Information about Trove user: maurielyn

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

RankCorrectorLines corrected
1 JohnWarren 2,851,493
2 annmanley 2,007,783
3 NeilHamilton 1,841,847
4 noelwoodhouse 1,441,489
5 maurielyn 1,363,611
6 John.F.Hall 1,323,614
7 mrbh 1,146,214

1,363,611 lines corrected.

Corrections by month

October 2014 15,669
September 2014 28,719
August 2014 46,848
July 2014 54,325
June 2014 10,647
May 2014 15,795
April 2014 16,770
March 2014 3
February 2014 92
January 2014 36
December 2013 4,433
November 2013 6,312
October 2013 40,154
September 2013 26,891
August 2013 19,229
July 2013 30,238
June 2013 35,889
May 2013 34,599
April 2013 5,953
March 2013 4,178
February 2013 60
December 2012 122
November 2012 6,412
October 2012 9,007
September 2012 2,074
August 2012 13,001
July 2012 8,995
June 2012 41,702
May 2012 10,728
April 2012 4,423
March 2012 12,588
February 2012 9,171
January 2012 2,655
December 2011 22,428
November 2011 29,308
October 2011 28,340
September 2011 20,977
August 2011 22,871
July 2011 20,215
June 2011 11,018
May 2011 7,946
April 2011 45,102
March 2011 14,791
February 2011 30,582
January 2011 36,679
December 2010 14,510
November 2010 15,639
October 2010 25,076
September 2010 35,694
August 2010 38,196
July 2010 31,494
June 2010 42,660
May 2010 42,984
April 2010 33,196
March 2010 26,158
February 2010 21,768
January 2010 23,693
December 2009 14,169
November 2009 13,910
October 2009 8,721
September 2009 5,101
August 2009 5,707
July 2009 6,083
June 2009 5,576
May 2009 30,715
April 2009 8,466
March 2009 21,801
February 2009 7,575
January 2009 5,156
December 2008 7,165
November 2008 6,402
October 2008 24,538
September 2008 28,111
August 2008 5,372

Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
THE MAXWELLS OF BREMGARTEN. A STORY OF TASMANIA. [Founded on Facts.] (ALL RIGHTS ARE RESERVED.) (Continued from Saturday, 25th July.) CHAPTER LII. EDWIN GOES TO HOBART TOWN AND MEETS WITH OLD ACQUAINTANCES. (Article), Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 - 1899), Saturday 1 August 1868 page Article 2014-10-20 15:25 tered upon the occupation of his fartl to that
had boon exceedingly busy, and by employ.
ing two or three handy men and being un
* roomed' cottage, built upon the top of a
. grassy hill, which sloped in the easiest and
· prettiest manner possible down to the margin
of the river. Here some fine specimons of
- beauty of the landscape, which was bounded
• the swamp gum tree added greatly to the
in- the: distance by the beautiful western
mountains on one side, and the B3en
-Lomond range, forty miles ofl, on the other.
F At intervals between these mountains arose
numerous hills-Sugar Loaves, Saddles, and
"fHummocks, all well known by their respeo
t·ive local designatione-soparated by flowery
water;. As far as the eye can reae lto the
bill, open plain, and well watered valley is
honeysuckle and silver wattle afford admi
Srailo:shelter to the sleek fiat sheep and cattle
' hethey become overpowered by the heat
Obf sumimer. The highest eminence on Belloe
sides, and from it there was no: desert or
bai bln land to be seen, If we except the pre
* cilitous sides of the Western Tier. All was
bright, sunny, and beautiful; the land was
the richest in the island; the forests were
neither heavy nor dense; the climate was,
--and is, second to none for favoring the
growth of cereal crops; and the land our
"rimae to Launceston apparently free from
.serous obstructions. It was no wonder,
pleasure when hlie looked around upon lis
tWo thousand acres, raised almost to priceless
su these.
It is not necessary to enter into an elabo
'rate description of Edwin's farm. Counter
p?ati of it may be seen in dozens by any
:x.: carious traveller who takes the trouble to
ride from Launceston to Doloraino, or from
Longford to Oressy. There are nearly the
.their abundant crops of sweet smelling hay
and golden corn;. there is the eternal garden
brilliancy of promising effloresenco; there
S are the reserved marshes on which sheep and
,-land beyond, thickly covered with native
some time for these comforts: they did not
Sthey bad a severe effect on his mind, he did
not allow himself to be crushed by them;
and did not once forgot the resolution he had
iat first adopted, namely, to provide a home
' "for his mother and sisters, whom he tenderly
l- :loved.
pounds to commence with, bht his expenses
(even before shining as a poet) to be honor
able in his dealings, and punctual in his pay
-ments. What with money continually going
-----.- of being sold up by the bank if principal and
interest were not forthcoming, the grumb
lest the growing crop should prove insuffi
Slings. of farm servants, the agony of mind
. was still dark with many clouds. He was
Buffer had the came difficulties to contend
; him financial ruin was nothing but a more
----probably have smoked his pipe as happily in
?; a' debtor's prison as upon the open downs of
-;i:'Bella Park. But with Edwin it was des
truotion, hopeless disgrace, and moral death.
mever to rise again, so foolish and unsoplhis
j~, ticated was lie in the ways of the world.
a;: =-':" The old enens of Australian sd stters
. own upon Edwin's homestead once with
i terrific fury. The weather had been as dry
;:: eeks; and the clear air of spring had be.
. taken itself elsewhere, leaving the Tasmanian
:' :'moke which rose apparently from the earth
at all points of the compass. Busywith his
S men fencingin a new paddock of fifty acres,
for two hours in th hesat of the day. One
:f fed by nothing less inflammable than gun
I.:.-ecotton. All hands were soon engaged in
tying to save the piddok fences; and
.: ough nearly stifled with smoke and over
....lest only about a mile of now fence. This in
Jdwin's present position was a serious
l . ess? but, as Buffer remarked, who came to
:.the scene of the calamity puffing and
might have been much worse. H?erbart's
All night they had to stay and wateh that
firo lost it should break out again; and the
whole of tlhd next day was spent in walking
sticks and everything olso which
might possably ignite theo. parched grass.
1Mr. Buffer was ofgreat service to his friend
Horbart bout in extinguishing the fire andti
in helping him to keep his spirits above low I
wator mark. The aim of the quondam I
Assistant.Suporintendent was to pass through
life as quietly as possible; that of Edwin to
small, How the former fared with his five
epraking, with this history; but it is no harm 1
to note in passing that in the course of tinie
he could boast of being tlhe proprietor, with
whatever assistance Edwin was ablefto 'aflbid
him, of about five hundred sheep ; and ihe
had also Iris cultivated paddocks and fruit
garden. Ho was a jovial fellow and could
altogether in-lovo with the bottle, and he did
not fiil to comurunicate to any visitor who
happened to call, the important intelligenoe,
fromn a cloud of tobacco smoke,
that hoe was a shrewd observer of
fortunate, he was 'not yet cursed with a
While thus busily occupied ate home, the
invitation to the free inhabitants to join'in
the grand effort to capture the holstiloenatiites
issued from Govornment Houso'; and Edwin~,
like base ingratitude if he did not' give all the
how he and Buffer were present at tihe derth
wilderness called, by some heartless flond,
Paradise, whore his penitent wife and affec
tionato daughter could not drop their tears
This happytimo arrived at length,and thoyhad
estate, and of the family of Herbart. . At
present, however, he was obliged to be con
tent with four small rooms and a lhut outside
for a servant, and in those lie hoped one day
could summon up courage to commit them
judge from the letters which Mrs. Heibart
wrote to her son, this very happy meetir g
the prospect of a sea voyage; her youngest
fixed object in view, and she yearned to em
cottage on the banks of the Dolddr, and on a
Mersey in a well-manned bark bound, for
Edwin accordingly went .to the capital
months previously to, the highest pitch of
to question the decrees of Providence; yet is
Edwin's anxiety was at last terminated'
children arrived in safety, and tears iaturally
Hobart Town, they made inmediate prepara
tions for-their journey to Norfolk Plains. As
tihe colony had made considerable 'advances
ini civilisation since Mrs. Maxwell travelled
to Bromgarten, there was now no necessity
for -Mrs. Herbart to go in a bullock.cart.
whose name was Frank, a lively young gen.
towards stoutness, without fault. Her daugh
brown curls, high foreheads, bright light.
they- were graceful and gay, and delighted
?# ...........·_ _-.Z -?- '* I,, ather Edwin
looking so well. He had many questions w
ask about his late father and his last mo
monts, and of the friends left at home whom
survived; but he did not tell them that thie
every morning when hIe opened hIis cottage
door, was to gaze upon thie distant Ben
Lomond, whoso craggy crest looked down,
Wrapped up as it wore in mutual confi
dance and love they' teok many delightfill
most fashionable streets, and in thie govern
Ul'pon one occasion a sudden and heavy
shower drove them for shelter into a watch
maker's shop, from thie proprietor of which
a few inchites of the glass, gazed steadily atn the
sententious dialogue :
"Donel" I
" Wlhen I"
" Damage 1"
" Crown," "
" Too'much," said toe stranger leaning with t
his elbow on the glass ease, "too mucoh by
half-them holes don't want jules in them."
"My friend," said Mrs. IHerbart, who
belonged to the order of universal benevolence),
"you will break this glass ,if you are not
"Laws I" said the follow starting back and
holding up both hands with an indesoribably
ludicrous air ofiimpudence, "what a sublime
angelio countenance 'I Air we gone to 'eaven
or do we live still on yearth I" But im
mediatelyrenmoving hiso eyes from the coun
tonanco whlch so charmed him, they rested
hand stretched out, he said-" Hullo, Musthur
Hlubburd, how are .ye, Sir how is every bone
In yor body 1"
Now, had Edwin beon ambitious of parlia
mentary honors, and happened to be canvass
ing for-votes at that time, he would probably
haveotaken and squeezed the proffered hand,
but as such was not the case ho put both his
"Don't you know me 1" said the stranger,
"yor old follow laborer at the fence and the
plough-Jacob Singlowood."
"0O yes," said Edwin, but without offering
are very much altered; what have you been
doing since you left Mr. Maxwell I"
"Always a doing of zunmut, Musther
Hubbard," said Jacob, with a hea-y lunge
zummut. Jacob Singlowood was'nt born to
drive a good bargain. No, Sir; them people
Sir, these times I"
"Pretty well, thank you," answered
Edwin. "I am doing tolerably well, I uam
happy to say, and hope to do bettor as times
"You and me left Musthor Maxwell about
the same time, Sir," said Jacob. "I did'nt
stop a fortnight after you left, and 1 told
Musthor the reason I wouldn't stop which
gentleman; and I wouldn't countenance sich
had privately agreed with Musthoer Skinner
and a man killed; but made no particular
sheep and he would pay me off; so I mus
thored o'm, me and my mate; and we got
nineteen short as Musthier Charles found
comes and tolls Musther. ' Sir,' says I, ' I'll
hundred and seventy-two, leaving only four
you a penny you won't toll me in three
" I am not likely," said Edwin, "being a
bad hand at guessing-where did you find
them 1"
"In the gathering paddock, Sir."
already counted, did you " said Edwin in
"what else could I do I I wanted to get
away-Musther was satisfied and turned the
a invite to call upon him when I wanted em
ployment, and I went away singing
Here 1 go op, up, up, here I go down, down,
Edwin; "1 am very much surprised"
"'Surprised, air you, Sir T' interrupted
"I thought you was no' sich a child. How
over, people may be surprised or no, as they
your- a._ tmyU -sh -hoJ
do you think Maxwell himself is ,a clean
tbtur" -
" T know he is not a dishonest man, nor
truth," said.Jacob; "I don't believe there is
like this t It was made purposely for rogues
anmd chats, and them it's full of. What was
Maxwell afore he came heroet Why did hle
come here 7 Ho was in a bank, wasn't hlie,
in Dublin or some sich hole 1"
"Why,what has that to do with his coming
out hiero t'"
patronising wave of his hand, "I .didn't
think you was siohb a flat as to ask that ques
tion: why, he robbed the bank by course
and bolted hero with the money, and he did
right to sarve 'em out; I would 'a done just
Edwin. "You will do well to be cautious
some value in the eye of the law, iand'defa
mation of charactor is a serious offence."o'
" The eye of the law I" said Jacoi with
contimptuous emphasis. "I might under
putrifled vultur, or a carrion crow. I don'ts
care a button for the eye of the law. If n
Maxwell was hero this minit I'd tell him to e
his faco that if hu didn't rob the bank he in- v
tended to do it, but was found out and pre- a
vented; there, that's a dronedary to go a
through the eye of the law-he, lie."
tered upon the occupation of his farm to that
had been exceedingly busy, and by employ-
ing two or three handy men and being un-
roomed cottage, built upon the top of a
grassy hill, which sloped in the easiest and
prettiest manner possible down to the margin
of the river. Here some fine specimens of
beauty of the landscape, which was bounded
the swamp gum tree added greatly to the
in the distance by the beautiful western
mountains on one side, and the Ben
Lomond range, forty miles off, on the other.
At intervals between these mountains arose
numerous hills--Sugar Loaves, Saddles, and
Hummocks, all well known by their respec-
tive local designations--separated by flowery
water. As far as the eye can reach to the
hill, open plain, and well watered valley is
honeysuckle and silver wattle afford admi-
rable shelter to the sleek fat sheep and cattle
whe they become overpowered by the heat
of summer. The highest eminence on Belle
sides, and from it there was no desert or
barren land to be seen, if we except the pre-
cipitous sides of the Western Tier. All was
bright, sunny, and beautiful ; the land was
the richest in the island ; the forests were
neither heavy nor dense ; the climate was,
and is, second to none for favoring the
growth of cereal crops ; and the land car-
riage to Launceston apparently free from
serious obstructions. It was no wonder,
pleasure when he looked around upon his
two thousand acres, raised almost to priceless
as these.
It is not necessary to enter into an elabo-
rate description of Edwin's farm. Counter-
parts of it may be seen in dozens by any
curious traveller who takes the trouble to
ride from Launceston to Deloraine, or from
Longford to Cressy. There are nearly the
their abundant crops of sweet smelling hay
and golden corn ; there is the eternal garden
brilliancy of promising efflorescence ; there
are the reserved marshes on which sheep and
land beyond, thickly covered with native
some time for these comforts : they did not
they had a severe effect on his mind, he did
not allow himself to be crushed by them ;
and did not once forget the resolution he had
at first adopted, namely, to provide a home
for his mother and sisters, whom he tenderly
loved.
pounds to commence with, but his expenses
(even before shining as a poet) to be honor-
able in his dealings, and punctual in his pay-
ments. What with money continually going
of being sold up by the bank if principal and
interest were not forthcoming, the grumb-
lest the growing crop should prove insuffi-
lings of farm servants, the agony of mind
was still dark with many clouds. He was
Buffer had the same difficulties to contend
him financial ruin was nothing but a mere
probably have smoked his pipe as happily in
a debtor's prison as upon the open downs of
Bella Park. But with Edwin it was des-
truction, hopeless disgrace, and moral death.
never to rise again, so foolish and unsophis-
ticated was he in the ways of the world.
The old enemy of Australian squatters and landed proprietors, one summer fire, bore
down upon Edwin's homestead once with
terrific fury. The weather had been as dry
weeks ; and the clear air of spring had be-
taken itself elsewhere, leaving the Tasmanian
smoke which rose apparently from the earth
at all points of the compass. Busy with his
men fencing in a new paddock of fifty acres,
for two hours in the heat of the day. One
if fed by nothing less inflammable than gun-
cotton. All hands were soon engaged in
tying to save the paddock fences ; and
though nearly stifled with smoke and over-
lest only about a mile of now fence. This in
Edwin's present position was a serious
loss ; but, as Buffer remarked, who came to
the scene of the calamity puffing and
might have been much worse. Herbart's
All night they had to stay and watch that
fire lost it should break out again; and the
whole of the next day was spent in walking
sticks and everything else which
might possibly ignite the parched grass.
Mr. Buffer was of great service to his friend
Herbart both in extinguishing the fire and
in helping him to keep his spirits above low
water mark. The aim of the quondam
Assistant-Superintendent was to pass through
life as quietly as possible ; that of Edwin to
small. How the former fared with his five
speaking, with this history ; but it is no harm
to note in passing that in the course of time
he could boast of being the proprietor, with
whatever assistance Edwin was able to afford
him, of about five hundred sheep ; and he
had also his cultivated paddocks and fruit
garden. He was a jovial fellow and could
altogether in love with the bottle, and he did
not fail to communicate to any visitor who
happened to call, the important intelligence,
from a cloud of tobacco smoke,
that he was a shrewd observer of
fortunate, he was not yet cursed with a
While thus busily occupied at home, the
invitation to the free inhabitants to join in
the grand effort to capture the hostile natives
issued from Government House ; and Edwin,
like base ingratitude if he did not give all the
how he and Buffer were present at the death
wilderness called, by some heartless fiend,
Paradise, where his penitent wife and affec-
tionate daughter could not drop their tears
This happy time arrived at length,and they had
estate, and of the family of Herbart. At
present, however, he was obliged to be con-
tent with four small rooms and a hut outside
for a servant, and in those he hoped one day
could summon up courage to commit them-
judge from the letters which Mrs. Herbart
wrote to her son, this very happy meeting
the prospect of a sea voyage ; her youngest
fixed object in view, and she yearned to em-
cottage on the banks of the Dodder, and on a
Mersey in a well-manned bark bound for
Edwin accordingly went to the capital
months previously to the highest pitch of
to question the decrees of Providence ; yet is
Edwin's anxiety was at last terminated.
children arrived in safety, and tears naturally
Hobart Town, they made immediate prepara-
tions for their journey to Norfolk Plains. As
the colony had made considerable advances
in civilisation since Mrs. Maxwell travelled
to Bremgarten, there was now no necessity
for Mrs. Herbart to go in a bullock-cart.
whose name was Frank, a lively young gen-
towards stoutness, without fault. Her daugh-
brown curls, high foreheads, bright light-
they were graceful and gay, and delighted
and happy to see their brother Edwin
looking so well. He had many questions to
ask about his late father and his last mo-
ments, and of the friends left at home whom
survived ; but he did not tell them that the
every morning when he opened his cottage
door, was to gaze upon the distant Ben
Lomond, whose craggy crest looked down,
Wrapped up as it were in mutual confi-
dence and love they took many delightful
most fashionable streets, and in the govern-
Upon one occasion a sudden and heavy
shower drove them for shelter into a watch-
maker's shop, from the proprietor of which
a few inches of the glass, gazed steadily at the
sententious dialogue :--
" Done ?"
" When ?"
" Damage ?"
" Crown."
" Too much," said the stranger leaning with
his elbow on the glass case, " too much by
half--them holes don't want jules in them."
" My friend," said Mrs. Herbart, who
belonged to the order of universal benevolence,
" you will break this glass if you are not
" Laws !" said the fellow starting back and
holding up both hands with an indescribably
ludicrous air of impudence, " what a sublime
angelic countenance ? Air we gone to 'eaven
or do we live still on yearth ?" But im-
mediately removing his eyes from the coun-
tenance which so charmed him, they rested
hand stretched out, he said--" Hullo, Musthur
Hubburd, how are ye, Sir ? how is every bone
in yer body ?"
Now, had Edwin been ambitious of parlia-
mentary honors, and happened to be canvass-
ing for votes at that time, he would probably
have taken and squeezed the proffered hand,
but as such was not the case he put both his
" Don't you know me ?" said the stranger,
" yer old fellow laborer at the fence and the
plough--Jacob Singlewood."
" O yes," said Edwin, but without offering
are very much altered ; what have you been
doing since you left Mr. Maxwell !"
" Always a doing of zunmut, Musther
Hubbard," said Jacob, with a heavy lunge
zummut. Jacob Singlewood was'nt born to
drive a good bargain. No, Sir ; them people
Sir, these times ?"
" Pretty well, thank you," answered
Edwin. " I am doing tolerably well, I am
happy to say, and hope to do better as times
" You and me left Musther Maxwell about
the same time, Sir," said Jacob. " I did'nt
stop a fortnight after you left, and I told
Musther the reason I wouldn't stop which
gentleman ; and I wouldn't countenance sich
had privately agreed with Musther Skinner-
and a man killed ; but made no particular
sheep and he would pay me off ; so I mus-
thered e'm, me and my mate ; and we got
nineteen short as Musther Charles found
comes and tells Musther. ' Sir,' says I, ' I'll
hundred and seventy-two, leaving only four-
you a penny you won't tell me in three
" I am not likely," said Edwin, " being a
bad hand at guessing--where did you find
them ?"
" In the gathering paddock, Sir."
already counted, did you ?" said Edwin in
" what else could I do ? I wanted to get
away--Musther was satisfied and turned the
a invite to call upon him when I wanted em-
ployment, and I went away singing--
Here I go up, up, up, here I go down, down,
Edwin ; " I am very much surprised"--
" Surprised, air you, Sir ?' interrupted
" I thought you was no' sich a child. How-
er, people may be surprised or no, as they
your fine silver-spun truth and honesty,
do you think Maxwell himself is a clean
tatur ?"
" I know he is not a dishonest man, nor
truth," said Jacob ; " I don't believe there is
like this ? It was made purposely for rogues
and cheats, and them it's full of. What was
Maxwell afore he came here ? Why did he
come here ? He was in a bank, wasn't he,
in Dublin or some sich hole ?"
" Why, what has that to do with his coming
out here ?"
patronising wave of his hand, " I didn't
think you was sich a flat as to ask that ques-
tion : why, he robbed the bank by course
and bolted here with the money, and he did
right to sarve 'em out ; I would 'a done just
Edwin. " You will do well to be cautious
some value in the eye of the law, and defa-
mation of character is a serious offence."
" The eye of the law !" said Jacob with
contemptuous emphasis. " I might under-
putrified vultur, or a carrion crow. I don't
care a button for the eye of the law. If
Maxwell was here this minit I'd tell him to
his face that if he didn't rob the bank he in-
tended to do it, but was found out and pre-
vented ; there, that's a dromedary to go
through the eye of the law--he, he."
THE MAXWELLS OF BREMGARTEN. A STORY OF TASMANIA. [Founded on Facts.] (ALL RIGHTS ARE RESERVED.) (Continued from Saturday, 25th July.) CHAPTER LII. EDWIN GOES TO HOBART TOWN AND MEETS WITH OLD ACQUAINTANCES. (Article), Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 - 1899), Saturday 1 August 1868 page Article 2014-10-20 13:23 THE MAXWEL' S OF DBREMIARTEN,
A STORY OF TABSMANTA,
i{DWp{ GOES TO IIODAIT TOWN AND MEETS
On thoe termination of the black war Edwin
Iferbart returned to his estate of 3ello Park,
(Foundod on Facts!,
(ALL n rlITs AnL I nR fnv·D.)
(Cosninsedfrom Saturday, 25th July.)
Buffer, From the period at which he en
CHAPTER. L1,
THE MAXWELLS OF BREMGARTEN,
A STORY OF TASMANIA.
EDWIN GOES TO HOBART TOWN AND MEETS
On the termination of the black war Edwin
Herbart returned to his estate of Belle Park,
(Founded on Facts.]
(ALL RIGHTS ARE RESERVED.)
(Continued from Saturday, 25th July.)
Buffer. From the period at which he en-
CHAPTER. LII.
THE MAXWELLS OF BREMGARTEN. A STORY OF TASMANIA. [Founded on Facts.] (ALL RIGHTS ARE RESERVED.) (Continued from Saturday, 17th July.) CHAPTER LI MAXWELL ENTERTAINS A STRANGER. (Article), Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 - 1899), Saturday 25 July 1868 page Article 2014-10-20 13:20 ":Doiyou know r.m a gentleman,' ir 1 Let
me :go,.D ,ll bring ,-an -action against
Earlsal .for:false imprisonment. I. this'
your biandyc1 workMr Maxwell 1"
SNo ponniii'y'honr 'I -declare I know
nothiigrabout it," said Maxwell ..
" Come, now, be quiet; and "don't 'compel
me to callin miy mate,' said the constabbi;
" he's waiting in the kitchen.. What have
you got here 1 a bulldog,ih 1:: .
pocket the constable'drew :forth : a small
,Putting 'his, hand into :the prisoner's
pistol which was found-on examination-to ibo
primed and loaded. (I Mr. Spytho resigned
hLimself td his fate,.' and askedd~' his
captor what was the ,ohargo, .,ainst hi1 i ,
"Stealinga horse myr:.friend,. was the
reply." "And noi~r,'econtinuod thlot limbiof
the law, whonlhe.had:finiahel-; .ds examida.
tion of hid.friond'as petson,?f.just i.como along
with ma, I see youv.e 'had, dinner; !sorry ito
depriveoyou;'Mr;: Maxwell, .of your company,
but; necessity, don't .:.often wait for legal
advice, sir." .,i -.:.:, -
Mr. Smythe was incordingly walked loff
his chagrin. Weo may as \ollidismiss him
=withsteel brh celots oti this wrists," mnuch
ifor fever frosn oir irhess-board , by. informing
the reader that he was': trned:fnr horso
stealig : ard: re-transported for fourteen
yeats. He was betrayed to 'Earlsley by ono
of Maxwell's servants' who knew the horse
and hladheard:it had' been stolle. His was
notian'isolatedicaob 'of'tprisoner of tolerable
address,.illegally at ILlarg;e, palming himself
off upoz!a numnboi of iettlers as a gentlemn.
A wealthy, proprietor of our acquaintance
oncb' e'teirtaniedi one "at dinner, aud, to /do
hliim jiistice, he .made himself agrecabloe I to
the hadia? d, deluded lis, host. into the
flock of sheep at a large paying pre " but
~ijof]ha hewa?ted i ? urlihaso' '" large
wishing to seo a little more of the country
to travelled on. The next day the settler
ttood at Ili gate and saw two consthblea d
going by with his fascinating guest ofyyester- n
tiay betwoen them in haondofll. " I thought
you wanted to buy sheopl," said the settler,
" Sir," said the prisoner, " you would never t
throw water on a drowning rat." lll hadI I
boon a'reated as an absconder whilst sitting t
In another settler's carriage with the Inladie of r
tihe family.
A more pleasing subject, at leant we hope
so, is at hand. Grisolda and Isabel were
iarnest and intorstiteresting kind. They walkled,
read, 'and played the jpiano together; and
vonturo to say, arose in the mind of the one
that was not instantly madl known to the
take snuch oxorcise on horseback no had been
the Earlsloy's or any of their other neighbors,
so they wore forced to amusnoe themselves as
well as they could atit hoone. Had it not been
to say what Griselda would havo done at
she could with her mother; and upon topics
young people, were likely to be much lesa so
"It is very singular Grisllda," said
Isabel one day as they saot together over
their needle-work, 1" that we two amiable,
"You certainly have a remedy, though I
should bt sorry if you availed yoursoelf ot it,
Isabel," said Grisolda with a smile, " but I
have not. . You are rich and your own
mistress, but -I am still dependent on my
for eyes, I. never wish.to see a more hand
sotle pair tihan-you possess yourself."
said Isabel; "an attentive beau might have
paid:isie the same, but not in so ingenuous a
manner. No, the foolish speechl of the being
probability be-' Miss Arnott, I dread your
week, but'pon my honor the last time I
came under tihe influence of your eyes I had
"And what in all probability would be
your irply, Isabel ?" said Grisolda, laugihing.
" Why, my reply would be with a dis
doinful look,-Sir, had there been three hun
dred and sixty.five days in the week you
positive rejoicing.'"
" That would he a very bitter speech," said
Griselds, " and hardly consistent with your
Monday morning till Sunday night. Vat
life myself very much sometimes; and
been accustomed to sea friends and strangers
pleasure. My father was a pecoliar man, and
made it his constant habit to refuse invitationsr
mother. Griseldn, but still I sometimes wish
we could see a little more of the world. In
"I should also like to travel," said
Griseldo, "but I should not like to go among
ironical smile on the face of an Englishman,'I
for servants and tell the public that' no Irish
the island very dlearly ; and it is to it that all
Belleview, and the Glen of the Downs, anti
nearly to tihe top of tihe great Sugar Loaf, and
I have been with them to a picnic at Powers.
young gentleman fell from the rooks above
" Oh no-it occurred a short time before
our visit." : ' :
"I should not like," said 'Isabel, "to wit
ness ihe death of any person in, that way, it
would be very shocking. -"'I have not yet re
hope I sallnl never, never be called upon to
And yet my wild dreams of which I have for.
me. "A few nights ago I dreamed that I saw
SHarry standing in a bath up to his shoulders;
the water was very black and hid face was as
whiteoas snow, and what I considered more
remarkable, I thoughlt that your friend Mr.
':lterbart was present, and stood by, my side.
Something prompted mo to dip my hand in the
water to try'its temperature, and when Idrew
it out again it was quite red; and seeing that,
I thought I said playfully,,' What for goodness
sake, Henry, induoes you to bathe in wins ?'
and ihe replied in such an unaccountable and
unnatural voice--'No Isabel, it is blood!' I
cannot tell youin what an agony I awoke."
dream,".said Griselda; "do you often have
sucbh' teirrible visions, Isabol ?"
";'Why,:no dear, not very often," replied
M!MissArnott, "but having mentioned the
names of Harry and Mr. HIorbart, I am led to
ask you'Griselda if'you ibink there is any
likelihood of a dangerous' rivalry or jealousy
"On whosoaccount ?'"asked Griselds.
u,
" On your account," said Isahel.
"Good gracious, Isabel, you frighten me to
naith,"naid Oriselda ;" how can you think sucll
probable," answered Isabel. "1 am no stranger
" I not only think it posibhl hut oxtremely
to the statle of your mind with respect to my
brother, and I am not so blind at not to have
discovered a clue to tihe state of Mr. :[erbart's
mind with respeot to you. Now knowirng
'ny brolthr as I do, I cannot help thinking
that shouhi you refuse to become his wife, na
frtot the p'',jindices you oceeo to have itnhiled
I greatly fear you will, his liloco temper,
which you lnighthave softelledll into gentlenllss,
will mark out your unotetindliug cousin ato an
object of vengeance, and, trust ome, lie will
never rent until the supposed stain upon his
htonr is wiped away in blood."
" A catastrophy like that," aoid Griseldn,
" would certainly cause uem inexpressible
pain, but to view tihe matter in a proper,
oCnsiblte light, there is ino earthly reason why
it should takeo place. Your brother hilts done
int the high Ihonor to astk mty hand in inmr
rigte, and though I an grateful, I still claim
tihe right of freely using the prerogative which
is universally accorded to tile femoale sex, of
aecepting or rejecting his proposals. If I de
aide upon the latter course I ain not bound, I
beliove, to give mIy reasons for coming to a
decision. The gentleman so refuised is bound
by tile laws of society to submit withl the best
grace possible to his ftite, hard though it
may be : lie lhs no right to coerce the incli
nations of the lady who rejects hlin, either
directly by offending her personally, or in
whom heo suspects the lady who has rejected
thing is quite preposterous : if such a tihing
the dark ages, when the simple act of hand
" Your reasoning may be very good, Gri
solda," said Isabel, "annd your arguments
sound, but I think you would ftil to con
vince HIenry; and if you do reject hlim, you
will do so in the fuill assmrunce of the ftct
that something dreadftl will happen."
" I cannot bring myself to believe tlat
Mr. Arnott would be so foolish," said Gri
solda; "his folly would be coupled with illn
justice, and his injustice with cruelty. Ile
has no conceivable right to trifle with Ed
win's happiness-I miean, withl the happiness
or life of tiany person, to whom such ltanefill,
attach itself; and if iny poor prayers are
heard in IIeaven, he certainly will not com
"You acknowledge, then, Griselda," said
Isabel, " that you do tVak a tender interest
in your cousin, Mr. Herbartl'
"Indeed, Isabel," said Griselda, bending
more closely over her work, " I did not ac
knowledge anything of the kind. IHow could
has forbidden me to think I You said your
brother ihas singled him out as a rival, but
if lie has done so he has done wrong. You
thoughts with respect to ime, but I can assure
childish sp)eeches made when we were chil
fair speaker lookingt up suddenly, " that you
in the way "T
"You cannot make me confess that of
which I have no consciousness," said Gri
seldna. "I have not given the subject any
serious consideration. If Edwin came hero
B3esides I am not anxious to be married;
her ? I amt too practical, perhaps, to view an
Feed on her damask cheek-'
monument and smnilo at grief : when I am
" Quite natural, indeed," said Isabel. "Is
Edwin your first cousin '1'
"Your second --a woman cafinot marry
her second cousin,-you-know."
" fhat I believe to be a popular error," said
Griselda; "but Edwin is my third cousin,
one enough," said Isabel ; "and he seems to
possess those mental qualities which are essen
he may choose' for his wife;-who can tell
but with his literary talents hI may become
an author of some celebrity at a future time I
from city to city and show mue the wonders
be his friend, his lovet, hIis wife; I would
not only make hitm hnappy with my wealth
but with mnay templer too, and if it were hIis
pleasure to settle down in soume quiet valley
his homo should not be disturbed by disputes
or complainta. Do you not think, Griselda,
ttat it is thus in the power of every woman
to bind her lnusband to lherself, so that if ihe
neglects or despisces hier it must be because of
the natural wickedneas of his own heart l"
"If you are wise, Isabel," said Griselda,
" you will not lentd yourself to any vain illu.
sions of earttly happiness. In this world
there is no true or piermanent happiness, and
it is thIe greatest of all folly to expect such."
The sudden entrance of Mrs. I axwell pIut
announced thlat Chlarles was on his way hIome
from tie black war, and that the carrier,
Baxter, Iad been killed: MIrs. Baxter was
overwlelmned with grief, and htis daugtter,
WonTn REslEnMERnoN.-Never lose any
tinme ; that is not lost which is spent .in
amusement or recrosation some time every day;
bat always be in the habit of bolng employed.
(a0 be continued.)
" Do you know I'm a gentleman, sir ? Let
me go. I'll bring an action against
Earlsley for false imprisonment. Isa this
your handy work, Mr. Maxwell ?"
" No 'pon my honor I declare I know
nothing about it," said Maxwell.
" Come, now, be quiet, and don't compel
me to call in my mate," said the constable,
" he's waiting in the kitchen. What have
you got here ? a bulldog, eh ?"
pocket the constable drew forth a small
Putting his hand into the prisoner's
pistol which was found on examination to be
primed and loaded. Mr. Smythe resigned
himself to his fate, and asked his
captor what was the charge against him ?
" Stealing a horse my friend," was the
reply. "And now," continued the limb of
the law, when he had finished his examina-
tion of his friend's person, " just come along
with me, I see you've had, dinner ; sorry to
deprive you, Mr. Maxwell, of your company,
but necessity don't often wait for legal
advice, sir."
Mr. Smythe was accordingly walked off
his chagrin. We may as well dismiss him
with steel bracelets on this wrists, much to
for ever from our chess-board by informing
the reader that he was tried for horse-
stealing and re-transported for fourteen
years. He was betrayed to Earlsley by one
of Maxwell's servants who knew the horse
and had heard it had been stolen. His was
not an isolated case of prisoner of tolerable
address, illegally at large, palming himself
off upon a number of settlers as a gentleman.
A wealthy proprietor of our acquaintance
once entertained one at dinner, and, to do
him justice, he made himself agreeable to
the ladies, and deluded his host into the
flock of sheep at a large paying price ; but
belief that he wanted to purchase a large
wishing to see a little more of the country
he travelled on. The next day the settler
stood at the gate and saw two constables
going by with his fascinating guest of yester-
day between them in handcuffs, " I thought
you wanted to buy sheep," said the settler,
" Sir," said the prisoner, " you would never
throw water on a drowning rat." He had
been arrested as an absconder whilst sitting
in another settler's carriage with the ladies of
the family.
A more pleasing subject, at least we hope
so, is at hand. Griselda and Isabel were
earnest and interesting kind. They walked,
read, and played the piano together ; and
venture to say, arose in the mind of the one
that was not instantly made known to the
take such exercise on horseback as had been
the Earlsley's or any of their other neighbors,
so they were forced to amuse themselves as
well as they could at home. Had it not been
to say what Griselda would have done at
she could with her mother ; and upon topics
young people, were likely to be much less so
" It is very singular Griselda," said
Isabel one day as they sat together over
their needle-work, " that we two amiable,
" You certainly have a remedy, though I
should be sorry if you availed yourself of it,
Isabel," said Griselda with a smile, " but I
have not. You are rich and your own
mistress, but I am still dependent on my
for eyes, I never wish to see a more hand-
some pair than you possess yourself."
said Isabel ; " an attentive beau might have
paid me the same, but not in so ingenuous a
manner. No, the foolish speech of the being
probability be--' Miss Arnott, I dread your
week, but 'pon my honor the last time I
came under the influence of your eyes I had
" And what in all probability would be
your reply, Isabel ?" said Griselda, laughing.
" Why, my reply would be with a dis-
dainful look,--' Sir, had there been three hun-
dred and sixty-five days in the week you
positive rejoicing.' "
" That would be a very bitter speech," said
Griselda, " and hardly consistent with your
Monday morning till Sunday night. But
life myself very much sometimes ; and
been accustomed to see friends and strangers
pleasure. My father was a peculiar man, and
made it his constant habit to refuse invitations
mother. Griselda, but still I sometimes wish
we could see a little more of the world. In-
" I should also like to travel," said
Griselda, " but I should not like to go among
ironical smile on the face of an Englishman. I
for servants and tell the public that ' no Irish
the island very dearly ; and it is to it that all
Belleview, and the Glen of the Downs, and
nearly to the top of the great Sugar Loaf, and
I have been with them to a picnic at Powers-
young gentleman fell from the rocks above
" Oh no--it occurred a short time before
our visit.":
" I should not like," said Isabel, " to wit-
ness the death of any person in that way, it
would be very shocking. I have not yet re-
hope I shall never, never be called upon to
And yet my wild dreams of which I have for-
me. A few nights ago I dreamed that I saw
Harry standing in a bath up to his shoulders ;
the water was very black and his face was as
white as snow, and what I considered more
remarkable, I thought that your friend Mr.
Herbart was present, and stood by my side.
Something prompted me to dip my hand in the
water to try its temperature, and when I drew
it out again it was quite red ; and seeing that,
I thought I said playfully, ' What for goodness
sake, Henry, induces you to bathe in wine ?'
and he replied in such an unaccountable and
unnatural voice--' No Isabel, it is blood!' I
cannot tell you in what an agony I awoke."
dream," said Griselda ; " do you often have
such terrible visions, Isabel ?"
" Why, no dear, not very often," replied
Miss Arnott, " but having mentioned the
names of Harry and Mr. Herbart, I am led to
ask you Griselda if you think there is any
likelihood of a dangerous rivalry or jealousy
" On whose account ?" asked Griselda.

" On your account," said Isabel.
" Good gracious, Isabel, you frighten me to
death," said Griselda ; " how can you think such
probable," answered Isabel. " I am no stranger
" I not only think it possible but extremely
to the state of your mind with respect to my
brother, and I am not so blind as not to have
discovered a clue to the state of Mr. Herbart's
mind with respect to you. Now knowing
my brother as I do, I cannot help thinking
that should you refuse to become his wife, as
from the prejudices you seem to have imbibed
I greatly fear you will, his fierce temper,
which you might have softened into gentleness,
will mark out your unoffending cousin as an
object of vengeance, and, trust me, he will
never rest until the supposed stain upon his
honor is wiped away in blood."
" A catastrophy like that," said Griselda,
" would certainly cause me inexpressible
pain, but to view the matter in a proper,
sensible light, there is no earthly reason why
it should take place. Your brother has done
me the high honor to ask my hand in mar-
riage, and though I am grateful, I still claim
the right of freely using the prerogative which
is universally accorded to the female sex, of
aecepting or rejecting his proposals. If I de-
cide upon the latter course I am not bound, I
believe, to give my reasons for coming to a
decision. The gentleman so refused is bound
by the laws of society to submit with the best
grace possible to his fate, hard though it
may be : he has no right to coerce the incli-
nations of the lady who rejects him, either
directly by offending her personally, or in-
whom he suspects the lady who has rejected
thing is quite preposterous : if such a thing
the dark ages, when the simple act of hand-
" Your reasoning may be very good, Gri-
selda," said Isabel, " and your arguments
sound, but I think you would fail to con-
vince Henry ; and if you do reject him, you
will do so in the full assurance of the fact
that something dreadful will happen."
" I cannot bring myself to believe that
Mr. Arnott would be so foolish," said Gri-
selda ; " his folly would be coupled with in-
justice, and his injustice with cruelty. He
has no conceivable right to trifle with Ed-
win's happiness--I mean, with the happiness
or life of any person, to whom such baneful,
attach itself ; and if my poor prayers are
heard in Heaven, he certainly will not com-
" You acknowledge, then, Griselda," said
Isabel, " that you do take a tender interest
in your cousin, Mr. Herbart ?"
" Indeed, Isabel," said Griselda, bending
more closely over her work, " I did not ac-
knowledge anything of the kind. How could
has forbidden me to think ? You said your
brother has singled him out as a rival, but
if he has done so he has done wrong. You
thoughts with respect to me, but I can assure
childish speeches made when we were chil-
fair speaker looking up suddenly, " that you
in the way ?"
" You cannot make me confess that of
which I have no consciousness," said Gri-
selda. " I have not given the subject any
serious consideration. If Edwin came here
Besides I am not anxious to be married ;
her ? I am too practical, perhaps, to view an
Feed on her damask cheek--'
monument and smile at grief : when I am
" Quite natural, indeed," said Isabel. " Is
Edwin your first cousin ?"
" Your second ?--a woman cannot marry
her second cousin, you know."
" That I believe to be a popular error," said
Griselda ; " but Edwin is my third cousin,
one enough," said Isabel ; " and he seems to
possess those mental qualities which are essen-
he may choose for his wife ;--who can tell
but with his literary talents he may become
an author of some celebrity at a future time ?
from city to city and show me the wonders
be his friend, his lover, his wife ; I would
not only make him happy with my wealth
but with my temper too, and if it were his
pleasure to settle down in some quiet valley
his home should not be disturbed by disputes
or complaints. Do you not think, Griselda,
that it is thus in the power of every woman
to bind her husband to herself, so that if he
neglects or despises her it must be because of
the natural wickedneas of his own heart ?"
" If you are wise, Isabel," said Griselda,
" you will not lend yourself to any vain illu-
sions of earthly happiness. In this world
there is no true or permanent happiness, and
it is the greatest of all folly to expect such."
The sudden entrance of Mrs. Maxwell put
announced that Chlarles was on his way home
from the black war, and that the carrier,
Baxter, had been killed : Mrs. Baxter was
overwhelmed with grief, and his daughter,
WORTH REMEMBERING.--Never lose any
time ; that is not lost which is spent in
amusement or recreation some time every day ;
but always be in the habit of being employed.
(To be continued.)
THE MAXWELLS OF BREMGARTEN. A STORY OF TASMANIA. [Founded on Facts.] (ALL RIGHTS ARE RESERVED.) (Continued from Saturday, 17th July.) CHAPTER LI MAXWELL ENTERTAINS A STRANGER. (Article), Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 - 1899), Saturday 25 July 1868 page Article 2014-10-20 12:38 Augustus Clifford Smythe, a gentleman en
qpiring about sheep, which lie was desirous of
- Maxwell rose and bowed to the stranger,
* the dinner hour was at hand he invited his
- visitors to dine with him, and on their assent
-about the plains of Port Phillip, which the
Lstranger eloquently described, and the sheep
'capabilities of Port Phillip as a pastoral
country, 2Maxwell closely examined his fea
- but rather gaunt, and awkward on the first
: introduction, and had the aspect of one not
in his proper element. A smile played occa
as Earlsley did, or, indeed, as any thorough
. bred gentleman would have done; but
shuffled himself from side to side, tho.shuffle
dressed like a gentleman-that is to say, not
settlers at that period generally dressed them
selves when visiting their neighbors-a
:have nothing in unison with his aristocratic
dark pair of whiskers and mounstache.
: ar.:Earlsley explained, after some general
• ,conversation, that Mr. Smythe was anxious
:to purchase one thousand four-tooth owes to
i take-to Port- Phillip, and appealed to Mr.
w; ith a six-inch shuffle on his chair, replied in
1 the aflirmnative.;.. Ho then, with another
---number to dispose of, and Maxwell intimated
that he. might be able to supply him. Mr.
-eye, enquired the price. Maxwell said that
for, picked owes he would require 18s.
; and asked, with another shuflle, what term
• ;off credit Maxwell was disposed to allow;
-.:.Maxwell answered that lie would allow nine
or even twelve months' credit, upon an ac
4eptance.endorsed by his friend Mr. Earisley,
.ý and bearing interest at ten per cent. per
annum; upon hearing which Earlsley fixed
.hiis: eyes with magisterial severity upon
-niSinythe,,and'then broke out.into a series'of
vw)extrdordinary 'cadaverous chuckles.
. Dinner was announced, and Mr. Augustus
Mrs. Maxwell. 'and the ,young ladies. The
fact! of bein? ~i isuch a presence did not in
crease Mr. Simythe's easy nonchalance, but
of his eye ; and his,general, manner appeared
so'very outre, -to ussothe polite expression of
-?Tisl'belh 'that -that youieg lady herself was
,c Oircely able to :resti-in her'mirth. Never
I"' the?elss the :gentleman managed to gat
through some of' the dinner ceremonials in a
• crtditable manner, drank wine with Mrs.
" 'Maxwidll without spillinig' his wine over the
"tablecotli 'and finally, when the ladies with
S.drew.ho opened the door for them after tlhe
-most;approved fashion.
: After some commonplace conversationover
Saniother glass of wine, MIr. Earlsley excused
'huimnself.and took his leave, saying that~ he
would leave Mr. Smythe to settle his busi:
""onsider best for mutual advantage.., Mix
well asked Earlsloy if he would not have
s---omothing to do with the transaction touch
Sing the bill I Earlsley replied-with an amount
.of equivocation which leaves us nothiing to
almiro--" Yes, Sir, I have a bill to sdttlo;
Soffenco was repeated, I would follow Dr"
,.me last week, and 1 told him'that if the
'. Moungarrett's examnple and giv lhiinthree
Sdozen laslhes." .
-,> This piec' f ?imall it put Mr. Soythi
SLito a great statg of delight,-to judgeict
hea s bhp th~ manner in which he buried hi
comitmnanoo in ll his landkerolief. After the
mngistrato left the room Maxwell leumined H
silent for awhile, and as if to give his aiustero
friend time to got away, went to a bookcase I
and spent about it quarter of an hour in u
looking over some papers. Then resuming I
his seat he turned abruptly towardslhis guest
and said-" I think I have repaid you your I
" So I see, and know an hour ago that 1
you had found me out, Mr. Maxwell," said r
the visitor; "but I hope you will remember I
the laws of hospitality, and not betray m
was to make mnyself known to you, as your
character for honor and boinvolence is well
known, thinking you might possibly 1o in
" It was scarcely fair I think," said AMax
well, "lin you to take your 'place at this
"You invited me," said Mr. Smytho,
"your good sense will allow that when a man
is invited to dinner and happens to be hun
iry, he must be an idiot not to accept the
invitation. Ilad you consigned me to your
kitchen the suspicions of Mr. harlsley would!
have been aroused. I really own you many;
thanks, both for your dinner and your for
"I am aware," said Maxwell, " that I lie
under another obligation besides thle hospi
wlhen a great bush fire raged in this neigh
of Mr. Juniper and a number of men; at
present told me that my wheat would cer
"Yes, Sir," said the stranger, "I was that
at that time to impart some secret informa
tion concerning thebushlranger Jeffries, who
my intention was frustrated by that mis
ago. I spoiled the plan of Jeffries, ho wever,
by giving him falso.information concerning
dollars ii siliver tied up in a red and black
"You certainly are, Sir," answered Mr.
Smythe ; "when I had) you in my power in.
I was master of: yoiJrepaid me at the time
of them I have carried into practice; and if
firnish you with material for the best thing
hands of a bookseller,"
"I never read and an not likely to write
at the fire 1"
"You ask the qiuestion apart from police
treachery, of course 1" said Smythe, "I know
biound to be doubly cautious."
"You need not be apprehensive of police
treachery," said Maxwell. "I cannot per
proper to repose in me ;-yet, bless my soul,
what a setting down I shall get from .Mrs.
wine with 'P bushranger I"
"That, you will say, was the unkindest
cut of all, Sir," said the guest, "but I don't
as you are yourself. You see I was ac.
who was compelled by fortuitous circum
wiwhen she arrived. Well, she found a master
Srenewed my acquaintance with. her. She
reccived me graciously, and procured me em
ployment in the same service; and.when in
my ruling genius, absconded from that ser
vice,, she assisted me time after time with
food, clothes, and money. .Woman was
P made, Sir, to make smooth the roughest paths
in this life, and upon my. honor 1 believe I
would have married her if shle had not un
expectedly married somebody ,eise. Even
borrow a name, and. equip myself like a gen
.tleman."
YI, you said, I think,! saidiaxwell, .,f that
yod were in a difficulty,- an?d intended ito,
apply to me for assistance i"
" 1 hid,". replied the outlaw, "and will
candidly explain myself if you havoe pot be
come so hard as to turn me out-of' doors tat
the ,montion- of that :objectionable word
'assistance,'., You :must, know, then, that
I when I paid my last visit, to my Du'lci9ca'I
received stridt and'positi'veinstruct'ions never
to show my 'dolightful' 'countenance to boio
again, and for no otlher reason that I'can dis.
cover thanhbeing somewhat erratic in mny
habits and staying awnay from her too long.
l:hhd' been di: ai'visit 'to SBydnoy with the
lielp'ifia certifitate offreedomvwhich IIior?
rowed from the pockct of a mnate with whbm
showed me his certificate,, and I.borrowed it
whliio he slept on agrassy bank onoe sunny
day., I made someo money in Sydnepy, and
camo back hero .to spend it and see my 'iar
Polly'?Hopkins again, ,but as I said shetold
moeto be offthreatoning to denounce md to
her hlusband mid the police.' Think, Sir of
the treachery of theo.female heart I' She had
the unparalleled impudence,to accuse md of
stealing-mark the word-~stcaling ia: g~old
watch, a ruby, broioch, and other trinkets to
the value of thirty-seven pounds.".. ,
" Of which'you were.perfectly innocent? of
round to see if the. spoon.b ro alli ri ,le j
"As innocont as a ibailo iunborn, Sr I
.pyrsp," said .Maxaxwll, glanding ivoluntarily
never steal, I only', borrowwith the 1fullin
thtiiuiobf returning hliuiifettet timies'coino.
m'"'" ou said it wi+? ''by IieiP bounty that you
:aid Maxwell. I
" Did II" answerod Smytheo, "then I be-.
love I said it ironically-but to say truth I g
was so provoked at her insolence that I d
lurked about the promises till it 'was dark, y
and then wont into the stable and borrowed "
her husband's horse and saddle,and rode away.
Tho horse-I have him now-is a goodl follow 1
to go, but ,I was not pleased with the saddle I
as it turned out to be by daylight as blak as t
ink, with the stulling hanging out in various
places in a most ungentlemanly manner, So
it became. necessary that a good lookingl
saddle if not a now one must be procured for
love at least, if not for money. - Well, after
riding all night I breakfasted at an inn in a a
and ascertained that there was to be a sale of I
about seven miles off. , Made up my mind to
saddle. On the road I, overtook a middle
aged gentleman and entered, into affable con
versation with him. .I found him congenial
and communicative; he rode a high stepping
chestnut, had on a blue coat with brass but
tons; and trowsers which'for' want of straps
terminated at his knees. But my soul' was
refreshed at the sight of the bran now saddle
on to be in time for lunoheon; plenty of Ilhao
and beer; lunched like a prince; went out to
at the stable door; you may' inidgine how II
.meet Mr. Brass Buttons and welcomed him
recommended theoham and beer ; ostler was:
already drunk; my Adonis went into the
ham and beer and I watched my opportunity:
to borrow a horse is no crime, and to ex
my' saddle, which I hung up in a business
"it is time to put an end to this frivolous
mue you certainly should not come here con
Is it not.my duty to arrest you for having
committed these offences against society 1"
" It.may be your duty, but it won't be your
" Why so 1" demanded Maxwell.
"Because," returned Smythe slapping his
breast, " I would shoot you dead on' the
said Maxwell, looking firmly at the oiutlaw,
" but go-leave the house, and never -let me
'see you hoero again'.: I could not arrest you,
as.such a proceeding would endanger'your
life; but I would again venture to advise you
for'your good-return the horse and 'saddle
t'theoir proper owners, repent of your sinsand
'turn'to God, and 'get out of this country as
fast as you can." '
" W"1Vhy that is precisely what I wantyou to
' Help you to leave the country I-how am
I to help youwl".said Maxwell.
1 "With money," answered Smythe.. I" You
owe me fifty pounds. You cannot-grumble
and house from being burnt. You're'a rich
man, and ought to have somo gratitiudo. I'll
cry quits at half the money; give, me five
and twenty and I walk. Your'housq was not
insured 1"
" There;-if it had been burnt a dead loss
of athousand pounds at least; premium for
five years at one per cent. say fifty: pounds
saved by not insuring, besides- the value of
barn arid wheat, fifteen hundredspounds saved
in all; I'll let you off for twenty-give me
and search for Brass Buttons, Esq., with dili-.
gence." "
Maxwell; "you borrowed money from me
" O, how cana rich man like you ,talk of
such a thing I I believe there is a limitation
statute,-though it is faulty, for the time is
too long-it' should have been six months.
Twenty pounds .will give, me a fair start,
of thee.'"
"Vory glad to hear you say so," said a
room. "Sit still, Mr. Smytheo-don't allow
on 'the 'warrant of Arthur 'Earlsley, Esq.,
J.P.' 'There, you need not show your teeth,
won't allow mischief to be done."'
"The constible, 'as he said these words,
caught hold of the'prisoner's wrist"as he weas
in the act of thruilting his right hand into the
breast podket 'of his bcoat. Mr. Siythe began
to fume-o?
Augustus Clifford Smythe, a gentleman en-
quiring about sheep, which he was desirous of
Maxwell rose and bowed to the stranger,
the dinner hour was at hand he invited his
visitors to dine with him, and on their assent-
about the plains of Port Phillip, which the
stranger eloquently described, and the sheep
capabilities of Port Phillip as a pastoral
country, Maxwell closely examined his fea-
but rather gaunt, and awkward on the first
introduction, and had the aspect of one not
in his proper element. A smile played occa-
as Earlsley did, or, indeed, as any thorough-
bred gentleman would have done ; but
shuffled himself from side to side, the shuffle
dressed like a gentleman--that is to say, not
settlers at that period generally dressed them-
selves when visiting their neighbors--a
have nothing in unison with his aristocratic
dark pair of whiskers and moustache.
Mr. Earlsley explained, after some general
conversation, that Mr. Smythe was anxious
to purchase one thousand four-tooth owes to
take to Port Phillip, and appealed to Mr.
with a six-inch shuffle on his chair, replied in
the affirmative. He then, with another
number to dispose of, and Maxwell intimated
that he might be able to supply him. Mr.
eye, enquired the price. Maxwell said that
for picked ewes he would require 18s.
and asked, with another shuffle, what term
off credit Maxwell was disposed to allow ;
Maxwell answered that he would allow nine
or even twelve months' credit, upon an ac-
ceptance endorsed by his friend Mr. Earlsley,
and bearing interest at ten per cent. per
annum ; upon hearing which Earlsley fixed
his eyes with magisterial severity upon
Smythe, and then broke out into a series of
extraordinary cadaverous chuckles.
Dinner was announced, and Mr. Augustus
Mrs. Maxwell and the young ladies. The
fact of being in such a presence did not in-
crease Mr. Smythe's easy nonchalance, but
of his eye ; and his general manner appeared
so very outre, to use the polite expression of
Isabel, that that young lady herself was
scarcely able to restrain her mirth. Never-
theless the gentleman managed to get
through some of the dinner ceremonials in a
creditable manner, drank wine with Mrs.
Maxwell without spilling his wine over the
tablecloth and finally, when the ladies with-
drew he opened the door for them after the
most approved fashion.
After some commonplace conversation over
another glass of wine, Mr. Earlsley excused
himself and took his leave, saying that he
would leave Mr. Smythe to settle his busi-
consider best for mutual advantage. Max-
well asked Earlsley if he would not have
something to do with the transaction touch-
ing the bill ? Earlsley replied with an amount
of equivocation which leaves us nothing to
admire--" Yes, Sir, I have a bill to settle ;
offence was repeated, I would follow Dr.
me last week, and I told him that if the
Moungarrett's example and give him three
dozen lashes."
This piece of small wit put Mr. Smythe
into a great state of delight--to judge at
least by the manner in which he buried his
countenance in his handkerchief. After the
magistrate left the room Maxwell remained
silent for awhile, and as if to give his austere
friend time to get away, went to a bookcase
and spent about a quarter of an hour in
looking over some papers. Then resuming
his seat he turned abruptly towards his guest
and said--" I think I have repaid you your
" So I see, and knew an hour ago that
you had found me out, Mr. Maxwell," said
the visitor ; " but I hope you will remember
the laws of hospitality, and not betray me
was to make myself known to you, as your
character for honor and benevolence is well
known, thinking you might possibly be in-
" It was scarcely fair I think," said Max-
well, " in you to take your place at this
" You invited me," said Mr. Smythe,
" your good sense will allow that when a man
is invited to dinner and happens to be hun-
gry, he must be an idiot not to accept the
invitation. Had you consigned me to your
kitchen the suspicions of Mr. Earlsley would
have been aroused. I really owe you many
thanks, both for your dinner and your for-
" I am aware," said Maxwell, " that I lie
under another obligation besides the hospi-
when a great bush fire raged in this neigh-
of Mr. Juniper and a number of men ; at
present told me that my wheat would cer-
" Yes, Sir," said the stranger, " I was that
at that time to impart some secret informa-
tion concerning the bushranger Jeffries, who
my intention was frustrated by that mis-
ago. I spoiled the plan of Jeffries, however,
by giving him false information concerning
dollars in silver tied up in a red and black
" You certainly are, Sir," answered Mr.
Smythe ; " when I had you in my power in
I was master of : you repaid me at the time
of them I have carried into practice ; and if
furnish you with material for the best thing
hands of a bookseller."
" I never read and am not likely to write
at the fire ?"
" You ask the question apart from police
treachery, of course ?" said Smythe, " I know
bound to be doubly cautious."
" You need not be apprehensive of police
treachery," said Maxwell. " I cannot per-
proper to repose in me ;--yet, bless my soul,
what a setting down I shall get from Mrs.
wine with a bushranger !"
" That, you will say, was the unkindest
cut of all, Sir," said the guest, " but I don't
as you are yourself. You see I was ac-
who was compelled by fortuitous circum-
when she arrived. Well, she found a master
renewed my acquaintance with her. She
received me graciously, and procured me em-
ployment in the same service ; and when in
my ruling genius, absconded from that ser-
vice, she assisted me time after time with
food, clothes, and money. Woman was
made, Sir, to make smooth the roughest paths
in this life, and upon my honor I believe I
would have married her if she had not un-
expectedly married somebody else. Even
borrow a name, and equip myself like a gen-
tleman."
" You said, I think," said Maxwell, " that
you were in a difficulty, and intended to
apply to me for assistance ?"
" I did," replied the outlaw, " and will
candidly explain myself if you have not be-
come so hard as to turn me out of doors at
the mention of that objectionable word
'assistance.' You must know, then, that
when I paid my last visit, to my Dulcinea I
received strict and positive instructions never
to show my delightful countenance to her
again, and for no other reason that I can dis-
cover than being somewhat erratic in my
habits and staying away from her too long.
I had been on a visit to Sydney with the
help of a certificate of freedom which I bor-
rowed from the pocket of a man with whom
showed me his certificate, and I borrowed it
while he slept on a grassy bank one sunny
day. I made some money in Sydney, and
came back here to spend it and see my dear
Polly Hopkins again, but as I said she told
me to be off, threatening to denounce me to
her husband and the police. Think, Sir, of
the treachery of the female heart ! She had
the unparalleled impudence to accuse me of
stealing--mark the word--stealing a gold
watch, a ruby brooch, and other trinkets to
the value of thirty-seven pounds."
" Of which you were.perfectly innocent, of
round to see if the spoons were all right.
" As innocent as a babe unborn, Sir. I
course," said Maxwell, glancing involuntarily
never steal, I only borrow with the full in-
tention of returning when better times come. But my real offence was keeping away from her too long."
" You said it was by her bounty that you
said Maxwell.
" Did I ?" answered Smythe, " then I be-
lieve I said it ironically--but to say truth I
was so provoked at her insolence that I
lurked about the premises till it was dark,
and then went into the stable and borrowed
her husband's horse and saddle, and rode away.
The horse--I have him now--is a good fellow
to go, but I was not pleased with the saddle
as it turned out to be by daylight as black as
ink, with the stuffing hanging out in various
places in a most ungentlemanly manner. So
it became necessary that a good looking
saddle if not a new one must be procured for
love at least, if not for money. Well, after
riding all night I breakfasted at an inn in a
and ascertained that there was to be a sale of
about seven miles off. Made up my mind to
saddle. On the road I overtook a middle-
aged gentleman and entered into affable con-
versation with him. I found him congenial
and communicative ; he rode a high stepping
chestnut, had on a blue coat with brass but-
tons ; and trowsers which for want of straps
terminated at his knees. But my soul was
refreshed at the sight of the bran new saddle
on to be in time for luncheon ; plenty of ham
and beer ; lunched like a prince ; went out to
at the stable door ; you may imagine how I
meet Mr. Brass Buttons and welcomed him
recommended the ham and beer ; ostler was
already drunk ; my Adonis went into the
ham and beer and I watched my opportunity :
to borrow a horse is no crime, and to ex-
my saddle, which I hung up in a business
" it is time to put an end to this frivolous
me you certainly should not come here con-
Is it not my duty to arrest you for having
committed these offences against society ?"
" It may be your duty, but it won't be your
" Why so ?" demanded Maxwell.
" Because," returned Smythe slapping his
breast, " I would shoot you dead on the
said Maxwell, looking firmly at the outlaw,
" but go--leave the house, and never let me
see you here again. I could not arrest you,
as such a proceeding would endanger your
life ; but I would again venture to advise you
for your good--return the horse and saddle
to their proper owners, repent of your sins and
turn to God, and get out of this country as
fast as you can."
" Why that is precisely what I want you to
" Help you to leave the country !--how am
I to help you ?" said Maxwell.
" With money," answered Smythe. " You
owe me fifty pounds. You cannot grumble
and house from being burnt. You're a rich
man, and ought to have some gratitude. I'll
cry quits at half the money ; give me five
and twenty and I walk. Your house was not
insured ?"
" There ;--if it had been burnt a dead loss
of a thousand pounds at least ; premium for
five years at one per cent. say fifty pounds
saved by not insuring, besides the value of
barn and wheat, fifteen hundred pounds saved
in all ; I'll let you off for twenty--give me
and search for Brass Buttons, Esq., with dili-
gence."
Maxwell ; " you borrowed money from me
" O, how can a rich man like you talk of
such a thing ! I believe there is a limitation
statute, though it is faulty, for the time is
too long--it should have been six months.
Twenty pounds will give me a fair start,
of thee.' "
" Very glad to hear you say so," said a
room. " Sit still, Mr. Smythe--don't allow
on the warrant of Arthur Earlsley, Esq.,
J.P. 'There, you need not show your teeth,
won't allow mischief to be done."
The constable, as he said these words,
caught hold of the prisoner's wrist as he was
in the act of thrusting his right hand into the
breast pocket of his coat. Mr. Smythe began
to fume--
THE MAXWELLS OF BREMGARTEN. A STORY OF TASMANIA. [Founded on Facts.] (ALL RIGHTS ARE RESERVED.) (Continued from Saturday, 17th July.) CHAPTER LI MAXWELL ENTERTAINS A STRANGER. (Article), Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 - 1899), Saturday 25 July 1868 page Article 2014-10-20 11:46 THE MAXWELLS O? BI.EMG ARTEN. °'
A STORY 01F TASMANIA.
WE would gladly take our curious reader to Y
Bromgarten again, and draw aside the curtain
which has so long hidden our interesting t
friends, Grisolda and Isabel, from his view;
ring importance remain to be recorded. Our C
mont to a magnitude which, so far
tended, has astonished ourselves; and it is a
"detest.
guest, Then'with renewed life and vigor we
"visit to the capital in company with that
army on its bootless expedition Maxwell re
mnagistrate, and often called at Brorugarten to
LFonmded on Facts.]
(ALL IourTS ARn R1SirnVRD.)
(Continuedfrom Saturday, 17th July.) 1
M5AXWKEV L 1NTERTAINBl A STRANOGER.
minute details when so many events of stir. I
tale has swollen since its commence.
from being originally thought of or in-. I
public, which may or mtay not approve of thias
'Notwithstanding this apology, we cannot
.will take a hasty glance at Bella Park, which
Shoitly aftert the departure of the grand
a sort of sneaking regard for *his brother
CHiAPTER LI.
THE MAXWELLS OF BREMGARTEN.
A STORY OF TASMANIA.
WE would gladly take our curious reader to
Bremgarten again, and draw aside the curtain
which has so long hidden our interesting
friends, Griselda and Isabel, from his view ;
ring importance remain to be recorded. Our
ment to a magnitude which, so far
tended, has astonished ourselves ; and it is
detest.
guest. Then with renewed life and vigor we
visit to the capital in company with that
army on its bootless expedition Maxwell re-
magistrate, and often called at Bremgarten to
[Founded on Facts.]
(ALL RIGHTS ARE RESERVED.)
(Continued from Saturday, 17th July.)
MAXWELL ENTERTAINS A STRANGER.
minute details when so many events of stir-
tale has swollen since its commence-
from being originally thought of or in-
public, which may or may not approve of this
Notwithstanding this apology, we cannot
will take a hasty glance at Bella Park, which
Shortly after the departure of the grand
a sort of sneaking regard for his brother
CHAPTER LI.
THE MAXWELLS OF BREMGARTEN. A STORY OF TASMANIA. [Founded on Facts.] (ALL RIGHTS ARE RESERVED.) CHAPTER L. (Continued from 11th July.) (Article), Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 - 1899), Saturday 18 July 1868 page Article 2014-10-20 11:39 tlhankd for their services and dismuissed to
'thegrateful intelligence, but disappointekd the
,nuniber of natives were still within
t reflected withl some little pride that this Ihis
Prosser's River.'. Colonel Arthur might have
.released from their arduous services the indi.
,viduals composing the civil portion of the
a and]aiiiy turnid their faces towards their
respeqtivo' h???es.
Buffos, set out. together for the South Esk,
.,rJusiiper add Charles, with Edwin and
trariveling iii ,'company with Walker, of
SBlanlott Bottom, Soowywnll, Junior, and
on tto Upper Macquoario, they rested for a
' ecduple of days, _and a very hospitable and
Soexcellent follow their host proved hlimself to
he.- At Campbell Town' they separated,
IEdwin and Buffer declining the kind invite.
tion, of Charles and Juniper to spend a few
days 'at Bloemgarten and Skittleball Hill.
They said that they were in rags, 'which was
itoo knough, and . thbey weoro uneasy about
offiaire at home; but the fact eas Edwin ,wnas
uonwilling;to meet his fair:relative, Griseldn,
lest tho :meetjig sshould.nu into fibrco- flamo
thdi. fire; which' though it 'mig it" smoulder,
dodld ndrvbt be Uh6Ollr'extingui,h'd'' "
An'd ,slow the colony' with its exhausted
energies was at pencoTorn considelabl tinme.
The ndtii?ds"(terrilod probably by 'iuch an
lib~tiltidr) did not' finally cose until they were
tilnstl diipl ay'of fordo, remained. quiot, but
' itealthlilydogged' throuh the bhush and:per.
uadeod to give themselves up to the Govern
nienutl From Tasmania they wore bauished
r provisions found for them, and attempts were
to Flinders ,Island, where huts were built,
Smadd to instruct them in.some of the more
simpleo arts of eivilised lihe. Many of them
'.di.ed lit is aaid 'of homo.sickness, 'and even
'sincd their re-deportation to tlrown's 'River,
Stiots of'the iabo has not diminished. All the
, Tasmhnie, the prospect of the speedy extinoc
Swith arms delivered thenm'up'again, and re.
British 'iriinsers uwho libad: been trusted
a turcld' to their service, According to Mel.
./ i.
lle (Ititi aw 01) 1swilltt cost tho Go o I llt i Ii'i
ototit thitity-livo ltotiorito potilss aitd titi
lot's iii fouL or IveO hltlurotittttl wihto' wOerl
killtd Iby accitiint, whil onily onio ptriiontlt of
illr itns ITroughit jittulu I hthrt lototi, ndrti cccii
it seipitt sitin atehirwatrdt titlo the bush.
hIl' 1R5tsthI 11103' w011 aI nevrthleis, itt in sp10151
tic uxtxrtiionts of s fisw ill-tIIItt mI gItIrmIblers,
ovorwclitlittd wi th cotigrit tilnlug oil teorse
from nll ports of thi colosuy. Fr'olll an It 's
Qovernor ite wns oxelted into it hIcro. Ilu
ha(d Itiught tim otisutists titoir atreiOgi ii nIod
eirculnled the moneoy which h adn~ berm bombedll~l
u601 a iy ill ilia pubii IlollRUI.y liii IeaIthI
swot drunk at conviviil mcetingso with dlrfit
lug hocrs, hit, nsuhpcr-hlunll oxertiouIs 111th
licloio cetamplit ltudcte to thoe svics, sild
ptniet souch as Cismtillus Ilimstlsif might 11115
unviod woro Itvislthed upont thiu uead of thin
fruaort to and Ilhppy cstitct tlcnr.
(ITo h cotttinutedt.)
thanked for their services and dismissed to
the grateful intelligence, but disappointed the
number of natives were still within
reflected with some little pride that this his
Prosser's River. Colonel Arthur might have
released from their arduous services the indi-
viduals composing the civil portion of the
grand army turned their faces towards their
respective homes.
Buffer set out together for the South Esk,
Juniper and Charles, with Edwin and
travelling in company with Walker, of
Blanket Bottom, Snowywull, Junior, and
on the Upper Macquarie, they rested for a
couple of days, and a very hospitable and
excellent follow their host proved himself to
be. At Campbell Town they separated,
Edwin and Buffer declining the kind invita-
tion of Charles and Juniper to spend a few
days at Bremgarten and Skittleball Hill.
They said that they were in rags, which was
true enough, and they were uneasy about
affaire at home ; but the fact was Edwin was
unwilling to meet his fair relative, Griselda,
lest the meeting should fan into fierce flame
the fire, which, though it might smoulder,
could never be wholly extinguished.
And now the colony with its exhausted
energies was at peace for a considerable time.
The natives, terrified probably by such an
hostilities did not finally cease until they were
unusual display of force, remained. quiet, but
stealthily dogged through the bush and per-
suaded to give themselves up to the Govern-
ment. From Tasmania they were banished
provisions found for them, and attempts were
to Flinders Island, where huts were built,
made to instruct them in some of the more
simple arts of civilised life. Many of them
died it is said of home-sickness, and even
since their re-deportation to Brown's River,
tion of the race has not diminished. All the
Tasmania, the prospect of the speedy extinc-
with arms delivered them up again, and re-
British prisoners who had been entrusted
turned to their service. According to Mel-
.
ville this famous war cost the Government
about thirty-five thousand pounds, and the
lives of four or five Europeans who were
killed by accident, while only one prisoner of
war was brought into Hobart Town, and even
he escaped soon afterwards into the bush.
His Excellence was nevertheless, and in spite
of the exertions of a few ill-natured grumblers,
overwhelmed with congratulating addresses
from all ports of the colony. From an able
Governor he was exalted into it hero. He
had taught the colonists their strength and
circulated the money which had been hoarded
uselessly in the pubic treasury. His health
was drunk at convivial meetings with deafen-
ing cheers, his super-human exertions and
heroic example lauded to the skies, and
praises such as Camillus himself might have
envied were lavished upon the head of this
fortunate and happy commander.
(To be continued.)
THE MAXWELLS OF BREMGARTEN. A STORY OF TASMANIA. [Founded on Facts.] (ALL RIGHTS ARE RESERVED.) CHAPTER L. (Continued from 11th July.) (Article), Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 - 1899), Saturday 18 July 1868 page Article 2014-10-20 11:16 'the mighty influenice of tattered clothing
r struggle bravely, and used every effort to
t overcome the obstacles which still lay be
e tween them and the promised triumph, when
a whisper flow along the line, followed by an
b quickly disseminated through the ranks,
the mighty influence of tattered clothing
struggle bravely, and used every effort to
overcome the obstacles which still lay be-
tween them and the promised triumph, when
whisper flew along the line, followed by an
quickly disseminated through the ranks,
THE MAXWELLS OF BREMGARTEN. A STORY OF TASMANIA. [Founded on Facts.] (ALL RIGHTS ARE RESERVED.) CHAPTER L. (Continued from 11th July.) (Article), Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 - 1899), Saturday 18 July 1868 page Article 2014-10-20 11:15 Thisong was received with several rounds of
appa'use, being mnor gratifying to the vulgar
tastes bf tlho majority of the hearers than one
of moru' rOfined language and versifeation
could be, and tie owhimsical contortions of
the singi'r lhad the effect, if not of adding' to
his own 'iospebtability, of procuring for him
an oalabli 'thoeigh sh1ot-llved popularity.
promised hornpipe; and the performer com
monesd, having first ceromonlously called
as "liardiir"',' "but that ill-used individual
not choosing bo appear, Baxter throw out his
f self to:sueh fantastic gyrations that the wco ls
legs, extended his arms, and committed him
rasousnded.with the unrestrained laughter of
all' w?ho behold him.. This continued for
dances uittered a strange unearthly howl and'
fell to:the ground struggling. Some of the
bystadedrs ran to hlis tssistanco ; one poured
a pamiican of cold water over hisface, another
untied his' neckcloth. " He is in a fit," said
one; "l1e is dead drunk," said another.
"Turi his head away from the lire, Peter,"
ground whore the poor. man fell was dis
whio'i followed this tragical event. The
enemy' resounded on allsides. The soldiers
from :which the deadly weapon 'had been
rank, and lioured in successive volleys accon
panied with furious'shouts. When the filing
into the" tsngled thickets, but the search
though keit up for'several hours, and warmly
seoonded;by fresh nacessiois 'of force, was in
vain, no 'noiiny was 'discoyvered. 'It' is a
mystery to this day by whom thie unfortu
nate carrier was murdered; but there were
Sthat his sworn foe, Bill Jinkins,' was the solo
SEarly on 'tho following' morning the
author of the poor follow's untimely death.
previously receirved instructions the line
advanced and closed around the :interminable
scrubs that fringed the bases 'of the inhos
pitible and rocky mountains of Buckingham.
They now advanced 'into a' country which
resaombled more tlhefounidation of an anto
diluvian coal' field than anything over before
i seen by civilised eyes. "' Masses of dead trees
progress of the -jaded volunteers, who saw
, that a largo tract of unexplored country was
I still before them; and though the line from
I the ocean on the east to Frederick Henry
I Bay on the south was in length a mere
n bagatelle when compared to what it had
r once so high and extravagant, were now
r considerably bJlow zeto, and this buoyant
, courage was foand to have evaporated before
The song was received with several rounds of
applause, being more gratifying to the vulgar
tastes of the majority of the hearers than one
of more refined language and versification
could be, and the whimsical contortions of
the singer had the effect, if not of adding to
his own respectability, of procuring for him
an enviable though short-lived popularity.
promised hornpipe ; and the performer com-
menced, having first ceremoniously called
as "pardner," but that ill-used individual
not choosing to appear, Baxter threw out his
self to such fantastic gyrations that the woods
legs, extended his arms, and committed him-
resounded with the unrestrained laughter of
all who beheld him. This continued for
dances uttered a strange unearthly howl and
fell to the ground struggling. Some of the
bystanders ran to his assistance ; one poured
a pannican of cold water over his face, another
untied his neckcloth. " He is in a fit," said
one ; " he is dead drunk," said another.
" Turn his head away from the fire, Peter,"
ground where the poor man fell was dis-
which followed this tragical event. The
enemy resounded on all sides. The soldiers
from which the deadly weapon had been
rank, and poured in successive volleys accom-
panied with furious shouts. When the firing
into the tangled thickets, but the search
though kept up for several hours, and warmly
seconded by fresh accessions of force, was in
vain, no enemy was discovered. It is a
mystery to this day by whom the unfortu-
nate carrier was murdered ; but there were
that his sworn foe, Bill Jinkins, was the sole
Early on the following morning the
author of the poor fellow's untimely death.
previously received instructions the line
advanced and closed around the interminable
scrubs that fringed the bases of the inhos-
pitable and rocky mountains of Buckingham.
They now advanced into a country which
resembled more the foundation of an ante-
diluvian coal field than anything ever before
seen by civilised eyes. Masses of dead trees
progress of the jaded volunteers, who saw
that a large tract of unexplored country was
still before them ; and though the line from
the ocean on the east to Frederick Henry
Bay on the south was in length a mere
bagatelle when compared to what it had
once so high and extravagant, were now
considerably below zero, and this buoyant
courage was found to have evaporated before
THE MAXWELLS OF BREMGARTEN. A STORY OF TASMANIA. [Founded on Facts.] (ALL RIGHTS ARE RESERVED.) CHAPTER L. (Continued from 11th July.) (Article), Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 - 1899), Saturday 18 July 1868 page Article 2014-10-20 09:39 : "Take it easy, Bill, if that's your same,"
aid .axter, adminitint rt?g ituibilhattliot
same imd' ameiidrt'klck hi'n-uld ear to lot him
kno, -Iis whereabout?_-.'Taktdeasy,.
iSll,"a ad tlhe carrier agai jupgingon one
sidewt the agility oi rope anal
gIving his adversary a'blow onhoheft ste
of hi- face; and thus he hntinuoeddanaing
,rount hin and tellin'g hini toddike it easy,
gIvinn now a blow and noew akick?until his
enreged foe fairly Iaflhl, sldld~n ae 'Isis
scap frin" the laughiing'tn4 aPIiid
, )dinged it 'l1 be fot~?,ou,'i yoiuiaudadcis sar
, rel ellowing as'lid di so -' I Ii t b
pind si teful wrotch"of a bi'eF. .'. " ''
o it win't, Bill," 'said Bixtor, " don't
r y a Jthat youe will boehangod Idevoutly
beliet ;"bu't it .won't- bhe :for;moeand in
LI I aly,?vitoerions carrier so?qgiai down on a
a our I'll g qd set thbe sport. ,
Log o rdcoverlhis exhaustedi breath, anum.
Sand ond":ditlib?s id6 of him "th'Lguard aigainst
Sor lf ls fieionds mnuing tliemsblves,'behind
Sany reacherous renowal of.'thi attack ?n this
lpar? of Jinkinse :;Baxter's bslood was up to
. g point, his talk flowed rapidly;,:and he
did not rqulen thie adllditional Hlstimls of a v
still' ipamiican of rsuin alnd water to keep his
spirits from flagging. HStislled that he was
well guarded, he ntertaUihned his auditors by k
giving them ia history of the lifo ald exploits o
of Hill Jinkins, which would apparently have h
detained them till morning, had not Juniperl,
told them paromptorily to leave Hill Jinkins o
alone, and give them a song by way of o
changeo,, Baxter got on his logs and reeled i
into thid odpenl spaoo before the fll', sputtoering
out as he did so-" Yes, blister Juniper, I I
knows a song, and can sing it-with ro ia
m0an between hero-and Partigonia--nd I u
can dance the Now Zealana out-throat
hornppO )o with Bill Jlnkins for a pardnoer
so whihh'will yo have, the dance or the I
song I"
', Both" replied the spectators, " the song u
fii's aod tho.dance afterwards.
..Baxter throw hiiself Into a ludlorops atti
tudo,.dommnunced an accompaniment to him
whpich burroadoers will excuse us for omitting.
?,?i? onl an imaginary fiddle, and sang a ditty
" Take it easy, Bill, if that's your game,"
said Baxter, administering to him at the
same time a smart kick in the rear to let him
know his whereabouts. " Take it easy,
Bill," said the carrier again, jumping on one
side with the agility of a rope dancer, and
giving his adversary a blow on the heft side
of his face ; and thus he continued dancing
round him and telling him to take it easy,
giving now a blow and now a kick until his
enraged foe fairly baffled, suddenly made his
escape from the laughing and applauding
hanged it'll be for you, you audacious sar-
circle, bellowing as he did so--" If I'm to be
pint and spiteful wretch of a carrier."
" No it won't, Bill," said Baxter, " don't
go yet ; that you will be hanged I devoutly
believe ; but it won't be for me--and in
The victorious carrier now sat down on a
course I'll go and see the sport."
log to recover his exhausted breath, a num-
and on either side of him to guard against
ber of his friends ranging themselves behind
any treacherous renewal of the attack on the
part of Jinkins. Baxter's blood was up to
boiling point, his talk flowed rapidly, and he
did not require the additional stimulus of a
stiff pannican of rum and water to keep his
spirits from flagging. Satisfied that he was
well guarded, he enteretained his auditors by
giving them a history of the life and exploits
of Bill Jinkins, which would apparently have
detained them till morning, had not Juniper
told them peremptorily to leave Bill Jinkins
alone, and give them a song by way of
change. Baxter got on his legs and reeled
into the open space before the fire, sputtering
out as he did so--" Yes, Mister Juniper, I
knows a song, and can sing it--with ere a
man between here--and Partigonia--and I
can dance the New Zealand cut--throat
hornpipe with Bill Jinkins for a pardner--
so which will ye have, the dance or the
song ?"
" Both," replied the spectators, " the song
first and the dance afterwards.
Baxter threw himself into a ludicrous atti-
tude, commenced an accompaniment to him-
which our readers will excuse us for omitting.
self on an imaginary fiddle, and sang a ditty
THE MAXWELLS OF BREMGARTEN. A STORY OF TASMANIA. [Founded on Facts.] (ALL RIGHTS ARE RESERVED.) CHAPTER L. (Continued from 11th July.) (Article), Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 - 1899), Saturday 18 July 1868 page Article 2014-10-19 20:41 who wore detained, by strict discipline, was
momentarily brokeoi, for friends walked for
miles in search of friends. Mutual recog
nitions and remarks on each othor's pedrsonal
appearanccs imad the woods ring with
laughter. Here was one brothor making en
quiries for another, speakins to the indi
vidual lieo as -iooking for, and not able to
recognise hint in his beard, dirt, and rags:
to come-from to fit him out a second time as
a gentleman. . Amongst the rest Charles
Lhaxwell *rambled without any other
object - than to enjoy himself.
Bo passed his jokes like l the rest,
incessantly froin face to face with nods and
smiles ;'and ab last they remained fixed upon
a countenance which he know well. Ho ran
and caught the willing hurtd. It. was his
seen a friend since ho left home with the
oxceptiin of Buller, who aceompanied him.
The three withdraw from the throng and
made plnUparatiosis to enjoy 'the feast of
bound after the parents of his friend Charles;
"Woe had soime glorious fin yesterday
several ot us went down a deep gully end
was. I was pufling away up the hill when I
mcttwo soldiers, an old man and a youn g
man, coming down as fist as they could
* What's in the wind I' said- I; . ' have the,
blacks bieen seen 1' ' I didn't see none myself,
said the old man stopping; ' but some of the
people 'saw a quare thing go hoppety,
boppety, hop likethis'-and he squatted down.
and began jumping like a kangaroo. Comne
"And we,"' said Edwin, "had a little sport
barn with about fifty othelr people, when who
should come up but Captain V--- with about
a lhundred soldiers drenched with rain, for it
W'bll, the captain rode backwards and for
cost him,fors the poor drowned rats were more
barn door and ordered us all off to our respec.
tive stations some two or three miles off; but
trudge a single inch.. In vain the captain
stormed and threatened, and 'stamped and
swore; the only concessioni he:could get' out
of the wooden headed bumpkins was permis
make him a bed in a corner; but I noticed a
young fellow, the son of a landed prolrietor
tea and- laughing over it, and the more he
laughed the wilder the captain grow."
Later in the evening Clmrles learned that
Juniper and his men were returning to re
occupy their old position in the line; and he
an invitation to share his opossum rug forthe
during .the night. - They then walked to
it ought ' to have been, for the
clothes. in, the open. air, with a stone
]h bad-divested himself. Edwin was about
soon reedy, but Charles interposed. We love
ajol?o sohetitses, provided at is an' Innocsoft'
joke; bubt ajpnnot-.toeo strongly condemn
the hardiness offieatn and' mihplc'd lenergy
which Charlesadilplayod in robrinig his ;friend
of his boots iistead of invitinglin to, break
fast. Edwin did not arouse the saleper,ind
therefore became accessgry, to: thi,piepo,i;,
iniquity. They retuirned-to th?ir own fire,
leaving poor Juniper asleep on his.cold, wet,
hard bed; his veneinbloe hai bleached with
frost, and his,.features'i fswollen froinm- the
effects ofhb tEeight.air;. and ato their. break
fast with internal satisfaction I? :When' they
had eaten enough they iigain visited the .for-,
lorn surveyor, and fond:hllinm. wide: awnlake
bomoaninghlooes of his loots and hctertily
abusing the -coundrol.whol lindstole?a: tluhem;
and they bad the wickedness to opodole with
him and appcear.?priyy for-llia jeoss .,'.Who
ever wears my.o,-rl,? o -d?idlDnpe-iin ihis
excessih·u·'t tegrets, ,0l s hobpe; taay lhve pcir
potualblisters on his feet.!' , If there was sin'
in tho.wiah yelcan:hpladly blame Juniperu.n''
As that was to be a day of rest, our ftiend
had plenty of time to think:os.iwat, waq :.to
be done; and ie forthwith set abdutempairi
ing his loss by makingrnioeassiss.ofssw'llabys
and oIoseaumrlikios.'c stf.heytheoyld.: nbt last:s
long," hie observed to his friends, "but theS!
will leave my feg.li, mdrorl lroom
than the boots dlid, andmI;:hopboithio
toes of the man who: btolo.th~qm -mayb?s
eternally pinched assin, a.vyeaR I?iEdwih, and
Charles laughed at their tottiredirvictimeuand.'
invited him and4Ba:ptito..spedrt..bheateptai
tihe day at thleir;t.fl9T .? pdPerphad been
issued that a strict wa hwas 0 be kept, lest
the natives, hIsi i lst~ili?'io'by theo
rovingar ti'ist udoeonw their attempts
to Ire'ak tlitrughitjtnu auseoh jIan was to be
at his post at s?x '?401k on itle following
lmorng, ?von tie nfiil and dlcisive oellrt
woukh be ?ado, ldindfjil of this, and tyink.
ing i. ploisblo that ,it imigt beL tholir lst
sould meethrig during the war, Juniperanud
inonilority, and aoJapted their friends' invita
The time passed as agreeably as tinib could
be expected to pass uqder the circumstanecs.
Pleasant stories were told, and two or throe
musical nuon joined their voices in harmony
in glees about " Hail smiling E orn," and ,A'
skating we will go." As evening fell propa
rations were made for tea, and whilo Juniper
was busily employed in cutting a respootablo
piece of pork into slices, and laying thean on
divers pieces of bread, a stranger with. a pair,
of boots in his hand accosted hIl with--" Do
those liore boots belong to you, Sir" .
" b yvery boots," said Junipier, looking aup
astonished,u?from his' work; "whore did you got
them I who stole them 1"
S"Bilo 'eom I" said tlhe man, "I don'tknoti
who stble 'em, all I- know is that the slhoo
enake elat Soroll sent 'inm back with his cons
plimonts, he won't mend 'em witliout;the
moneyj; and if so be as the money, isiseont
he'll send 'em-back to Lunnon to o.o mended
by ste4ra, as there's not a.cobbler in this heore
blessed island as:cauimend those hero, boots.a
"Tdll the shoemaker Ieo's an impudent
rascal,'.' roared the excited Juniper; "1. novdr
sent the bdots to be mended at all."
The messongsr disappeared and the con
spirators Inughed.
Thd sun wont down, and the spirits of the
party ose up. There were , besides Charles,
Edwin, Juniper,u and Baxte"-Walker, of
Blanket Bottom; Snowywill, jlun., of Salt
pan Plafins; the lawyer, T. W. RIousal, all tiie
way from Toppletoi Cottago ; Ferman Staple
whose, names, did we record them, would
swell Qur book to the size of a cyclopmdia.
There were two or three niilitary oflicers in.
search' of amusement whoso. cognomens have
day. I The company of Baxter was not ob
jected to, as he was a kind of wag; and. the
certaid extent all distinctions of rank, and
SAfer tea the rum bottle and water can
of the party grew boisterous.--- Great quan
tities qf wood were heaped- upon the social
highest branches of. the surrounding trees
with a sickly supernatural- -glow. The
noise . and songs of the revellers
called around them a large 'party, of the
inon, who sometimes joined in the noise,
though they did not share in the good cheer;'
Baxter cast his eye from tiniomto tiiie around
the crowd of fire-lit- faces, and then asked
Charles, who wlas helping JunipBer-aid BufFer
out with ' Hail to the Chief who'in triumph'
advances,' where Bill- Jinkins was I : Charles
replied that he didn't know,' hp hadn't seen
'dlidn't care whether lie had or not, didn't
want to be bothered about 'Jinkins,. and
wouldn't be bullied or 'made a fool of by
more water to his grog, and Clii-ihes stood up
by thatl When the song was over,-a sten.
torian voice from the 'crowd roared out
"'Give us that agin, gentleman Jupp ; did they
give you back your boots old boy1" Another
continued, "Who was it scratched' your face,
the old woman that took you into the scrub I"
louder tones, "Give him a dish o' biled eggs,
and a sheepskin to make a new pair o' trou
Juniper; "did you hear him, Mr. Juniper l
It's tlhat born son of old Nick, Bill Jinkins
the redoubtable Jinkins Boundingat:boice
his stalwart figure magnified by the glaro-of
the fire, and his hands and face begrimed wiith
sweat and charcoal,;he roared out " NVWhere is
Tim BaxterT''
" Hero I am, Bill," said Baxter with great
coolness, "rand glad I am to see you : how's
then wife and faimilyl You look as if you
was flustered, Bill; what's up" -
""This is up, this is;" said. Bill .vehe
mently, "and I'll tell you what, Baxter?!
you're a low minded spider altogether, to-be
going about and abusing me behind my-back
as you do." '
" Who says sol" 'said Baxter, feigning.
great surprise. -
"Everybody says so," replied the exas
"Everybody lies," said Baxter; " don't
the world is fools anid 'tether half rogues,
and all on 'em liars- together. Here's your,
captain, Mr. "Charley Maxwell, ready to ;take
is --most solemnest-oath that/ 1 don'!tnever:
saytnethini'about you to nobody."
A roar of laughlter from the assembled
-crown ihad the effect of heaping fuel on the
fir of Bill Jilkins's-rage; -The sympathies
'of- tho, bystanderi we'eto evidently with the
facetipus carrier, .andi ;his':antagonist. became
cdnscious that he was a butt-for Baxter's wit
iarid . laughing itock : for rthb.s people:.. He
foameddat the inouth,i and- made a:desperate
attempt tolannihilate the?carrienr byone ter
rible blow,vbetiinsteadmof hitting him he
struck the: air only, dnd very. nearly precipi
Itated lrimselfinto:tlhe-fire. , .. : .,
who were detained, by strict discipline, was
momentarily broken, for friends walked for
miles in search of friends. Mutual recog-
nitions and remarks on each other's personal
appearances made the woods ring with
laughter. Here was one brother making en-
quiries for another, speaking to the indi-
vidual he was looking for, and not able to
recognise him in his beard, dirt, and rags :
to come from to fit him out a second time as
a gentleman. Amongst the rest Charles
Maxwell rambled without any other
object than to enjoy himself.
He passed his jokes like the rest,
incessantly from face to face with nods and
smiles ; and at last they remained fixed upon
a countenance which he knew well. He ran
and caught the willing hand. It was his
seen a friend since he left home with the
exception of Buffer, who accompanied him.
The three withdrew from the throng and
made preparations to enjoy ' the feast of
bound after the parents of his friend Charles ;
" We had some glorious fun yesterday
several of us went down a deep gully and
was. I was puffing away up the hill when I
met two soldiers, an old man and a young
man, coming down as fast as they could
' What's in the wind ?' said I; ' have the
blacks been seen ?' ' I didn't see none myself,'
said the old man stopping ; ' but some of the
people saw a quare thing go hoppety,
hoppety, hop like this'--and he squatted down
and began jumping like a kangaroo. ' Come
"And we," said Edwin, " had a little sport
barn with about fifty other people, when who
should come up but Captain W---- with about
a hundred soldiers drenched with rain, for it
Well, the captain rode backwards and for-
cost him, for the poor drowned rats were more
barn door and ordered us all off to our respec-
tive stations some two or three miles off ; but
trudge a single inch. In vain the captain
stormed and threatened, and stamped and
swore ; the only concession he could get out
of the wooden headed bumpkins was permis-
make him a bed in a corner ; but I noticed a
young fellow, the son of a landed proprietor
tea and laughing over it, and the more he
laughed the wilder the captain grew."
Later in the evening Charles learned that
Juniper and his men were returning to re-
occupy their old position in the line ; and he
an invitation to share his opossum rug for the
during the night. They then walked to-
it ought to have been, for the
clothes in the open. air, with a stone
he had divested himself. Edwin was about
soon ready, but Charles interposed. We love
a joke sometimes, provided it is an innocent
joke ; but we cannot too strongly condemn
the hardness of heart and misplaced energy
which Charles displayed in robbing his friend
of his boots instead of inviting him to break-
fast. Edwin did not arouse the sleeper, and
therefore became accessory to the piece of
iniquity. They returned to their own fire,
leaving poor Juniper asleep on his cold, wet,
hard bed ; his venerable hair bleached with
frost, and his features swollen from the
effects of the night air ; and ate their break-
fast with internal satisfaction ! When they
had eaten enough they again visited the for-
lorn surveyor, and found him wide awake,
bemoaning the loss of his boots and heartily
abusing the scoundrel who had stolen them ;
and they had the wickedness to condole with
him and appear sorry for his loss. " Who-
ever wears my boots," said Juniper in his
excessive regret, " I hope may have per-
petual blisters on his feet." If there was sin
in the wish we can hardly blame Juniper.
As that was to be a day of rest, our friend
had plenty of time to think on what was to
be done ; and he forthwith set about repair-
ing his loss by making mocassins of wallaby
and opossum skins, " They would not last
long," he observed to his friends, " but they
will leave my feet more room
than the boots did, and I hope the
toes of the man who stole them may be
eternally pinched as in a vyce." Edwin and
Charles laughed at their tortured victim, and
invited him and Baxter to spend the rest of
the day at their fire. An order had been
issued that a strict watch was to be kept, lest
the natives, harrassed within the line by the
roving parties, should renew their attempts
to break through it, and each man was to be
at his post at six o'clock on the following
morning, when the final and decisive effort
would be made. Mindful of this, and think-
ing it possible that it might be their last
social meeting during the war, Juniper and
in seniority, and accepted their friends' invita-
The time passed as agreeably as time could
be expected to pass under the circumstances.
Pleasant stories were told, and two or three
musical men joined their voices in harmony
in glees about " Hail smiling morn," and " A
skating we will go." As evening fell prepa-
rations were made for tea, and while Juniper
was busily employed in cutting a respectable
piece of pork into slices, and laying them on
divers pieces of bread, a stranger with a pair
of boots in his hand accosted him with--" Do
those here boots belong to you, Sir ?"
" My very boots," said Juniper, looking up
astonished from his work ; " where did you get
them ? who stole them ?"
" Stole 'em !" said the man, " I don't know
who stole 'em, all I know is that the shoe-
maker at Sorell sent 'em back with his com-
pliments, he won't mend 'em without the
money ; and if so be as the money is sent
he'll send 'em-back to Lunnon to be mended
by steam, as there's not a cobbler in this here
blessed island as can mend those here boots."
" Tell the shoemaker he's an impudent
rascal," roared the excited Juniper ; " I never
sent the boots to be mended at all."
The messenger disappeared and the con-
spirators laughed.
The sun went down, and the spirits of the
party rose up. There were, besides Charles,
Edwin, Juniper, and Baxter--Walker, of
Blanket Bottom ; Snowywull, jun., of Salt-
pan Plains ; the lawyer, T. W. Rousal, all the
way from Toppleton Cottage ; Herman Staple-
whose names, did we record them, would
swell our book to the size of a cyclopædia.
There were two or three military officers in
search of amusement whose cognomens have
day. The company of Baxter was not ob-
jected to, as he was a kind of wag ; and the
certain extent all distinctions of rank, and
After tea the rum bottle and water can
of the party grew boisterous. Great quan-
tities of wood were heaped upon the social
highest branches of the surrounding trees
with a sickly supernatural glow. The
noise and songs of the revellers
called around them a large party of the
men, who sometimes joined in the noise,
though they did not share in the good cheer.
Baxter cast his eye from time to time around
the crowd of fire-lit faces, and then asked
Charles, who was helping Juniper and Buffer
out with ' Hail to the Chief who in triumph
advances,' where Bill Jinkins was ? Charles
replied that he didn't know, he hadn't seen
didn't care whether he had or not, didn't
want to be bothered about Jinkins, and
wouldn't be bullied or made a fool of by
more water to his grog, and Charles stood up
by that ? When the song was over, a sten-
torian voice from the crowd roared out--
" Give us that agin, gentleman Jupp ; did they
give you back your boots old boy ?" Another
continued, " Who was it scratched your face,
the old woman that took you into the scrub ?"
louder tones, " Give him a dish o' biled eggs,
and a sheepskin to make a new pair o' trou-
Juniper ; " did you hear him, Mr. Juniper ?
It's that born son of old Nick, Bill Jinkins
the redoubtable Jinkins. Bounding at once
his stalwart figure magnified by the glare of
the fire, and his hands and face begrimed with
sweat and charcoal, he roared out " Where is
Tim Baxter ?''
" Here I am, Bill," said Baxter with great
coolness, " and glad I am to see you : how's
then wife and family ? You look as if you
was flustered, Bill ; what's up ?"
" This is up, this is ;" said. Bill vehe-
mently, " and I'll tell you what, Baxter :
you're a low minded spider altogether, to be
going about and abusing me behind my back
as you do."
" Who says so ?" said Baxter, feigning
great surprise.
" Everybody says so," replied the exas-
" Everybody lies," said Baxter ; " don't
the world is fools and 'tother half rogues,
and all on 'em liars together. Here's your
captain, Mr. Charley Maxwell, ready to take
his most solemnest oath that I don't never
say nothin' about you to nobody."
A roar of laughter from the assembled
crowd had the effect of heaping fuel on the
fire of Bill Jinkins's rage. The sympathies
of the bystanders were evidently with the
facetious carrier, and his antagonist became
conscious that he was a butt for Baxter's wit
and laughing stock for the people. He
foamed at the mouth, and made a desperate
attempt to annihilate the carrier by one ter-
rible blow, but instead of hitting him he
struck the air only, and very nearly precipi-
tated himself into the fire.

Counts updated hourly

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

  1. BARRY, John Arthur
    List
    Public

    64 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2011-08-02
    User data
  2. KIPLING, Rudyard
    List
    Public

    10 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2011-01-08
    User data
  3. OXENHAM, John
    List
    Public

    1 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2011-01-09
    User data
  4. The Will Forgeries
    List
    Public

    16 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2010-08-14
    User data

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.