Information about Trove user: maurielyn

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

RankCorrectorLines corrected
1 JohnWarren 3,168,257
2 NeilHamilton 2,201,016
3 annmanley 2,027,673
4 noelwoodhouse 1,793,456
5 maurielyn 1,436,238
6 John.F.Hall 1,412,388
7 JudyClayden 1,172,011

1,436,238 lines corrected.

Corrections by month

March 2015 26,337
February 2015 30,109
January 2015 13
December 2014 1,991
November 2014 4,733
October 2014 25,113
September 2014 28,719
August 2014 46,848
July 2014 54,325
June 2014 10,647
May 2014 15,795
April 2014 16,770
March 2014 3
February 2014 92
January 2014 36
December 2013 4,433
November 2013 6,312
October 2013 40,154
September 2013 26,891
August 2013 19,229
July 2013 30,238
June 2013 35,889
May 2013 34,599
April 2013 5,953
March 2013 4,178
February 2013 60
December 2012 122
November 2012 6,412
October 2012 9,007
September 2012 2,074
August 2012 13,001
July 2012 8,995
June 2012 41,702
May 2012 10,728
April 2012 4,423
March 2012 12,588
February 2012 9,171
January 2012 2,655
December 2011 22,428
November 2011 29,308
October 2011 28,340
September 2011 20,977
August 2011 22,871
July 2011 20,215
June 2011 11,018
May 2011 7,946
April 2011 45,102
March 2011 14,791
February 2011 30,582
January 2011 36,679
December 2010 14,510
November 2010 15,639
October 2010 25,076
September 2010 35,694
August 2010 38,196
July 2010 31,494
June 2010 42,660
May 2010 42,984
April 2010 33,196
March 2010 26,158
February 2010 21,768
January 2010 23,693
December 2009 14,169
November 2009 13,910
October 2009 8,721
September 2009 5,101
August 2009 5,707
July 2009 6,083
June 2009 5,576
May 2009 30,715
April 2009 8,466
March 2009 21,801
February 2009 7,575
January 2009 5,156
December 2008 7,165
November 2008 6,402
October 2008 24,538
September 2008 28,111
August 2008 5,372

Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
CHAPTER XLV. WHEN NIGHT WAS PAST. (Article), Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904), Saturday 14 January 1893 page Article 2015-03-27 21:16 He said that be bad all along Buspected bis
friend of being tbe criminal, but) bad said
nothing on acconntof their friendship. He ;
.was never certain that the late millowner had
been guilty, but one fact had alwayB pointed to
hie guilt.
Matthew Lewie know the numbers of the
Lewis's lawyer, but he refrained from speak
he had not kept the numbers of the noteB.
so far as he was concerned with the dead mur
justice was done it would serve no useful pur
pose to pnnish the lawyer for being an aooessory
followed him to the Cemetery. Jaoob Freokle
and had been perpetrated for the same pur
pose ; but men did not revile bis name and
Pennyhurat Mill.
After tbe toil and stress of the darkness and
pain they bad had to fight through, they
language of the people among whom tbey
dwell, " May they live long and die happy!"
[the end.]
He said that he had all along suspected his
friend of being the criminal, but had said
nothing on account of their friendship. He
was never certain that the late millowner had
been guilty, but one fact had always pointed to
his guilt.
Matthew Lewis knew the numbers of the
Lewis's lawyer, but he refrained from speak-
he had not kept the numbers of the notes.
so far as he was concerned with the dead mur-
justice was done it would serve no useful pur-
pose to punish the lawyer for being an accessory
followed him to the Cemetery. Jacob Freckle-
and had been perpetrated for the same pur-
pose; but men did not revile his name and
Pennyhurst Mill.
After the toil and stress of the darkness and
pain they had had to fight through, they
language of the people among whom they
dwell, "May they live long and die happy!"
[THE END.]
CHAPTER XLV. WHEN NIGHT WAS PAST. (Article), Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904), Saturday 14 January 1893 page Article 2015-03-27 21:13 subjected him, bad strained bis feeble physique j
and weak brain to the utmost point, and when,
a doctor was called in to examine him he pro
So Jaoob had been taken to the Infirmary,
where he had been carefully tended ; but de
spite the attention of the dootors he sank day
after day, and it soon beoame clear that be
Before the inquest was held Freokleton
made a clean breast of everything. He con
fessed to having seen Matthew Iiewis murder
bad hidden it, and had afterwards hidden it
bad been placed in a private asylum. When he ,
bad made his way back to Legbsbury, intend
soene. He had been forced by Atherton to
confess all he knew when Matthew Lewie had
him—Freokleton—away to Thurston® Hall,
keeping him a prisoner there until he dis
inquest, and it oleared Will Atherton's name
be had been oondemned and had suffered
During the progress of the enquiry^ Will
doings since he bad been set free. He spoke
first of the suspicions he bad entertained, and
•of the eteps he had taken in order to verify or i
disDrove them.
Then he spoke of the scene in the factory
yard when Freokleton was confessing ere
to the firegrate; and, finally, of the exhuma
tion of the money when Jaoob had attacked
- the late mill-owner with the hammer.
At the conclusion of the inquest the gentle
and m the sight of all present had shaken
bad oleared his own name and brought the
who wbb shunned by everybody. This was the 1
millownet's son, Stephen Lewis, who had been
When the enquiry was endrd Stephen had
about to enter a cab, which was waiting for J
him at the Court door, when a hand waa laid
" Stay a minute, Stephen Lewis. A gentle
man here wisheB to speak to you."
He flnBhed red, then turned white, and some
bow managed to gasp:—
" Well, what is it?"
"This iB Stephen Lewis, Mr. Melton," said
Philip to bis companion. " Do you know j
"Know him ? I should think I do, Stephen
" Your sister ! What do I know about
either your sister or you ?"
" You do know and shall answer to me for |
imminent, but Lewis dropped hiB threatening
Just then Will Atherton oame upon the
Blaokburn there, his nod wbb of the coldest
"How,"cried Stephen in a sharp decisive
manner, " what is it yon want ?"
" I want to assure these gentlemen that you
waa Philip Blackburn. She believed you, and
" It's a lie 1 Stephen thundered. '"I know 1
" It is true, as I can prove. Any one who
-saw the unknown woman will be satisfied that
" The portrait of my sister and that of the
" I found her in the barn."
" Then examine these portraits and Bpeak
This is the dead woman," Will Atherton
He held out hie hand, and Philip wrung it
measured bis length on the pavement. He had
viotim had knocked him down. The assaulted
bleeding be jumped into the oab and was
Before the night fell many things had hap
bad renewed their old engagement, for the girl
doings in Amerioa, the success of his invention
there, his meeting with MiBS Melton's old
lover, and his discovery of her brother after
And the money whioh bad been the cause of
was banded over to the son and heir of Adam
Blaokburn by the polioe authorities, who had
bad it in their keeping since the night when
Matthew Lewis met his well-merited fate.I
Will Atherton to indnoe bis daughters lover
Philip said a curse seemed to dling to the
to eeire it. Had his father lived the gold and
they were the property of his eon, who would,
these dramatic inoidents had given rise to in
Leghsbniy circles, His Worship the Mayor had
an interview with Philip Blaokburn and Will
Atherton to oonfess all he knew of Adam
Blackburn's murder, and Lewis's oonneotion
-with it.
subjected him, had strained his feeble physique
and weak brain to the utmost point, and when
a doctor was called in to examine him he pro-
So Jacob had been taken to the Infirmary,
where he had been carefully tended; but de-
spite the attention of the doctors he sank day
after day, and it soon became clear that he
Before the inquest was held Freckleton
made a clean breast of everything. He con-
fessed to having seen Matthew Lewis murder
had hidden it, and had afterwards hidden it
had been placed in a private asylum. When he
had made his way back to Leghsbury, intend-
scene. He had been forced by Atherton to
confess all he knew when Matthew Lewis had
him—Freckleton—away to Thurstone Hall,
keeping him a prisoner there until he dis-
inquest, and it cleared Will Atherton's name
he had been condemned and had suffered
During the progress of the enquiry, Will
doings since he had been set free. He spoke
first of the suspicions he had entertained, and
of the steps he had taken in order to verify or
disprove them.
Then he spoke of the scene in the factory--
yard when Freckleton was confessing ere
to the firegrate; and, finally, of the exhuma-
tion of the money when Jacob had attacked
the late mill-owner with the hammer.
At the conclusion of the inquest the gentle-
and in the sight of all present had shaken
had cleared his own name and brought the
who was shunned by everybody. This was the
millowner's son, Stephen Lewis, who had been
When the enquiry was ended Stephen had
about to enter a cab, which was waiting for
him at the Court door, when a hand was laid
"Stay a minute, Stephen Lewis. A gentle-
man here wishes to speak to you."
He flushed red, then turned white, and some-
how managed to gasp:—
"Well, what is it?"
"This is Stephen Lewis, Mr. Melton," said
Philip to his companion. "Do you know him?"
"Know him? I should think I do. Stephen
"Your sister! What do I know about
either your sister or you?"
"You do know and shall answer to me for
imminent, but Lewis dropped his threatening
Just then Will Atherton came upon the
Blackburn there, his nod was of the coldest
"Now," cried Stephen in a sharp decisive
manner, "what is it you want?"
"I want to assure these gentlemen that you
was Philip Blackburn. She believed you, and
"It's a lie!" Stephen thundered. "I know
"It is true, as I can prove. Any one who
saw the unknown woman will be satisfied that
"The portrait of my sister and that of the
"I found her in the barn."
"Then examine these portraits and speak
"This is the dead woman," Will Atherton
He held out his hand, and Philip wrung it
measured his length on the pavement. He had
victim had knocked him down. The assaulted
bleeding he jumped into the cab and was
Before the night fell many things had hap-
had renewed their old engagement, for the girl
doings in America, the success of his invention
there, his meeting with Miss Melton's old
lover, and his discovery of her brother after-
And the money which had been the cause of
was handed over to the son and heir of Adam
Blackburn by the police authorities, who had
had it in their keeping since the night when
Matthew Lewis met his well-merited fate.
Will Atherton to induce his daughter's lover
Philip said a curse seemed to cling to the
to seize it. Had his father lived the gold and
they were the property of his son, who would,
these dramatic incidents had given rise to in
Leghsbury circles, His Worship the Mayor had
an interview with Philip Blackburn and Will
Atherton to confess all he knew of Adam
Blackburn's murder, and Lewis's connection
with it.
CHAPTER XLV. WHEN NIGHT WAS PAST. (Article), Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904), Saturday 14 January 1893 page Article 2015-03-27 21:03 The inquest held to enquire into tne cause
of the death of Matthew Iiewis was^ jusb
ended, and the Jury had returned a verdiot of
That finding was bob luceiy to ansos voa
murderer very much* for at the time tho ver
dict was delivered he was lying on the thres
the demented man had dug ont the treasure,
attracted the attention of the prison offioials.
The wild excitement of the past night, tha
The inquest held to enquire into the cause
of the death of Matthew Lewis was just
ended, and the Jury had returned a verdict of
That finding was not likely to affect the
murderer very much, for at the time the ver-
dict was delivered he was lying on the thres-
the demented man had dug out the treasure,
attracted the attention of the prison officials.
The wild excitement of the past night, the
CHAPTER XLIV. ANOTHER TRAGEDY. (Article), Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904), Saturday 14 January 1893 page Article 2015-03-27 21:01 "jjo you mean to murder me, MattaeiV
Lewie, aa you murdered Adam Blackburn?"
knew that it was Jaoob Freckleton who spoke,
" You miserable hound!" he heard the
master of Thuretone Hall reply. " I'll trample
again !"
"But it's true, you know," was the half,
defiant rejoinder. "And I do believe now j
that you mean to Btarve me to death."
" You will never leave this house unless you
blood to let you reap the benefit of my orime?
innocent and you guilty 1 Don't 1 Don't 1 For
pushing open the door an inoh or two Will
111 kill yon as Bure as God's in heaven !"
There was silenoe for a space, and ere either
Atherton made a discovery whioh startled him.
Around Freckleton's waist a stout ohain was
passed tightly twice and fastened with a pad
look, while the other end was coiled around
completely at Lewis's mercy in that upper j
" Will you tell me where you hid the money
you stole from me ?"
" I won't. The money's as much mine as
" And I mean that you won't," the mill
owner answered doggedly. " If you don't tell
" You mean to starve me to death then?"
" I do, unless you speak."
" You were going to tell that man, Ather
" Because he Jiod a hold upon me—could
send me to prispfi if he liked. Besides, he
" If you won't speak you can rot here. You
shall cot have another morsel of food or a drop
With that Lewis turned ob if to go away.
" It is safe enough while I have you here,
and if I let you go you will ta'se the twenty
" I won't! If you don't release me I'll break
" You will have to break that chain first."
" Then I oan rouse the house."
" I tell you it is empty. I have sent every
floor to your heart's oontent, and no one will
oome near you again until to-morrow night.
again you will be wuling to do anything 1
" Stop! Stop !" Freckleton shrieked in
frenzy. "For the lore of God give me some
"Not a crumb 1 Not a drop!"
the door of whioh was open. He had taken
off his boots, and the car petted corridor
"Come back! Come back, and I'll tell you 1
Comeback! Comeback!"
He saw Lewis walk back and the conversa
"Giveme a drink and III tell you."
" No; out with it or I'm off," cried Lewis,
" All I want—you will give me half the .
money then, Lewis ?"
where is it?" ,
Buried behind the wall just beside the fire
" Where there?"
" I know the place, but cannot describe it so
that yon could find it. Take me with you and
"This is the truth on your soul 1 You am
not attempting to mislead me thinking yon
" God knows I am speaking the troth. But
you will give me five thousand, Lewis ?".
Freokleton pleaded. "That will leave you
fifteen. Say you will give me five thousand—
won't you?" .
" I have told you what I will give you.
in a threatening tone to the slouching half
"Bemember, Freckleton, that I will shoot
you if yon attempt to run away."
"Bun; why, I can hardly walk. You've
At a safe distance Atherton orept stealthily
stairs Lewis led his oompanion towards the
Lewis's den and esoaped by the window.
He lnrked about the Hail until he saw two
formB emerge from the back entrance. They
went towards Thura tone-lane, and he followed.
dlearly, and it was easy to trace the dark
figures, especially as he knew their destina
towards the Pennyhnrat Mills, Atherton lost
Harrying along on the grass whioh bordered
the ditcn he was amazed to see a figure ap
moment, thinking it was Lewis returning, bub
he soon discovered hiB mistake.
It was a polioeman. He hurried forward
with a new pnrpose burning in his brain.
"Good night, sir," Baid the constable.
paused, adding quiokly as he reoognised the
stalwart bearded man:—" Are you not Tom
"Ibelieve I am."
" Don't you know me ?"
" What! Are you Mr. Atherton ?"
"lam. I was released a few months ago,
and since then I have been traoking the man
who committed the murder for whioh I was
meet some one a few moments ago ?"
" I met Mr. Lewis, of Thurstone Hall, and
" Those are the men I want!" Atherton
cried in an excited way. " You remember thab
pounds ?"
" So it was said."
We must track them—watoh them, and arresb
Never dreaming that any one was "shadow
ing" them Matthew Lewis and Jacob Freckle
ton hurried along at a quick paoe, and pre
sently the dark masses of the Pennyhursb
difficulty they would have to overcome, whioh
" What about the night watobman, Lewis ?"
Freokleton cried, laying his hand on the other's
arm. " He will be at the fireholes. How wilt
you get shut of bim?"
" Easily enough. Come along."
sn old man who had taken Freokleton's place
after his sudden, and to all save three men, in
"You can go home," 'said the millowner to
The old fellow stared at his employer, bub
threw more slaek on the fires, after pooketing
"Here. Behind those brioks," Freokleton
black-faced brickB which marked the hiding
plaoe of the long buried treasure.
" How shall we get at it ? We want tools—
a hammer and ohiael. I wonder if the engine
house is looked up!" Lewis oried, now in a
"Ill find tools," Freokleton replied, re
The hammer was a heavy one with a shorb
shaft; the chisel was thin and keen-edged ;
and when Freokleton produced them Lewis
without a word began to attack the walL
strength, and in a little space of time a com
work was easier, and soon other brides were
dislodged. Soon the gravel at the baok was
treasure,
"Where is the money?" Lewis cried, turn
face; he had cut his fingers in several plaoes,
and a fiendish expression was on bis sallow
face as he cried again, " Where is the money?
"It is there somewhere," Jaoob screamed.
" I buried it there. " Let me look for it ?"
wall and Freokleton thrust his head and
there was a sharp olink as of metal striking
metal, and a minute later Jacob bad dragged
"Thab is the box!" cried LewiB as ha
snatched it from the old man's hands. "Bub
is the hammer ?"
cast away the hammer, and thrust his ava
rioions bands among the Bank-notes and
gold be bad paid to Adam Blackburn in ex
Fasoinated with the treasure he had reco
Atherton and the polioeman were lurking,
the pair of villiane, when an awful tragedy
was enaotod under their very eyes.
Suddenly Jacob Freokleton pioked up the
heavy-headed hammer, Bwung it on high, and
Matthew Lewis's bare skull 1
A ory of horror issued from the lips oE
Atherton and Strong; but before they conld
blood-stained hammer fell again, and the mill
"Do you mean to murder me, Matthew
Lewis, as you murdered Adam Blackburn?"
knew that it was Jacob Freckleton who spoke,
"You miserable hound!" he heard the
master of Thuretone Hall reply. "I'll trample
again!"
"But it's true, you know," was the half-
defiant rejoinder. "And I do believe now
that you mean to starve me to death."
"You will never leave this house unless you
blood to let you reap the benefit of my crime?
innocent and you guilty! Don't! Don't! For
pushing open the door an inch or two Will
I'll kill you as sure as God's in heaven!"
There was silence for a space, and ere either
Atherton made a discovery which startled him.
Around Freckleton's waist a stout chain was
passed tightly twice and fastened with a pad-
lock, while the other end was coiled around
completely at Lewis's mercy in that upper
"Will you tell me where you hid the money
you stole from me?"
"I won't. The money's as much mine as
"And I mean that you won't," the mill-
owner answered doggedly. "If you don't tell
"You mean to starve me to death then?"
"I do, unless you speak."
"You were going to tell that man, Ather-
"Because he had a hold upon me—could
send me to prison if he liked. Besides, he
"If you won't speak you can rot here. You
shall not have another morsel of food or a drop
With that Lewis turned as if to go away.
"It is safe enough while I have you here,
and if I let you go you will take the twenty
"I won't! If you don't release me I'll break
"You will have to break that chain first."
"Then I can rouse the house."
"I tell you it is empty. I have sent every
floor to your heart's content, and no one will
come near you again until to-morrow night.
again you will be willing to do anything I
"Stop! Stop!" Freckleton shrieked in
frenzy. "For the love of God give me some-
"Not a crumb! Not a drop!"
the door of which was open. He had taken
off his boots, and the carpetted corridor
"Come back! Come back, and I'll tell you!
Come back! Come back!"
He saw Lewis walk back and the conversa-
"Give me a drink and I'll tell you."
"No; out with it or I'm off," cried Lewis,
"All I want—you will give me half the
money then, Lewis?"
where is it?"
"Buried behind the wall just beside the fire-
"Where there?"
"I know the place, but cannot describe it so
that you could find it. Take me with you and
"This is the truth on your soul? You are
not attempting to mislead me thinking you
"God knows I am speaking the troth. But
you will give me five thousand, Lewis?"
Freckleton pleaded. "That will leave you
fifteen. Say you will give me five thousand---
won't you?"
"I have told you what I will give you."
in a threatening tone to the slouching half--
"Remember, Freckleton, that I will shoot
you if you attempt to run away."
"Run; why, I can hardly walk. You've
At a safe distance Atherton crept stealthily
stairs Lewis led his companion towards the
Lewis's den and escaped by the window.
He lurked about the Hall until he saw two
forms emerge from the back entrance. They
went towards Thurstone-lane, and he followed.
clearly, and it was easy to trace the dark
figures, especially as he knew their destina-
towards the Pennyhurst Mills, Atherton lost
Hurrying along on the grass which bordered
the ditch he was amazed to see a figure ap-
moment, thinking it was Lewis returning, but
he soon discovered his mistake.
It was a policeman. He hurried forward
with a new purpose burning in his brain.
"Good night, sir," said the constable.
paused, adding quickly as he recognised the
stalwart bearded man:—"Are you not Tom
"I believe I am."
"Don't you know me?"
"What! Are you Mr. Atherton?"
"I am. I was released a few months ago,
and since then I have been tracking the man
who committed the murder for which I was
meet some one a few moments ago?"
"I met Mr. Lewis, of Thurstone Hall, and
"Those are the men I want!" Atherton
cried in an excited way. "You remember that
pounds?"
"So it was said."
We must track them—watch them, and arrest
Never dreaming that any one was "shadow-
ing" them Matthew Lewis and Jacob Freckle-
ton hurried along at a quick pace, and pre-
sently the dark masses of the Pennyhurst
difficulty they would have to overcome, which
"What about the night watchman, Lewis?"
Freckleton cried, laying his hand on the other's
arm. "He will be at the fireholes. How will
you get shut of him?"
"Easily enough. Come along."
an old man who had taken Freckleton's place
after his sudden, and to all save three men, in-
"You can go home," said the millowner to
The old fellow stared at his employer, but
threw more slack on the fires, after pocketing
"Here. Behind those bricks," Freckleton
black-faced bricks which marked the hiding
place of the long buried treasure.
"How shall we get at it? We want tools---
a hammer and chisel. I wonder if the engine--
house is locked up!" Lewis cried, now in a
"I'll find tools," Freckleton replied, re-
The hammer was a heavy one with a short
shaft; the chisel was thin and keen-edged;
and when Freckleton produced them Lewis
without a word began to attack the wall.
strength, and in a little space of time a com-
work was easier, and soon other bricks were
dislodged. Soon the gravel at the back was
treasure.
"Where is the money?" Lewis cried, turn-
face; he had cut his fingers in several places,
and a fiendish expression was on his sallow
face as he cried again, "Where is the money?
"It is there somewhere," Jacob screamed.
"I buried it there. Let me look for it?"
wall and Freckleton thrust his head and
there was a sharp clink as of metal striking
metal, and a minute later Jacob had dragged
"That is the box!" cried Lewis as he
snatched it from the old man's hands. "But
is the hammer?"
cast away the hammer, and thrust his ava-
ricious hands among the Bank-notes and
gold he had paid to Adam Blackburn in ex-
Fascinated with the treasure he had reco-
Atherton and the policeman were lurking,
the pair of villians, when an awful tragedy
was enacted under their very eyes.
Suddenly Jacob Freckleton picked up the
heavy-headed hammer, swung it on high, and
Matthew Lewis's bare skull!
A cry of horror issued from the lips of
Atherton and Strong; but before they could
blood-stained hammer fell again, and the mill-
CHAPTER XLIV. ANOTHER TRAGEDY. (Article), Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904), Saturday 14 January 1893 page Article 2015-03-27 20:44 CHAPTER XEIV.
CHAPTER XLIV.
CHAPTER XLIII (Article), Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904), Saturday 14 January 1893 page Article 2015-03-27 20:44 On the follotvinfc night. he was there again,
more the light appeared at the attio window.
Hidden among the shrubs he watohed and
it was that he never saw any one abont the
Next day he disoovered that there was not a
eoul living in the Hall save Matthew Lewis. ;
In a fit of spleen, his informant stated, the.
as nsnsl, and when the light shone at the
window he stole forth, resolved to foroe an
entranoe into the HalL Window after
thrust up the lower half and olimbed through,
to find himself in the very room in whioh he
own direoting his feet be came to a seoond set
of stairs _ leading to the upper rooms. Up
these stairs he orept silently, but before he
He paused and heard men's voioeB. One
in deadly toneB.
The voioeB were those of Jacob Freckleton
and knees nearer to the door of the room, re
solved to know the truth if it oost him his life.
On the following night he was there again,
more the light appeared at the attic window.
Hidden among the shrubs he watched and
it was that he never saw any one about the
Next day he discovered that there was not a
soul living in the Hall save Matthew Lewis.
In a fit of spleen, his informant stated, the
as usual, and when the light shone at the
window he stole forth, resolved to force an
entrance into the Hall. Window after
thrust up the lower half and climbed through,
to find himself in the very room in which he
own directing his feet be came to a second set
of stairs leading to the upper rooms. Up
these stairs he crept silently, but before he
He paused and heard men's voices. One
in deadly tones.
The voices were those of Jacob Freckleton
and knees nearer to the door of the room, re-
solved to know the truth if it cost him his life.
CHAPTER XLIII (Article), Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904), Saturday 14 January 1893 page Article 2015-03-27 20:42 As the weeks sped by he grew more reokless
noticed that a light was bvrning in one of the
upper rooms next the roof, at the backef the
As the weeks sped by he grew more reckless
noticed that a light was burning in one of the
upper rooms next to the roof, at the back of the
CHAPTER XLIII (Article), Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904), Saturday 14 January 1893 page Article 2015-03-27 20:41 When Will Atherton name to his senses he
that vengeful and oruBhing blow on the head
had Bent him. His hands and feet were ioy
together, and Btained and stiffened his collar
and ehirt.
and he gazed around half expeoting to see
Jacob Freckleton and his own unknown assail
But he oould near nothing, oould perceive no
human form. The dark factory yard was com
pair who had disappeared while he lay uncon
soious there. If the ground had but a voice to
boiler holeB he went that way.
touched sinoe evening. But the gas was burn
read thus
has turned up. Oome at once. F. is not
settled as we thought."!
liewis at Oovent Garden Hotel, London, and
mind the words of the telegraphio message
of it alh
had fled to London to get away from the hub
whom? Jaoob Freckleton? Probably the
aB we thought," mean ?
Freokleton was alive and in the town ? Very
likely, he thought, oonsidering that Freokle
And if the "F." meant Freokleton what
interest could Lewis have in him? Oould it be
Was it the millowner's name that Freok
—was felled to the earth ?
What was Jacob doing beside the fireholeB
ont of his thinking there grew up several con
Lewis bad been on the premises that night;
wound in his head had |been inflicted by no
one save the Master of Tburstone Hall.
Seoondly, the presence of Jacob Freck
leton near the soene of the murder gave
Adam Blaokburn had been done to death
were buried Bomewhere not far away from
which be had been waiting all these years was
knew now who had the seoreb of his old
late he would drag that secret from the half
orazed old fellow's mouth.
Before the morning was spent he had dis
covered that Matthew Lewis bad returned
from London on the previous night, fie had
gone to the station at LeghBDury, and en
quired who was on night duty as ticket col
address were given him: he sought the man's
the night before at 8 o'olook. Thus he would
have had ample time to go heme and after
rolled by, seated inside <5f whioh was His
Worship the Mayor of Leghsbnry.
He watched the oab turn in at the gate
whioh led to Lewis's residence. That inci
many days that followed. By thia time Ather
ton's little store of money was almost ex
hausted : but he had no heart to seek work
a oritical point. So he lived on in hope,
trusting that the end woold oome before he
was reduoed to starvation.
Day after day he lounged about the Penny
hunt Mills, almost always within sight of tne
fireholes near which he believed tne blood
night he hung abont Thurstone Hall, con
vinced that Lewis had imprisoned Jaoob
Freokleton there.
When Will Atherton came to his senses he
that vengeful and crushing blow on the head
had sent him. His hands and feet were icy
together, and stained and stiffened his collar
and shirt.
and he gazed around half expecting to see
Jacob Freckleton and his own unknown assail-
But he could near nothing, could perceive no
human form. The dark factory yard was com-
pair who had disappeared while he lay uncon-
scious there. If the ground had but a voice to
boiler holes he went that way.
touched since evening. But the gas was burn-
read thus:--
has turned up. Come at once. F. is not
settled as we thought."
Lewis at Covent Garden Hotel, London, and
mind the words of the telegraphic message
of it all.
had fled to London to get away from the hub-
whom? Jacob Freckleton? Probably the
as we thought," mean?
Freckleton was alive and in the town? Very
likely, he thought, considering that Freckle-
And if the "F." meant Freckleton what
interest could Lewis have in him? Could it be
Was it the millowner's name that Freck-
—was felled to the earth?
What was Jacob doing beside the fireholes
out of his thinking there grew up several con-
Lewis had been on the premises that night;
wound in his head had been inflicted by no
one save the Master of Thurstone Hall.
Secondly, the presence of Jacob Freck-
leton near the scene of the murder gave
Adam Blackburn had been done to death
were buried somewhere not far away from
which he had been waiting all these years was
knew now who had the secret of his old
late he would drag that secret from the half-
crazed old fellow's mouth.
Before the morning was spent he had dis-
covered that Matthew Lewis had returned
from London on the previous night. He had
gone to the station at Leghsbury, and en-
quired who was on night duty as ticket col-
address were given him; he sought the man's
the night before at 8 o'clock. Thus he would
have had ample time to go home and after-
rolled by, seated inside of which was His
Worship the Mayor of Leghsbury.
He watched the cab turn in at the gate
which led to Lewis's residence. That inci-
many days that followed. By this time Ather-
ton's little store of money was almost ex-
hausted; but he had no heart to seek work
a critical point. So he lived on in hope,
trusting that the end would come before he
was reduced to starvation.
Day after day he lounged about the Penny-
hurst Mills, almost always within sight of the
fireholes near which he believed the blood--
night he hung about Thurstone Hall, con-
vinced that Lewis had imprisoned Jacob
Freckleton there.
CHAPTER XLIII (Article), Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904), Saturday 14 January 1893 page Article 2015-03-27 20:33 CHAPTER XLTIL
CHAPTER XLIII.
CHAPTER XLII. A REVELATION. (Article), Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904), Saturday 14 January 1893 page Article 2015-03-27 20:32 Philip Blackburn lived there was a young fel
low of about nis own age who chanced to work
He was a bright-faced, dark-haired, attrac
male and female, but also among his fellow
coldly received, by the other. This both
friends that he oame from Liverpool; and
set the Liverpudlian down as an unsooiable
being—so far as he was himself oonoerned—
One day, however, ohance threw the two
Lanoashire ladB together for some hours.
maoninery; and as Philip detested the idea of
'that you dislike me? I could see it from
'There is a reason yon may be sure,"
" But I am sure there cannot be, lad," Philip
"11 tell you there is."
'I'd rather not talk about it, Blackburn."
' But I think you ought, Frank. Tell me
what I have done to make you Bhun me. I
am sure that I should like to be en friendly
went on, eonfusion marking his Bpeeoh and
Of oourse the girl had a right to choose be
"What the deuoe are you talking about,
Seddon?" Philip demanded in real amaze
ment. "You never lived at LeghBbury, did
'Of course not."
' Then how oould you know and fall in love
with Nanoy Atherkm?"
"'I never heard the name before."
'What?" Seddon cried.
' I never heard the name of Edith Melton
before to-day I" Philip repeated, firmly.
"But you are Philip Blaokburn, and you
come from Leghsbury in Lancashire ?"
''I do."
'Then there must be two Philip Blaokburns
She told me all about it; said they were en
" I think I understand now," Philip mur
"Nor had a description of him given to
' Now let me tell you, Frank, how I came
The foregoing conversation did not oocur as
it is recorded here. It took plaoe in snatches; as
desoribea her appearanoe as well as he was
name were produoed, and he, despite his pro
testations, was believed by every one, inoluding
"Would you be able to reoognise a portrait
" Most certainly."
" I have a photo cf Edith Melton in my box
there. jParhapa, after all, it is not the same
had tidied themselves tip, the former produoed
the likeness of which hehad spoken.
" Well?" he cried in an exoited tone as he
" It is the likeness of the woman who was
found dead at Leghsbury. 1 could ewear to
it. Had she any relatives ?"
a fast girl She bad a good voice'and went on
the musio hall stage. He was a clerk, but
and had gone somewhere in the North of Eng
"I wonder." said Philip, refleotively, as he
kissed it tenderly, '* who was the man who led
my name !"
- "I wiahlknewl" FrankSeddonotied with
an oath and a Budded outburst of tearB he
oould not slay. "Sever I meet the cursed
" I also have a heavy score against him, who
ever he may be. Now, Frank, old man, let ub
Philip Blackburn lived there was a young fel-
low of about his own age who chanced to work
He was a bright-faced, dark-haired, attrac-
male and female, but also among his fellow--
coldly received by the other. This both
friends that he came from Liverpool; and
set the Liverpudlian down as an unsociable
being—so far as he was himself concerned---
One day, however, chance threw the two
Lancashire lads together for some hours.
machinery; and as Philip detested the idea of
"that you dislike me? I could see it from
'There is a reason you may be sure,"
"But I am sure there cannot be, lad," Philip
"I tell you there is."
"I'd rather not talk about it, Blackburn."
"But I think you ought, Frank. Tell me
what I have done to make you shun me. I
am sure that I should like to be on friendly
went on, confusion marking his speeoh and
Of course the girl had a right to choose be-
"What the deuce are you talking about,
Seddon?" Philip demanded in real amaze-
ment. "You never lived at Leghsbury, did
"Of course not."
"Then how could you know and fall in love
with Nancy Atherton?"
"I never heard the name before."
"What?" Seddon cried.
"I never heard the name of Edith Melton
before to-day!" Philip repeated, firmly.
"But you are Philip Blackburn, and you
come from Leghsbury in Lancashire?"
"I do."
"Then there must be two Philip Blackburns
She told me all about it; said they were en-
"I think I understand now," Philip mur-
"Nor had a description of him given to you?" "No!"
"Now let me tell you, Frank, how I came
The foregoing conversation did not occur as
it is recorded here. It took place in snatches; as
described her appearance as well as he was
name were produced, and he, despite his pro-
testations, was believed by every one, including
"Would you be able to recognise a portrait
"Most certainly."
"I have a photo of Edith Melton in my box
there. Perhaps, after all, it is not the same
had tidied themselves tip, the former produced
the likeness of which he had spoken.
"Well?" he cried in an excited tone as he
"It is the likeness of the woman who was
found dead at Leghsbury. I could swear to
it. Had she any relatives?"
a fast girl. She had a good voice and went on
the music hall stage. He was a clerk, but
and had gone somewhere in the North of Eng-
"I wonder." said Philip, reflectively, as he
kissed it tenderly, "who was the man who led
my name?"
"I wish I knew!" Frank Seddon cried with
an oath and a sudden outburst of tears he
could not stay. "If ever I meet the cursed
"I also have a heavy score against him, who-
ever he may be. Now, Frank, old man, let us

Counts updated hourly

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

  1. BARRY, John Arthur
    List
    Public

    65 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2011-08-02
    User data
  2. KIPLING, Rudyard
    List
    Public

    10 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2011-01-08
    User data
  3. OXENHAM, John
    List
    Public

    1 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2011-01-09
    User data
  4. The Will Forgeries
    List
    Public

    16 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2010-08-14
    User data

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.