Information about Trove user: maurielyn

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

RankCorrectorLines corrected
1 JohnWarren 3,206,407
2 NeilHamilton 2,236,872
3 annmanley 2,041,746
4 noelwoodhouse 1,821,951
5 maurielyn 1,448,688
6 John.F.Hall 1,435,088
7 JudyClayden 1,180,858

1,448,688 lines corrected.

Corrections by month

April 2015 12,450
March 2015 26,337
February 2015 30,109
January 2015 13
December 2014 1,991
November 2014 4,733
October 2014 25,113
September 2014 28,719
August 2014 46,848
July 2014 54,325
June 2014 10,647
May 2014 15,795
April 2014 16,770
March 2014 3
February 2014 92
January 2014 36
December 2013 4,433
November 2013 6,312
October 2013 40,154
September 2013 26,891
August 2013 19,229
July 2013 30,238
June 2013 35,889
May 2013 34,599
April 2013 5,953
March 2013 4,178
February 2013 60
December 2012 122
November 2012 6,412
October 2012 9,007
September 2012 2,074
August 2012 13,001
July 2012 8,995
June 2012 41,702
May 2012 10,728
April 2012 4,423
March 2012 12,588
February 2012 9,171
January 2012 2,655
December 2011 22,428
November 2011 29,308
October 2011 28,340
September 2011 20,977
August 2011 22,871
July 2011 20,215
June 2011 11,018
May 2011 7,946
April 2011 45,102
March 2011 14,791
February 2011 30,582
January 2011 36,679
December 2010 14,510
November 2010 15,639
October 2010 25,076
September 2010 35,694
August 2010 38,196
July 2010 31,494
June 2010 42,660
May 2010 42,984
April 2010 33,196
March 2010 26,158
February 2010 21,768
January 2010 23,693
December 2009 14,169
November 2009 13,910
October 2009 8,721
September 2009 5,101
August 2009 5,707
July 2009 6,083
June 2009 5,576
May 2009 30,715
April 2009 8,466
March 2009 21,801
February 2009 7,575
January 2009 5,156
December 2008 7,165
November 2008 6,402
October 2008 24,538
September 2008 28,111
August 2008 5,372

Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
A SEA QUEEN. [Published by special arrangement with the author. All rights reserved.] CHAPTER XL-1 SEND A LETTER TO FATHER. (Article), South Australian Weekly Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1881 - 1889), Saturday 20 October 1883 page Article 2015-04-19 12:39 The trades blew us afocg finely* day. ana ' :-.v.'
eight, and twelve days after 7e had braced . ? -~J'
up and headed the Bolama fbr/hovie we wewr -,,
en the parallel of the island of Madeira, It ~
vs« glow work, to be sure, showing nut iittte .. ';.-.
r..oro than 150 miles a day^ or a speed of ''':;
between six and seven nautical miles in hoar;
yet to hear that we were in the latitude tX. ' ?„'.? X
Madeira was to feel that we were drawing :
ntar home indeed, and I remember that when: r
Eicbardtaid to me when he had worked oat'
bis observations, 'If we carry this weather . :
fcr another twenty days, Jess, we shall be ? ? ?
»shoic, and in Siinderland, aye, and perhaps
it South. Shitida, yurning with your father, '.'.
at tbe end cf that time,' my heart bsat -.='
/orliihly, and 1 wanted but a very little to
tiait meeff crjinglikea child. ?: .^
1 eijisjed the sea more than ever I did -
abo&rei the Aurora, in spite of my husband's -
ht-'p.'css condition ; tbat *as always a depres's
JD£ v tight upon my heart. In the Aurora,
f rooi tfce very hour of our bringing up in tho
DewEs. I was always uneasy and troubled.
Every day something unpleasant was happen
ing ;o take, the edge off my enjoyment of the
cceau. Either the men were grumbling or re
be! ling, or the mate was at hand to chill and
vtx me with hid cold, insolent indifference o£
ntfiuiifr ; or, if it was not Heron, then it waa
Short, &nd if not Short, then it was the
trials Orange', itis true, could never alter his
sour face ; but he took his tone from 'the
ofhere, stowed that be valued bis own ante
Ttbt..«, gave us even more attention than he hai
bestowf d upon Heron, and though, after Me
Short, I dbliked him the most of all the crew,
3 ct bis presence was no longer a discomfort
to me.
The trades blew us along finely day and
night, and twelve days after we had braced
up and headed the Bolama for home we were
on the parallel of the island of Madeira. It
was slow work, to be sure, showing but little
more than 150 miles a day, or a speed of
between six and seven nautical miles an hour;
yet to hear that we were in the latitude of
Madeira was to feel that we were drawing
near home indeed, and I remember that when
Richard said to me when he had worked out
his observations, "If we carry this weather
for another twenty days, Jess, we shall be
ashore, and in Sunderland, aye, and perhaps
in South Shields, yarning with your father,
at the end of that time," my heart beat
foolishly, and I wanted but a very little to
start me off crying like a child.
I enjoyed the sea more than ever I did
aboard the Aurora, in spite of my husband's
helpless condition; that was always a depress-
ing weight upon my heart. In the Aurora,
from the very hour of our bringing up in the
Downs, I was always uneasy and troubled.
Every day something unpleasant was happen-
ing to take, the edge off my enjoyment of the
ocean. Either the men were grumbling or re-
belling, or the mate was at hand to chill and
vex me with his cold, insolent indifference of
manner; or, if it was not Heron, then it was
Short, and if not Short, then it was the
trials. Orange, it is true, could never alter his
sour face; but he took his tone from the
others, showed that he valued his own inte-
rests, gave us even more attention than he had
bestowed upon Heron, and though, after Mr.
Short, I disliked him the most of all the crew,
yet his presence was no longer a discomfort
to me.###
A SEA QUEEN. [Published by special arrangement with the author. All rights reserved.] CHAPTER XL-1 SEND A LETTER TO FATHER. (Article), South Australian Weekly Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1881 - 1889), Saturday 20 October 1883 page Article 2015-04-19 12:32 do more than put splinters on the leg and
order Bichard to lie, as he now did, until the
of course have afforded us ; I mean he would
the broken limb bad to take its chance
in my hands, and there was the dis
mal prospect before! my poor husband
again in order tbat it might heal in such a
manner as to enable hint to use it. However,
we bad to wait until we could see a doctor
and imprisonment were in store for Bichard ;
esey en the score of -roft« tb.*a tfce frastttirt . ' _ .!:
following the accident. -' :'_'. -.'-='?. i
no more than put splinters on the leg and
order Richard to lie, as he now did, until the
of course have afforded us; I mean he would
the broken limb had to take its chance
in my hands, and there was the dis-
mal prospect before my poor husband
again in order that it might heal in such a
manner as to enable him to use it. However,
we had to wait until we could see a doctor
and imprisonment were in store for Richard;
easy on the score of worse than the fracture
following the accident.
A SEA QUEEN. [Published by special arrangement with the author. All rights reserved.] CHAPTER XL-1 SEND A LETTER TO FATHER. (Article), South Australian Weekly Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1881 - 1889), Saturday 20 October 1883 page Article 2015-04-19 12:31 I bave now arrived at a point in my narra
tive when I find that the Bea leaves me little
marine pictures of calm and' atcrrn which
harassed aDd terrified by peril. I am aware
tbat many landsmen's idea of the sea id that
ii is ncrmng due a dull circle ot water, sonae
timt s blue, when the sun shines, and some
times dark, when tbe heavens are overcast ;
at one bour smoothly sleeping, at another
hour filled with tbe commotion of roaring
sighting of a ship, tbe forming of a water
spout, or the hookin? of a shark.
Well, it would be like admittin» that; a
llatly fails as an expression of my owa notions
were I to argue against suuh opinions here.
When some marine Wordsworth risea to in
terpret the ocean mysteries— as the bike poet
to that wondrous liquid unicerse whose
and unknown shadows; bright-eyed, silver
atruored shapes floating like sunbeams over
their golden territory ; huge rhinocerou3
tbe heights of their own death-silent crystal
as Wordsworth, nsiDgling with the colorsiaud
of them icto rich words, so that the very
scul as well as tbe eye of the beholder comes
to tbe spectacle of tbe storm and the calm ;
tbe water ; tfce moonlight touching with
pearl tbe glimmering crests of the rolling,
pallid surges ; the gleaming sails that pass
like a xnbrniDg mist along the shining line
agaicst which the firmament leans its weight
monotony at sea. Hot a fragment of dark
bosom of the ocean a field of surpassing in
terest ; even one more pregnant than the
flower-teeming earth herself with sugges
tions Xo bring the soul close to that God
and whose peace that passe th all understand
voyage leaves a person little to relate ; for a'
exhausted ber malice in burning our barque
bcur when the Aurora's longboat came along
the Snnderlacd docks, hardly an incident befel
up and headed for the nortb, accepting the
submitted the list to my husband, we dis
covered to our great satisfaction that the sup
calculated on occupying in making the
cf beef, a good supply of salt pork, with a
Eugar, tea, coffee, lime-juice, and suchmatters,
inveterate smoker, and who, when the news'
though there were too many troubles upon,
allow him to make a grievance of sach a want
as tobacco. The men bad but two pipes, but
the lockers in the berth ho used, hoping I
would find a pipe there. I searched, unsuc
in the pockets of the coats, I found two welt
triumph to Bichard, who, giving one to the
lying on his back with a soothed and con
tented face, blowing out clouds ' of smoke
with a relish I could not view without laugh
'Thorp urns atari fnimri a «!nti Whpsf frill r\f
clothes — Eailors' shirts and drawers and coats
— which Bichard ordered the carpenter to
wanted. These clothes and the tobacco com
fine sunset in the sky, the strong steaiy
including ithe foretopmast studding-sail, was
to leeward, I found all bands— saving the
singing songs. Such are sailors ! even when
still children ; and like children, who are to
rag-doll or broken go-cart, so a pipe of to
and songs. Indeed, there is no man com
simplicity of heart ; no man one can more
when heis honest and true, than a sailor. Pity
be should not always be so, for the sake of
spparel, as you will suppose if you are a
woman ; still when the things were finished
those sheets, which Bichard told me he had
on ; and only, women who bave been ship
wrecked can appreciate the inexpressible com*
me. Bichard was better off than I, there
some of which made us fancy that poor Cap
to in Hmnat* — fnr +-ift-:. it spaitiii. wasfhfinamfi
of the bite master of the Bolama— must have
in that way, however, we took the ut
children living in Sunderland,for whose poor
What with sewing— for when I had com
my needle— I say, what with sewing and wait
ing upon Bichard, who required to be dressed
bis leg paining him sometimes exquisitely if he
moved it or even sat upright, unless I poshed
him in an erect posture with my hande, and
then propped Viiin with bolsters, the time
to wcrk them out, and this business marked
' Another morning gone, Bichard ; how fast
the days roll along ! it seems butjust now that
tbe men carried you last on deck.'
first week went by and bis health and spirits
1 ? J & *...«.*.j-jt*« a«% Tk.tiiMj4 Itn aa*i1^ liana* jI/ima
nau a ourgcuu uu uucuru uv woiu uavc uuiio
I have now arrived at a point in my narra-
tive when I find that the sea leaves me little
marine pictures of calm and storm which
harassed and terrified by peril. I am aware
that many landsmen's idea of the sea is that
it is nothing but a dull circle of water, some-
time's blue, when the sun shines, and some-
times dark, when the heavens are overcast;
at one hour smoothly sleeping, at another
hour filled with the commotion of roaring
sighting of a ship, the forming of a water-
spout, or the hooking of a shark.
Well, it would be like admitting that a
flatly fails as an expression of my own notions
were I to argue against such opinions here.
When some marine Wordsworth rises to in-
terpret the ocean mysteries— as the late poet
to that wondrous liquid universe whose
and unknown shadows; bright-eyed, silver-
armored shapes floating like sunbeams over
their golden territors; huge rhinocerous-
the heights of their own death-silent crystal
as Wordsworth, mingling with the colors and
of them into rich words, so that the very
soul as well as the eye of the beholder comes
to the spectacle of the storm and the calm;
the water; the moonlight touching with
pearl the glimmering crests of the rolling,
pallid surges; the gleaming sails that pass
like a morning mist along the shining line
against which the firmament leans its weight
monotony at sea. Not a fragment of dark
bosom of the ocean a field of surpassing in-
terest; even one more pregnant than the
flower-teeming earth herself with sugges-
tions to bring the soul close to that God
and whose peace that passeth all understand-
voyage leaves a person little to relate; for a
exhausted her malice in burning our barque
hour when the Aurora's longboat came along-
the Sunderland docks, hardly an incident befel
up and headed for the north, accepting the
submitted the list to my husband, we dis-
covered to our great satisfaction that the sup-
calculated on occupying in making the voyage home. We made out some
of beef, a good supply of salt pork, with a
sugar, tea, coffee, lime-juice, and such matters,
inveterate smoker, and who, when the news
though there were too many troubles upon
allow him to make a grievance of such a want
as tobacco. The men had but two pipes, but
the lockers in the berth he used, hoping I
would find a pipe there. I searched, unsuc-
in the pockets of the coats, I found two well-
triumph to Richard, who, giving one to the
lying on his back with a soothed and con-
tented face, blowing out clouds of smoke
with a relish I could not view without laughing.
There was also found a slop chest full of
clothes — sailors' shirts and drawers and coats
— which Richard ordered the carpenter to
wanted. These clothes and the tobacco com-
fine sunset in the sky, the strong steady
including the foretopmast studding-sail, was
to leeward, I found all hands— saving the
singing songs. Such are sailors! even when
still children; and like children, who are to
rag-doll or broken go-cart, so a pipe of to-
and songs. Indeed, there is no man com-
simplicity of heart; no man one can more
when he is honest and true, than a sailor. Pity
he should not always be so, for the sake of
apparel, as you will suppose if you are a
woman; still when the things were finished
those sheets, which Richard told me he had
on; and only women who have been ship-
wrecked can appreciate the inexpressible com-
me. Richard was better off than I, there
some of which made us fancy that poor Cap-
tain Grange— for that, it seems, was the name
of the late master of the Bolama— must have
in that way, however, we took the ut-
children living in Sunderland, for whose poor
What with sewing— for when I had com-
my needle— I say, what with sewing and wait-
ing upon Richard, who required to be dressed
his leg paining him sometimes exquisitely if he
moved it or even sat upright, unless I pushed
him in an erect posture with my hands, and
then propped him with bolsters, the time
to work them out, and this business marked
"Another morning gone, Richard; how fast
the days roll along! it seems but just now that
the men carried you last on deck."
first week went by and his health and spirits

had a surgeon on board he could have done
OBITUARY MR. JOHN BAKER. (Article), The Richmond River Herald and Northern Districts Advertiser (NSW : 1886 - 1942), Friday 2 February 1940 page Article 2015-04-19 12:26 ' The Maclean-Asliby ferryman', Thomas
a. seat qf. tho punt, on Monday night
last, at 10 o'clock. Collie, .who had
and Mrs. Robert Collie, and was a fish
he socured the ferry ' contract. His
tho Serpentine, Har.wood Island), one
The Maclean-Ashby ferryman, Thomas
a seat of the punt, on Monday night
last, at 10 o'clock. Collie, who had
and Mrs. Robert Collie, and was a fish-
he secured the ferry contract. His
the Serpentine, Harwood Island), one
ITEMS OF INTEREST. (Article), The Richmond River Herald and Northern Districts Advertiser (NSW : 1886 - 1942), Friday 25 November 1932 page Article 2015-04-19 12:24 . near Chatsworth, has marketed 109 bags
E. Davis, of Hanvood Island.
near Chatsworth, has marketed 109 bags
E. Davis, of Harwood Island.
BRIEF MENTION. (Article), The Richmond River Herald and Northern Districts Advertiser (NSW : 1886 - 1942), Friday 6 September 1907 page Article 2015-04-19 12:23 .Tames Dorcey, of the Serpentine, and Mr.
Richard, son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Thoa.
Coll is, of Shark Creek.
James Dorcey, of the Serpentine, and Mr.
Richard, son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Thos.
Collis, of Shark Creek.
District News. HARWOOD, THURSDAY. (Article), The Clarence River Advocate (NSW : 1898 - 1949), Friday 30 August 1907 page Article 2015-04-19 12:21 in the presence of a largo assemblage of
lriends in tne li.U. cliurcu at Uliatswortn,
Mrs. James Doruey, of the' Serpentine,
was joined in tho lioly bonds of matrimony
to Mr. llichard, son of the late Mr. and
by the Von. Archdeacon Walsh.. Tliero
was a beautiful florul arch plucod over the
church gate by lady friends of tho bride.
After the ceremony upwards of 50 rela
tions and friends adjourned to tho bride's
bridegroom in a very happy and well
chosen speech, in which \w referred to the
newly-married couple us good God-fearing
bridegroom suitably replied. Mr. Thos
Donelly proposed tho health of tho brides
maid, Miss Annie Dorccy, and the
groomsman, Mr. S. Collis, in a very ap
the health of the bride's parents . and
heartily eulogised their many sterling qual
ities us friends and neighbors and hoped
that -the newly -married couple would fol
low in their footsteps. Mr. J. Dorcey re
turned thanks, after which the guests in
spected the wedding presents, which wero
numerous and choice, quite- filling up one
all went to show tho popularity of the
M. KTelly, of Maclean. At night about
100 guests assembled and a most enjoy
able time was spent until the wee sma'
hours iu music, daucing and singing. The
being of crepo de shone coat and skirt
maid wove gold brooches, gifts of the
? : — o ?
C0WP.EE, Tjiubsday.
in the presence of a large assemblage of
friends in the R.C. church at Chatsworth,
Mrs. James Dorcey, of the Serpentine,
was joined in the holy bonds of matrimony
to Mr. Richard, son of the late Mr. and
by the Ven. Archdeacon Walsh. There
was a beautiful floral arch placed over the
church gate by lady friends of the bride.
After the ceremony upwards of 50 rela-
tions and friends adjourned to the bride's
bridegroom in a very happy and well-
chosen speech, in which he referred to the
newly-married couple as good God-fearing
bridegroom suitably replied. Mr. Thos.
Donelly proposed the health of the brides-
maid, Miss Annie Dorcey, and the
groomsman, Mr. S. Collis, in a very ap-
the health of the bride's parents and
heartily eulogised their many sterling qual-
ities as friends and neighbors and hoped
that the newly-married couple would fol-
low in their footsteps. Mr. J. Dorcey re-
turned thanks, after which the guests in-
spected the wedding presents, which were
numerous and choice, quite filling up one
all went to show the popularity of the
M. Kelly, of Maclean. At night about
100 guests assembled and a most enjoy-
able time was spent until the wee small
hours in music, dancing and singing. The
being of crepe de shene coat and skirt
maid wore gold brooches, gifts of the
——ooOoo——
COWPER, THURSDAY.
District Correspondence. HARWOOD ISLAND. (Article), The Clarence River Advocate (NSW : 1898 - 1949), Friday 5 April 1907 page Article 2015-04-19 12:13 Valedictory' — Owing to Mr. Henry
Law, who has for tho past live years been
arranged to leave, a number of his neigh
bours and friends decided to accord him n
muni, wuLiuij' iuuk me mailer up, wiiu me
result that one of the. finest functions ever
one hundred neighbours and friends turn
ing up to do honor to the occasion. Mi
Law was presented with a- very hand
him to be accorded the honor of introduc
presentation to Mr. Law, and his daugh
ter to Mrs. Law. Mr. Dorecy, in making
the greatest pleasure, as a neighbour o£
Mr. Law, to be placed in the position oE
pleasure of knowing them. As a neigh
neat and well chosen speech, then . made
the presentation to Mrs. Law, after which'
quite a number of speakers 'expressed
name had figured for many years in row
ing clubs, water brigades, and in Caledon
McPhee, secretary of the Harwootl
Water Brigade and ltowing Club, iii a
most eulogistic speech, referred to 'Mr.
residence would not interrupt his associa
tion with both. Mr. D. McPhee (Serpen
Mr. Law, who was very much, affected,- in
acknowledging tho presentations, stated
as he saw present, and that lie could
of his life were the last live spent on the
VALEDICTORY. — Owing to Mr. Henry
Law, who has for the past five years been
arranged to leave, a number of his neigh-
bours and friends decided to accord him a
most warmly took the mailer up, with the
result that one of the finest functions ever
one hundred neighbours and friends turn-
ing up to do honor to the occasion. Mr.
Law was presented with a very hand-
him to be accorded the honor of introduc-
presentation to Mr. Law, and his daugh-
ter to Mrs. Law. Mr. Dorcey, in making
the greatest pleasure, as a neighbour of
Mr. Law, to be placed in the position of
pleasure of knowing them. As a neigh-
neat and well chosen speech, then made
the presentation to Mrs. Law, after which
quite a number of speakers expressed
name had figured for many years in row-
ing clubs, water brigades, and in Caledon-
McPhee, secretary of the Harwood
Water Brigade and Rowing Club, in a
most eulogistic speech, referred to Mr.
residence would not interrupt his associa-
tion with both. Mr. D. McPhee (Serpen-
Mr. Law, who was very much, affected, in
acknowledging the presentations, stated
as he saw present, and that he could
of his life were the last five spent on the
A SEA QUEEN. [Published by special arrangement with the author. All rights reserved.] CHAPTER XL-1 SEND A LETTER TO FATHER. (Article), South Australian Weekly Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1881 - 1889), Saturday 20 October 1883 page Article 2015-04-19 12:02 A SEA QUEEN'.
Author of 'The Wreck of tho t}roa«?«i.or,'
Lance,' &c, &c
Chapteb XL.— I Send a Letter to
BY W. CLARK BUSSEM*
'A Sailor's Sweetheart.' 'An O-*»ir ?rfn
(Published by special arrangement vritb f.h~ aushor.
N All rights reserved.}
Father.
A SEA QUEEN.
Author of 'The Wreck of the Grosvenor,'
Lance,' &c, &c.
CHAPTER XL.--I SEND A LETTER TO
BY W. CLARK RUSSELL.
'A Sailor's Sweetheart.' 'An Ocean Free
[Published by special arrangement with the author.
All rights reserved.]
FATHER.
A SEA QUEEN. [Published by special arrangement with the author All rights reserved.] CHAPTER XXXIX—THE CARPENTER ENABLES RICHARD TO TAKE SIGHTS. (Article), South Australian Weekly Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1881 - 1889), Saturday 13 October 1883 page Article 2015-04-19 11:49 wish my damage,' said he, looking at his
leg, 'was a smaller one. The pain is atro
I am -apt to do when I am not thinking aboab
it'
' Does the movement of the stretcher when
the men lift it pain you?'
'Wot in the least,' he answered; 'I suffer
twitch it. Hie freedom from pain when I am
'? broken ends into their place. If so, the bone
may unite fairly, and I shan't have ;to go
trtfcer.'
'How long will it take us now to get
tiome?* I asked him.
?* Why,' said he, ' this brig must be an old
from jo-day.'
?would be suffering all that time and that no
-medical-aid could come to him before. But
fretting was idle work ; nor would it do to let
?was an obligation upon a wife nursing her
poor, stricken, .imprisoned darling, who had
'diverted by hearing the hoarse notes of Mr.
canvas. Richard cocked his ears like a dog
?'They're taking in the topgallant and
main topmast stu'nsails,' said he. 'When
they've braced up well go on deck.'
clown, more spngs raised, and the brig's heel
bumming like a distant roll upon a drum
as the little vessel, by being brought [close
Hie rigging, and the motion grew lively as the
at Bichard'sTequest, told the steward to tell
some men ? to come aft and carry my husband
on to the top of -the cabin. The pitching of the
twig made tne feel verynervous while this was
lung as caeily and lightly as a pendulam.
They soon had him sate and in the full eye
of- the warm, sweet, rushing wind ; and as it
-would be impossible for me to do any cutting
vat on deck, in the face ef a breeze that would
any handB for a second, I deferred the setting
'« little, to sit by Richard's side and enjoy the
Heavily crufihing along, her yards braced up to
-a point that just allowed the foretopmast
* in beautifully-tinted crystals upon her
breather bow, a white band of froth seething
Jikea path of snow over a hilly ground far
away astern on the blue from- created billows,
Strained at the black yards like imprisoned
?clouds seeking to break their bonds and join
the graceful fleet -of swan-white bodies of
vapor -which sailed in swift procession over
our mastheads ; and the hollow cloths of the
ridings of the standing rigging, whose
shadows -were as black as those of objects
seen in dear moonlight, in the tropical
«plendor of the stooping sun whose flying
teams flashed up the ocean in the south -into
Winding spaces of brilliant silver, athwart
?which the epray from the breaking heads of
anight have passed for fragments of a great
-wings headlong down the slope of the bright,
zxtshiDg azure expanse of the mighty deep.
(To be continued. j
wish my damage," said he, looking at his
leg, "was a smaller one. The pain is atro-
I am apt to do when I am not thinking about
it."
"Does the movement of the stretcher when
the men lift it pain you?"
"Not in the least," he answered; "I suffer
twitch it. The freedom from pain when I am
broken ends into their place. If so, the bone
may unite fairly, and I shan't have to go
other."
"How long will it take us now to get
home?" I asked him.
"Why," said he, "this brig must be an old
from to-day."
would be suffering all that time and that no
medical aid could come to him before. But
fretting was idle work; nor would it do to let
was an obligation upon a wife nursing her
poor, stricken, imprisoned darling, who had
diverted by hearing the hoarse notes of Mr.
canvas, Richard cocked his ears like a dog
"They're taking in the topgallant and
main topmast stu'nsails," said he. "When
they've braced up well go on deck."
down, more songs raised, and the brig's heel
humming like a distant roll upon a drum
as the little vessel, by being brought close
the rigging, and the motion grew lively as the
at Richard's request, told the steward to tell
some men to come aft and carry my husband
on to the top of the cabin. The pitching of the
brig made me feel very nervous while this was
brig as easily and lightly as a pendulum.
They soon had him safe and in the full eye
of the warm, sweet, rushing wind; and as it
would be impossible for me to do any cutting
out on deck, in the face of a breeze that would
any hands for a second, I deferred the setting
a little, to sit by Richard's side and enjoy the
heavily crushing along, her yards braced up to
a point that just allowed the foretopmast
in beautifully-tinted crystals upon her
weather bow, a white band of froth seething
like a path of snow over a hilly ground far
away astern on the blue from created billows,
strained at the black yards like imprisoned
clouds seeking to break their bonds and join
the graceful fleet of swan-white bodies of
vapor which sailed in swift procession over
our mastheads; and the hollow cloths of the
rulings of the standing rigging, whose
shadows were as black as those of objects
seen in clear moonlight, in the tropical
splendor of the stooping sun whose flying
beams flashed up the ocean in the south into
blinding spaces of brilliant silver, athwart
which the spray from the breaking heads of
might have passed for fragments of a great
wings headlong down the slope of the bright,
rushing azure expanse of the mighty deep.
(To be continued.)

Counts updated hourly

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

  1. BARRY, John Arthur
    List
    Public

    65 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2011-08-02
    User data
  2. KIPLING, Rudyard
    List
    Public

    10 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2011-01-08
    User data
  3. OXENHAM, John
    List
    Public

    1 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2011-01-09
    User data
  4. The Will Forgeries
    List
    Public

    16 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2010-08-14
    User data

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.