Information about Trove user: maurielyn

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

RankCorrectorLines corrected
1 JohnWarren 3,356,632
2 NeilHamilton 2,381,432
3 annmanley 2,094,147
4 noelwoodhouse 1,918,120
5 maurielyn 1,525,417
6 John.F.Hall 1,500,878
7 JudyClayden 1,204,812

1,525,417 lines corrected.

Corrections by month

July 2015 13,919
June 2015 9,102
May 2015 39,756
April 2015 26,402
March 2015 26,337
February 2015 30,109
January 2015 13
December 2014 1,991
November 2014 4,733
October 2014 25,113
September 2014 28,719
August 2014 46,848
July 2014 54,325
June 2014 10,647
May 2014 15,795
April 2014 16,770
March 2014 3
February 2014 92
January 2014 36
December 2013 4,433
November 2013 6,312
October 2013 40,154
September 2013 26,891
August 2013 19,229
July 2013 30,238
June 2013 35,889
May 2013 34,599
April 2013 5,953
March 2013 4,178
February 2013 60
December 2012 122
November 2012 6,412
October 2012 9,007
September 2012 2,074
August 2012 13,001
July 2012 8,995
June 2012 41,702
May 2012 10,728
April 2012 4,423
March 2012 12,588
February 2012 9,171
January 2012 2,655
December 2011 22,428
November 2011 29,308
October 2011 28,340
September 2011 20,977
August 2011 22,871
July 2011 20,215
June 2011 11,018
May 2011 7,946
April 2011 45,102
March 2011 14,791
February 2011 30,582
January 2011 36,679
December 2010 14,510
November 2010 15,639
October 2010 25,076
September 2010 35,694
August 2010 38,196
July 2010 31,494
June 2010 42,660
May 2010 42,984
April 2010 33,196
March 2010 26,158
February 2010 21,768
January 2010 23,693
December 2009 14,169
November 2009 13,910
October 2009 8,721
September 2009 5,101
August 2009 5,707
July 2009 6,083
June 2009 5,576
May 2009 30,715
April 2009 8,466
March 2009 21,801
February 2009 7,575
January 2009 5,156
December 2008 7,165
November 2008 6,402
October 2008 24,538
September 2008 28,111
August 2008 5,372

Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
THE STORYTELLER A SERIAL STORY LOLA-SUE CHAPTER XV.—Continued. THE HUNTED. (Article), The Week (Brisbane, Qld. : 1876 - 1934), Friday 5 July 1929 page Article 2015-07-28 21:15 Constable Treioar unlocked thy hq^nd
cuffs, and he and Humphry Pryor ran
to which Lola-Sue lay bleeding. .She
was badly hurt, but she looked up wfti;
a beautiful smile when she saw ""Hunj-t '•
phrey Pryor leaning over her and hold**
ing her in his arms. Bending do^yp
and kissing her, he said, with a vQlij©
"Lohj, Lola, my own darling, wtiy
did you do It?"
Tlien turning to Constable Treioar
lie said, with sndrling bitterness, "May
You've shot the most loyal and faith-'
tho penitent constable, as he and.
to stop the flowing blood. Lela->23}ie
had fainted, and Constable Treioar r-$n
to ttio creek and brought some water
in -his hat. Taking out his handker
eyes, ehe said" weakly, "I could not beg*
to see you . , . but ... X did my pe^t
to free you. my heart's mate. , "R
Kiss me once again, dear.'1
Humphrey Pryor, pressing her
him, kissed her softly, tendsrly °n tips
• "Look, Lola* your engagement rhsg."
he said, trying to speak cheerfully, notr
withstanding the agony of his soul,
he placed tho diamond loop on her
wistfully. "You "darling," was all she.
said. After ii pause, she continued
slowly, scarcely above a-whisper, -"Wo
were to be married, my mate . . • bpl
to dio . . . loving Is, perhaps, bettor. .
Who knows? They who have . , .
wronged me I might'... in the joy.ef
your love . . • have forgiven. But,
Humphrey . ... there is no forgiveness
. . . for those who wrong you.. . • Bm'
gorry, dear. . . •. Thfe hate In mo » • .
through . ... Eternity ... in tho Lead
O'Evcrlastin.V
Constable Treloar unlocked the hand
cuffs, and he and Humphrey Pryor ran
to where Lola-Sue lay bleeding. She
was badly hurt, but she looked up with
a beautiful smile when she saw Hum-
phrey Pryor leaning over her and hold-
ing her in his arms. Bending down
and kissing her, he said, with a voice
"Lola, Lola, my own darling, why
did you do it?"
Then turning to Constable Treloar
he said, with snarling bitterness, "May
You've shot the most loyal and faith-
the penitent constable, as he and
to stop the flowing blood. Lola-Sue
had fainted, and Constable Treloar ran
to the creek and brought some water
in his hat. Taking out his handker-
eyes, she said weakly, "I could not bear
to see you . . . but . . . I did my best
to free you, my heart's mate. . . . .
Kiss me once again, dear."
Humphrey Pryor, pressing her to
him, kissed her softly, tenderly on lips
"Look, Lola, your engagement ring,"
he said, trying to speak cheerfully, not-
withstanding the agony of his soul, and
he placed the diamond loop on her
wistfully. "You darling," was all she
said. After a pause, she continued
slowly, scarcely above a whisper, "We
were to be married, my mate . . . but
to die . . . loving is, perhaps, better.
Who knows? They who have . . .
wronged me I might . . . in the joy of
your love . . . have forgiven. But,
Humphrey . . . . there is no forgiveness
. . . for those who wrong you . . . . I'm
sorry, dear. . . . The hate in me . . . .
through . . . . Eternity . . . in the Land
O'Everlastin'."
THE STORYTELLER A SERIAL STORY LOLA-SUE CHAPTER XV.—Continued. THE HUNTED. (Article), The Week (Brisbane, Qld. : 1876 - 1934), Friday 5 July 1929 page Article 2015-07-28 21:08 Sergeant Conway turned swiftly.. ?it .
before ho bad time to raise his rift,
or speak, he too fol, shot through, tha
head. Constable Treioar slipped be*
hind a tree and raised his rifle. " V
'Great God! Don't shoot Trelo&r!?.
yelled Humphrey Pryor,' who knew,
that it was Lol«Vr£?ue who had ftrecCT
But tho command camo too la^? W?
rifle cracked, and Us bullet sped acfbs^
the Sllversand, chipping the bouhjer
behind which, only half ** concealed,
above tho heart. The blackbQy, feed
ing his presence there an error, Lave
a frightened yell and bolted into th©
timbey. Hq ran, and kept on running,
a sinner chased by demonds, down the
Sergeant Conway turned swiftly, but
before he had time to raise his rifle
or speak, he too fell, shot through the
head. Constable Treloar slipped be-
hind a tree and raised his rifle.
"Great God! Don't shoot, Treloar!"
yelled Humphrey Pryor, who knew
that it was Lola-Sue who had fired.
But the command came too late. His
rifle cracked, and its bullet sped across
the Silversand, chipping the boulder
behind which, only half concealed,
above the heart. The blackboy, feel-
ing his presence there an error, gave
a frightened yell and bolted into the
timber. He ran, and kept on running,
a sinner chased by demons, down the
THE STORYTELLER A SERIAL STORY LOLA-SUE CHAPTER XV.—Continued. THE HUNTED. (Article), The Week (Brisbane, Qld. : 1876 - 1934), Friday 5 July 1929 page Article 2015-07-28 21:05 "My God. if they dare arrest you. ,
bushranger will avenge you." •
"No, Lola, beloved/ you mustn't take
not interfere. It will bo better to keep
with rifles. •
"Mr. Pryor," said the sergeant, rid
ing up. "I've a warrant > for yer
ahrcsht." and he. proceeded to read it.
slaughter of her goats, turned Lola
If it had been1 any other officer but
Sergeant Conway wfto had been
much. But that he of pit.men should
She assailed him with a- torrent of
galloped t® the homestead in a race
for love.and mate. She did not spare
the noble horse. When soma' of the
I men saw her ride up on a steaming
foam-flecked horse, they anxlousJ^ Ip
quired what was up. LoJurSue briefly
ran to. her room. ami. took, hey
down from its hide-loops*, on .thp wall,
loaded it With hate, and threw her
cartridge' bandolier across-' her '-left
shoulder. The prion ran" for'{heir rifles
and wanted to come, too, hut she-for
bade them-*,.
'Xo«—you men keep out of this," she
commanded.. '-'This is a matter f^hnt
The. men . did not like tfie look of
things. There was madness In the
Wondsr,"- and they knew that if
dog for Us master* she noticed that
lllily .Stinson had. during her short
absence, ridden ' up and joined the
police. Instantly, with a lover's un
erring intuition, slu» now fcrsp*'
had planted the colts, and
sponlble for the l'mme up, EiJegl
son was jealous o£ Pryor and*lS
to set him out of. the way foij*
"\Vell that .wag yio way of
it?" she said to herself.* Then-Stf
u kmile in- vhicJv th.ure. wag no-g
ahc cwHinued her spliloquy, Eg
reckoned without eon5l4®£*n£
Thut was the tyea}c llnjfin jUnt
of scheming. Well how lis
the consequence. How.-dare* heTn
fere with her Humphrey! "He'had't
t.aVKht his ieaaon' when lie 'Jnt6rf
with her. Now it was a jQprfi Set
matter. God.damn and blast his 80
Dismounting and letting Bat*
bridle trail, »bq took up 4 jjq?itlo»
hind a boulder. Looking carefully..
saw that Humphrey Pryor had tfcfr
as if handcuffed. Raising her rifle,;
sighted carefully and shot Billy Stjusa .
"My God, if they dare arrest you,
bushranger will avenge you."
"No, Lola, beloved, you mustn't take
not interfere. It will be better to keep
with rifles.
"Mr. Pryor," said the sergeant, rid-
ing up. "I've a warrant for yer
ahresht," and he proceeded to read it.
slaughter of her goats, turned Lola--
If it had been any other officer but
Sergeant Conway who had been
much. But that he of all men should
She assailed him with a torrent of
galloped to the homestead in a race
for love and mate. She did not spare
the noble horse. When some of the
men saw her ride up on a steaming
foam-flecked horse, they anxiously in-
quired what was up. Lola-Sue briefly
ran to her room, and took her rifle
down from its hide-loops on the wall,
loaded it with hate, and threw her
cartridge bandolier across her left
shoulder. The men ran for their rifles
and wanted to come, too, but she for-
bade them.
"No—you men keep out of this," she
commanded. "This is a matter that
The men did not like the look of
things. There was madness in the
Wonder," and they knew that if she
dog for its master, she noticed that
Billy Stinson had, during her short
absence, ridden up and joined the
police. Instantly, with a lover's un-
erring intuition, she now knew who
had planted the colts, and was re-
sponsible for the frame up, Billy Stin-
son was jealous of Pryor and wanted
to get him out of the way for good.
"Well that was the way of it, was
it?" she said to herself. Then smiling
a smile in which there was no mirth,
she continued her soliloquy. But he
reckoned without considering Lola-Sue.
That was the weak link in his chain
of scheming. Well how he must take
the consequence. How dare he inter-
fere with her Humphrey! "He had been
taught his lesson when he interfered
with her. Now it was a more serious
matter. God damn and blast his soul!"
Dismounting and letting Battle's
bridle trail, she took up a position be-
hind a boulder. Looking carefully, she
saw that Humphrey Pryor had moved
as if handcuffed. Raising her rifle, she
sighted carefully and shot Billy Stinson
THE STORYTELLER A SERIAL STORY LOLA-SUE CHAPTER XV.—Continued. THE HUNTED. (Article), The Week (Brisbane, Qld. : 1876 - 1934), Friday 5 July 1929 page Article 2015-07-28 20:50 . vehement outburst on the part of Lola
; Sue, and was overwhelmed by her pas
j sion, by her terrible earnestness. Ho
I was moro. than glad that he had not
I forced her love. This filled him with
jimmeasureable happiness. Riding close
i her and almost drew her out of her
little soul, how I love you 1 To-day is
the copestono of my happiness. I be*
Jieve you would fight with tooth and
.claw for the man you love, and I am
! proud to .be that man. It Is lo'vo such
| as yours that raises man above the
; brutes and makes him akin to God."
| Humphrey Pryor had not long to
| wait before his fears concerning the
I matter of the colts were realised. j
! A few days after he had returned
1 from his droving trip, he and Lola
Sue rode out to inspect a boro that
riding back to the homested when,
up the valley towards them, two con-.
: stables, in khaki, accompanied by a
! black boy leading a "pack horse.
when he saw the trio cross the Silver
sand, making for the homestead. Per
colts of which lie knew he was not
guilty, then, possibly as regards the :
would wait and see. Whatever it .was I
the officers of the law required of him, ;
lie would stand his ground.
vehement outburst on the part of Lola--
Sue, and was overwhelmed by her pas-
sion, by her terrible earnestness. He
was more than glad that he had not
forced her love. This filled him with
immeasureable happiness. Riding close
her and almost drew her out of her
little soul, how I love you! To-day is
the copestone of my happiness. I be-
lieve you would fight with tooth and
claw for the man you love, and I am
proud to be that man. It is love such
as yours that raises man above the
brutes and makes him akin to God."
Humphrey Pryor had not long to
wait before his fears concerning the
matter of the colts were realised.
A few days after he had returned
from his droving trip, he and Lola--
Sue rode out to inspect a bore that
riding back to the homestead when,
up the valley towards them, two con-
stables, in khaki, accompanied by a
black boy leading a pack horse.
when he saw the trio cross the Silver-
sand, making for the homestead. Per-
colts of which he knew he was not
guilty, then, possibly as regards the
would wait and see. Whatever it was
the officers of the law required of him,
he would stand his ground.
THE STORYTELLER A SERIAL STORY LOLA-SUE CHAPTER XV.—Continued. THE HUNTED. (Article), The Week (Brisbane, Qld. : 1876 - 1934), Friday 5 July 1929 page Article 2015-07-28 20:48 patient. You've played the 'game.
I am jroura whenever you like to claim
patient. You've played the game.
I am yours whenever you like to claim
THE STORYTELLER A SERIAL STORY LOLA-SUE CHAPTER XV.—Continued. THE HUNTED. (Article), The Week (Brisbane, Qld. : 1876 - 1934), Friday 5 July 1929 page Article 2015-07-28 20:47 ^ Beauty." said ( <
iupghing in sPJtl': ''_ r t Sn i,i,la-Sue',-.
he saw the lighting glint in Lma .,
i eyes. "What on car.th .couia ..o y
I The mujesty of the law is unassail
j able."
1 "Ik It! Well the men who seek to
uphold it are not. I have heard tin"*
.story of Granny HuttoriV life. I am a
, Gardiner. If you're arrested, your past
, record will go against you. You might
what's to become of me ? I could not
live if yon were gaoled. We've been
la only one thing left to consumatn
more than good to mc, and more than
from me ? My God, no. You've been
"My Beauty," said Humphrey,
laughing in spite of his concern, when
he saw the fighting glint in Lola-Sue's
eyes. "What on earth could you do?
The majesty of the law is unassail-
able."
"Is it! Well the men who seek to
uphold it are not. I have heard the
story of Granny Hutton's life. I am a
Gardiner. If you're arrested, your past
record will go against you. You might
what's to become of me? I could not
live if you were gaoled. We've been
is only one thing left to consummate
more than good to me, and more than
from me? My God, no. You've been
THE STORYTELLER A SERIAL STORY LOLA-SUE CHAPTER XV.—Continued. THE HUNTED. (Article), The Week (Brisbane, Qld. : 1876 - 1934), Friday 5 July 1929 page Article 2015-07-28 20:43 "My God H^Phrey f the^
, ^'he0rnnfaewVdIo^eeth snapped to
like a steel trap.
"My God Humphrey if the police attempt to arrest you, there'll be something doing. If they attempt it they won't get away with it. So there!"
And her little white teeth snapped to-
gether like a steel trap.
THE STORYTELLER A SERIAL STORY LOLA-SUE CHAPTER XV.—Continued. THE HUNTED. (Article), The Week (Brisbane, Qld. : 1876 - 1934), Friday 5 July 1929 page Article 2015-07-28 20:41 "I think
I nmmber'that*! memt^f
they coulf",?L or cattle dulling, they
at horse stealing o s uke m;
I would frame me. This
surmise coming true. n weren't
"Oh, but lm surc the ,, keJ
the nolioe, Humphrey. tneJ
more like «P"t stoeknmn Bul t
dXi^eYoWthlngs. I'm sure j
'^Ser TOU orrco>WhS!
planted thoso col Boompa 1
^nd I ^an sw^ar that^ the men were
""sc. ^ola. NeiUier you-^I
rantedbtlosfeo.V« ^"^T^anU
Then Lola-Sue » "11' u police
"I think it is an attempt by the police at a frame up. You will re-
member that I mentioned to you if
they could not catch me red-handed
at horse stealing or cattle duffing, they
would frame me. This looks like my
surmise coming true."
"Oh, but I'm sure the men weren't
the police, Humphrey. They looked
more like expert stockmen."
"Oh, well, we'll wait and see. But I don't like the looks of things. I'm sure it's a plant."
"Well, neither you nor your men
planted those colts on Contraband. You can prove an alibi, and Boompa
and I can swear that the men were strangers."
"No use, Lola. Neither you nor I
would be believed. The men who planted those colts on Contraband had an object in doint so--to get me--and they'd swear anything to do that."
Then Lola-Sue saw red.
THE STORYTELLER A SERIAL STORY LOLA-SUE CHAPTER XV.—Continued. THE HUNTED. (Article), The Week (Brisbane, Qld. : 1876 - 1934), Friday 5 July 1929 page Article 2015-07-28 20:35 "Truly. Lola, n«ne, he saiu, Bu(.
o. Divinity that sbob^ o^ no men
ot one thing B°!a"Sutke visit ot Biuy
tlon., That wmsot.the v however.
Stlnson to ContrabamJ. ^ ^ o{ u
told hlro of the three ahe aIU,
three unknown men dlng lhcm.
Boompa had surpriseo. ^ the run.
away in a remote s considerable
™ScerVa Ho^ Questioned Lola-Suo
^dadear.
before ?" Were they ,vere too
"No, HomP cct near them
alert. Before ;««»M get n ^
in the thiek aogwoo^tt^ ^ ^
?o« Send of a spur. What do you
°r -
"Truly, Lola, mine," he said, "there's
a Divinity that shapes our ends." But
of one thing Lola-Sue made no men-
tion. That was of the visit of Billy
Stinson to Contraband. She, however,
told him of the three colts and of the
three unknown men whom she and
Boompa had surprised, branding them,
away in a remote gorge of the run.
This news caused him considerable concern. He questioned Lola-Sue closely.
"Think, dear. Had you seen the men
before? Were they at all familiar?"
"No, Humphrey. They were too
alert. Before we could get near them
in the thick dogwood, they rode up
the gorge and were soon lost to sight round the bend of a spur. What do you think of the matter?"
"I think
THE STORYTELLER A SERIAL STORY LOLA-SUE CHAPTER XV.—Continued. THE HUNTED. (Article), The Week (Brisbane, Qld. : 1876 - 1934), Friday 5 July 1929 page Article 2015-07-28 20:30 In Lola-Sue tl consolousness that
tlvoness born of base born. This |
she was not. after • tlook,on lite
cave her a rapturous o ^ wonder. 1
i and filled her withal on lheir tirea
As they roda thickets of dogwood,
horses throug'h ® htey' Pryor all
?he stmnse coincidences that were,
revealed to him. • "there's
In Lola-Sue there was a new asser-
tiveness born of the consciousness that
she was not, after all, base born. This
gave her a rapturous outlook on life
and filled her with a jubilant wonder.
As they rode together on their tired
horses through thickets of dogwood, Lola-Sue told Humphrey Pryor all that Granny Hutton in her dying hours had said to her, and he marvelled at
the strange coincidences that were
revealed to him.

Counts updated hourly

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

  1. BARRY, John Arthur
    List
    Public

    65 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2011-08-02
    User data
  2. KIPLING, Rudyard
    List
    Public

    10 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2011-01-08
    User data
  3. OXENHAM, John
    List
    Public

    1 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2011-01-09
    User data
  4. The Will Forgeries
    List
    Public

    16 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2010-08-14
    User data

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.