Information about Trove user: maurielyn

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,147,717
2 NeilHamilton 2,919,586
3 noelwoodhouse 2,589,202
4 annmanley 2,224,687
5 John.F.Hall 1,983,300
6 maurielyn 1,628,967
7 culroym 1,503,118
8 C.Scheikowski 1,455,338

1,628,967 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

December 2016 5,244
November 2016 1,522
October 2016 191
September 2016 2,098
August 2016 1,202
July 2016 10,621
June 2016 35
May 2016 789
April 2016 215
March 2016 10,393
February 2016 4,991
January 2016 4,856
December 2015 3,718
November 2015 23,784
October 2015 23,715
September 2015 8,676
August 2015 1,500
July 2015 13,919
June 2015 9,102
May 2015 39,756
April 2015 26,402
March 2015 26,337
February 2015 30,109
January 2015 13
December 2014 1,991
November 2014 4,733
October 2014 25,113
September 2014 28,719
August 2014 46,848
July 2014 54,325
June 2014 10,647
May 2014 15,795
April 2014 16,770
March 2014 3
February 2014 92
January 2014 36
December 2013 4,433
November 2013 6,312
October 2013 40,154
September 2013 26,891
August 2013 19,229
July 2013 30,238
June 2013 35,889
May 2013 34,599
April 2013 5,953
March 2013 4,178
February 2013 60
December 2012 122
November 2012 6,412
October 2012 9,007
September 2012 2,074
August 2012 13,001
July 2012 8,995
June 2012 41,702
May 2012 10,728
April 2012 4,423
March 2012 12,588
February 2012 9,171
January 2012 2,655
December 2011 22,428
November 2011 29,308
October 2011 28,340
September 2011 20,977
August 2011 22,871
July 2011 20,215
June 2011 11,018
May 2011 7,946
April 2011 45,102
March 2011 14,791
February 2011 30,582
January 2011 36,679
December 2010 14,510
November 2010 15,639
October 2010 25,076
September 2010 35,694
August 2010 38,196
July 2010 31,494
June 2010 42,660
May 2010 42,984
April 2010 33,196
March 2010 26,158
February 2010 21,768
January 2010 23,693
December 2009 14,169
November 2009 13,910
October 2009 8,721
September 2009 5,101
August 2009 5,707
July 2009 6,083
June 2009 5,576
May 2009 30,715
April 2009 8,466
March 2009 21,801
February 2009 7,575
January 2009 5,156
December 2008 7,165
November 2008 6,402
October 2008 24,538
September 2008 28,111
August 2008 5,372

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,147,716
2 NeilHamilton 2,919,586
3 noelwoodhouse 2,589,202
4 annmanley 2,224,617
5 John.F.Hall 1,983,300
6 maurielyn 1,628,967
7 culroym 1,503,042
8 C.Scheikowski 1,455,331

1,628,967 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

December 2016 5,244
November 2016 1,522
October 2016 191
September 2016 2,098
August 2016 1,202
July 2016 10,621
June 2016 35
May 2016 789
April 2016 215
March 2016 10,393
February 2016 4,991
January 2016 4,856
December 2015 3,718
November 2015 23,784
October 2015 23,715
September 2015 8,676
August 2015 1,500
July 2015 13,919
June 2015 9,102
May 2015 39,756
April 2015 26,402
March 2015 26,337
February 2015 30,109
January 2015 13
December 2014 1,991
November 2014 4,733
October 2014 25,113
September 2014 28,719
August 2014 46,848
July 2014 54,325
June 2014 10,647
May 2014 15,795
April 2014 16,770
March 2014 3
February 2014 92
January 2014 36
December 2013 4,433
November 2013 6,312
October 2013 40,154
September 2013 26,891
August 2013 19,229
July 2013 30,238
June 2013 35,889
May 2013 34,599
April 2013 5,953
March 2013 4,178
February 2013 60
December 2012 122
November 2012 6,412
October 2012 9,007
September 2012 2,074
August 2012 13,001
July 2012 8,995
June 2012 41,702
May 2012 10,728
April 2012 4,423
March 2012 12,588
February 2012 9,171
January 2012 2,655
December 2011 22,428
November 2011 29,308
October 2011 28,340
September 2011 20,977
August 2011 22,871
July 2011 20,215
June 2011 11,018
May 2011 7,946
April 2011 45,102
March 2011 14,791
February 2011 30,582
January 2011 36,679
December 2010 14,510
November 2010 15,639
October 2010 25,076
September 2010 35,694
August 2010 38,196
July 2010 31,494
June 2010 42,660
May 2010 42,984
April 2010 33,196
March 2010 26,158
February 2010 21,768
January 2010 23,693
December 2009 14,169
November 2009 13,910
October 2009 8,721
September 2009 5,101
August 2009 5,707
July 2009 6,083
June 2009 5,576
May 2009 30,715
April 2009 8,466
March 2009 21,801
February 2009 7,575
January 2009 5,156
December 2008 7,165
November 2008 6,402
October 2008 24,538
September 2008 28,111
August 2008 5,372

No text corrections for 'Government Gazettes'


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
LATE JUSTICE HIGGINS. Nettie Palmer's Biography. LONDON, April 16. (Article), Townsville Daily Bulletin (Qld. : 1907 - 1954), Friday 17 April 1931 [Issue No.92] page 7 2016-12-05 16:33 (Australiar. Cable Service.)
a ' (treat Australian Judpe Is the
Mograuhy or the Inle Justke Henry
Bournes HlpKlns liy his nlei-c. Mrs.
Nettle palmer, of Molliourne. formerly
Illgglns, who Is the wife of tho nove
list. Vnnce I'iilmer. The hook ileals
with the family's nil strutrclcs In
Irel.-ind beforo their arrival In Aiw
trnlln. Hnd Justlee Ulsslns- InriefnllR
.ihle Indufli-y nnd determination to
succeed. It r^lln nUcntlon to his
nolltlonl nrllvltlet nnd Ills fine 1ndlc.il
rfporrt anil nvl-iirnlion work, nlso Mf
activities In the Hteh Court. Ad
mirable chapters review the Federa
tion cnmnalcr, ni--J the foundation ft
LATE JUSTICE HIGGINS.
(Australian Cable Service.)
A consciousness valuable memoir of
a great Australian judge is the
biography or the late Justice Henry
Bournes Higgins by his niece. Mrs.
Nettie Palmer, of Melbourne, formerly
Higgins, who is the wife of the nove-
list. Vance Palmer. The book deals
with the family's early struggles in
Ireland before their arrival in Aus-
tralia, and Justice Higgins' indefatig-
able industry and determination to
succeed. It calls attention to his
political activities and his fine judicial
record and arbitration work, also his
activities in the High Court. Ad-
mirable chapters review the Federa-
tion campaign and the foundation of
the Commonwealth.
MRS. VANCE PALMER (Nettie Palmer). (Article), The Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947), Wednesday 13 February 1929 [Issue No.17,534] page 14 2016-12-05 16:24 yesterday for Melbourne, accom
panied by Mr. Palmer ami her two
daughters, Alleen and Helen.
yesterday for Melbourne, accom-
panied by Mr. Palmer and her two
daughters, Aileen and Helen.
MRS. VANCE PALMER (Nettie Palmer). (Article), The Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947), Wednesday 13 February 1929 [Issue No.17,534] page 14 2016-12-05 16:24 yesterday for Melbourne, accom
/a£va£va£vsvsvSYSvsvsv2v?vsvravsva£vrav2vsv2.cv
yesterday for Melbourne, accom-
=========================
AUSTRALIAN WRITER. (Article), The Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947), Saturday 6 June 1931 [Issue No.18,252] page 10 2016-12-05 16:22 .- A rocent photogrnph of "Mro. Vanoe -
Palmor (Nettlo Palmer) who is now
liylng .at Chrystobol Crescent, Haw
memoirs conoerning her unole, the
.late Mr. Justice: Hlgg.lns, has been
favourhbly reviewed by . several ;
' . : leading 'pepors.
A recent photograph of Mrs. Vance
Palmer (Nettie Palmer) who is now
living at Chrystobel Crescent, Haw-
memoirs concerning her uncle, the
late Mr. Justice Higgins, has been
favourably reviewed by several
leading papers.
Tornado causes £20,000 loss (Article), The Courier-Mail (Brisbane, Qld. : 1933 - 1954), Monday 9 January 1950 [Issue No.4094] page 1 2016-12-05 16:18 Dart of North Tamworth this afternoon.
Constable J. A. Smith said:,
The wind drove in from the:
Manilla district, and hit a 200
the Tamworth High School col
apsed. The roof and rafters
mashed on to desks and split
on to another double port
Street. Tamworth, was lifted
ksnee, and was taken to hospital.
James Maner, two-year-old
The child was almost com
pletely burled beneath the
BRISBANE has had 26 suc
cessive doys without rain.
n Brisbane last month com
mred with a normal 507
January is 634 points. .
Immediate rain in Brisbane.
Ine, with north-east and
lorth-west winds. -
'urther rain on the coast north
Sultry conditions, with thun
yesterday was 104deg. at Win
dorah. Lowest was Bides, at
Humidity averaged from 55 tc
60 per cent.,
Iniffo forecasts
A coastal gale, brineinp
leavy rains and some flooding
ibou't January 20, was forecast
ast nleht by Mr. Inigo Jones,
:n a special renort from Cro
lamhurst Observatory.
rioodins: would occur in North
3oast south from Mackay
five Inches.
be the same as during the cor
ivhen heavy rains fell along the
:oast. :
unroofed and many others partly un-
part of North Tamworth this afternoon.
Constable J. A. Smith said:
The wind drove in from the
Manilla district, and hit a 200-
the Tamworth High School col-
lapsed. The roof and rafters
smashed on to desks and split
on to another double port-
Street, Tamworth, was lifted
knee, and was taken to hospital.
James Maher, two-year-old
The child was almost com-
pletely buried beneath the
BRISBANE has had 26 suc-
cessive days without rain.
in Brisbane last month com-
pared with a normal 507
January is 634 points.
immediate rain in Brisbane.
fine, with north-east and
north-west winds.
further rain on the coast north
Sultry conditions, with thun-
yesterday was 104deg. at Win-
dorah. Lowest was 61deg. at
Humidity averaged from 55 to
60 per cent..
Inigo forecasts
A coastal gale, bringing
heavy rains and some flooding
about January 20, was forecast
last night by Mr. Inigo Jones,
in a special report from Cro-
hamhurst Observatory.
flooding would occur in North
coast south from Mackay
five inches.
be the same as during the cor-
when heavy rains fell along the
coast.
SEASONAL FORECAST (Article), Maryborough Chronicle (Qld. : 1947 - 1954), Friday 6 January 1950 [Issue No.24,304] page 5 2016-12-05 16:12 SEASONAL FORECAST;
{Spccial for the Maryborough
Chronicle — Bv Inieo Jones).
time the only guide. The mam
coast, and moderate falls else
gaining in influence as .lujntcr
journals the far west .seems to
have been very dry witli relief
rains about thr 20th.
(Special for the Maryborough
Chronicle — Bv Inigo Jones).
time the only guide. The main
coast, and moderate falls else-
gaining in influence as Jupiter
journals the far west seems to
have been very dry with relief
rains about the 20th.
MORE HOUSING CO-OPERATION? (Article), The Courier-Mail (Brisbane, Qld. : 1933 - 1954), Wednesday 4 January 1950 [Issue No.4090] page 3 2016-12-05 16:10 everybody that decent Aus
n housing camps, Mr. Francis^
;aid at the declaration of thej
Uoreton poll. Conditlonsj!
;hroughout housing camps werej
utterly shocking, he said. They!
xere a reflection on the State!
government which has been in;
ivhich had held office since
The defeated Labour candi
'Labour was beaten, on the
:hurches, the B.M.A., and prac
tically the whole of the Austra
ivhom you persuaded to vote
for you.'
'Suspend rule
011 migrants'
WARWICK, Tuesday.— 'Why
not suspend the migrant ac
period?' said the Warwick
B T. de Conlay) to-day.
The president of the Lan
and English societies got to
speed migration. *
return to the conditions of|
years ago, when the coun
try was flooded with im
country. Jobs and accommoda
'Put migrants
in tents'
and employed only in house
He Is Mr. Colin D. Brodie, a
has bfen in Australia a year,
after 'being forced out of Eng
arthritis.' He has been to Fre
Creek. Mt. Isa. Townsville. the
Atherton Tableland, and Bris
bane — all 'for experience.' He
'Some of these migrants
have been sleeping in bug
them living In tents should be
paradise,' he said.
everybody that decent Aus-
in housing camps, Mr. Francis
said at the declaration of the
Moreton poll. Conditions
throughout housing camps were
were a reflection on the State
government which has been in
which had held office since
The defeated Labour candi-
"Labour was beaten on the
churches, the B.M.A., and prac-
tically the whole of the Austra-
whom you persuaded to vote
for you."
"Suspend rule
on migrants"
WARWICK, Tuesday.—"Why
not suspend the migrant ac-
period?" said the Warwick
B. T. de Conlay) to-day.
The president of the Lan-
and English societies got to-
speed migration.
return to the conditions of
years ago, when the coun-
try was flooded with im-
country. Jobs and accommoda-
"Put migrants
in tents"
and employed only in house-
He is Mr. Colin D. Brodie, a
has been in Australia a year,
after "being forced out of Eng-
arthritis." He has been to Fre-
Creek. Mt. Isa, Townsville, the
Atherton Tableland, and Bris-
bane—all "for experience." He
"Some of these migrants
have been sleeping in bug-
them living in tents should be
paradise," he said.
More Than Coronets. Chambers' Miscellany. CHAPTER V. CONCLUSION. (Article), Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 - 1918), Saturday 14 July 1894 [Issue No.5237] page 1 2016-12-05 15:25 u w®ut 'it' i)ntud be,' Vera ratd ; jaqtfa
do wing oye«. ; David,- to i gorapw
I am glad; X found . tiioee Itotere 1
iBnot toat atrange thing to eay? ; -
-t Well, rather/. Davidconfeeaed. 'I
bbbaaiiketo knowjOMi-rejaspn.' ' i
ci'iYAfq'eface was tornedqpwards jher
«Ber9g!pv|og wdik IwninoaB ligh t
flSBRlSSiMV'eklEE.
jnindedto-
1 '".a . ' ,
--n.- ' .--f
yon are mistaken — that yon can care
enough for me to be my wife?
I Yes ; I ask no greater hononr ; I
covet no dearer happiness.' Hie eyes
! Then, with a snddqn impulse, Vere
buret from him, and, crossing to the
; organ, played a wild 1 Gloria in excehde,'
i foil of rich triumphant chords. , It Ib
the ' Te Deum for a aonl that is free,'
she' explained reverently. 1 The shadow
I the Anioma nf Del Rnen's noesv. Read
I it aloud, please.'
I ' Tbys was my arks of safetio, here
| I found the Englyshs shore ;
Thya ia my home, and here withyn
j Is tronml gone and o'er' —
J David quoted slowly. I think I can
| see yonr meaning, dearest.'
| Vera laughed as ebe laid her head
! npon her lover's shoulder. 'Yes, this
I is my home in very sooth,' she said ;
! 'and there, better, I discovered that
which caused my trouble to be 1 gone
and o'er.' — And now, let ns tell yonr
They passed down the stairs band
clasped in band; the light; filtered
through the device of De Roe, fell npon
Van's face and made it glorious.
'But it must be,' Vera said with
glowing eyes. 'David, do you know
that I am glad I found those letters?
Is not that a strange thing to say?'
'Well, rather,' David confessed. 'I
should like to know your reason.'
Vera's face was turned upwards ; her
eyes were glowing with a luminous light.
'Because they killed my pride,' she
murmured. 'They showed me how poor
and mean I was ; how noble and high
minded you. Forgive me, David ; you
would not have me say any more?' She
held out her white hands to him, her
face full of supplication.
David took the fluttering fingers in
his own and held them firmly. 'There
can be no half-measure between us,' he
saod almost sternly. 'I must have all
or nothing. Vera,do you mean that
you are mistaken—that you can care
enough for me to be my wife?'
'Yes ; I ask no greater honour ; I
covet no dearer happiness.' The eyes
Then, with a sudden impulse, Vera
burst from him, and, crossing to the
organ, played a wild 'Gloria in excelsis,'
full of rich triumphant chords. 'It is
the 'Te Deum' for a soul that is free,'
she explained reverently. 'The shadow
the enigma of Del Roso's poesy. Read
it aloud, please.'
'Thys was my arke of safetic, here
I found the Englyshe shore ;
Thys is my home, and here withyn
Is troubil gone and o'er'—
David quoted slowly. 'I think I can
see your meaning, dearest.'
Vera laughed as she laid her head
upon her lover's shoulder. 'Yes, this
is my home in very sooth,' she said ;
'and there, better, I discovered that
which caused my trouble to be 'gone
and o'er.'—And now, let us tell your
They passed down the stairs hand
clasped in hand; the light, filtered
through the device of De Ros, fell upon
Vera's face and made it glorious.
More Than Coronets. Chambers' Miscellany. CHAPTER V. CONCLUSION. (Article), Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 - 1918), Saturday 14 July 1894 [Issue No.5237] page 1 2016-12-05 15:11 up the broken tiiread
tya y'J1.18 k®® was grave, yetjne
Utter.. . 11 you read aihae:
eiT? ?rne). 'emembet . ry'
denreto he Hud. Yonrehd
my falher
' hSft veryttiing. ®ss; I'
«fetohJkLmy8e a '
hut
and myself that he hsd done so — we
the succession which lie had forfeited
.secret. My father dies, and the secret
with him. And then Dene de Rob ia
Ambrose concluded with the 'triumph
ant air of a man who had absolntely
Bat Vera declined to see it'io the
same light. ' Yon have forced me to
speak, and I must,' she replied slowly.'
'It was wrong. Yon know ft was
ItrnANinM nf rnnr nrnner nnattinn f/t
— - j - — r"i — r — .v
years. He aBsmned to be an honourable
shame of saying bo much of my own
! found you out and restated yoa to your
would you have done under tbe earns
circumstances !' Vera bent forward with
Yen continued. ' You could not have
done such a thing.— Ob, I have watched
to dislike and despise yon ; but my
trouble comes opon me. How can I
ever look the world in the face again f'
your first trouble, and you find it bard
why should not yon ? Yon are not
injured at all. There is no one amongBt
us, man or womau, who has not yielded
great ; he was only obeying the in
junction of a dying mao. And again,
do you think be did not consider yon ?
own! He could have bribed Swayne
into silence ; bat his natare abhorred
soch a deed. My dear, he is your
Vera made no reply for a moment,and
about ber heart was melting like enow
letter?,' Ambrose de Ros went on. But
were written by the husbBnd of my
mother. That is why" we pat them
back in the old casket; thinking they
'You are wrong,' Ambrose- replied.
His voice was not devoid of severity. .
profit. Pride, my dear, is yonr be
setting sin ; it hides the perfect, gener
rest, as if you 'were a different clay, a
ppet of yours, whose works I am just
beginning tovunderstaud, tells us that
Ah ! when yon come to mix with tbe
that means. Iam not like you ; I lack
yonr advantages.
No; you are not like me,' Vera
burst oat impetuously. 'You are a
thousand times better, and I thank yon
for yonr ktadneea. — Oh ! yoa dear, kind,
lesson yon have given me J I am glad
that yon came here ; . I am - glad Hie
estates are yours, becauaeyou ire much
more worthy to control ' them than we
are. And the people herCwre happier
and mora contented; I cansee it in their
faces.' Vera covered hqr face in- her
hands, and burst into tears. i>, -
Ambrose waited until the sunlrifoiae
oat lruui otsnjna «io ctuuuo uauw m
spoke tgain. 'Now you begin to '-bB
yonr father ?
Yes, if you wish it,' Vera scud with
Yon will meet htm as if nothing had
happened; and this mstte'rshailnever
be mentioned between us again. - -Those
- letters have been returned to , the old
casket, becaose it is my fancy that yon
should take them ont'and" destroy 'them
with your own -band. - The -secrets
belongs to three jof-os— Swayne we shall
aside for ever. Yon must come up to-
morrow." - ...
long lashes. - The rare vrith her,
seemed to have washed' aU ber pride
away. As. Ambrose ; rose, she came to
and maidenhair from a glass,-piuned it
on his coat. 'These are my <soIours,and
you snail oe.my zmgnE, .Buesaiuauuwu
gaily. Heir voice was still unsteady, but
thrilling with happiness. ' YouHave
won yonr way into toy heart against
my. will ; but yon cannot say-that iny
capitulation is not graceful. 'Sams pear
et sans reproche.' That is yon, sir.'
' I don't know what that meanB,' Amfe
ruBe- eaid aimply. - Bntf it rignifieB
thatydnlook arhonBand'Tames "hand
somer and SweetCT, now„ vou are. yonr
u&toraTself,rm \nbt going .'tplugntMie
point' - - .. . , !
" AMife&ittoo/Yerncbnfessed.-j-
« Yes, you may kiss me." 'j
Thentorm'hsd -died hwnyalong kljo
wntindsx tbe wavee rolled lazilv m-to
the shore. Only IheavraA lay. on toe
t» VMevidetora thB tempest if
bad placed in ber hands. As a matter
of fact, Vera wanted to view agaio the
scene of David's exploit, to pore npon it
sentimentally. Not that toe admitted
this to herself ; she wonld have been
angry had any one suggested it She had
no Idea that this indignation wonld have
been a direct evidence of love.' Bat then
Vera had"no acquaintance with psycho
the works of Messrs W. D. HoweUeand
of yesterday in the bind ptacidness of
the shore, gray gulls floated Idly on tbe
vaiar 'a aimer was cthvaIv fintiincr nff ttm ;
her laugh rippled out ou the air, and
'You here!' "Vera faltered. 'I — I
thought that I should be alone.
She coloured at the boldness eof the
Bnt David did not appear to notice
and fair, and (hat there was a gentle
light in ber eyes that had never toone
so meekly there before,. .
I daresay,' ho replied mildly. ' I'm
Vera's laugh rangont load and sweet
The anti-climax was too ridiculous. Bnt
it seemed to remove tbe reeling of
restraint between them. ' Strange, "Vera
a man who Is so reckless with his life
Bhould think eo much of a pocket-
. ' It was given to me by a man who
IB dead,' David explained with a ample
father.. ' Besides, it matters little
' For shame f Vera cried indignantly.
they bad turned by mutual consent, and
were climbing the cliff side by side. 1 1
fromyonrloftierstand-point,hei8 nothing
bnt a. poor, uneducated man, who
occupies a position to whloh he is not
ber hand npon David's arm. Her
leaving It mora beautiful than ever, and
infinitely more eweet and womanly.
but I have -changed my mind. I regard
your father as one of the beat and
noblest of men; and, were he ever so
nearly related to me, I conld nob love
him mora ; and I care not who bears
me say bo.'
'Iam glad to hear yon say that,'
David replied. ' I always told yon
what a splendid man he u; and yon
' I-reoognised it from the very fint,'
confession full and absolute. I
Latterly, be bad schooled himself to
think nothing further of Vera . save In a
a red glow ou Vera's cheeks. But the
little bitterly. 'But yon are a thing
caste of Vera de Vere.'
look at her ae they entered the hall at
was there, bat he made no effort to ac
company her when ebe turned towards
the staircase. 'He stood before tbe
burning logs on the heartb, his "feet
upon the hammered irpn rail. - it
seemeff'- to Vera that her pride bad gone
out and entered his tool.
strange timidity bad -taken possession of
her. She pronounced "David's name
.omn' mia fivet. h'mn fill a imlit "avap dnno
no, end he turned swiftly to ber, his
:&ce. aflame, expectant. The purple and
amber light flashing from ' the storied
device in -tbe lancet window fell fall upon
eyes, a .warm look of invitation far more,
eloquent . than any - words could be.
' David,'; toe whispered again, '"' come
along wirtflme ; I want' you.';::/"-
- There , was no occasion for her to re
peat the 'command ; he was by ber side
Hirifctly." He8uwtbat the -hand vesting
.on. the rail. was trembling. . Without a
_£ TV _1 "T> AMeneil fits and
oi A/ei xunu. vpouw
fell on ber koees before it . ' Help me,'
she said, 'since you know what I re
quire.1 - .
in her hand. She clasped them dose
until David had replaced the. parch
ments; then toe broke the ' string that-
bound them - and dropped them in a
kaara All fhb hanpfll ftf fJlA
UtttWOIUI UOBjr V«» vaiv wwmm — — —
Wide capacious grate. ' Ai; if. it -were
Wme-solemn -ordinance, David struck
a match and applied it to Hie yellow
p!l« Gravely and quletljv the twain
watched -until the Sobbing rpqints of
flume died down Buddeihlv/ aim' nothing
butaptneu M, grey teatoerv aanee te-
'-mained. "L'_ - ., ?.
";Tt is gohe," forgotten,' Dayid' mnr-
ishnced.' ''Let it not - be'- mentioned
Ambrose up the broken thread
for her ; his face was grave, yet his
eyes kindly. 'And you read those
letters,' he said. 'My child, if what I
say seems cruel, remember it is my
earnest desire to be kind. You read
those letters from my father to yours,
telling the latter everything. Yes ; I
have read them myself. Leslie de Ros
wrote to his kinsman here from time to
time ; but he never told my mother
and myself that he had done so—we
the succession which he had forfeited
secret. My father dies, and the secret
with him. And then Dene de Ros is
Ambrose concluded with the triumph-
ant air of a man who had absolutely
Bat Vera declined to see it in the
same light. 'You have forced me to
speak, and I must,' she replied slowly.
'It was wrong. You know it was
ignorance of your proper position to
years. He assumed to be an honourable
shame of saying so much of my own
found you out and restored you to your
would you have done under the same
circumstances?' Vera bent forward with
Vera continued. 'You could not have
done such a thing.—Oh, I have watched
to dislike and despise you ; but my
trouble comes upon me. How can I
ever look the world in the face again?'
your first trouble, and you find it hard
why should not you? You are not
injured at all. There is no one amongst
us, man or woman, who has not yielded
great ; he was only obeying the in-
junction of a dying man. And again,
do you think he did not consider you?
own? He could have bribed Swayne
into silence ; but his nature abhorred
such a deed. My dear, he is your
Vera made no reply for a moment, and
about her heart was melting like sow
letter,' Ambrose de Ros went on. 'But
were written by the husband of my
mother. That is why we put them
back in the old casket, thinking they
'You are wrong,' Ambrose replied.
His voice was not devoid of severity.
profit. Pride, my dear, is your be-
setting sin ; it hides the perfect, gener-
rest, as if you were a different clay, a
poet of yours, whose works I am just
beginning to understand, tells us that
Ah! when yon come to mix with the
that means. I am not like you ; I lack
your advantages.'
'No ; you are not like me,' Vera
burst out impetuously. 'You are a
thousand times better, and I thank you
for your kindness.—Oh! you dear, kind,
lesson you have given me! I am glad
that you came here ; I am glad the
estates are yours, because you are much
more worthy to control them than we
are. And the people here are happier
and more contented ; I can see it in their
faces.' Vera covered her face in her
hands, and burst into tears.
Ambrose waited until the sun shone
out from behind the clouds before he
spoke again. 'Now you begin to be
your father?'
'Yes, if you wish it,' Vera said with
Yon will meet him as if nothing had
happened ; and this matter shallnever
be mentioned between us again. Those
letters have been returned to the old
casket, because it is my fancy that you
should take them out and destroy them
with your own hand. The secrets
belongs to three of us—Swayne we shall
aside for ever. You must come up to-
morrow.'
long lashes. The tears, so rare with her,
seemed to have washed all her pride
away. As Ambrose rose, she came to
and maidenhair from a glass, pinned it
on his coat. 'These are my colours, and
you shall be my knight,' she said almost
gaily. Her voice was still unsteady, but
thrilling with happiness. 'You have
won your way into my heart against
my will ; but you cannot say that my
capitulation is not graceful. 'Sans peur
et sans reproche.' That is you, sir.'
'I don't know what that means,' Amb-
rose said simply. 'But if it signifies
that you look a thousand times hand-
somer and sweeter, now you are your
natural self, I'm not going to argue the
point.'
'And I feel it too,' Vera confessed.—
'Yes, you may kiss me.'
* * * * *
The storm had died away along the
deep ; the oaks on the crest looked like
sentinelsw ; the waves rolled lazily in to
the shore. Only the wreck lay on the
granite spar, evidence of the tempest of
yesterday. Already most o9f the wrecked
sailors had departed for the nearest port
of Hull ; the wild feeling of excitement
had subsided into quietness, for loss of
life along that coast was, alas! no
novelty.
Vera toiled along up the slope in the
bright sunshine. She was on her way
to the shore, before calling as Deepdene
on the errand which Ambrose de Ros
had placed in her hands. As a matter
of fact, Vera wanted to view again the
scene of David's exploit, to pore upon it
sentimentally. Not that she admitted
this to herself ; she would have been
angry had any one suggested it. She had
no idea that this indignation would have
been a direct evidence of love. But then
Vera had no acquaintance with psycho-
the works of Messrs W. D. Howells and
of yesterday in the blue placidness of
the shore, gray gulls floated idly on the
water, a shag was gravely fishing off the
her laugh rippled out on the air, and
thought that I should be alone.'
She coloured at the boldness of the
But David did not appear to notice
and fair, and that there was a gentle
light in her eyes that had never shone
so meekly there before.
'I daresay,' he replied mildly. 'I'm
Vera's laugh rang out load and sweet.
The anti-climax was too ridiculous. But
it seemed to remove the feeling of
restraint between them. 'Strange,' Vera
a man who is so reckless with his life
should think so much of a pocket-
is dead,' David explained with a ample
'For shame?' Vera cried indignantly.
they had turned by mutual consent, and
were climbing the cliff side by side. 'I
from your loftier stand-point, he is nothing
but a poor, uneducated man, who
occupies a position to which he is not
her hand upon David's arm. Her
leaving it more beautiful than ever, and
infinitely more sweet and womanly.
but I have changed my mind. I regard
your father as one of the best and
noblest of men ; and, were he ever so
nearly related to me, I could not love
him more ; and I care not who hears
me say so.'
'I am glad to hear you say that,'
David replied. 'I always told you
what a splendid man he is ; and you
'I recognised it from the very first,'
confession full and absolute. 'I
Latterly, he had schooled himself to
think nothing further of Vera save in a
a red glow on Vera's cheeks. But the
little bitterly. 'But you are a thing
caste of Vere de Vere.'
look at her as they entered the hall at
was there, but he made no effort to ac-
company her when she turned towards
the staircase. He stood before the
burning logs on the hearth, his feet
upon the hammered iron rail. It
seemed to Vera that her pride had gone
out and entered his soul.
strange timidity had taken possession of
her. She pronounced David's name
softly, the first time she had ever done
so, end he turned swiftly to her, his
face aflame, expectant. The purple and
amber light flashing from the storied
device in the lancet window fell full upon
eyes, a warm look of invitation far more
eloquent than any words could be.
'David,' she whispered again, 'come
along with me ; I want you.'
There was no occasion for her to re-
peat the command ; he was by her side
directly. He saw that the hand resting
on the rail was trembling. Without a
of Del Roso. Vera opened the lid and
fell on her knees before it . 'Help me,'
she said, 'since you know what I re-
quire.'
in her hand. She clasped them close
until David had replaced the parch-
ments ; then she broke the string that
bound them and dropped them in a
fluttering heap on the hearth of the
wide capacious grate. As if it were
some solemn ordinance, David struck
a match and applied it to the yellow
pile. Gravely and quietly the twain
watched until the sobbing points of
flame died down suddenly, and nothing
but a pinch of gray feathery ashes re-
'It is gone, forgotten,' Dayid mur-
mured. 'Let it not be mentioned
again.'
More Than Coronets. Chambers' Miscellany. CHAPTER V. CONCLUSION. (Article), Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 - 1918), Saturday 14 July 1894 [Issue No.5237] page 1 2016-12-05 12:41 I It wasahareb judgment for a negative
I crime committed in a moment of the
I fercest temptation ; but yonth is prone
I to be hard in its judgments, and it . is
I always those who have known no un-
I gratified desire who are the hardest
I upon tbe weaknesses of poor human
I eitore.
It was all over now, Vera told herself;
I tbe pleasant days had come to an end ;
I she could never show her face at
I Deepdene again. The organ would
I remain nnplsyed ; she wonld tell her
I btter of ber discovery on her retarn,
I ad then she would go away,never more
I to be eeen by those who knew her atory.
I She was thankful that Ambrose bad
I not followed her. All the afternoon ahe
I bill expected him, but he came not
I Sie neter imagined that he was waiting
I rati! she could wrestle with and fight
| don ber sorrow before he approached
I te. Aud later on, when she was par-
I tiling of tea iu solitary state, he arrived,
I and, unannounced, came into the
dnwing-room. Vera's back was to the
light, which wbs softened and snbdned
windows, and he conld not see tbe look
nf misery in her eyes.
Apparently, he was not io the least
(mhumaed ; indeed, when yon came to
( should te. He sat down by the little
gypsy table on which stood the qnaint
write of silver, and begged for a cop
j of tea. The smile on bis handsome,
'Well, he said cheerfully, 'we did
| Hows. None of them seem to be the
mse for their adventure.'
Ten was conscious of a little pang of
conmence. For some hoars now, ehc
bid not given the shipwrecked mariners
die said in a strangled voice. 'How
bebared like a hero.'
1 He did his duty,' Ambrose remarked;
sfiflrwovB till <-i. d _ '
me tears usais to lay
Vs. Pity you weren't there as well,
bwnae David would have liked it.'
' David doeB not know everything,'
ma said bitterly, conscioaB of a little
tinge of reproach in the speaker's voioe.
If he did, he would bate me.'
Ambrose made no reply for a moment;
« appeared to be raptly contemplating
sportive satyr depicted on the frescoed
"! Then a goat-hoofed Pan
Kimed to engage his earnest and critical
tentlcn, 'David does know everything,'
e said qnietly, without movibg his
u8, ' act' " Wis David who first
®e into the secret Yon see, some
o months ago I happened to be torn-
lDffnntflv. a.. . . .. « . K
y" c wnceots oi oiei nei itosos
vtet, when I came upon a handle of
Vers— yon know the ones I mean. —
J the way, my dear, how did yon come
"dMMver them! You left me ao
rreidly this morning, that I hadn't
'to ask yon any questions.'
era explaine(j. So long as she was
pnwaliong upan an abgteact bundle of
paners. tho ... — j .... .
-. , „uluti came gitnty enongn.
«hW the lines of the listener's
48 8e ProceeHeA with
U.?Bayne koew a11 abont these
heanked curtly.
wj he had found them there years
.nu nsd left them for safely. He
know when they wonld be useful,
them ,'caa 00 opportunity of abstracting
, 'fore my father dismmsed him;
"terf Dbt Swayne had taken
addresses. No wonder that
iowd I yoa ao enrijy -m
w vm, J blackmail my father,
tha let. now' wthout success. . Again
th-6" 08ele?8- ®at whsn yott
viv . I" mft0 88 weH> he saw. his'
wnrto Vera's voice died
mJl murmur: she conld eav no
- - ' -
It was a harsh judgment for a negative
crime committed in a moment of the
fiercest temptation ; but youth is prone
to be hard in its judgments, and it is
always those who have known no un-
gratified desire who are the hardest
upon the weaknesses of poor human
nature.
It was all over now, Vera told herself ;
the pleasant days had come to an end ;
she could never show her face at
Deepdene again. The organ would
remain unplayed ; she would tell her
father of her discovery on her return,
and then she would go away, never more
to be seen by those who knew her story.
She was thankful that Ambrose had
not followed her. All the afternoon she
half expected him, but he came not.
She never imagined that he was waiting
until she could wrestle with and fight
down her sorrow before he approached
her. And later on, when she was par-
taking of tea in solitary state, he arrived,
and, unannounced, came into the
drawing-room. Vera's back was to the
light, which was softened and subdued
windows, and he conld not see the look
of misery in her eyes.
Apparently, he was not in the least
embarrassed ; indeed, when you came to
should be. He sat down by the little
gypsy table on which stood the quaint
service of silver, and begged for a cup
of tea. The smile on his handsome,
'Well,' he said cheerfully, 'we did
fellows. None of them seem to be the
worse for their adventure.'
Vera was conscious of a little pang of
conscience. For some hours now, she
had not given the shipwrecked mariners
she said in a strangled voice. 'How
behaved like a hero.'
'He did his duty,' Ambrose remarked;
afterwards till the tears came in my
eyes. Pity you weren't there as well,
because David would have liked it.'
'David does not know everything,'
Vera said bitterly, conscious of a little
tinge of reproach in the speaker's voice.
'If he did, he would hate me.'
Ambrose made no reply for a moment ;
he appeared to be raptly contemplating
a sportive satyr depicted on the frescoed
ceiling. Then a goat-hoofed Pan
seemed to engage his earnest and critical
attention, 'David does know everything,'
he said quietly, without moving his
eyes. 'In fact, it was David who first
let me into the secret. You see, some
two months ago I happened to be turn-
ing out the contents of old Del Roso's
casket, when I came upon a bundle of
letters—you know the ones I mean.—
By the way, my dear, how did yon come
to discover them? You left me so
hurriedly this morning, that I hadn't
time to ask you any questions.'
Vera explained. So long as she was
generalising upon an abstract bundle of
papers, the words came glibly enough.
She saw how the lines of the listener's
mouth tightened as she proceeded with
her story.
'Then Sayne knew all about these
letters ?' he asked curtly.
'Yes ; he had found them there years
ago, and left them for safety. He
did not know when they would be useful.
There was no opportunity of abstracting
them before my father dismissed him ;
but no doubt Swayne had taken
notes of addresses. No wonder that
he found you so easily in Australia.
Then he tried to blackmail my father,
as you know, without success. Again
the letters were useless. But when you
dismissed the man as well, he saw his
way to—to'—— Vera's voice died
away to a murmur ; she could say no
more.

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

  1. BARRY, John Arthur
    List
    Public

    65 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2011-08-02
    User data
  2. BOOTH, Lancelot
    List
    Public

    Australian Author
    (24 September 1845 – 20 May 1913)

    4 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2016-06-11
    User data
  3. KIPLING, Rudyard
    List
    Public

    10 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2011-01-08
    User data
  4. OXENHAM, John
    List
    Public

    1 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2011-01-09
    User data
  5. The Will Forgeries
    List
    Public

    16 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2010-08-14
    User data

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.