Information about Trove user: maurielyn

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

RankCorrectorLines corrected
1 JohnWarren 2,980,285
2 annmanley 2,010,194
3 NeilHamilton 2,007,831
4 noelwoodhouse 1,624,980
5 maurielyn 1,378,210
6 John.F.Hall 1,343,703
7 mrbh 1,147,837

1,378,210 lines corrected.

Corrections by month

December 2014 422
November 2014 4,733
October 2014 25,113
September 2014 28,719
August 2014 46,848
July 2014 54,325
June 2014 10,647
May 2014 15,795
April 2014 16,770
March 2014 3
February 2014 92
January 2014 36
December 2013 4,433
November 2013 6,312
October 2013 40,154
September 2013 26,891
August 2013 19,229
July 2013 30,238
June 2013 35,889
May 2013 34,599
April 2013 5,953
March 2013 4,178
February 2013 60
December 2012 122
November 2012 6,412
October 2012 9,007
September 2012 2,074
August 2012 13,001
July 2012 8,995
June 2012 41,702
May 2012 10,728
April 2012 4,423
March 2012 12,588
February 2012 9,171
January 2012 2,655
December 2011 22,428
November 2011 29,308
October 2011 28,340
September 2011 20,977
August 2011 22,871
July 2011 20,215
June 2011 11,018
May 2011 7,946
April 2011 45,102
March 2011 14,791
February 2011 30,582
January 2011 36,679
December 2010 14,510
November 2010 15,639
October 2010 25,076
September 2010 35,694
August 2010 38,196
July 2010 31,494
June 2010 42,660
May 2010 42,984
April 2010 33,196
March 2010 26,158
February 2010 21,768
January 2010 23,693
December 2009 14,169
November 2009 13,910
October 2009 8,721
September 2009 5,101
August 2009 5,707
July 2009 6,083
June 2009 5,576
May 2009 30,715
April 2009 8,466
March 2009 21,801
February 2009 7,575
January 2009 5,156
December 2008 7,165
November 2008 6,402
October 2008 24,538
September 2008 28,111
August 2008 5,372

Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
T CHAPTER I.—Captain Dysart. (Article), The World's News (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 1955), Wednesday 11 December 1929 page Article 2014-12-20 12:10 ELL, I must say, young man, you've
M
WELL, I must say, young man, you've
THE AMATEUR BANDIT, By J.H.M. ABBOTT.
IN THE MI[?] (Article), Brighton Southern Cross (Vic. : 1896 - 1918), Saturday 21 June 1902 page Article 2014-12-20 11:03 m the mnr, I
iiy FiiKI). M. Will TIC.
IN THE MINE.
By FRED M. WHITE.
THE GOLDEN HOPE. (Article), Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1878 - 1954), Thursday 1 October 1891 page Article 2014-12-19 16:04 " AB good as anything he has written. Of
"Aa imaginative and wonderful as anyone
oould wish it to he, whilst tho description of
THE ROLDES* HOPE.
the voyage of the Ooldea Hppe, and thc
replete with light and poetry."-Qlatyow
"A glorious book. Ozone seems tocóme
cruise to thc Indian Ocean ¡B nlainlv a cure for
all the- ills of uum&mty."
Si. Jamcx'eGazttte.
"As good as anything he has written. Of
"As imaginative and wonderful as anyone
could wish it to be, whilst the description of
THE GOLDEN HOPE.
the voyage of the Golden Hope, and the
replete with light and poetry."-Glasgow
"A glorious book. Ozone seems to come
cruise to the Indian Ocean is plainly a cure for
all the ills of humanity."
St. James's Gazttte.
THE FROZEN PIRATE. (Article), Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1878 - 1954), Thursday 1 October 1891 page Article 2014-12-19 16:02 " Mr. Clark Ruatell baa epun. many a good
"The moat enthralling romance which Mr.
Clark 'Russell bas written since 'The Wreck
"Mr. Clark Russell's new story Ss tre-
sinking of thc ' Laughing Mary ' are all done
hi Mr. Russell's best inauuer ; and that is a
terrible or impressive scenes, of sufferings en-I
thankful to their hearts content. "-St. James'*
Gaulle.
THE FBOZKN PIBATK.
"Mr. Clark Russell has spun many a good
"The most enthralling romance which Mr.
Clark Russell has written since 'The Wreck
"Mr. Clark Russell's new story is tre-
sinking of the 'Laughing Mary ' are all done
in Mr. Russell's best manner; and that is a
terrible or impressive scenes, of sufferings en-
thankful to their hearts content. "-St. James's
Gazette.
THE FROZEN PIRATE.
THE DEATH SHIP. (Article), Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1878 - 1954), Thursday 1 October 1891 page Article 2014-12-19 15:42 that will be read hy men ss well as women." I
"The whole story is one of th» most
" There appears to be no limit to Mr: Clark '
seemingly os inexhaustible as the sea itself, ;
which is his treasury. 'The Death Shin' is
perhaps tho best of all his novels, both in
that will be read by men as well as women."
"The whole story is one of the most
" There appears to be no limit to Mr: Clark
seemingly as inexhaustible as the sea itself,
which is his treasury. 'The Death Ship' is
perhaps the best of all his novels, both in
MAROONED. (Article), Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1878 - 1954), Thursday 1 October 1891 page Article 2014-12-19 15:41 "The prince of sea-story tellers is the anthor
the Grosvenor/ 'A Strange Voyage,' and
'The Golden Hópé I' "-Illustrated London
Ntm.
MABOOKED.
"The prince of sea-story tellers is the author
the Grosvenor,' 'A Strange Voyage,' and
'The Golden Hope!' "-Illustrated London
News.
MAROONED.
W. CLARK RUSSELL AT HOME. (Article), Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1878 - 1954), Thursday 1 October 1891 page Article 2014-12-19 15:39 THERE is a peculiar charm ia stories of
the wild, capricious,, perilous deep, which
makes the delight of youth, and chains ¿he
attention of the elders os welt The gleaners
comparatively few aince the days of Marryat
and Dans, and tim world glsdiy .welcomes-a
author of "'The. Wreck ©£ tho Grosvenor,"
"The Golden Hopei a. Romance of, the
Deep," "A'Sea Queen," and other (exquisite
stories of theses. Mr. Russell is eon of the
well known , musical coriposor and sluger,
whose popular melodies, "Tbs Old. Arm
Life on the Ocean Wave," "Cheor, Doys,
Cheer," " Mau the Ltfo-Bo&t," " The Ship on
a century ago, «nd are still familiar to, and>
enjoyed by, the.present ueaeratiou, Henry
'Russell, senior, was, warmly interested in the
antiislavery cause «nd in.tho emigration of
English labourers to. America, and. made
IÚ family, during .ons .of ? willoh his eon, W.
Clark Russel), was born, at Carlton- House
Hotel, Broadway, Hew York City, on
February. 24, 1844. Shortly afterwards the
family wcrc agein tn : England.
Young Russvll was educated at Winchester,
For eight.years,he-led a roving life in the.
lneroanjila marine, storing np the material
which was to do him cood service in future
years. He. then found eight .years of salt
age of twenty-three, à neice of the late Sir
of, London. Five years afterwards be drifted
ary bv£ stories, .and contributed ¡bo the maga-
zines and newspaper of .the day ; and then he.
wrote "John Holdsworth, Chief Mate," andi
soon after."The Wreck .of. the Grosvenor,"
which attrac ted instant attention, and placed
its, author in the front rank.of nautical,
novelists. These were followed, in quick,
succession-hy "A Sailor's Sweetheart," "An
Ocean Free Lance," "Auld Lang, Syne,"
"The Lady Maud,1''and "A Sea Queen."
Strange and thrilling as aro the adventures
absolute truth, which is indeed eft times'
to substantiate aU the details.
. Toé'; following facts, supplied ly Mr
Bussell, will be Kid with interest : " I sup-
pose I took to' the-«es at- most boysido-in1
order-to «se-- the srorld, and meet adventures.
I bsd aa idea th as a sailor'« life-was very
romantic. Anyone who reads my booka will
find that that idea Jias long since faded from
my mind. I began sailing early j being only
thirteen-and-aJialf years old when I snipped
aa midshipman on titer Duncan -Danbar, sailing
usual price to the ship's owners-ninety
ship left the dooks in London, the owners had
leaving the Duncan Dunbar, I shipped on thc
Hugoumout and had rather a varied expe-
rience. The first trip on hor we sailed from
London to Madras witli troops, intending
again. But -whilo, lying at Calcutta, tho war
turned into a troop snip, aod first taking, a
lot of soldiers to Hong,Kong we then pro-
ceeded further North. After land.ng the
remainder of our troops, we lay, for ten
uiontliB wallowing in the Bay of i'etclieli, off
the mouth of, tho Peilio River, doing nothing.
Duriug' the following seven years 1 made a
great many trips to different .parts of the
shore. I was completely tired of thc seo.
" When I nrrivod homo I didn't know what
suited f, r the Stack Exchange. That lasted
gave ms £150 e. year, ond'toldrsie to godhead
auddo wnat I,thought myself suited for.
''Dflring these buetaess attempts > I had
made very good use«! «ny odd:tiiue.by study-
ing, so when I left tue Stock iExchange I took
first sjorel, * Life's Masquerade.'" .?.
" What first turned your mind to writing V
"Thc idea first'struck me off Cape Horn.
I had a little difiérenos with the captain, and
and wateK Of course there was nothing to
do down there but poss tho time as best I
could, andi managed to get »'Copy of 'Lalla
Rookh,'and" began reading it; - As I' «ad I
thought there w«s nothing to keen me'fram
which happily is now lost. ' Lalla Rookh '
expect i to tann a person's mind -te story j
writing, "but it started me.
"I next.turned to newspaper writing. By
tob time I was married, and I bogan, to write
the booka that I am glad to know 1iavo been
very successful. Mr. Joseph. Cowes, of. the
XevxattU Chronicle, offered me a situation on
hie paper and I took, it, .and after sometime
became connected with <& Londou paper.
.' What I have tried to teach in my works
in the -world than sailors. Sailors are the
most unnautioal men in the world. They
talk with an ' aye, aye.' When at sea Jack
sings ' The Last Rose of Summer,' and ' Wait
Till tho Clouds Roll By,'and 'Two Lovely
Black Eyes,' and all sorts of laud songs.
fellows on the concert hall platforms, Give
him a sos sohg^and hell smell it and drop it.
I lie wants none of it."
THERE is a peculiar charm in stories of
the wild, capricious, perilous deep, which
makes the delight of youth, and chains the
attention of the elders as well. The gleaners
comparatively few since the days of Marryat
and Dana, and the world gladly welcomes a
author of "The Wreck of the Grosvenor,"
"The Golden Hope: a Romance of the
Deep," "A Sea Queen," and other exquisite
stories of the sea. Mr. Russell is son of the
well known musical composer and singer,
whose popular melodies, "The Old Arm
Life on the Ocean Wave," "Cheer, Boys,
Cheer," "Man the Life-Boat," "The Ship on
a century ago, and are still familiar to, and
enjoyed by, the present generation. Henry
Russell, senior, was warmly interested in the
anti-slavery cause ad in the emigration of
English labourers to America, and made
his family, during one of which his son, W.
Clark Russell, was born, at Carlton House
Hotel, Broadway, New York City, on
February 24, 1844. Shortly afterwards the
family were again in England.
Young Russell was educated at Winchester,
For eight years he led a roving life in the
mercantile marine, storing up the material
which was to do him good service in future
years. He then found eight years of salt
age of twenty-three, a niece of the late Sir
of London. Five years afterwards he drifted
ary love stories, and contributed to the maga-
zines and newspaper of the day; and then he
wrote "John Holdsworth, Chief Mate," and
soon after"The Wreck of the Grosvenor,"
which attracted instant attention, and placed
its author in the front rank of nautical
novelists. These were followed in quick
succession by "A Sailor's Sweetheart," "An
Ocean Free Lance," "Auld Lang Syne,"
"The Lady Maud," and "A Sea Queen."
Strange and thrilling as are the adventures
absolute truth, which is indeed oft times
to substantiate all the details.
The following facts, supplied by Mr
Russell, will be read with interest: "I sup-
pose I took to the sea as most boys do--in
order to see the world, and meet adventures.
I had an idea that a sailor's life was very
romantic. Anyone who reads my books will
find that that idea has long since faded from
my mind. I began sailing early, being only
thirteen-and-a-half years old when I shipped
as midshipman on the Duncan-Dunbar, sailing
usual price to the ship's owners--ninety
ship left the docks in London, the owners had
leaving the Duncan Dunbar, I shipped on the
Hugoumont and had rather a varied expe-
rience. The first trip on her we sailed from
London to Madras with troops, intending
again. But while lying at Calcutta, the war
turned into a troop ship, and first taking a
lot of soldiers to Hong Kong we then pro-
ceeded further North. After landing the
remainder of our troops, we lay for ten
months wallowing in the Bay of Petcheli, off
the mouth of the Peiho River, doing nothing.
During the following seven years I made a
great many trips to different parts of the
shore. I was completely tired of thc sea.
"When I arrived home I didn't know what
suited for the Stock Exchange. That lasted
gave ms £150 a year, and told me to go ahead
and do what I thought myself suited for.
"During these business attempts I had
made very good use of my odd time by study-
ing, so when I left the Stock Exchange I took
first novel, "Life's Masquerade.'"
"What first turned your mind to writing?"
"The idea first struck me off Cape Horn.
I had a little difference with the captain, and
and water. Of course there was nothing to
do down there but pass the time as best I
could, and I managed to get a copy of 'Lalla
Rookh,' and began reading it. As I said I
thought there was nothing to keep me from
which happily is now lost. 'Lalla Rookh'
expect to turn a person's mind to story
writing, but it started me.
"I next turned to newspaper writing. By
this time I was married, and I began to write
the books that I am glad to know have been
very successful. Mr. Joseph Cowes, of the
Newcastle Chronicle, offered me a situation on
his paper and I took, it, and after some time
became connected with a London paper.
"What I have tried to teach in my works
in the world than sailors. Sailors are the
most unnautical men in the world. They
talk with an 'aye, aye.' When at sea Jack
sings 'The Last Rose of Summer,' and 'Wait
Till the Clouds Roll By,' and 'Two Lovely
Black Eyes,' and all sorts of land songs.
fellows on the concert hall platforms. Give
him a sea song, and he'll smell it and drop it.
He wants none of it."
BRILLIANT NEW ROMANCE BY A WORLD FAMOUS NOVELIST. (Article), Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1878 - 1954), Thursday 1 October 1891 page Article 2014-12-19 15:13 " \ LONE ON A WIDE, WIDE SEA," on Ocean Mystery, is a striking, original and
XJL powerful Story will sliortly appear in our columns, lt will run us a Sci ¡iii for tko
full tenn of Six Months, and it is the latest and best Story its talented Author lias pro-
CLAHK RUSSELL is the son of Henry Russell, author of " dicer, Boys, Cheer 1 " In
his youth he followed thu sea. Latterly, hu has directed all Iiis energies to writing Stories,
suchas "A Sea tineen," "The Golden Hope," "My Danish Sweetheart," &c. His bookB
are universally admired for their, accuracy of delineation, hold flights of fancy, unequalled
descriptive power, and brilliant romantic passages. Clark Russell's heroines ure delightful.
" Alone on a Wide, Wide Sea" it « woman's Story, and possesses extraordinary attrac-
tions. ? ' '
WORLD FAMOUS NOVELI8T.
av A
"ALONE ON A WIDE, WIDE SEA," an Ocean Mystery, is a striking, original and
powerful Story will shortly appear in our columns. It will run as a Serial for the
full term of Six Months, and it is the latest and best Story its talented Author has pro-
CLARK RUSSELL is the son of Henry Russell, author of "Cheer, Boys, Cheer!" In
his youth he followed the sea. Latterly, he has directed all his energies to writing Stories,
such as "A Sea Queen," "The Golden Hope," "My Danish Sweetheart," &c. His books
are universally admired for their accuracy of delineation, bold flights of fancy, unequalled
descriptive power, and brilliant romantic passages. Clark Russell's heroines are delightful.
"Alone on a Wide, Wide Sea" is a woman's Story, and possesses extraordinary attrac-
tions.
WORLD FAMOUS NOVELIST.
BY A
OBITUARY MR. CLARK RUSSELL. London, Nov. 8. (Article), Kalgoorlie Miner (WA : 1895 - 1950), Friday 10 November 1911 page Article 2014-12-13 22:25 MR. CLARK RUSSELU,
The death is announced, at tho
born at the Carlton House Hotels
?p^norlmov in f.Vio ni+.ir nf 'Mpw Vorlc.
Russell, the composer of 'Cheer,
Boys, Cheer,'J 'There's a Good
Time Coming, Boys,' and many
othe-r compositions of a like kind.i ,
Mr. Clark Russell's ?* mother was,
connection 'of the poet Wordsworth,
Coleridge, Southey, Lamb, ^ and
others of ; that group. She died in
,1887. Mr. Clark Russell was edu
cated at Winchester and in France,;
and went to sea as a midshipman in'
thirteen and a half. He made sev
China, but abandoned the sea aftes
seven or eight jtears. He wrote a»
few novels under a no-m-de-plume^
novel, 'John HoMsworth, Chief
Mate,' was published in 1874. The
success of this book was great --and.,
'The. Wreck of the Grosvenor,'
which appears to have proved ther
most popular of his stories. In'
the 'Grpsvenor' he anticipated the'
dietary of the British merchantsea
man. 'The Little Loo' followed
the 'Grosvenor,' -and then earae in
rapid ' succession U.A Sailor's Sweet
heart,' 'An Ocean Free-Lance, ' 'A'
Sea Queen,' and 'The Lady Maud.'
At this time Mr. Clark Russell was'
'Daily Chronicle,' the property oF
member for that city ; but beingr
asked by the proprietors of the Lon
don . 'Daily Telegraph' to join tlW
staff of that journal, he bade bis
and settled in London. There he[:
wrote 'Jack's Courtship' ' and ' ''A'
Strange Voyage,' at the same 'time
contributing- stories and leading ar
ticles to the 'Daily Telegraph.''' His
health failed him, and he was ob
Kent, he continued to write for thd
'Dailv Telegraph.' but with growing,
dislike, of the work, as the exactions1
npon_ his time and imagination grew,,
heavier and heavier in proportion as ;
Hope,' 'The Death Ship,' 'A1
'Daily Telegraph' ceased, but tha
greater bulk of his contributions id
volumes such' as 'Round 'the Galley
Fire.' 'My Watch Below,' 'In thai
Middle Watch,' 'On the Fok'slei.
Head,', etc. These- works cover ai
very extensive range of seafaring in
Bcith, where, he wrote 'An Ocean/ -
Tragedy,' 'My Shipmate Louise,''
''Betwixt the Forelands,' 'The Rp~,
mance of Jenny Harlowe,' and other*
works. Among later novels are ;i
'The Emigrant Ship,' 1894; 'Listv,
ye Landsmen,' 'The Convict Ship-'\
and 'What Cheer?' both in 1895 U
'A Noble Haul,' 'The Last Entry'!
'The Two Captains, ' and 'Nelson''-'
1897; 'The Romance of a Midship-,
man,' 1898:'. 'The Ship's Adven
ture,' 1899; ''Overdue,' 1003 ?
'Abandoned,' and 'Wronp- Side
and 'The Yarn of Old Harbour '
books were:— 'Mv Watch BelowJ*
'In the Middle Watch,' 'The Mys- ?
from the Life of Nelson,' 'The Life ,
of Collingrrood,' etc. He married
in 1868 Alexandria, dane-M.e-r- of
Mr. D. J. Henry.) ' ' '
MR. CLARK RUSSELL.
The death is announced, at the
born at the Carlton House Hotel,
Broadway, in the city of New York,
Russell, the composer of "Cheer,
Boys, Cheer," "There's a Good
Time Coming, Boys," and many
other compositions of a like kind.
Mr. Clark Russell's mother was,
connection of the poet Wordsworth,
Coleridge, Southey, Lamb, and
others of that group. She died in
1887. Mr. Clark Russell was edu-
cated at Winchester and in France,
and went to sea as a midshipman in
thirteen and a half. He made sev-
China, but abandoned the sea after
seven or eight years. He wrote a
few novels under a nom-de-plume,
novel, "John Holdsworth, Chief
Mate," was published in 1874. The
success of this book was great and
"The Wreck of the Grosvenor,"
which appears to have proved the
most popular of his stories. In
the "Grosvenor" he anticipated the
dietary of the British merchant-sea-
man. "The Little Loo" followed
the "Grosvenor," and then came in
rapid succession "A Sailor's Sweet-
heart," "An Ocean Free-Lance," "A
Sea Queen," and "The Lady Maud."
At this time Mr. Clark Russell was
'Daily Chronicle,' the property of
member for that city ; but being
asked by the proprietors of the Lon-
don 'Daily Telegraph' to join the
staff of that journal, he bade his
and settled in London. There he
wrote 'Jack's Courtship' and 'A
Strange Voyage,' at the same time
contributing stories and leading ar-
ticles to the 'Daily Telegraph.' His
health failed him, and he was ob-
Kent, he continued to write for the
'Daily Telegraph,' but with growing
dislike of the work, as the exactions
upon his time and imagination grew
heavier and heavier in proportion as
Hope,' 'The Death Ship,' 'A
'Daily Telegraph' ceased, but the
greater bulk of his contributions to
volumes such as 'Round the Galley
Fire.' 'My Watch Below,' 'In the
Middle Watch,' 'On the Fok'sle
Head,' etc. These works cover a
very extensive range of seafaring in-
Bath, where, he wrote 'An Ocean
Tragedy,' 'My Shipmate Louise,'
'Betwixt the Forelands,' 'The Ro-
mance of Jenny Harlowe,' and other
works. Among later novels are:
'The Emigrant Ship,' 1894; 'List,
ye Landsmen,' 'The Convict Ship'
and 'What Cheer?' both in 1895;
'A Noble Haul,' 'The Last Entry'
'The Two Captains, ' and 'Nelson'
1897; 'The Romance of a Midship-
man,' 1898:'. 'The Ship's Adven-
ture,' 1899; ''Overdue,' 1903;
'Abandoned,' and 'Wrong Side
and 'The Yarn of Old Harbour
books were:— 'My Watch Below,'
'In the Middle Watch,' 'The Mys-
from the Life of Nelson,' 'The Life
of Collingwood,' etc. He married
in 1868 Alexandria, daughter of
Mr. D. J. Henry.)
OBITUARY. (Article), The Maitland Daily Mercury (NSW : 1894 - 1939), Thursday 9 November 1911 page Article 2014-12-13 22:10 Tim dentil ifi n tin on 1 1 end nt tbf n^e of 07.
of Mr. AVillinm Clark Rurwll. the nnuticiil
juiveliHt, who wmi in the British nierohimfc
servien from the iige of J') In i'l, when he
The death is announced at the age of 67,
of Mr. William Clark Russell, the nautical
novelist, who was in the British merchant
service from the age of 18 to 21, when he

Counts updated hourly

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

  1. BARRY, John Arthur
    List
    Public

    65 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2011-08-02
    User data
  2. KIPLING, Rudyard
    List
    Public

    10 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2011-01-08
    User data
  3. OXENHAM, John
    List
    Public

    1 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2011-01-09
    User data
  4. The Will Forgeries
    List
    Public

    16 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2010-08-14
    User data

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.