Information about Trove user: maurielyn

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

RankCorrectorLines corrected
1 JohnWarren 3,113,143
2 NeilHamilton 2,154,954
3 annmanley 2,013,768
4 noelwoodhouse 1,747,746
5 maurielyn 1,410,733
6 John.F.Hall 1,382,197
7 JudyClayden 1,164,842

1,410,733 lines corrected.

Corrections by month

March 2015 832
February 2015 30,109
January 2015 13
December 2014 1,991
November 2014 4,733
October 2014 25,113
September 2014 28,719
August 2014 46,848
July 2014 54,325
June 2014 10,647
May 2014 15,795
April 2014 16,770
March 2014 3
February 2014 92
January 2014 36
December 2013 4,433
November 2013 6,312
October 2013 40,154
September 2013 26,891
August 2013 19,229
July 2013 30,238
June 2013 35,889
May 2013 34,599
April 2013 5,953
March 2013 4,178
February 2013 60
December 2012 122
November 2012 6,412
October 2012 9,007
September 2012 2,074
August 2012 13,001
July 2012 8,995
June 2012 41,702
May 2012 10,728
April 2012 4,423
March 2012 12,588
February 2012 9,171
January 2012 2,655
December 2011 22,428
November 2011 29,308
October 2011 28,340
September 2011 20,977
August 2011 22,871
July 2011 20,215
June 2011 11,018
May 2011 7,946
April 2011 45,102
March 2011 14,791
February 2011 30,582
January 2011 36,679
December 2010 14,510
November 2010 15,639
October 2010 25,076
September 2010 35,694
August 2010 38,196
July 2010 31,494
June 2010 42,660
May 2010 42,984
April 2010 33,196
March 2010 26,158
February 2010 21,768
January 2010 23,693
December 2009 14,169
November 2009 13,910
October 2009 8,721
September 2009 5,101
August 2009 5,707
July 2009 6,083
June 2009 5,576
May 2009 30,715
April 2009 8,466
March 2009 21,801
February 2009 7,575
January 2009 5,156
December 2008 7,165
November 2008 6,402
October 2008 24,538
September 2008 28,111
August 2008 5,372

Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
CHAPTER V. THE NEW SQUIRE OF ORSDEN GREEN. (Article), Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904), Saturday 14 August 1897 page Article 2015-03-01 19:42 Tin? NEW SQUIltK OF OKSDEN O'llKEX,
. Again it was Saturday afternoon, and once'
THE NEW SQUIRE OF ORSDEN GREEN.###
Again it was Saturday afternoon, and once'
CHAPTER IV. AARON SHELYOCKE EXPLAINS. (Article), Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904), Saturday 14 August 1897 page Article 2015-03-01 19:41 was pondering somewhat deeply.###
" I supposo the Hail will go for an.old song,"
Levi Blackshaw said quietly, with his eyos
uoon Uncle Luke's eyes.
""The whole job lot—Ha', Moss, cottages,
an' colliorv—will bogi'on oivny to someb'dy!"
Luke cried. "That's if there's ami y buyers,"
he added quickly, " which I much misdoubt. "
" I have half a mind to go in for tho busi
ness!" Aaron murmured aloud, yet spoaking
to himself. "It would be somothing, wouldn't
it. Luke, to lioconio ttquiro of Orsden Grcon?
You wouldu't bo ashamed of your wild, rock
less. and sinful brother then, would you?"
He throw himself into his scat with aloud)
laugh, and stared at his companions with liis
keen, alort, groy-bluc eyes, as if to mark tho
effect liis words had prodccod upon them.
stay among us, no matter what olso you do."
"Thank -j'.ou, Napmi/'he answered gravely.
" Bub why/do you wish hie "to 'stay at Oradeii
' "I scarcely know," the girl answered, and
her soft, dark cheek mantled under hie close
gaze.. "Somehow—I oan't tell why—I like
you very muohi" ,
- "So'dol," Mat exclaimed brusquely.
"'I thanlc you two young people-very much.
If it is only to please you both I think X- will
remain in the villago. Now, you youngsters
had better go and havo a good long walk,"
Aaron Shelvocko added, as ba rose to bis feet
again, "I want to have a bit "of a private chat
with -my brother. But there is one thing X
want you all to remember." .
" What isthat?" Blaokshaw onquirod, as he
put on his hat. " ' -
" That: toy name yet is Mr. ' Israel Brown*
might bo mode more difficult to carry out."
The young men nodded :in assent. Naomi
gave ber word to keop the otlior's secret, and
theii the three passed out, leaving tho two
brothers together. j
" A'most singular man that, Matthew," Levi
Blackshaw remarked in liis patronising way,
as they gained the paved space in front of tho
"Black Boar.
"Singular, is lie? I call Undo Aaron b
gradoly nice chap," was Mat's answer. " And,
what's more,"Levi," hb's as straightforward aa
was pondering somewhat deeply.
"I suppose the Hall will go for an old song,"
Levi Blackshaw said quietly, with his eyes
upon Uncle Luke's eyes.
"The whole job lot—Ha', Moss, cottages,
an' colliery—will be gi'en oway to someb'dy!"
Luke cried. "That's if there's anny buyers,"
he added quickly, "which I much misdoubt."
"I have half a mind to go in for the busi-
ness!" Aaron murmured aloud, yet speaking
to himself. "It would be something, wouldn't
it, Luke, to become Squire of Orsden Green?
You wouldn't be ashamed of your wild, reck-
less, and sinful brother then, would you?"
He threw himself into his seat with a loud
laugh, and stared at his companions with his
keen, alert, grey-blue eyes, as if to mark the
effect his words had produced upon them.
stay among us, no matter what else you do."
"Thank you, Naomi," he answered gravely.
"But why do you wish me to stay at Orsden
"I scarcely know," the girl answered, and
her soft, dark cheek mantled under his close
gaze. "Somehow—I can't tell why—I like
you very much!"
"So do I," Mat exclaimed brusquely.
"I thank you two young people very much.
If it is only to please you both I think I will
remain in the village. Now, you youngsters
had better go and have a good long walk,"
Aaron Shelvocke added, as he rose to his feet
again, "I want to have a bit of a private chat
with my brother. But there is one thing I
want you all to remember."
"What is that?" Blackshaw enquired, as he
put on his hat.
"That my name yet is Mr. 'Israel Brown.'
might be made more difficult to carry out."
The young men nodded in assent. Naomi
gave her word to keep the other's secret, and
then the three passed out, leaving the two
brothers together.
"A most singular man that, Matthew," Levi
Blackshaw remarked in his patronising way,
as they gained the paved space in front of the
Black Boar.
"Singular, is he? I call Uncle Aaron a
gradely nice chap," was Mat's answer. "And,
what's more, Levi, he's as straightforward as
CHAPTER IV. AARON SHELYOCKE EXPLAINS. (Article), Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904), Saturday 14 August 1897 page Article 2015-03-01 19:14 "I am'perfectly delighted," she cried,
frankly. " t ani sure every woman must like
a rich unclo. I am only afraid that, having
found you so lato wo shall loso you again very
qiliekly."
" Perhaps not, my dear," he returned
" 1 suppose, Aaron," Luko said, in his old
grumbling way. giving utterance to an idea
his daughter's words had suggested, " that
now you'vo turned up again, like a bad penny
into a goivd sey'rin, you'll bo o(f again an' set
up somewhecr in a big way as a gentlomon?"
"I had some thought of ■ staving in the
village, Luke," was tkoquito unexpected re
"Staying'here, Aaron?"
" Yes. I Jiko tho place, or I should hardly
have come back to it after all these yoais; and
neighbourhood I would do'so."
" There's Osdon Ha' !" Luke cried.
"So there is, and it would boa striking illus
stration of Time's vengeance—of tho grim,
inevitable irony, of ' Fate, if tho ono timo
poacher, rapscallion, and general ne'er-do
well were to slip iiito the shoes of the worth
less Squire who drove him out of tho villago
J Aarou Shclvocke had risen to 1ns feet, and
illumined countenance, • A new—a striking
and it was ovident to those about him that ho
was pondering somewhat deeply.
"I am perfectly delighted," she cried,
frankly. "I am sure every woman must like
a rich uncle. I am only afraid that, having
found you so late we shall lose you again very
quickly."
"Perhaps not, my dear," he returned
"I suppose, Aaron," Luke said, in his old
grumbling way, giving utterance to an idea
his daughter's words had suggested, "that
now you've turned up again, like a bad penny
into a gowd sov'rin, you'll be off again an' set
up somewheer in a big way as a gentlemon?"
"I had some thought of staying in the
village, Luke," was the quite unexpected re-
"Staying here, Aaron?"
"Yes. I like the place, or I should hardly
have come back to it after all these years; and
neighbourhood I would do so."
"There's Osden Ha'!" Luke cried.
"So there is, and it would be a striking illus-
stration of Time's vengeance—of the grim,
inevitable irony, of Fate, if the one time
poacher, rapscallion, and general ne'er-do--
well were to slip into the shoes of the worth-
less Squire who drove him out of the village!"
Aaron Shelvocke had risen to his feet, and
illumined countenance. A new—a striking
and it was evident to those about him that he
was pondering somewhat deeply.###
CHAPTER IV. AARON SHELYOCKE EXPLAINS. (Article), Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904), Saturday 14 August 1897 page Article 2015-03-01 19:09 "Well-saidp lad? I- thahk- you "With- all- my
■heart. .-Whenever Lnoeda biteand a sup I
shall not hositatetooomoto you;"
: Aaron Sholvocke had jumped to his foot
and - was,, wringing the young miner's hard,
looked on with'displeased'faees.
Some folks," old Luke muttered aulkHy,
are readier wi promises than penny-pieces 1
Afore a ___.r ,
to keep aunybody else he owt to keep kissel,
an' then ?' - . i. .
Luke Shelvocko -.stopped suddenly in his
'snarling, and all eyes wire riveted Upon his
unfavoured nephew. Mat, had jumped
angrily, to his feet, his handsome florid face
flushod with feeling, for no oue present- could
mistake the person upon whom the vials of tho
mine Manager's wrath bad been piured.
. "I am hot aware, Uncle Luke, that I ever
troubled you for any fa vour," tho young pitman
cried, with gleaming eyes; bent upon his aged
relative; "and if I ever wanted any thing you
are the very last man in all the world 1' should
think of goiug to. Perhaps I am not all I
might be; I'm rough and ready, I know; hut
what I say 1 mean. 1 say now what I said
before.. My uncle hero is doing right by holp
ing Dan Co^all, and if ever £ can nolp him—if
he.needs it—he can try mo,"
: " There, .Mat; that, .will do .lad," Aaron
said, not unkindly, as his hand patted hiB
nephew's sturdy shoulder. Then ho added in
a lighter vein, as the irato pitman resumed his
seat,;," Come now, lot us have.no quarrelling !
Thisis'a family gathering—a sort of family re
union, 'which I hope we shall all live long to
remenaber and bo, proud of some day. You
'wcro going $<> say.something, Lnkp.". - -
V'I. wore goin' to sey that if yo'. han some
.money to. throw away,--AaronJit's yore own
business, an' I'm-Sorry I. interfered," the late
Manager of the Orsden Green Colliery re
gain'to soy, too," with a dogged shrug of his
round shoulders, "what ov'ry other sensible
chap would say. If yo'vo plenty of monoy
The.Lord'tak's care o'. thoose .as tak'scaroo'
thoireel's .. That's mymotty, Aaron.'.'.
. "And you, Levi? What do you thinkj? I
should like to have tho benefit of your advice,
as you seem neithor so reckless nor passionate
as Mat hero; nor so cynically selfish as my
. "Well, to bo frank with you, Mr. Shel
vocko," the swarthy young clerk began, "I
am bound to confess that thore is golden
advice ' iu what Uncle Luke has said.
Generosity like oharity ought to begin at
home.' Now if you had only returned to
Oraden Green five or ten years ago when you
"Still I am glad now that I didn't corno
then," Aaron cried. •
"Glad! Why?" Levi queried, with, a
puzzled expression on his shrowd, dark coun
tenance. • ■
" Because the seven thousand pounds I had
a few years ago have grown considerably sinco
Friday last I was ablo to open an account with
a bank tlie'ro with something over twenty
"Twenty thcawsand peynds!" old Luke
Slielvocke.muttered avariciously, as bis almost
over his brother from top to bottom,
"That's the amount, Luke!" Aaron criod
gaily. " What do you think of that? Bettor,
"Some "folk has luck!" the older"brother
muttered, in a -voice which meant that those
folk had luck who least dosorvod it. " But
yo're only inalcin' gammon on us a', Aaron?"
" If .you care to seo my bankbook, brother,
perhaps I may show it to you," was the smil
money to you stiok-in-the-mud villagers.
Sometimes you see, Lulco, in spite of all your
old saws, n rolling stono does gather moss." -
" Twenty theawsaud peynds !"(!io old pitman
"Only to think o''that! An' bene I've bin
workin' an' sehaymin', scrapin' an savin', a'
may lahfo for a houdful o' hunderds! It's a
queer warld after a's said an' done!" <
"Thov who venture much .sometimes win
stop at homo and talco things easily can't
get tho dollars deserve thum. What do you
eay, Mat?" •
" I think thoy do," was all the young miner
" I ain suro I have the greatest pleasure in
tho world, Unclo' Aaron, in congratulating
said, blandly, a9 he rose and held out lu's hand.
"Thanks," Aaron said, drily. lie had
unclo just then for the first time, and the
thought of it .did not please him. Then he
turned airily to tho gipsy-faced girl. " What
of an unolv?" • _
chap talks abeawt keepin* or nelpin'
"Well said, lad; I thank you with all my
heart. Whenever I need a bite and a sup I
shall not hesitate to come to you."
Aaron Shelvocke had jumped to his feet
and was wringing the young miner's hard,
looked on with displeased faces.
"Some folks," old Luke muttered sulkily,
"are readier wi promises than penny-pieces!

to keep annybody else he owt to keep hissel,
an' then----"
Luke Shelvocke stopped suddenly in his
snarling, and all eyes were riveted upon his
unfavoured nephew. Mat had jumped
angrily to his feet, his handsome florid face
flushed with feeling, for no one present could
mistake the person upon whom the vials of the
mine Manager's wrath had been poured.
"I am not aware, Uncle Luke, that I ever
troubled you for any favour," the young pitman
cried, with gleaming eyes bent upon his aged
relative; "and if I ever wanted anything you
are the very last man in all the world I should
think of going to. Perhaps I am not all I
might be; I'm rough and ready, I know; but
what I say I mean. I say now what I said
before. My uncle here is doing right by help-
ing Dan Coxall, and if ever I can help him—if
he needs it—he can try me."
"There, Mat; that will do lad," Aaron
said, not unkindly, as his hand patted his
nephew's sturdy shoulder. Then he added in
a lighter vein, as the irate pitman resumed his
seat, "Come now, let us have no quarrelling!
This is a family gathering—a sort of family re-
union, which I hope we shall all live long to
remember and be proud of some day. You
were going to say something, Luke."
"I were goin' to sey that if yo' han some
money to throw away, Aaron it's yore own
business, an' I'm sorry I interfered," the late
Manager of the Orsden Green Colliery re-
goin' to sey, too," with a dogged shrug of his
round shoulders, "what ev'ry other sensible
chap would say. If yo've plenty of money,
The Lord tak's care o' thoose as tak's care o'
theirsel's. That's my motty, Aaron."
"And you, Levi? What do you think? I
should like to have the benefit of your advice,
as you seem neither so reckless nor passionate
as Mat here; nor so cynically selfish as my
"Well, to be frank with you, Mr. Shel-
vocke," the swarthy young clerk began, "I
am bound to confess that there is golden
advice in what Uncle Luke has said.
Generosity like charity ought to begin at
home. Now if you had only returned to
Orsden Green five or ten years ago when you
"Still I am glad now that I didn't come
then," Aaron cried.
"Glad! Why?" Levi queried, with a
puzzled expression on his shrewd, dark coun-
tenance.
"Because the seven thousand pounds I had
a few years ago have grown considerably since
Friday last I was able to open an account with
a bank there with something over twenty
"Twenty theawsand peynds!" old Luke
Shelvocke muttered avariciously, as his almost
over his brother from top to bottom.
"That's the amount, Luke!" Aaron cried
gaily. "What do you think of that? Better,
"Some folk has luck!" the older brother
muttered, in a voice which meant that those
folk had luck who least deserved it. "But
yo're only makin' gammon on us a', Aaron?"
"If you care to see my bankbook, brother,
perhaps I may show it to you," was the smil-
money to you stick-in-the-mud villagers.
Sometimes you see, Luke, in spite of all your
old saws, a rolling stone does gather moss."
"Twenty theawsand peynds!" the old pitman
"Only to think o' that! An' here I've bin
workin' an' schaymin', scrapin' an savin', a'
may lahfe for a houdful o' hunderds! It's a
queer warld after a's said an' done!"
"They who venture much sometimes win
stop at home and take things easily can't
get the dollars deserve them. What do you
say, Mat?"
"I think they do," was all the young miner
"I am sure I have the greatest pleasure in
the world, Uncle Aaron, in congratulating
said, blandly, as he rose and held out his hand.
"Thanks," Aaron said, drily. He had
uncle just then for the first time, and the
thought of it did not please him. Then he
turned airily to the gipsy-faced girl. "What
of an uncle?"
Afore a chap talks abeawt keepin' or helpin'
CHAPTER IV. AARON SHELYOCKE EXPLAINS. (Article), Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904), Saturday 14 August 1897 page Article 2015-03-01 18:52 "Quito true that, too!" was Aaron's
look of triumph at . his brother and his dark
visaged nephew. " Well, 1 havcy quite made
We arc very good friends already, as you havo
all Been, and I think wo shall remain so. I
will keep tho old chap in broad and cheese and
a glass of ale for tho remainder of his days."
• "Does to ineean to sev, Aaron," old Luke
broko out with some warmth,- "that tha
intens to bank o theawsand poyiid—"thou
monoy it makes?" . . j
ready response, " and I fail to see why vou I
should bo displeased about it. If I sinned in
tho past, .surely I ought to - make some atone
ment now?" .
! "If I,,understand my Unclo Luke rightly,":
Levi Blackshaw broko in at this point, "ho
exniation for wrong done, as in tho manner in
which you arc going to make it. Ho thinks
by your genorosity, but oven dograded.
That " .
"Enough, Lqvil" Aaron cried authorita
wish? But-wo need not discuss that further.
( My mind is mad ■ up. Dan is old and a
crippio; I am young and strong vet, coin
'parat-ively speaking. Even if I come to noed
through my genorosity I feel sure that I shall
relativos."
Tho spoakor's eyes fell with a questioning
look first uponhisbrothor, then upon Levi Black
Matthew Shelvocko. Tho first two wore silent
and gave no sign; but tho girl nodded em
phatically, and Mat said energetically— " ,
'"I'ia only a collier, Unci ) Aaron, and a
need anything I have, or uan get, yon shall
havcit as freely as if you were my own father.
If things come to thoAvorst, unclo, I daresay I
Could niauagb to keep us both'." A " *
"Quite true that, too!" was Aaron's
look of triumph at his brother and his dark-
visaged nephew. "Well, I have quite made
We are very good friends already, as you have
all seen, and I think we shall remain so. I
will keep the old chap in bread and cheese and
a glass of ale for the remainder of his days."
"Does to meean to sey, Aaron," old Luke
broke out with some warmth, "that tha
intens to bank o theawsand peynd—"thou-
money it makes?"
ready response, "and I fail to see why you
should be displeased about it. If I sinned in
the past, surely I ought to make some atone-
ment now?"
"If I understand my Uncle Luke rightly,"
Levi Blackshaw broke in at this point, "he
expiation for wrong done, as in the manner in
which you are going to make it. He thinks
by your generosity, but oven degraded.
That----"
"Enough, Levi!" Aaron cried authorita-
wish? But we need not discuss that further.
My mind is made up. Dan is old and a
cripple; I am young and strong yet, com-
paratively speaking. Even if I come to need
through my generosity I feel sure that I shall
relatives."
The speaker's eyes fell with a questioning
look first upon his brothor, then upon Levi Black-
Matthew Shelvocke. The first two were silent
and gave no sign; but the girl nodded em-
phatically, and Mat said energetically—
"I'm only a collier, Uncle Aaron, and a
need anything I have, or can get, you shall
have it as freely as if you were my own father.
If things come to the worst, uncle, I daresay I
could manage to keep us both."
CHAPTER IV. AARON SHELYOCKE EXPLAINS. (Article), Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904), Saturday 14 August 1897 page Article 2015-03-01 18:46 even cared a rap about."###
Shelvocko remarked, his browu faoo and his
j fine eyes lit up with pleasure-as ho followed
every word his relative uttered. - - - ]
auswor. " I am glad now I have done so, if
I it wore only for old Dan Coxall's sake. When
I ran away I was afraid wo had killed him,
| and that was why I came to the village under
| have thought of ooming back at all."
, " Tho sin weighed upon your conscience,
an1 yo'couldn't rest till yo' cooin back an'
repentc£. Well, it's better to mend late i'tho
: day than never." ■ .
■ ■ "Yes, brother; it's decidedly better late
than never. Old Dau will think so when he j
. life; and the loss of that limb deprived him of
the situation ho held. Ho is. poor now and
old, imd has a strong claim upon mo, Luke;
-find I intend to tako care that lie never wants
;so long as I have funds. Don't you think,
! Luke, and you also, Levi, that as a Christian
poor fellow 1 nearly killed ?"
" Dan Coxall is a drunken owd good-for
acerbity t "aud if yo' ban anny money to
throw away yo' could do better nor givo it to
| Dan."
" L havo no money to throw away, Luke.
If I had como home fivo or ten years sinco I
[ could have brought back with me the better
part of soyon thousand., pounds. Now—but
that's nothing to do with tho question of pro
and they can't bo expected to do anything for
| tho old man now that tho Orsden Groon
Colliery has been closed and ho is out of work.
What do you say, Levi? I ask you bocauso
you are a young man—a temporauce advocate,
. I appreciate tho motives, Sir, which impel
believe,.with my Unclo.Luke, that if you givo
Dan money it will all bo wasted in drink."
' You do! Well, thanks for your opinion,
[ Sholvocke said, drily. "And now givo mo
your opinion, Mat." ' .
[ "My opinion, unclo!" the young miner
' cried, with somo confusion, as the colour
j mounted his checks. " I'm not quite suro that
I have nny opinion on tho matter. All I know
is this, sir. , If you have anything to sparo
givo it to owd Dan. lie's not a bad sort, any
way. I've hoard him talk scores of times
about you when you wore a wild.young man
and a poacher, but I never hoard him givo you
a bad name, though ho always did maintain 1
that you were the ringleader of tho gang that
night when ho got hurt so badly."
even cared a rap about."
Shelvocke remarked, his brown face and his
fine eyes lit up with pleasure as he followed
every word his relative uttered.
answer. "I am glad now I have done so, if
it were only for old Dan Coxall's sake. When
I ran away I was afraid we had killed him,
and that was why I came to the village under
have thought of coming back at all."
"The sin weighed upon your conscience,
"an' yo' couldn't rest till yo' coom back an'
repented. Well, it's better to mend late i' the
day than never."
"Yes, brother; it's decidedly better late
than never. Old Dan will think so when he
life; and the loss of that limb deprived him of
the situation he held. He is poor now and
old, and has a strong claim upon me, Luke;
and I intend to take care that he never wants
so long as I have funds. Don't you think,
Luke, and you also, Levi, that as a Christian
poor fellow I nearly killed?"
"Dan Coxall is a drunken owd good-for--
acerbity; "and if yo' han anny money to
throw away yo' could do better nor give it to
Dan."
"I have no money to throw away, Luke.
If I had come home five or ten years since I
could have brought back with me the better
part of seven thousand pounds. Now—but
that's nothing to do with the question of pro-
and they can't be expected to do anything for
the old man now that the Orsden Green
Colliery has been closed and he is out of work.
What do you say, Levi? I ask you because
you are a young man—a temperance advocate,
"I appreciate the motives, Sir, which impel
believe, with my Uncle Luke, that if you give
Dan money it will all be wasted in drink."
"You do! Well, thanks for your opinion,
Shelvocke said, drily. "And now give me
your opinion, Mat."
"My opinion, uncle!" the young miner
cried, with some confusion, as the colour
mounted his checks. "I'm not quite sure that
I have any opinion on the matter. All I know
is this, sir. If you have anything to spare
give it to owd Dan. He's not a bad sort, any-
way. I've heard him talk scores of times
about you when you were a wild young man
and a poacher, but I never heard him give you
a bad name, though he always did maintain
that you were the ringleader of the gang that
night when he got hurt so badly."
CHAPTER IV. AARON SHELYOCKE EXPLAINS. (Article), Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904), Saturday 14 August 1897 page Article 2015-03-01 16:11 Several roasons, ray dear brother/1 Aaron
Sholvocke resumed complaoently, ''induced
mq to come, to the village'Of Orsden Green.'1
Though lie began by addressing Luke' per
sonally, his eyes were roving slowly over the■.
other three as ho went on. Ten years ago I
bad quite made.up my mind that the- country '
I had beep forced to fly to, through the Squire
of Orsden Hall, his gamekeepers, and the out
rageous'game laws of Old England, was about
good enough for me, and that I would end" my
days there. I thought tho matter over many
deserting my auarters." . ' ' " .
" You must have prospered then, sir?" Levi
Blackshaw ventured- to enquire, as his uncle
paused, for a moment. .
■ "I'd made a few thousands, was comfortably .
spttlcd down, and I was not at all certain that :
my return to Orsden Green would bo at ail a
keepor and his assistants whom wo had
mauled; then thero were my own relations,
over, and would bo sorry to see rao again;.and,
even cared a rap abou t."
"Several reasons, my dear brother," Aaron
Shelvocke resumed complacently, ''induced
me to come to the village of Orsden Green."
Though he began by addressing Luke per-
sonally, his eyes were roving slowly over the
other three as he went on. "Ten years ago I
had quite made up my mind that the country
I had been forced to fly to, through the Squire
of Orsden Hall, his gamekeepers, and the out-
rageous game laws of Old England, was about
good enough for me, and that I would end my
days there. I thought the matter over many
deserting my quarters."
"You must have prospered then, sir?" Levi
Blackshaw ventured to enquire, as his uncle
paused, for a moment.
"I'd made a few thousands, was comfortably
settled down, and I was not at all certain that
my return to Orsden Green would be at all a
keeper and his assistants whom we had
mauled; then there were my own relations,
ever, and would be sorry to see me again; and,
even cared a rap about."###
CHAPTER IV. AARON SHELYOCKE EXPLAINS. (Article), Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904), Saturday 14 August 1897 page Article 2015-03-01 16:08 CHAPTER IV.
AARON 8HELVOOKE EXTLAINS.
CHAPTER IV.--
AARON SHELVOCKE EXPLAINS.
THE NOVELIST. THE WATCHMAN OF ORSDEN MOSS. SYNOPSIS OF PREVIOUS CHAPTERS. (Article), Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904), Saturday 14 August 1897 page Article 2015-03-01 16:07 THE WATCHMAN OF OBSDEN
j MOSS.
. BY J. MONK FOSTE&.
■ the.Factory," "A Pit Brow Lassie," "The i
SYNOPSIS OF PRE VIOUS CHAPTERS.
CllAPTRti I. to HI.—A'ter an absence of irany
years, Aaron Khelvocke returns to his native colliery
village, Oradeii. lie has been absent in Australia
nearly all bis life, and on his return' from-his
wanderings he .at first takes the ninne of Brown.
He makes enquiries of old Daniel Uoxall as to his
Shelvocke.Naorai Slielvocke,ami Levi ulack<-liaware
alive. DaU'-recoguises the stranger as the wild
bad died abroad. He invites his relatives to see
should never have left Australia Ho proceeds to
' fooprnroTrr,] >
THE WATCHMAN OF ORSDEN
MOSS.
BY J. MONK FOSTER.
the Factory," "A Pit Brow Lassie," "The
SYNOPSIS OF PREVIOUS CHAPTERS.
CHAPTER I. to III.—After an absence of many
years, Aaron Shelvocke returns to his native colliery
village, Oraden. He has been absent in Australia
nearly all his life, and on his return from his
wanderings he at first takes the name of Brown.
He makes enquiries of old Daniel Coxall as to his
Shelvocke, Naomi Shelvocke, and Levi Blackshaw are
alive. Dan recognises the stranger as the wild
had died abroad. He invites his relatives to see
should never have left Australia. He proceeds to

CHAPTER III. A FAMILY GATHERING. (Article), Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904), Saturday 7 August 1897 page Article 2015-03-01 16:04 "Perhans it would," was the half-smiling;
answer. " But I had a fancy, brother, to en- j
tertain you all when we met. The UBual j
thing is, I know, for the rambler to ask for- '
givenesa for his ramblinge when he gets back
home again—especially if he has to fly for life j
as I had to do—but that sortof thing wouldn't
Suit me. But for one of two things, Luke, I
spending more than one-half of my life there, j
"An' what were those things, Aaron?" the |
elder brother queried, with his eyes watching !
~"I am goingto tell you all, That is why I
speaker, who, after the last word, coolly pro
ceeded to drain hie cup. But no one spoke;
"Perhaps it would," was the half-smiling
answer. "But I had a fancy, brother, to en-
tertain you all when we met. The usual
thing is, I know, for the rambler to ask for-
giveness for his ramblings when he gets back
home again—especially if he has to fly for life
as I had to do—but that sort of thing wouldn't
suit me. But for one of two things, Luke, I
spending more than one-half of my life there.
"An' what were those things, Aaron?" the
elder brother queried, with his eyes watching
"I am going to tell you all. That is why I
speaker, who, after the last word, coolly pro-
ceeded to drain his cup. But no one spoke;

Counts updated hourly

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

  1. BARRY, John Arthur
    List
    Public

    65 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2011-08-02
    User data
  2. KIPLING, Rudyard
    List
    Public

    10 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2011-01-08
    User data
  3. OXENHAM, John
    List
    Public

    1 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2011-01-09
    User data
  4. The Will Forgeries
    List
    Public

    16 items
    created by: public:maurielyn 2010-08-14
    User data

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.