inno?' s'le observed, 'very funny !' |
7'hen r-iip. we»t.awav. Mrs Roames
stopped lnughiiig instantly, and she.
too. stood an to go. To my amaze
'You've got a nasty tongue in your
-)n .;geuf^'-'^mQ^li^%l^.^^'/M,-sri^':' ? '?'?^?i'ii'M
CHAPTER III.—MATES.
I was still endeavoring to piece to-
gether the fragmentary impressions of
my interview when Mrs Soames ap-
peared and a stranger whom I guessed
for Mrs Twomy because she wore a
widow's bonnet. I was right. She
was rather a pretty woman with a
somewhat predacious cast of face, but
fat and figureless. Her eyes were bold
and full of sex appeal—but alas! she
had a double chin. I thought as I
looked at her of a hawk's soul incar-
nate in the body of a pouter pigeon.
She enclosed the hand I offered her in
two soft intensely female paws, and
she patted it and sighed and simpered
over me. I was a "pore dear," and
she "felt for me." She understood
my loneliness—wasn't she lonely? And
she gave me a bottle of raspberry
brandy she had made herself. Mrs
Soames opened it there and then, and
glassful to let me see it wasn't poison-
ous. So did Mrs. Twomey. The
Mrs Soames she had no mental indi-
viduality at all. There was not a re-
lieving feature, not a contrast in her
composition. She was fourteen stone
of sex sentiment and crude feminine
craving for masculine dominion. In
twenty I detested her. In half an
hour I had to choose between boorish-
given her the courage and imperti-
nence to confess her conviction that it
was not good for either man or woman
to live alone. In sheer desperation I
behaved like a savage.
"Ah!" said I: "It's a crying shame
for a sweet lovely creature like you to
remain a widow."
"Dear man," she sighed.
"You owe it to yourself—and the
race—to mend your state," I declared.
She uttered an amorous guffaw and
cast down her bold eyes in an impu-
dent pretence of modesty.
"But husbands don't grow on every
bush," she muttered, then she ogled
"Have you got any money?" I brut-
"Fifty pounds in the bank, and I
own my house I live in," replied the
widow eagerly, "not to speak of a
piano, a cow—and three of the best
Angora milkin's goats in these parts."
"And yet with all these possessions
—and your beauty—I repeat, Mrs Two-
my, your beauty—you've been twelve
months a widow."
"Every day of it," she groaned.
"You must be very hard to please," I suggested with deceitful gallantry.
She was silent, but her eyes spoke
volumes.
"Very hard to please," I repeated
"I've been waiting for Mr Right,"
she whispered and giggled like an
It was the chance I had been wait-
ing for. "Ah! but you shouldn't
wait." I earnestly admonished her.
"The poor fellow may not be able to
come to you. You should be gener-
ous, Mrs Twomy, and go to him."
"Where?" she demanded, plainly
I shook my head. "I'm not a
wizard, madam—but I should say in
Africa. I hear the women are scarce
in both those places and far outnum-
wouldn't wait a day. I would con-
Right and make the dear man happy—
as I'm very sure you can."
The silence that followed was broken
by the strangled laughter of Mrs
Soames. I had meanwhile been star-
Twomy had risen and was standing in
the middle of the room. Involuntarily
I turned and glanced at her. She
and she was eyeing me like a wild ani-
"Very funny—aren't ye—Mister Joe
Tolano?" she observed, "very funny!"
Then she went away. Mrs Soames
stopped laughing instantly, and she,
too, stood up to go. To my amaze-
"You've got a nasty tongue in your
head, an' that's a fact," she observed.
MYRTLE [ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.] CHAPTER II.—(Continued.) (Article), Daily Telegraph (Launceston, Tas. : 1883 - 1928), Tuesday 6 September 1910 page Article 2014-09-16 14:32 'Here is a romance to your hand,'
she muttered. 'My father is a Ger
farm and thirteen children, eleven oi
whom are girls. Yet ho loves his farm
habits oi obedience. Margaret has
no tnougnt oi resistance, aitnougn uarl
fourth pig tor the last six months. An
eager lover — ah, yes! but then his
ardor is nicely tempered with provi
not to be too proud of him.'
of the tone in which she Telated it
Quixote to the 'rescue of Margaret.
'And when is the happy day?'
'Fortunately father is a strict
Catholic — therefore not until after
Lent,' replied Miss Hofer.
'Can nothing be done meanwhile to
save your sister from her fate?'
'OhJ yes! a miracle might happen,
might find a gold mine and jansom her,
from both, her tyrants. Or another;
yesi — much might happen in three
months.'
'It is a' long time,' I commented
stupidly. . '
She put her hands behind her -head
and stared me in the eves, a morose
'It is a thousand centuries and at
the same time half a day— a ' second !
Ah, if I were a man.'
'What would you do?'
'I should beat those traffickers in a
point of death — ay — though one is my
father. And then I should- take Mar
reach her.' ' '
'le see — but are you absolutely help
Jess now?'
'My salary is sixteen shillings a
week.''
'A pittance.'
She nodded, smiling bitterly. 'I
could,3' she presently observed.
'Yes,' he said. *'Bnt I ?'„ cannot.
What of your brothers ?' V ?? i
'They think only of the new pigs.' :
'But your mother?' ?. J ; '?''?'? .;,'
'She is dead, but were she still: liv
ing she would only think of the new'
COWS.'' . ? ? . ?? . . '??-? /.V-v\ -- - ';? ?;????!
'It is a tragedyl' \ : /
the door. 'I must put on some soup
for your supper,' she said quietly; ?' 'It
takes time to boil soup — ^to be-any
good. And I want yoif ; to be ; well
Very quickly.''. ? , ?'',-?''' '?''.
[all bights eesebved.]
"Here is a romance to your hand,"
she muttered. "My father is a Ger-
farm and thirteen children, eleven of
whom are girls. Yet he loves his farm
habits of obedience. Margaret has
no thought of resistance, although Carl
fourth pig for the last six months. An
eager lover—ah, yes! but then his
ardor is nicely tempered with provi-
not to be too proud of him."
of the tone in which she related it
Quixote to the rescue of Margaret.
"And when is the happy day?"
"Fortunately father is a strict
Catholic—therefore not until after
Lent," replied Miss Hofer.
"Can nothing be done meanwhile to
save your sister from her fate?"
"Oh! yes! a miracle might happen,
might find a gold mine and ransom her,
from both her tyrants. Or another
yes!—much might happen in three
months."
"It is a long time," I commented
stupidly.
She put her hands behind her head
and stared me in the eyes, a morose
"It is a thousand centuries and at
the same time half a day—a second !
Ah, if I were a man."
"What would you do?"
"I should beat those traffickers in a
point of death—ay—though one is my
father. And then I should take Mar-
reach her."
"I see—but are you absolutely help-
less now?"
"My salary is sixteen shillings a
week."
"A pittance."
She nodded, smiling bitterly. "I
could," she presently observed.
"Yes," he said. "But I cannot.
What of your brothers?"
"They think only of the new pigs."
"But your mother?",'
"She is dead, but were she still liv-
ing she would only think of the new
cows."
"It is a tragedy!"
the door. "I must put on some soup
for your supper," she said quietly. "It
takes time to boil soup—to be any
good. And I want you to be well
very quickly."
[ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.]
MYRTLE [ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.] CHAPTER II.—(Continued.) (Article), Daily Telegraph (Launceston, Tas. : 1883 - 1928), Monday 5 September 1910 page Article 2014-09-16 14:10 She nodded, : 'L 'ahr : 3bteaitifiil^ W
think, » she said calmly. 'Biit l am^l
plain— rdompared with my eister Mir
gai et. Yet- that is not an' explanation '
-)V ? replied, 'patrician the
fool '' s'lou^ 'iave used- ' I was a
'The word applies to Margaret,' she
said , her eyes aglow. - 'Ah 1 if you could
?ee her She is nearly as. possible
an angel. And, her mind is more
lovely than iier pereon. She is the
world in the whole wide
. I was too astonished to . speak I
could only stare at her. ... Slie seemed
to be dreaming aloud, and to have for
gotten my existence, 'ilargaret would
adorn' a throne,' she! said, -'and they
have sold her to a Dutch dairy farmed
tor three Jersey cows, some wddv.
a^l ^our ; Berkshire p^sBl,,
IS Hofer !' I gasped
Uo be continued to-morrow.)
She nodded, "I am beautiful, I
think," she said calmly. >But I am
plain—compared with my sister Mar-
garet. Yet that is not an explanation."
"No," I replied, "patrician was the
word I should have used. I was a fool."
"The word applies to Margaret," she
said, her eyes aglow. "Ah ! if you could
see her. She is nearly as possible
an angel. And her mind is more
lovely than her person. She is the
only thing I love in the whole wide world."
I was too astonished to speak. I
could only stare at her. She seemed
to be dreaming aloud, and to have for-
gotten my existence. "Margaret would
adorn a throne," she said, "and they
have sold her to a Dutch dairy farmer
for three Jersey cows, some poddy
calves, and four Berkshire pig!"
"Miss Hofer !" I gasped.
(To be continued to-morrow.)
MYRTLE [ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.] CHAPTER II.—(Continued.) (Article), Daily Telegraph (Launceston, Tas. : 1883 - 1928), Monday 5 September 1910 page Article 2014-09-15 21:56 ? . 'Every one '
/ ''You do not discrimiriate P'
? ? ? 'You had no right' to, w^ash that\
blanket. ., The thought of it t mirages
me ' ^ 7
. Her hps trembled, , and she -took , up
lier sewing. ..again: . . 'Xt - was _-iothing, ' '
shie presently. t ln.«a low ifoks'M .
was xeally Api^tiO ^e* OTash-ta^;'.-: ? ?
;,--^Yoii!'
. Her face c^b^iJ^yrvf^T^b^fvm^ . .V'
sisters are s'erv^tfe^^ ihrlimwo .
now. 'I wouId.have iWn,^1t^:tinV^-}p. '?
winning a : Sfatte ^
which paid for my .educatito^iit- */a^ ''J :
Woman 's Traiiiiiig Collie hi 'Sydney.
I ipt is new j oecame a t-eacherl. Why
.'did you say — 'Impossible?'!'' - v '
| 'Because yon -'look— tdo4^': . .'
She glanced - at \mev and 1'- parsed, j
confounded. ' - . .'a
'? Yes,1 she asked, and her eyes tisoin- *
mand^d ' me^'to ? 'speak:^
.'Beautiful !' I -h%»fered,' fend J:iolor- -
ea as I'said- it. - ^
"Every one."
"You do not discriminate ?"
"You had no right to wash that
blanket. The thought of it enrages
me."
Her lips trembled, and she took up
her sewing again. "It was nothing,"
she said presently, in a low voice. "I
was really born to the wash-tub."
"You!" I gasped. "Impossible."
Her face coloured hotly. "Two of my
sisters are servant girls in Tamworth
now. I would have been, too, but for
winning a State school scholarship,
which paid for my education at a
Woman 's Training College in Sydney.
That is how I became a teacher. Why
did you say—'Impossible?' ''
"Because you look—too—"
She glanced at me, and I paused,
confounded.
"Yes," she asked, and her eyes com-
manded me to speak.
"Beautiful !" I whispered, and I color-
ed as I said it.
MYRTLE [ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.] CHAPTER II.—(Continued.) (Article), Daily Telegraph (Launceston, Tas. : 1883 - 1928), Monday 5 September 1910 page Article 2014-09-15 12:42 disguise, or a black sheep-^an outcast
[Br AMBROSE PRATT.]
[ail EIGHTS EESEBVED.]
CHAPTER H.' — (Continued.)
Suddenly, however, she began ? to
[speak. 'T have been 'here for two
! years, and during all that time sel
dom a week has passed without a dis
mean to say they are dipsomaniacs or |
anything like that, but periodically i
amusement. -It is horrible — and the
and tried and tried to do them good;
you knew him. 'Be was one of Na- .
Instead of being warned by- his dread
drunk the night of his burial, and: ,
there was fighting and 'brawling till
Spalding, and could guess what my 'life
has been these two years past.'
''I am not wondering, Miss Hofer.
But 1 should like you to tell me.'
'It would depress you, and I must not
forget you are an invalid.' She rose
she brought me a cup of tea. 'I have
uo class to teach this afternoon— I am
one of the unemployed, perforce. Per
you ?'
'I would prefer you to talk.'
'Very good, but I shall first get my
needlework.' She was away an honr
and she had not used all the tims look
her frock. She came back clad in -?-
left her throat and elbows bare; I
stuff suited her eyes aiid her complex
ion admirably. She made- no excuse
some intricate piece of fancy work — a
? toilet table-cover, I ibelieve.
'I have been chatting with Mrs
Soanies; she has given me your his
tory,'5 she observed.' _ |
'Wliat a quaint ladv she is! She put
me through an extended patechism.'1
'And did you answer her truthfullv.
Mr Tolano?'
- 'Why. of course.' - . .- j
'Then you are really— only by way
of being a digger temporarily — for
amusement perhaps?' ' ? ?!
'Is that what Mrs Soames has con
cluded?' ' |
. 'She considers yon cither a: duke in I
has not quite made tip her mind . Which :
yet.' ,- - -
'The queer old thing has evidently i
an imagination 'in1 keeping with her
.curiosity;' ? ?? ?
. 'I,' said Miss Hofer, 'am - vastly
.curious and' not bit'- imaginative? ;T'
am prepared to believe what youf may
tell me — at the foot -of 'the letter. - Now
I halve given you' a first rate :oppot
tunitgrto-snub me.'- - ? ' '
.. It .is quite irre^tiblei'l'sh^-'pimish ,
you as you ' deserve.5-'' -- ; :? ? -- -
She looked up, 'flushing. : 'Obl'/she
cried. ' ' ; -? / ?. -\==-,
But I held up' an admonishing handi
'lYou . ought to know that there' is but
one natural * ±orc6 ? greater - thaii ,: 'ai
woman's -curiosity, and that is a man's
you with, the history- of my- life.f'
'I do iiot expect to '4»e bored,' she -
said with a very ' pleasant smile;
'That is because 'you expect to hear
something romantic. - I defy you - to
denv it.' ' ?/
, She blushed-, very ! prettily .indeed.
'You are by way of being acute,' she
murmured. * ?'?Yet : ..you : must . not
plume yourself too- much.' I am not- a.
bread-and-butter miss by 'any means.'
Commence; then.'
. 'As your. Highness pleases — '
'Mr Tolano !'
'Miss Hofer!'
'I am an incorruptible democrat.'
'Then in the same of the great Aus-''
tralia'n democracy permit me to salute
I was- born of rich but reasonably -honest
parents, and I was brought .up in -the
worship of respectable conventions.'
'Your story opens well,-' she said.
^Therefore it must _end badly if the
nothing.' - '
'I hope not.' . .. r
'Judge for yourself. 1 was educa
ted at a Sydney -State public 'school/
and afterwards went through .'the Mel
bourne University. My father waritecT
me to become a lawyer, but !? had a
silly notion' that I had been cut/ out
for a sculptor. I snent four vfears in
that I was meant bv nature ,to dig
died, to my great surprise comparative
nay my debts, and to retnrn to Aus
ineradicable predilection tor undiluted
an occupation where tbis rule did not
obtain — being, as I am free to admit,
an idiot — and I found one alone— aold
T_ embraced it, and as I am also a tena
upon me I shall live and die a digger..
There you have my history in a nut
shell.' /
-Miss Hofer had laid down her sewing.'
She was regarding me with ai curiously,
'You do not wish me to believe that
you despise — wealth?' she asked pre
'No, indeed.'
— please tell me. j
'That I would disdain to acauire |
wealth by any means that would direct
ly or indirectly oppress or impoverish I
another living being; that is my com-!
mercial creed. I have -already admit
ted it is idiotic.' * j
'Yes,' she said, lowering her eves,
'it is idiotic. ? Some -neonle might cill
it noble, but not I. I do not ^Dt, mv
the strong. to prey upon the weak. You
are nrobablv a Socialist?'
'Not being a politician, I cannot
say.'
'Supposing that of a sudden you were
to be made very nV'i ; what would y-n
do with your gold?'
'I should try to it benefit a
many people as I could.'
and worse; you are a commn-ii' + .'
'T beg your' paidon,'- 1 retorted., 'I
may;$fe -:Mi , .,
again, believe -jne.' ' ' „ 1 '
thai ''a'-, fool. 'Vv^iOne- ? . ?;
think yoii 'nothihg but a *dr^mer;' ^ut' : ; t
?A ' see iiow that yon labk .that' sort of J
madman's usual mission^: ? ; Ybur^f^iji V ?-
to throw its b'eams on otberi people's
you are not looking m^nwhile; lor ,
mariy^s,^wiiV£';
responded tartly. 'I have- 'not'.Mived r
f'orfd ,s-,olji fjjrjyp'jalike. , -^enepji;. S0'r*ioain t
tenance .upqp.-woma-fi's ^
testation.©? ^Sro^essufe
customs .that ^vpur^MindJiicnnR , .'«'r
(sanctions arid rigidliies'' you gxpectrmen V
to bear witness 'to - fo%\3nselfiBffsd--? - -
yptmn instead of tg yftr folly.' \ ' .
- 'he gij'j ? bit ben.ilip 4aii3;.^er:i;ieTCSv '_:t!
flashed.
?rected..-;^Th.e|; Aostrfili^i^'dmen-^
shown c^.{thi§.^hat;..theitr- .
— but I fpLget, you are not ' -
' read, and J .vote:'.' ?he ^ igave ,-.^ne^.a-- .
; .-demure' , ^mife;,.,
neither-: ',!;
'Oh, I read jat times.*' . . ,
Heine, .-add . ?Burton^'
'You ha ve/been exaihiniha; ' mviw^fe3 '
I cried. - ', _ .
Garbeld s- fine; to ; jdiy? ,? ; she Answered -J/k
smiling. /'It., .cost me faalf-an-hour'sJH
work ajiid . half ,a iar ^of -soap .to make^^l
it look, like.a blanket again.' ?» *,'' ? .
'It got muddied m a swamp- :near-;
Doughboy's .Hollow^ I : explained shameV
fheedly- . /'Soriell had., the impudehcQ ?
to mistake a patch, of-slime for a ied
of grass But the books P' 4 -
- 'You shall have them io-morrowi- Mis '
Soames is putting «n _new covers ,
_ am accumulating pbligatibns -evfery
hour,' . I , njmttered .discOnten&dly^i ' j r ?
, 'Do yon really mind?' ,
. -'-Yes ' * , ? 'V
'Which 'one ' ** *
. Withoiit ;; .dieopveiiiig : ?
disguise, or a black sheep—an outcast
[By AMBROSE PRATT.]
[ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.]
CHAPTER II.—(Continued.)
Suddenly, however, she began to
speak. "I have been here for two
years, and during all that time sel-
dom a week has passed without a dis-
mean to say they are dipsomaniacs or
anything like that, but periodically
amusement. It is horrible—and the
and tried and tried to do them good,
you knew him. He was one of Na- .
Instead of being warned by his dread-
drunk the night of his burial, and
there was fighting and brawling till
Spalding, and could guess what my life
has been these two years past."
"I am not wondering, Miss Hofer.
But I should like you to tell me."
"It would depress you, and I must not
forget you are an invalid." She rose
she brought me a cup of tea. "I have
no class to teach this afternoon—I am
one of the unemployed, perforce. Per-
you ?"
"I would prefer you to talk."
"Very good, but I shall first get my
needlework." She was away an hour
and she had not used all the time look-
her frock. She came back clad in a
left her throat and elbows bare. I
stuff suited her eyes and her complex-
ion admirably. She made no excuse
some intricate piece of fancy work—a
toilet table-cover, I believe.
"I have been chatting with Mrs
Soames; she has given me your his
tory," she observed.|
"What a quaint lady she is! She put
me through an extended catechism."
"And did you answer her truthfully,
Mr Tolano?"
"Why, of course."
"Then you are really—only by way
of being a digger temporarily—for
amusement perhaps?"
"Is that what Mrs Soames has con-
cluded?"
"She considers yon either a duke in
has not quite made up her mind which
yet."
"The queer old thing has evidently
an imagination in keeping with her
curiosity."
"I," said Miss Hofer, "am vastly
curious and not bit imaginative. I
am prepared to believe what you may
tell me—at the foot of the letter. Now
I have given you a first rate oppor-
tunity to snub me."
It is quite irresistible. I shall punish
you as you deserve."
She looked up, flushing. "Oh!" she
cried.
But I held up an admonishing hand.
"You ought to know that there is but
one natural force greater than a
woman's curiosity, and that is a man's
you with the history of my life."
"I do not expect to be bored," she
said with a very pleasant smile.
"That is because you expect to hear
something romantic. I defy you to
deny it."
She blushed very prettily indeed.
"You are by way of being acute," she
murmured. "Yet you must not
plume yourself too much. I am not a
bread-and-butter miss by any means.
Commence then."
"As your Highness pleases—"
"Mr Tolano !"
"Miss Hofer!"
"I am an incorruptible democrat."
"Then in the same of the great Aus-
tralian democracy permit me to salute
I was born of rich but reasonably honest
parents, and I was brought up in the
worship of respectable conventions."
"Your story opens well," she said.
"Therefore it must end badly if the
nothing."
"I hope not."
"Judge for yourself. I was educa-
ted at a Sydney State public school,
and afterwards went through the Mel-
bourne University. My father wanted
me to become a lawyer, but I had a
silly notion that I had been cut out
for a sculptor. I spent four years in
that I was meant by nature to dig
died, to my great surprise comparative-
pay my debts, and to return to Aus-
ineradicable predilection for undiluted
an occupation where this rule did not
obtain—being, as I am free to admit,
an idiot—and I found one alone—gold
I embraced it, and as I am also a tena-
upon me I shall live and die a digger.
There you have my history in a nut-
shell."
Miss Hofer had laid down her sewing.
She was regarding me with a curiously,
"You do not wish me to believe that
you despise—wealth?' she asked pre-
"No, indeed."
"But—please tell me."
"That I would disdain to acquire
wealth by any means that would direct-
ly or indirectly oppress or impoverish
another living being; that is my com-
mercial creed. I have already admit-
ted it is idiotic."
"Yes," she said, lowering her eyes,
"it is idiotic. Some people might call
it noble, but not I. I do not set my-
the strong to prey upon the weak. You
are probably a Socialist?"
"Not being a politician, I cannot
say."
"Supposing that of a sudden you were
to be made very rich; what would you
do with your gold?"
"I should try to make it benefit as
many people as I could."
and worse; you are a communist."
"I beg your pardon,' I retorted. "I
may be an idiot, but I'm not a fool.
I would take care never to be a poor again, believe me."
"Oh!" she exclaimed, with a rich, full-throated laugh. "It is evident that you are not a fool. One may
have hopes for you. I had begun to think you nothing but a dreamer. But
I see now that yon lack that sort of
madman's usual mission. Your lamp is merely for yourself. You do not seek
to throw its beams on other people's pathway whether they will or not; and
you are not looking meanwhile for a
martyr's crown."
"Neither an I looking for a convert's especially at the present moment, I responded tartly. "I have not lived
world's old laws alike depend for main-
tenance upon woman's deep-rooted de-
testation of progression. At heart you all conservative, Miss Hofer; and when you are the chief victims of the
customs that your blind conservatism
sanctions and rigidifies you expect men
to bear witness to your unselfish de-
votion instead of to your folly."
The girl bit her lip and her eyes
flashed. "Not all of us, sir," she cor-
rected. "The Australian women have
shown ere this that they can think as broadly as their brothers, and act, too
—but I forget, you are not a politician!"
"Are you?"
She waved the question aside. "I read, and I vote;" she gave me a demure smile. "Apparently you do
neither."
"Oh, I read at times."
"De Quincey, Cervantes, Milton, Heine, and Burton."
"You have been examining my swag!"
I cried.
"Your blanket is hanging on Mrs Garfield's line to dry," she answered
smiling. "It cost me half-an-hour's
work and half a bar of soap to make
it look like.a blanket again."
"It got muddied in a swamp near
Doughboy's Hollow, I explained shame-
facedly. "Sorrell had the impudence
to mistake a patch of slime for a bed
of grass. But the books?"
"You shall have them to-morrow. Mrs
Soames is putting on new covers."
"I am accumulating obligations every
hour." I muttered discontentedly.
"Do you really mind?"
"Yes."
"Which one?"
thirty-five years without discovering that the worst and the best of the
MYRTLE [ALL BIGHTS RESERVED.] CHAPTER II.-(Continued.) (Article), Daily Telegraph (Launceston, Tas. : 1883 - 1928), Saturday 3 September 1910 page Article 2014-09-15 10:53 comfortable. He had evidently gorg
ed -himself, and was too full to spare
to reply to my u salutation, but curled
sleep. I was -ya-iyning for the hun
Hofer, carrying a small1 table. Her
movements were, completely noiseless.
brought in a tray containing a howl
the chicken -for herself. She took the
to eat— all without a word, for she
paid no' attention to my thanks. I
was ia mere circumstance to mine.
last meal, and besides, I was a breath
ing animal, not a ghost. I could, not
'bear it long.
'I wonder whether you- think I lie in
any danger of fever?' I ventured, in
'Do you feel feverish?' camo her J
answer. -
'Not exactly.*'
'Why do you. ask then?'
'T fancied that ' perhaps you were
me?'
'Exciting jeon! What do yon mean?'
ruiising my temperature oy inspir
might conceive it hazardous, from si
scientific point of view, to' satisfy.'
'I suppose that rhodomontade means
that you have finished your soup,' she
I. was too crushed . to retort. I
heard her rise kind move away across
the hoards, but three minutes ''ter
she returned, and .re-appeared -with a
pjate containing the otner half of her
chicken and (some steiaming chipped
potatoes,
'You must not expect to obtain any
of you,' she announced as she handed
me the food. 'Tea or water you' may
have — but nothing else.'
'Oh, indeed!' I gasped.
CShe met my enquiring glance and
frowned. 'I suppose you; wish to
make a quick recovery?' she asked im-i
'I'm afraid you have misinterpreted
Hofer,' 1 replied. 'The flaws in m\
equipment don't really include a crav
fact is, I never touch spirit when 1
can avoid it.'
She turned scarlet, slowly but sure i
ly from throat to forehead, yet she'
did not turn her head nor withdraw '
'It appears that I have foolishly mis
judged you,' she said quietly. '1
hope you will forgive me.' j
'On condition that you excuse me!
also, for having till this moment fan
cied you hard-hearted aud unsympa
thetic.' j
'You thought me that?' she cried. ,
'Even after your great kindness or
Won't you [finish your lunch in here,
Miss Hofer?'
her tray and ia chair. She was silent
For quite a long while. So was I.
I glauced at her occasionally, but
ite mechanically.
comfortable. He had evidently gorg-
ed himself, and was too full to spare
to reply to my salutation, but curled
sleep. I was yawning for the hun-
Hofer, carrying a small table. Her
movements were completely noiseless.
brought in a tray containing a bowl
the chicken for herself. She took the
to eat—all without a word, for she
paid no attention to my thanks. I
was a mere circumstance to mine.
last meal, and besides, I was a breath-
ing animal, not a ghost. I could not
bear it long.
"I wonder whether you think I lie in
any danger of fever?" I ventured, in
"Do you feel feverish?" came her
answer.
"Not exactly."
"Why do you ask then?"
"I fancied that perhaps you were
me?"
"Exciting you! What do yon mean?"
"Raising my temperature by inspir-
might conceive it hazardous, from a
scientific point of view, to satisfy."
"I suppose that rhodomontade means
that you have finished your soup," she
I was too crushed to retort. I
heard her rise and move away across
the boards, but three minutes later
she returned, and re-appeared with a
plate containing the other half of her
chicken and some steaming chipped
potatoes.
"You must not expect to obtain any
of you," she announced as she handed
me the food. "Tea or water you may
have—but nothing else."
"Oh, indeed!" I gasped.
She met my enquiring glance and
frowned. "I suppose you wish to
make a quick recovery?" she asked im-
"I'm afraid you have misinterpreted
Hofer," I replied. "The flaws in my
equipment don't really include a crav-
fact is, I never touch spirit when I
can avoid it."
She turned scarlet, slowly but sure-
ly from throat to forehead, yet she
did not turn her head nor withdraw
"It appears that I have foolishly mis-
judged you," she said quietly. "I
hope you will forgive me."
"On condition that you excuse me
also, for having till this moment fan-
cied you hard-hearted aud unsympa-
thetic."
"You thought me that?" she cried.
"Even after your great kindness on
Won't you finish your lunch in here,
Miss Hofer?"
her tray and a chair. She was silent
for quite a long while. So was I.
I glanced at her occasionally, but
ate mechanically.
MYRTLE [ALL BIGHTS RESERVED.] CHAPTER II.-(Continued.) (Article), Daily Telegraph (Launceston, Tas. : 1883 - 1928), Saturday 3 September 1910 page Article 2014-09-15 10:44 friend is a man-hunter?' I enquired,
?morosely.
fBr AMBROSE PRATT.]
Mrs Soames nodded. 'We'll all do i
our level best ter cheer yer.' she said
brightly. 'Mrs Twomy'll. be erlong
this after1. She's been laid up at the
Tamworth 'orsepital, .with pleurisy.
fer ther men. 'As there ain't none
she'll make it a point ter nurse yer.'
'I shouldn't like to trouble her.
'Yer couldn't, me son, bein1 a man,
fer she's twice married, ?whatever, an'
3er chances o' pickin up ernother 'us
offered;, and, lor! though you ain't
'ansome, 'zactly — you ain't a nigger.
'Sides, yer young.'
'You terrify me, Mrs Soames.'
Mrs Soames shook -with mirth. ;rAn'
?we're going ter have great times in
Nandlelong.'
'I am to understand' that your
'No, a widder/' corrected1 Mrs
last word possible to utter on the sub
ject, she changed the topic. 'Myrtle
tells me?'
'She has promised to prepare my
lunch.'
'She's a line cook, Myrtle. tShe'Il
not.'
'Oh !'
'You'll ]ick yer chops when yer j'^st
''You make me feel hungry in an
ticipation, Mrs Soames.'
'She's good at other things than
cookin'. though — Myrtle.'
'Indeed!'
'You bet. She's as good as er ret.
fer sick cows an' hoi-ses -with ther
lessern 110 time.'
'She appears to be a very learned
young 'woman.'
'So she'd oughter be — brung un at
ther Fort-street Tr-ainin' College.'
'She teaches in the State school
here, does she not?'
'Usual — but she ain't got much ter
do, just now — only about nine girls ter
hang knowledge into — ther boys 'as
mostly lit out ter ther Rush at Howlin'
the Levy's three 'brats left, an' iheVi1*
all wanted home fer yakker, n iilur,',
like.'
'Do Miss Hofer's parents reside in
Nandlelong?'
'Lordy, no. 'Er ole man's a corky
plains. Myrtle sleeps &t Unr s^Lool
house, an' boards at ther postmis
tress's — Missus Inglehaere's.'
'I see.'
'She's a queer girl, Myrtle. Up
every morn at daylight-, winter an'
Olives — fer exercise, she says. She's
got a terrible lot er books, an' slip's
.always readin'. But she don't take
much account er men. Bill Ickerspoon:s
Arbight; hut she don't seem tor oaro
give her a decent 'ome!'
'A bit stuck-up, perhaps,' I haz
' 'Tween you an' me,' she answered,
'she's bidin' her time— flyin' fer 'igher
game. They say as Ilow ther school
'er cap at. He's twice her age,' but
saved a tidy ibit, 'aving no one but
himself ter keep all these years.'
cup of 'water3 in order to make a
break in the tide of my visitor's garrul- j
ity. She fetched one .immediately,
and sighed as I drained it. 'Could 'er
done that mysedf once,' she mused.
I gave her back the cup. 'You
rliMi'+i /tara £ni* ur.a+jar T /arirmiriarl
'I got ter think er ther spasms,'
she answered, sadly, 'so I has ter put
a drop «r somethin' in it when I drink
anythin' but tea.'
Then she brightened up. 'What part
from?' 'slie demanded.
'Sydney, madam.'
'A ibig place?'
'Fairish.'
'I've never bin there, -but they say
Is it?'
'I should say even bigger still.
She sflook her head. 'They can
keep it, fer me. Why, even Tam
worth bothers me: 'ives me ther blues
an' makes me feel I can't breathe pro
per. Ole man alive?'
'No. madam ; my father and mother
both died ten years ago.'
'All. well! ye've bad time ter git
for a livin' ?'
'He was a lawyer.'
The lady sighed. 'Pore man! I
brothers and sisters?'
'Two brothers living.'
'Deary me! deary me! No sisters!
An' what might they be doin' — ther
boys I mean?'
'They are both lawyers.'
'Well, well, well ! An' are they
makin' a do of it?'
'I believe they are fairly well off,
Mrs Soames.''
'An' tliey let you go about the coun
try — prospectin' an' breakin' of yer
laig? Them -both well off?' Hie horror
the laughter that ha-l been consuming
me. .But she was not iu the least
offended, only surprised. 'I can't
see nowt to laugh at,' she kept re
had recovered my composure she in
'I s'pose you quarrelled with 'em?'
'No,' said I, 'we are the best of
friends.'
'P'raps you're the black sheep of the
family an' they're tired o' lielpin'
you ?'
'They have never lent or given me ,
a sixpence in their lives.'
Soames bent her brows together, strok
ed her cliin with her forefinger, and
thought hard. j
'I specs,' she said at last, 'you j
won't let '«m 'elp you?' and she fix-!
ed me with two bright eyes that con- ;
tained' forty separate qualities which '
each defied a contradiction. !
I surrendered at discretion. 'I ad- -
mit, Mrs Soames, that they have j
grown weary of offering to help me. ;
They are splendid fellows in every way j
and generous to a fault.'
'Married ?'
'One of them.' ,
'And yorself?'
'Do you think I look a lady's man?1'
She smiled capaciously. 'Yer
don't,' she conceded. 'But take my
Twomy. or maybe ye'll :be mendin' of
yer evil ways. iAh well! I'll hev ter
see yer agin soon. S'long!'
'Good-bye. Mrs Soames, and thank
you kindly for your call.'
'I've enjoyed it.' she declared, .mul
vanished. Pover followed her. a cir
[all eights EE8ERVED.]
showed that Rover— an unerring judge
of- character— had approved the old
lady as a good' 'kind-hear ted creature
hour thereafter I. listened to Mrs Gar
friend is a man-hunter?" I enquired,
morosely.
[By AMBROSE PRATT.]
Mrs Soames nodded. "We'll all do
our level best ter cheer yer," she said
brightly. "Mrs Twomy'll be erlong
this after'. She's been laid up at the
Tamworth 'orsepital, with pleurisy.
fer ther men. As there ain't none
she'll make it a point ter nurse yer."
"I shouldn't like to trouble her."
"Yer couldn't, me son, bein' a man,
fer she's twice married, whatever, an'
'er chances o' pickin up ernother 'us-
offered; and, lor! though you ain't
'ansome, 'zactly—you ain't a nigger.
'Sides, yer young."
"You terrify me, Mrs Soames."
Mrs Soames shook with mirth. "My,
we're going ter have great times in
Nandlelong."
"I am to understand that your
"No, a widder," corrected Mrs
last word possible to utter on the sub-
ject, she changed the topic. "Myrtle
tells me?"
"She has promised to prepare my
lunch."
"She's a fine cook, Myrtle. She'Il
not."
"Oh !"
"You'll lick yer chops when yer just
''You make me feel hungry in an-
ticipation, Mrs Soames."
"She's good at other things than
cookin' though—Myrtle."
"Indeed!"
"You bet. She's as good as er vet,
fer sick cows an' horses with ther
lessern no time."
"She appears to be a very learned
young woman."
"So she'd oughter be—brung up at
ther Fort-street Trainin' College."
"She teaches in the State school
here, does she not?"
"Usual—but she ain't got much ter
do, just now—only about nine girls ter
bang knowledge into—ther boys 'as
mostly lit out ter ther Rush at Bowlin'
the Levy's three brats left, an' they're
all wanted home fer yakker, milkin',
like."
"Do Miss Hofer's parents reside in
Nandlelong?"
"Lordy, no. 'Er ole man's a cocky
plains. Myrtle sleeps at ther school
house, an' boards at ther postmis-
tress's—Missus Inglehaere's."
"I see."
"She's a queer girl, Myrtle. Up
every morn at daylight, winter an'
Olives—fer exercise, she says. She's
got a terrible lot er books, an' she's
always readin'. But she don't take
much account er men. Bill Ickerspoon's
Arbight; but she don't seem ter care
give her a decent 'ome!"
"A bit stuck-up, perhaps," I haz-
" 'Tween you an' me," she answered,
"she's bidin' her time—flyin' fer 'igher
game. They say as how ther school
'er cap at. He's twice her age, but
saved a tidy bit, 'aving no one but
himself ter keep all these years."
cup of water, in order to make a
break in the tide of my visitor's garrul-
ity. She fetched one immediately,
and sighed as I drained it. "Could 'er
done that mysedf once," she mused.
I gave her back the cup. "You
don't care for water?" I enquired.
"I got ter think er ther spasms,"
she answered, sadly, "so I has ter put
a drop er somethin' in it when I drink
anythin' but tea."
Then she brightened up. "What part
from?" she demanded.
"Sydney, madam."
"A big place?"
"Fairish."
"I've never bin there, but they say
Is it?"
"I should say even bigger still."
She shook her head. "They can
keep it, fer me. Why, even Tam-
worth bothers me: gives me ther blues
an' makes me feel I can't breathe pro-
per. Ole man alive?"
"No. madam ; my father and mother
both died ten years ago."
"Ah, well! ye've had time ter git
for a livin' ?"
"He was a lawyer."
The lady sighed. "Pore man! I
brothers and sisters?"
"Two brothers living."
"Deary me! deary me! No sisters!
An' what might they be doin'—ther
boys I mean?"
"They are both lawyers."
"Well, well, well ! An' are they
makin' a do of it?"
"I believe they are fairly well off,
Mrs Soames."
"An' they let you go about the coun-
try—prospectin' an' breakin' of yer
laig? Them both well off?" The horror
the laughter that had been consuming
me. .But she was not in the least
offended, only surprised. "I can't
see nowt to laugh at," she kept re-
had recovered my composure she in-
"I s'pose you quarrelled with 'em?"
"No," said I, "we are the best of
friends."
"P'raps you're the black sheep of the
family an' they're tired o' helpin'
you ?"
"They have never lent or given me
a sixpence in their lives."
Soames bent her brows together, strok-
ed her chin with her forefinger, and
thought hard.
"I specs," she said at last, "you
won't let 'em 'elp you?" and she fix-
ed me with two bright eyes that con-
tained forty separate qualities which
each defied a contradiction.
I surrendered at discretion. "I ad-
mit, Mrs Soames, that they have
grown weary of offering to help me.
They are splendid fellows in every way
and generous to a fault."
"Married ?"
"One of them."
"And yorself?"
"Do you think I look a lady's man?"
She smiled capaciously. "Yer
don't," she conceded. "But take my
Twomy. or maybe ye'll be mendin' of
yer evil ways. Ah well! I'll hev ter
see yer agin soon. S'long!"
"Good-bye. Mrs Soames, and thank
you kindly for your call."
"I've enjoyed it," she declared, and
vanished. Rover followed her, a cir-
[ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.]
showed that Rover—an unerring judge
of character—had approved the old
lady as a good kind-hearted creature
hour thereafter I listened to Mrs Gar-
MYRTLE [ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.] CHAPTER II.—LIFE AT THE "GOLDEN GATE." (Article), Daily Telegraph (Launceston, Tas. : 1883 - 1928), Friday 2 September 1910 page Article 2014-09-15 10:12 at -Wier ..dog^gte.
yer -ray ter
penal, 'il '?lieafa?-' :a-'- ^
''Ard luck, an? uD mistake. 'Vm -
real, sorry. : . Smith's' -a', sixty- ^
cjfeaned up forty ffor two days' graft— ^
tops% Slugs - . all;
worldn on -the Jgmjilte.* P ?S
J: ^oaned, anvoluntai.nly: ''lyihe 0w
mates of , mine are making their for
tunes seven miles away. V r ' , s ^
''Sorry I .spoke,'
parson Jones says everythi^^
[?r thf best, an' he ought te^E
.Be :only said it last Sunday. - -
W yer«.'? Yer ne^
' ?/ \
^ -€ '?Ild helpless, while old
?? grinned, to .. ^lio w j difau
^ (To be continued to-morrow.)
V,
gins ter knit it'll give yer oold beano at their dog-fight. I've bruk both or mine, so I ought ter know. Was on
yer way ter the Rush when it hap-
pened. I hear?"
'' 'Ard luck, an? no mistake. I'm
real sorry. Smith's party got a sixty-ounce nugget yesterday, and Daebern
cleaned up forty for two days' graft—
mostly slugs; all pretty gold—pretty ernuff ter go inter a shop winder. Nearly all on 'em's doin' fair, too—ther others, I mean even the parties
workin' on the foothills."
I groaned, involuntarily, "lying on
mates of mine are making their for-
tunes seven miles away."
''Sorry I spoke," lamented Mrs Soames. "I oughter guessed it's make yer feel sick inside. Comes er
Parson Jones says everything happens
fer ther best, an' he ought ter know.
He only said it last Sunday. P'raps
it's a blessin' in disguise. Yer never know yer luck."
"Yes."
my back idle and helpless, while old
I grinned, to show I didn't care. "No doubt a blessing in disguise," I agreed.
(To be continued to-morrow.)
bein' an ole fool, jabberin' without thinkin'. But buck up, young man.
MYRTLE [ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.] CHAPTER II.—LIFE AT THE "GOLDEN GATE." (Article), Daily Telegraph (Launceston, Tas. : 1883 - 1928), Friday 2 September 1910 page Article 2014-09-15 10:01 _ 'Nicely, 'thank you. Mrs Soames.
after' -'that.':
1 1 er -do , seem.;fixcd «p— ^properly;? '
'c-?ncededi after scanning the feed: ,
lhat s ilyrtle; she's a. ginger for -
thorougluiess.. . Clean .sheets, .itoo, I
seei_ , my. ..land, ther :floor?s bin -'
jscrupbed, , positive;! . 'v
'She puffers from rheumatism;41 - I
suggested. . . - ' ,
? Mrs: Soames - giggled. - 'S'pose^Tcn'
-nmst .'a^ieardi j
lyin in a corner er ther drawrern
room,.3and
hertUlfer-morreri Butyerahnsth't
put it agm-her, Mr ? ' - 1 *
VTolano,' - ! suasresrted. ' ' 1 ' « i ?
'ilister Terla^er,- wmt my
bhe s Aideoent' wtea'iyiggaiS|j#i'55'
-««netimes' ? i
.gin-fer ?as;-toiyfc;
stretch. 1. specs it's hmr as hefc'
Myrtle mendin' v«r ' i? '.'j
this, go.'
Mrs1 Soames '6 ^riered 40 think
'Oh, yer needn't yoiing man. -Jne ?
pxcuse is as. good as ernother; iier Mrs' ..,
trtirfield when ther - era vin' xxKnes on
- «'xr '
J en°ugfa- men ther ione^e- .
3 , ^ bardly feel it.'' - -
"Nicely, thank you. Mrs Soames.
Miss Hofer and Mrs Garfield looked after that."
"Yer do seem fixed up—properly,"
she conceded, after scanning the bed.
"That's Myrtle; she's a ginger for
thoroughness. Clean sheets, too, I
see; an', my laud, ther floor's bin
scrubbed, positive! More Myrtle! Mrs Garfield—hum!—she——"
"She suffers from rheumatism," I
suggested.
Mrs Soames giggled. "S'pose you
must a heard us," she said. "She's
lyin' in a corner er ther drawrern-
room, and Heaven or earth won't shift
hert till ter-morrer. But yer mustn't
put it agin her, Mr——"
"Tolano," I suggested.
"Mister Terlarner," she went on.
"She's a decent body when she's sober,
an' sometimes she keeps off'n er ther
gin fer as long as six months at a
stretch. I specs it's how as helpin'
Myrtle mendin' yer leg druv her to it
this go."
"I should be grieved to think that," Mrs Soames."
"Oh, yer needn't young man. One
excuse is as good as ernother ter Mrs
Garfield when ther cravin' comes on
her. Yer laig hurtin' any?"
"Time enough. When ther bone be-
"Not a bit. I hardly feel it."

Counts updated hourly

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

  1. BARRY, John Arthur
    List
    Public

    64 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2011-08-02
    User data
  2. KIPLING, Rudyard
    List
    Public

    10 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2011-01-08
    User data
  3. OXENHAM, John
    List
    Public

    1 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2011-01-09
    User data
  4. The Will Forgeries
    List
    Public

    16 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2010-08-14
    User data

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.