Information about Trove user: liane777

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,550,788
2 NeilHamilton 3,081,182
3 noelwoodhouse 3,025,058
4 annmanley 2,253,573
5 John.F.Hall 2,251,698
...
2144 Boofsdad 10,645
2145 DonnaBishop 10,632
2146 Blacktoomi 10,631
2147 liane777 10,611
2148 lilnla 10,603
2149 jdjames 10,589

10,611 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

July 2017 9,950
June 2017 661

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,550,757
2 NeilHamilton 3,081,182
3 noelwoodhouse 3,025,058
4 annmanley 2,253,503
5 John.F.Hall 2,251,693
...
2144 jdjames 10,589
2145 John.Morriss 10,589
2146 PhilCowan 10,583
2147 liane777 10,579
2148 brucarmac 10,576
2149 TWGHistory 10,576

10,579 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

July 2017 9,937
June 2017 642

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 jaybee67 103,182
2 mickbrook 91,114
3 murds5 54,210
4 PhilThomas 33,402
5 EricTheRed 20,242
...
420 JudeLH 32
421 Kabomurf 32
422 kristie24 32
423 liane777 32
424 Lorrainehug 32
425 margaretpicard 32

32 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

July 2017 13
June 2017 19


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
OUR SERIAL "HEART OF LIANE" CHAPTER XXXIX (Article), The Northern Champion (Taree, NSW : 1913 - 1954), Saturday 8 July 1933 [Issue No.2099] page 8 2017-07-25 20:11 bring her. It had boon a hell of a dumb
.thing to do but he'd taken the chance.
'I'm ill and I want to sec you before
Yes, he had trusted to her lender
lieart.: Evidently he'd been. wrong. You
never knew women oven when you
As. ho throw his cirnottc into the fire
bring her. It had been a hell of a dumb
thing to do but he'd taken the chance.
'I'm ill and I want to see you before
Yes, he had trusted to her tender
heart. Evidently he'd been wrong. You
never knew women even when you
As he threw his cigarette into the fire-
OUR SERIAL "HEART OF LIANE" CHAPTER XXXIX (Article), The Northern Champion (Taree, NSW : 1913 - 1954), Saturday 8 July 1933 [Issue No.2099] page 8 2017-07-25 19:28 Van- Robard stamped about the upart
:m'cii.t, frowning. His man came to the
f'Put it down, Ito, and don't .stand
there grinning. I have a beast of a head
. .boy^M .
The Oriental vanished. When ho
:broucht the fizzing, tumbler Bobard
? drank it gratefully. He pushed the toast
, nwny. and closed his eyes.' ''None of
? ? that. Take, it away, will you? Leave
the' coffeo.; That's. all.' ; ?
' He -.drained the cup and poured an
other.'' .That made him feel better.' He
.'.. oven smilccl a little wryly: Good partj;
last night but his head. was paying for
.. ' 'it. ;,..': ? .'. ? ? '
'.table by the telephone, hitching his
-plum-colored, dressing gown closer about
of a debutante ho had met last week.
Ho sat, drumming on the table. A cigar
.. ? ? Funny Liano hadn 't called. That note
Van Robard stamped about the apart-
ment, frowning. His man came to the
'Put it down, Ito, and don't stand
there grinning. I have a beast of a head-
boy.'
The Oriental vanished. When he
brought the fizzing tumbler Robard
drank it gratefully. He pushed the toast
away and closed his eyes. ''None of
that. Take it away, will you? Leave
the coffee. That's all.'
He drained the cup and poured an-
other. That made him feel better. He
even smiled a little wryly. Good party
last night but his head was paying for
it.
table by the telephone, hitching his
plum-colored, dressing gown closer about
of a debutante he had met last week.
He sat, drumming on the table. A cigar-
Funny Liane hadn 't called. That note
OUR SERIAL "HEART OF LIANE" CHAPTER XXXVII (Article), The Northern Champion (Taree, NSW : 1913 - 1954), Saturday 1 July 1933 [Issue No.2097] page 8 2017-07-25 19:19 the opera- house they sat,' aloof, apart.
The lights died away and tho music be
dwindled to -a hush. The curtain rose.
Liano had been bored by opera. To
nigh't there seemed something infinite1}
touching about the story of the littlo
tore ;dt hot- heart, 'reminded her of what
she had lost irrevocably. Onco sho stole
a glance nt her husband. He sal will.
arm-? folded, hU hend drooping. She
looked away (]u.jekl(\ There was a do
^fenceless qunlity about his poso that
touched her deeply. .
She- forgot that the singer playing
Mimi was sadly overweight and no long
er young, that the Rudolph had- long
ago lost his claim' to manly beauty. .Shu
forgot that thepicce''Was ;\makc believe.
The notes seemed, to drip witlr honeyed
sweetness. They . were a part; ot the
on 'her shoulder. V '{
Softly sho'; touched her eyelids; witli
'the fragile /handkerchief/' she carried.
Tho poignancy- of Mimi's love seemed
It was hard after' that to return to
reality and: the brilliantly lighted amli
torium. Her inother-in-law^s brisk effi
on her a little. Shu longed for dark uiicj
quiet in which- to compose her thoughts.
'Good night, childron doar. I'll ex-,
pect to see.;you at 11 to-morrow.'
Liano was glad to bo. alone in the car
a 'uarling really. She smiled at him
Almost she decided to tell him of Lor
Better to' leave, things as they were.''
Clivc said abruptly,- 'I'm afraid you
get tired of' all this.'
'Oh, it seems ;to mo you have a rathe:
'dull timo of it. Not much gaiety. I'm
fast turning into an old American. busi-
She widened her. eyes at him. '1
could bo1;lots busici'j. bufc:you| mustn't
.sympathise-, wifl.'-lnio on' that- account.'.'.
Sho smiled, thinlcihg of Van across the
the time had flown! -
told Clive. 'And I've inddo a '.resolu
and eatl. Hadn't you' noticed?' ,'
His stem lips relaxed a littlo. ^ 'Your
figure's perfect and you' know it.''
fierce look he turned upoii her, at- the
grimness of his tone. ' ?'.?''
'You little devil. I- believe you're
teasing me!'-' ]?? :?? ..
Sbo .foil those strong hands again on;
her shoulders. ? Her mouth opened in
a 'frightened pry. 'Olive, I wasn't! I
don't know what- you mean!'
His blue eyes burned iiito Lors. ' 'I
wonder if you don't.'. ...-:. .
Sho shook herself frco. .''I don't
You bchavo as if you hated me almost.'
soi'ryT I wish I did somethnos.'
look. . .
She thought, 'Van -wouldn't; treat, mo
like tl.is. vVan is' so gentle. Hven his
voico is silky.' .She said, ?? choking n
littlo, 'You'vo spoiled my nicu livening.
I was linppy, listening to that music.'
She determine!! not to tell him ihw
of hei attpinoou's il\pnturo. '- If lie
eould bp so horrid she would punish him
for it, And she would nee Van again if
sho liked. At least he didn't behave
Clive asked her pardon when they,
??(To be continued)
the opera house they sat, aloof, apart.
The lights died away and the music be-
dwindled to a hush. The curtain rose.
Liane had been bored by opera. To-
night there seemed something infinitely
touching about the story of the little
tore at her heart, reminded her of what
she had lost irrevocably. Once she stole
a glance at her husband. He sat with
arms folded, his head drooping. She
looked away quickly. There was a de-
fenceless quality about his pose that
touched her deeply.
She forgot that the singer playing
Mimi was sadly overweight and no long-
er young, that the Rudolph had long
ago lost his claim to manly beauty. She
forgot that the piece was make believe.
The notes seemed to drip with honeyed
sweetness. They were a part of the
on her shoulder.
Softly she touched her eyelids with
the fragile handkerchief she carried.
The poignancy of Mimi's love seemed
It was hard after that to return to
reality and the brilliantly lighted audi-
torium. Her mother-in-law's brisk effi-
on her a little. She longed for dark and
quiet in which to compose her thoughts.
'Good night, children dear. I'll ex-
pect to see you at 11 to-morrow.'
Liane was glad to be alone in the car
a darling really. She smiled at him
Almost she decided to tell him of her
Better to leave things as they were.
Clive said abruptly, 'I'm afraid you
get tired of all this.'
'Oh, it seems to me you have a rather
dull time of it. Not much gaiety. I'm
fast turning into an old American busi-
She widened her eyes at him. 'I
could be lots busier, but you mustn't
sympathise with me on that account.'
She smiled, thinking of Van across the
the time had flown!
told Clive. 'And I've made a resolu-
and call. Hadn't you noticed?'
His stern lips relaxed a little. 'Your
figure's perfect and you know it.''
fierce look he turned upon her, at the
grimness of his tone.
'You little devil. I believe you're
teasing me!'
She felt those strong hands again on
her shoulders. Her mouth opened in
a frightened cry. 'Clive, I wasn't! I
don't know what you mean!'
His blue eyes burned into hers. ' 'I
wonder if you don't.'
Sho shook herself free. ''I don't
You behave as if you hated me almost.'
sorry. I wish I did sometimes.'
look.
She thought, 'Van wouldn't treat me
like this. Van is so gentle. Even his
voice is silky.' She said, choking a
little, 'You've spoiled my nice evening.
I was happy, listening to that music.'
She determined not to tell him now
of her afternoon's adventure. If he
could be so horrid she would punish him
for it. And she would see Van again if
she liked. At least he didn't behave
Clive asked her pardon when they
(To be continued)
OUR SERIAL "HEART OF LIANE" CHAPTER XXXVII (Article), The Northern Champion (Taree, NSW : 1913 - 1954), Saturday 1 July 1933 [Issue No.2097] page 8 2017-07-25 18:30 As one under a spell sl.o followed
him. She paused at the door of thu
flower shop juat off tho lobby. 'I'll do
one of my errands hero and now,' sho
havo tulips and narcissus and some yel
low roses for her centre i-ieco.
Van watched hor with a little quivk
man to bring gardenias. Carefully hu
choso three perfect, w'nxy blooms-. Tin
they made a decoration for her shoulder:
'These aro my favourites. How did
'I didn't but they suit you'' '
Togethor they went into tho big,
dance tunes. Liano stripped off her:
gloves. :?
'They tell me Clivc's deep in affair.;
down at tho office of the estate.'
you had heard about it? Yes, he's be-'
ing lerrifiglally interested in .business
His mother is so pleased'' '
She poured. his tea. Lemon? Ah, ho:
The hot, swoet liquid seemed to- clear'
her head, mado her fool less giddy.' This
was the hour sho had dreamed of, long
ago. A table between them, his smile,;
tho remembered glance. Only now shc;
woro a narrow ring upon her. finger, a
ring tl.at had not been there before.
deepened in tho narrow canyon of the
street. Lights sprang on. Traffic be--,
came noisier. None of this Liane hoard.
Van talked as she had never heard' him
talk before Wittily, amusingly, imper
sonally. No handclasps under . the da
mask. No dreamy glances. . . ? . . ; '.
Yet sho felt his spell with' tl.e old
time potency. She struggled to free her
self from it as sleepers try to free them
gown, one of rose tissue, lay in its pris
tine folds, waiting, to bo worn. Cliva
They had so much to say to eaith
'Thi3 has been great fun. We must
do it again.' , .
As Liane vodc away she fhought,
my friends, mayn't I? Clivo would not
But she did not mention the meet
ing to him. When she arrayed- herself
in the new frock she pinned the gar
Clive's 'Had a good day?' hold a
benefit he kissed Liano. The girl thought
he looked at her rather oddly across tl.e
. Cass had come to dinner, too. 'But
I must leave early,' she said. 'I'm mi
for the first act, you know.' Sho looked
rested, eager. The play was extraor
dinarily successful in a season of fail
ures. Cass hud now clothes and a few
comforts in the flat. She would not lut
Clivc give her anything. Sho was very
proud. ? ?
» * # e
dreamily listening to ' the others talk.
Her mind was busy elsewhere. : ' ' —
Bohcmc to-night,' she heard her mother
Tho girl roused herself. 'No, I love
that.' ? . : ?'.-.: / '
greeting us Clivo helped her into the ?ur.
motors on the avenue. The street wii3
like ;t black lane of waters along which
the lights flashed red and green, red ant!
A girl stood at tho crossing, clutch
gaze took in the trio in ? the car — tlie-
young man, so stern lipped and hand
some in his gleaming hat, tho girl, lan
guid above her grmine, the dowager,
Liane witched tho girl on the curb as
a .'thin 'young man darted out of the
service entrance of ;i great building and
slipped a hand under her arm. Clivc,
too, had observed the lovers' rendez
vous. It was a' little drama in a side
street. The boy and girl drifted on '
girl has her man. She may shiver but!
she's happy.' ?
The girl had 'not; heard. She roused
herself to listen. ?
As one under a spell she followed
him. She paused at the door of the
flower shop just off the lobby. 'I'll do
one of my errands here and now,' she
have tulips and narcissus and some yel-
low roses for her centre piece.
Van watched her with a little quick
man to bring gardenias. Carefully she
chose three perfect, waxy blooms. Tin-
they made a decoration for her shoulder.
'These are my favourites. How did
'I didn't but they suit you''
Together they went into the big,
dance tunes. Liane stripped off her
gloves.
'They tell me Clive's deep in affairs
down at the office of the estate.'
you had heard about it? Yes, he's be-
ing terrifically interested in business
His mother is so pleased''
She poured his tea. Lemon? Ah, he
The hot, sweet liquid seemed to clear
her head, made her fool less giddy. This
was the hour she had dreamed of, long
ago. A table between them, his smile
the remembered glance. Only now she
wore a narrow ring upon her finger, a
ring that had not been there before.
deepened in the narrow canyon of the
street. Lights sprang on. Traffic be-
came noisier. None of this Liane heard.
Van talked as she had never heard him
talk before. Wittily, amusingly, imper-
sonally. No handclasps under the da-
mask. No dreamy glances.
Yet she felt his spell with the old
time potency. She struggled to free her-
self from it as sleepers try to free them-
gown, one of rose tissue, lay in its pris-
tine folds, waiting to be worn. Clive
They had so much to say to each
'This has been great fun. We must
do it again.'
As Liane rode away she thought,
my friends, mayn't I? Clive would not
But she did not mention the meet-
ing to him. When she arrayed herself
in the new frock she pinned the gar-
Clive's 'Had a good day?' held a
benefit he kissed Liane. The girl thought
he looked at her rather oddly across the
Cass had come to dinner, too. 'But
I must leave early,' she said. 'I'm on
for the first act, you know.' She looked
rested, eager. The play was extraor-
dinarily successful in a season of fail-
ures. Cass had new clothes and a few
comforts in the flat. She would not let
Clive give her anything. She was very
proud.

dreamily listening to the others talk.
Her mind was busy elsewhere. ' '-
Boheme to-night,' she heard her mother-
The girl roused herself. 'No, I love
that.'
greeting as Clive helped her into the car.
motors on the avenue. The street was
like a black lane of waters along which
the lights flashed red and green, red and
A girl stood at the crossing, clutch-
gaze took in the trio in the car — the
young man, so stern lipped and hand-
some in his gleaming hat, the girl, lan-
guid above her ermine, the dowager,
Liane watched the girl on the curb as
a thin young man darted out of the
service entrance of a great building and
slipped a hand under her arm. Clive,
too, had observed the lovers' rendez-
vous. It was a little drama in a side
street. The boy and girl drifted on
girl has her man. She may shiver but
she's happy.'
The girl had not heard. She roused
herself to listen.
OUR SERIAL "HEART OF LIANE" CHAPTER XXXVII (Article), The Northern Champion (Taree, NSW : 1913 - 1954), Saturday 1 July 1933 [Issue No.2097] page 8 2017-07-25 17:16 Liane was walking down Fifth Ave
were giving that night in thoir rooms.
It wti.s to be a farewell party for Clivo's
mother who 'sailed 'on tho morrow for
tho crossing where she was held by a
red light- she felt n light touch on her
arm. She looked up into Van Eoburd's
darkly smiling eyes. ? '
Liane stammored, 'I thought you had
'Next week. 'What luck' running. Into
Ho fell into stop beside her. 'You're
looking fit,',' he said.
They talked linualtios. Clive wes
Ilndn.'t Van heard f Linue kept
her voice steady with an effort. He:
heart wn.s pounding in tho old, remem
bered wny.
They stopped nt n coiner ns the east
big hotel towering above them ami
spoke ns if on an impulse.
'Come in .'.ml have tea with me,
Liane was walking down Fifth Ave-
were giving that night in their rooms.
It was to be a farewell party for Clive's
mother who sailed on the morrow for
the crossing where she was held by a
red light she felt a light touch on her
arm. She looked up into Van Robard's
darkly smiling eyes.
Liane stammered, 'I thought you had
'Next week. What luck running into
He fell into stop beside her. 'You're
looking fit,' he said.
They talked banalties. Clive was
Hadn't Van heard? Liane kept
her voice steady with an effort. Her
heart was pounding in the old, remem-
bered way.
They stopped at a corner as the east
big hotel towering above them and
spoke as if on an impulse.
'Come in and have tea with me,
OUR SERIAL "HEART OF LIANE" CHAPTER XXXVII (Article), The Northern Champion (Taree, NSW : 1913 - 1954), Saturday 1 July 1933 [Issue No.2097] page 8 2017-07-25 17:01 .'.'Never mind. We're going to the Fifty
Club to see Martone. You'll liko that.':
do have fun.' Sho trotted along, tak
ing two steps to his one. At tho corner
he Hailed a taxi'
?hat and change my shirt every day. Now
li.-ivn married a millionaire or else .wear
'Shush. Yo'all talks biggoty, Mister
Man, but yo's skeeredo' inc.';
They chortled foolishly. The- sleepy
tnxi-man thought, 'Another pair of
tight ones.' .
good five minutes later, putting her ha';
ou straight,' ''I don't think Liano is
happy. Do you?' ' .
not. I'm for. the noble institution of
marriage.' . :
'You nieaii that?' :.
? His answer v/as bo vigorous she /hail
to do horjjps nil over again before they
reached %o Fifty Club. .; . ?
'CHAPTER XXXVIII
Liane was walking down Fifth' Ave
nue on one of those February days whicil
hold a false promise of spring. Sho was
'Never mind. We're going to the Fifty
Club to see Martone. You'll like that.'
do have fun.' She trotted along, tak-
ing two steps to his one. At the corner
he hailed a taxi'
hat and change my shirt every day. Now
have married a millionaire or else wear
'Shush. Yo'all talks biggety, Mister
Man, but yo's skeered o' me.'
They chortled foolishly. The sleepy
taxi-man thought, 'Another pair of
tight ones.'
good five minutes later, putting her hat
on straight, ''I don't think Liane is
happy. Do you?'
not. I'm for the noble institution of
marriage.'
'You mean that?'
His answer was so vigorous she had
to do her lips all over again before they
reached the Fifty Club.
CHAPTER XXXVIII
Liane was walking down Fifth Ave
nue on one of those February days which
hold a false promise of spring. She was
OUR SERIAL "HEART OF LIANE" CHAPTER XXXVII (Article), The Northern Champion (Taree, NSW : 1913 - 1954), Saturday 1 July 1933 [Issue No.2097] page 8 2017-07-25 12:10 ;.;';'? again.
:?? »????''-'., '0 '.-'?? .';?*.'? ? *?' . .-.. '
';,'??.:???'. -;ffis toue.was gentle, pleading. She
(: --/'/could not bear to have him so. , She
:' ynanagod 'to smile. By the time they
?V.^.vteachcd tho. apartment building in which
,i ?'-''rthe'yoiirig Desmonds lived she was quite
I ? : composed agaiii... Mui'iel met them 'n u
?? ' flurry of silver tissue and. a scent of
.:. ; /wood . smoko. They wore ushered in*,o
,;' V a'i small room, crowded with rare f urni-'
v-- tuiqnnd good prints. A long table in
£?'?-. ono^cornerwas brave with lace and what
':?? their hostess airily told thorn wore five
'?;? «--nt ;dishes. Her 'candle sticks were Geor
' gian. silver, her finger bowls were from
' ; : 'WooTwoVth 'p. '
.'?? - . Chuck appeared prosently, smiling and
: at, ease in shabby dinner clothes.' They
' all.'sat down and a clumsy mulatto in a
' ' dubious apron stumblod in and out with
tlolcctablo food. Mushroom Binip whi'jli
: could not havo been bettered at, Dol.
.. ?mdjiin'eo'fl in tho old dnw. Little bir1^
' .coolvcd to- the' color of strained- 'lioncy.
!????????????????????
Prns greon as lettuce and unhid in n
Ming bowl. Ices and . coffee strong
'You do yoursolf well, Mrs. Dos,
mond,' said Clivo in mock amazement;.
Muriel was casual. 'I've learned (o
cook. Hcpsy is teaching mo and wdat
shn. doesn't know I do. Together we
r.iunugo vciy well.' ' '
It wns odd to s«ec the air of. nmtronli
ness, of satisfaction, sho wore.
'These things wore grandmother's'
sho said, waving at the chairs, the grace
and. they were all in storage. Mother
was taking thorn. Tried to stop mo. ' '
' Chuck watched her as 8he chattorod,
his expression a mixturo of pride and
'She's cute, isn't sho?' he asked
them both. ' ' ,t
was ? a .softness, a bloom about this .new.
On the way homo Cli»e Kaa stiff,
for behaving so badly,' ha said at.
length. 'It was unpardoiJjmle. '
'Oh, Lord,. I am making a moss of
it!' he. cried. 'I was a fool to think
'.She checkod the childish tears. 'You
worcn't and we can make it work.' Sh-5
ami of it. . is
'Give mo a cigarette, darling.' He
shut qff the ? blues singer ' moaning
through the radio. 'What's tho itiat
out?' His tono was casual but in
before they arrived. They wcro too
Ho touselled her hair. ' ' Never be
like that to me, woman, will yon?'
She slipped down into his lap. Sho
w6rry you much?'
It seemed to satisfy her. 'Tunny,'
thought Van was cur-crazy for her once,
but ho seemed to lose interest.'
jealous on me?' ? ?
nature.'. He stood up, dumping her un
ceremoniously to the floor.- 'Got to see
a man.' . :
She looked at Tier wrist watch. 'Chuck
o 'clock. I 'm trailing along. '.
Ho pretended anger. ? 'It's an assign
vanished into tho bedroom, reappearing
with a «6at on her arm. 'No two- tim-
ing in this ..house, baby. I go by-by
with you! '.'?''..
He laughed at hor. He couldn't help
'Ummm. Hope so.' ?
again.'
His tone was gentle, pleading. She
could not bear to have him so. She
managed to smile. By the time they
reachcd the apartment building in which
the young Desmonds lived she was quite
composed again. Muriel met them in a
flurry of silver tissue and a scent of
wood smoke. They were ushered into
ture and good prints. A long table in
one corner was brave with lace and what
their hostess airily told them were five-
cent dishes. Her candle sticks were Geor-
gian silver, her finger bowls were from
Woolworth's.
Chuck appeared presently, smiling and
at, ease in shabby dinner clothes. They
all sat down and a clumsy mulatto in a
dubious apron stumbled in and out with
delectable food. Mushroom soup which
could not have been bettered at, Del-
menico's in the old days. Little biris
cooked to the color of strained honey.

Peas green as lettuce and salad in a
Ming bowl. Ices and coffee strong
'You do yourself well, Mrs. Des-
mond,' said Clive in mock amazement.
Muriel was casual. 'I've learned to
cook. Hepsy is teaching me and what
she doesn't know I do. Together we
manage very well.' ' '
It was odd to see the air of matronli-
ness, of satisfaction, she wore.
'These things were grandmother's'
she said, waving at the chairs, the grace-
and they were all in storage. Mother
was taking them. Tried to stop me. ' '
Chuck watched her as she chattered,
his expression a mixture of pride and
'She's cute, isn't she?' he asked
them both.
was a softness, a bloom about this new
On the way home Clive was stiff,
for behaving so badly,' he said at
length. 'It was unpardonable. '
'Oh, Lord, I am making a mess of
it!' he cried. 'I was a fool to think
'She checked the childish tears. 'You
weren't and we can make it work.' She
arm of it.
'Give me a cigarette, darling.' He
shut off the blues singer moaning
through the radio. 'What's the mat-
out?' His tone was casual but in-
before they arrived. They were too
He touselled her hair. ' ' Never be
like that to me, woman, will you?'
She slipped down into his lap. She
worry you much?'
It seemed to satisfy her. 'Funny,'
thought Van was cur-erazy for her once,
but he seemed to lose interest.'
jealous on me?'
nature.' He stood up, dumping her un-
ceremoniously to the floor. 'Got to see
a man.'
She looked at her wrist watch. 'Chuck
o 'clock. I 'm trailing along. '
He pretended anger. 'It's an assign-
vanished into the bedroom, reappearing
with a coat on her arm. 'No two- tim-
ing in this house, baby. I go by-by
with you! '
He laughed at her. He couldn't help
'Ummm. Hope so.'
OUR SERIAL "HEART OF LIANE" CHAPTER XXXVII (Article), The Northern Champion (Taree, NSW : 1913 - 1954), Saturday 1 July 1933 [Issue No.2097] page 8 2017-07-25 11:43 '?????????????????????????????????????????-
? OUR SERIAL i
I 'HEART OF LIANE' 1
1 BY S
? MABEL McELLIOTT. . ?
????????????????????I
They took a nmnll apartment at tlio
Bleeckman sinco their plans for the fu
herself in the position oil many nnother
youthful bride. She hnd timo on her
. first it was pure' luxury to have her tray
her, and the whole, long day boforc her
Clivc went to has office early and re
turned Tathcr late. The mini who had
been in cWrge of the estate for years
?had lately suffered a nervous break
down. ; Gliye found things nt sixes and
sovens. He was a man of business at
' 3a»t, much -to his mother's satisfaction,
but there were no tea. parties and shop
ping expeditions. Clivo acemed to Liane
older, gravor, increasingly silent.
She would dawdle through tl.e morn
: jngs; Perhaps she would order the car
around' and. go shopping. Some days
-she lunched with her. mother. Wcek
??.??.?.'- .'eijga.. sho and Clivc usually spent at
?Willow Stream. Here a suite was turned
, ? over for their use. But mostly Liano
''certain futility about her days. If they
? had taken a house and she had been ab
'sorbed in the fascinating business of
furnishing it sho might not have tasted
.??'' One day Muriel's high, imperative
' '.Voice reached her over the telephone.
'.'??' 'Do come and dine with us some
..?.-?:. night. -We're hutching in one of thoso
.. % wants to see you both. How about
?:',:??. '-Thursday?'
-*-.' ?.'-. Liane . said they would be delighted.
. -She was excited at tho prospect of see
ding Muriel again. She forgot her Tosont
' mont of a few months before. Muriol
?..-.' seemed more likable since she had mar
...?' ' riod her penniless writing man.
?'? ??.-'?'?. She told Clive about the invitation.
.. - He said abstractedly, 'I thought you
??'. ''. /.didn't like her.'
. '?..? ; Liane smiled. 'I didn't now and then.
???, ?:? '.'' She:Tather snubbed mo. But she's fun,
',-. really. Wo needn't go if you. don't
% '????? mindi.' ,'
.;. - 'I don't mind. If you'd enjoy-. seeing
}/'?',; them, of course we'll go.'
? v-' She 'took great pains with her appear
,.-';?? ance the evening of the dinner party;
?:?'?' Vifhori Clive came into the living room
.;. . of 'their suite, she stood in the doorway,
?smiling at him. . ' ?
. , , -'All Teady?' .
;.',;.- !r:;;; ;.'-Iiiane was in white and silver, the
-;1 ??'? .:': silk cunningly cut and contrived to make
'_ ,'.;':' her slini' figure alluring. She wore her
' -pearls. The diamond bracolet glittered
.;. .nt. her wrist.
??.?'.,'.'?''. -'We're dining at what time?'
''.'..???' 'Seven-thirty. Muriel snid to be
?;'I punctual. Her cook is temperamental.'
?,..-;;.. .They descended in the elevator. They
:;?;'. -woro still at the Bleeckman, having dc
;V ; eided. not to take an. apartment until
-M- after thoir trip to the Par East.
!'-; ' 'You look charming.' Clivo's tone
.' was formal. 'I liko that frock.'
;S-'. 'Thank you. I hoped you would.'
.',':- ? :? She turned her oyes to his with inno
?; ?:? ? .#ont coquetry. Hastily ho reached for
, .' a cigarette. . / . .- :
.': 'What 'a that perfume you're wear
.-'? .ing?'' . . ?? ' v .;. ?' ?- ?
'.;'V-i' 'Mimosa. D'you likeit?'V
?,'???;.;.'.. ..''Very much.-' It's sophisticated for
:;. .you.' -? ;?? ? ,'?'?;?': - ';;? ?' ?? ?
'. She smiled. 'Don't you 'think I'm
:'. ? 'Sophisticated?' ?' ';'
...' 'I hadn't noticed. it.' '
£/v She leaned nearer to ; glance at the
? 'Street' light. 'Oh,. I do believe ,ho's
?/, '.' taken tho wrong street.''. Her hair just
??.'.'.-? brushed Clive 's cheek.
? ; ?? . With ono abrupt movoment, he swept
? ''?'. hor into .his arms. His grasp was hard,
' ;'. compelling. ?
:'??' Liaiic felt his lips on hers, demanding.
??:.;?. .. She struggled in his clasp.
?..'.-'!??,?.' ''You'try inctdo har9, d'you hear?'
'.'?. Those Were the words she heard.
~- ? As suddenly as ho had seized her, he
: , let'Vher go. 'I'm sorry. Forgive me.
.. 1 forgot myself.'
,/^^hc- was' breathing hai-d. She put her
'-*? hand' to her lips. ' ' Oh, oh, you hurt
Inc.' She was whimpering, like a child
; '.- Ayhd has been frightened.
v ''1 didn't moan to. You're so sweet
? ;.??..!? 'rrso utterly desirable. I went of? my
:' ? '?' head.' 1 tell you I'm sorry.'
v:: - '..?A great tear trombled on the edgii
.' v ' of! her lashes. He took a big, soft k'er
';' ,-': -. chipf and wiped it away. ?
- . forgot it, won't you? I'll not offend
;.;';'? again.^ ?? ?.; .??.,'? ? ?

OUR SERIAL
'HEART OF LIANE'
BY
MABEL McELLIOTT.

They took a small apartment at the
Bleeckman since their plans for the fu-
herself in the position of many another
youthful bride. She had time on her
her, and the whole, long day before her
Clive went to his office early and re-
turned rather late. The man who had
been in charge of the estate for years
had lately suffered a nervous break-
down. Clive found things at sixes and
sevens. He was a man of business at
last, much to his mother's satisfaction,
but there were no tea parties and shop-
ping expeditions. Clive seemed to Liane
older, graver, increasingly silent.
She would dawdle through the morn-
ings. Perhaps she would order the car
around and go shopping. Some days
she lunched with her mother. Week-
ends she and Clive usually spent at
Willow Stream. Here a suite was turned
over for their use. But mostly Liane
certain futility about her days. If they
had taken a house and she had been ab-
sorbed in the fascinating business of
furnishing it she might not have tasted
One day Muriel's high, imperative
voice reached her over the telephone.
'Do come and dine with us some
night. We're hutching in one of those
wants to see you both. How about
Thursday?'
Liane said they would be delighted.
She was excited at the prospect of see-
ding Muriel again. She forgot her resent-
ment of a few months before. Muriel
seemed more likable since she had mar-
ried her penniless writing man.
She told Clive about the invitation.
He said abstractedly, 'I thought you
didn't like her.'
Liane smiled. 'I didn't now and then.
She rather snubbed me. But she's fun,
really. We needn't go if you don't
mind.'
'I don't mind. If you'd enjoy seeing
them of course we'll go.'
She took great pains with her appear-
ance the evening of the dinner party.
When Clive came into the living room
of their suite, she stood in the doorway,
smiling at him.'
'All ready?'
Liane was in white and silver, the
silk cunningly cut and contrived to make
her slim figure alluring. She wore her
pearls. The diamond bracelet glittered
at her wrist.
'We're dining at what time?'
'Seven-thirty. Muriel said to be
punctual. Her cook is temperamental.'
They descended in the elevator. They
were still at the Bleeckman, having de-
cided not to take an apartment until
after their trip to the Far East.
'You look charming.' Clive's tone
was formal. 'I like that frock.'
'Thank you. I hoped you would.'
She turned her eyes to his with inno-
cent coquetry. Hastily he reached for
a cigarette.
'What's that perfume you're wear-
ing?''
'Mimosa. D'you like it?'
''Very much. It's sophisticated for
you."
She smiled. 'Don't you think I'm
sophisticated?'
' 'I hadn't noticed it.' '
She leaned nearer to glance at the
street light. 'Oh, I do believe he's
taken tho wrong street.'' Her hair just
brushed Clive 's cheek.
With one abrupt movement, he swept
her into his arms. His grasp was hard,
compelling.
Liane felt his lips on hers, demanding.
She struggled in his clasp.
''You try me too hard, d'you hear?'
Those were the words she heard.
As suddenly as he had seized her, he
let her go. 'I'm sorry. Forgive me.
I forgot myself.'
She was breathing hard. She put her
hand to her lips. ' ' Oh, oh, you hurt
me. She was whimpering, like a child
who has been frightened.
''I didn't mean to. You're so sweet
-so utterly desirable. I went off my
head. I tell you I'm sorry.'
A great tear trembled on the edge
of her lashes. He took a big, soft ker-
chief and wiped it away.
Forgot it, won't you? I'll not offend
;.;';'? again.
OUR SERIAL "HEART OF LIANE" CHAPTER XXXV (Article), The Northern Champion (Taree, NSW : 1913 - 1954), Saturday 24 June 1933 [Issue No.2095] page 8 2017-07-25 10:56 papers in Liano 's lap. 'D'you mind if
They: .were' ser(vcd:. little': cakes ; flayored
with cinnamon. .? ? -A- great -..while 'vat am
bled into the '.patio and thoy pourod
some cream in a- saucer for it. '
' 'Let's drive ' back to New York,''
I, Clive cried. 'Chap's been wanting to
sell mo a car but'. I'd \iftallcil hnn off.'
Liane:.:\yas., appalled, at; this , idea. /.'But
'you've ttlnoo^.it' homo'' ?
'What diffoiento 'does that nuke?'
' Slio laughed. ? '1, forgot; .1 can't get
used to all this.' I
It was settled thou; - It would be 11101 o
fun than going back-.by,:. train.. They
had been away ? lour'. wcokB,; slMseemoJj
longer. Liano was anxious to see hoi
mother again. - ? ? \ 1
? Day bv day as thoy travelled tho wen- 1
ther growtcoldcn . Tho southern -interlude |
lind been pleasant but Liano. know? sho |
was returning to a more: critical.; woild
She dreaded taking up the new respon-,
sibihtios; Atlor all, bho only 10.
and iuox])oricncod. , ? ? .
Some oi this dread she iiiipai tod to
Clive He l.mgLed .itthei foais. 'Wo'll
got a ^ decorator if youvllko lo do -tho
apartment.' But she . domuuod. ,.'T
think I'd. llko to try. my. hand, at . it if
yoii'll help inc.' :
?He was delighted. ? -('Don't: lot,' Mother
steer voir too much. She'll have us. all
docked out in Victorian whul-nots. . Slip,
loves .'oiii.' - .
Liane said, 'It isn't fliijl; .1 mind cl.oos
ing the things for our. place. . It's moot
ing people. Taking my . placp , us..*
hoste-is ' * (
'Don't worr\V |'t'Y^u'i'«S;;nyoiv(Ioriiil;
They'll never know* it yoii'.havO a touch
oi st.igoinght'' „f« i ^
He thought to himself thai, : she was)
more composed than pnauy a. gbi of his
nwii world. .. '.Ife Said -sn .*? and slui was
pleased; .
. '.Do 'yon think so,, really ?'
'Of course.' Sho leaned over, Im
pulsively squeezed his tree hand.
Tl.o color flooded his face, darkened
? 'Don't do that unless you really mean:
it,' lie said.
,!She withdrew hastily ?« sorry.f:
Sho v.bit hor lip to -keep uback - tho - tears.
?She had forgotten. It wasnjt fair; of hira
to -say that. ? p - i t ? .' .s v- ,
. - ' n , ?
That night they reachcd Washington,
just after nightfaM. Liane 'was enchant
ed with, the city.i From the lull above,
it looked like a 'dusting of atars on
- : Tra vol-stai-nod and , weary, tlicy drew
lip rat a hotel oi :natioiiai- -fanio. Clive'tv
casual inquiry, at the desk aroused* a
bored clerk. . _. . -- ..
'Mr. ; Cleespaiigli ? ; Certainly. v. We
It was thus evor^whore tlioy wont
Menials springing -\to --attention.,; , Liaiit*
; yvas ainused and excited : byi it 'USiially
;But; to-iiigl.t shc )vas tooVtii'edl^'Hej' heail
ached.:, ..Without .stopping^tO- reUiove hei
little :brdwn . hat she ^slipped dowii upon
'tlio bed, 'her , fill' cbat dropping- from her
shoulders. -, V
'Worn out ?' ;
' lust about.' She raised, ii wan' face
tO.Clive'.S. -.. .. ';!?
? He ,wii^ coiitritc.;;- 'My -S &ult;:::: 1
shouldn't have tried to break the rocord.'
Ho rang for service. : . A bus boy eauie.
'Sorry, sir. We're uhoft-handed. All
the: inaids lun'o gone.' ?
Clivo ^Kut tho door on the voluble
boy aiid 'hisi-.ico water. J '.'I'lbput you t-j i
bed niysoli,'; he told -Liane.
She tried to spring up, appalled. ,
'You're ill. ?-..'?-Don't bo. a little . tool.'
At, the words she tell back. Tonderlv
liy took the tur: coat irom her, -lilted her
hat. Ho unstrapped her bag, took- irom
it the fragile, ncentod night things.
? 'Lie still; sillv.' His tone was stern.
Liane ? might liavo been a recalcitrant
child. . Sl.e ' was iaint . with fatigue,
Every : bono in her body 1 ached; She
struggled to rise/ . ,
'Ueallv, you neodii't bother. 1 can
manage perfectly: well' myself .'
Her 'head throbbed ,'painiully. There
were dark : circles beneath her dyes.
Clivo find, 'Don't ; :bo ' a -goose. . Lie
down'' ? ? ,. ? ...' ?. - -7 v ?
Ho was unlaciiig her littler ; brown,
shoes now. Drowsily /she folt horseli'
littod, ? felt the softness of/ her: silko'i:
ho was holding a glass ot: water to hei
lips
'Here, lake this.'/ Ho gave . her , an
aspernr tablet.: ?
She -took it meekly. She slept. Sit
ting in tlio big chair, ho kept watch over
her for ,uii' hour. : When hoi was at last
satisfied.' She whs 'quiet he dragged' linn -
self, dog tired, to his own room. But,
curiously-.onongh lie did not; sloop; Hj
sat, -smoking,-'- brooding, deep into the
night. Once lie struck the palm , of his
big hand angrily against I lie armchair,
ifis look was that of n man faced with
a problem whfch has no splutloii.
(To bo continued):
papers in Liane 's lap. 'D'you mind if
They were served little cakes flavored
with cinnamon. A great white cat am-
bled into the patio and they poured
some cream in a saucer for it.
' 'Let's drive back to New York,''
Clive cried. 'Chap's been wanting to
sell me a car but I'd stalled him off.'
Liane was appalled at this idea. 'But
you've three at home!''
'What difference does that make?'
She laughed. 'I forgot. I can't get
used to all this.'
It was settled then. It would be more
fun than going back by train. They
had been away four weeks. It seemed
longer. Liane was anxious to see her
mother again.
Day by day as they travelled the wea-
ther grew colder. The southern interlude
had been pleasant but Liane knew she
was returning to a more critical world
She dreaded taking up the new respon-
sibilities. After all, she was only 19
and inexperienced.
Some of this dread she imparted to
Clive. He laughed at her fears. 'We'll
get a decorator if you like to do the
apartment.' But she demurred. 'I
think I'd like to try my hand at it if
you'll help me.'
He was delighted. 'Don't let Mother
steer you too much. She'll have us all
decked out in Victorian what-nots. She
loves 'me.'
Liane said, 'It isn't that I mind choos-
ing the things for our. place. . It's meet-
ing people. Taking my place as a
hostess.'
'Don't worry. You're wonderful.
They'll never know it you have a touch
of stagefright.'
He thought to himself that she was
more composed than many a girl of his
own world. He said so and she was
pleased.
'Do you think so, really ?'
'Of course.' She leaned over, im-
pulsively squeezed his free hand.
The color flooded his face, darkened
'Don't do that unless you really mean
it,' he said.
She withdrew hastily. I'm sorry.
She bit her lip to keep back the tears.
She had forgotten. It wasn't fair of him
to say that.

That night they reached Washington,
just after nightfall. Liane was enchant-
ed with the city. From the hill above
it looked like a dusting of stars on
Travel stained and weary, they drew
up at a hotel of national fame. Clive's
casual inquiry at the desk aroused a
bored clerk.
'Mr. Cleespaugh ? Certainly. We
It was thus every where they went
Menials springing to attention. Liane
was amused and excited by it usually
But to-night she was too tired. Her head
ached. Without stopping to remove her
little brown hat she slipped down upon
the bed, her fur coat dropping from her
shoulders.
'Worn out ?'
' Just about.' She raised, a wan face
to Clive's.
He was contrite. 'My fault. I
shouldn't have tried to break the record.'
He rang for service. A bus boy came.
'Sorry, sir. We're short-handed. All
the maids,have gone.'
Clivo shut the door on the voluble
boy and his ice water. 'I'll put you to
bed myself,' he told Liane.
She tried to spring up, appalled.
'You're ill. Don't be a little fool.'
At, the words she tell back. Tenderly
he took the fur coat from her, lifed her
hat. He unstrapped her bag, took from
it the fragile, scented night things.
'Lie still silly.' His tone was stern.
Liane might have been a recalcitrant
child. She was faint with fatigue
Every bone in her body ached. She
struggled to rise.
'Really, you needn't bother. I can
manage perfectly well myself .'
Her head throbbed painfully. There
were dark circles beneath her eyes.
Clive said, 'Don't be a goose. Lie
down'"
He was unlacing her little brown
shoes now. Drowsily she felt herself
litted, felt the softness of her silken
he was holding a glass of water to her
lips.
'Here, take this.' He gave her an
asperin tablet.
She took it meekly. She slept. Sit
ting in the big chair, he kept watch over
her for an hour. When he was at last
satisfied she was quiet he dragged him
self, dog tired, to his own room. But
curiously enough he did not sleep. He
sat, smoking, brooding, deep into the
night. Once he struck the palm of his
big hand angrily against the armchair.
His look was that of a man faced with
a problem which has no solution.
(To be continued)
OUR SERIAL "HEART OF LIANE" CHAPTER XXXV (Article), The Northern Champion (Taree, NSW : 1913 - 1954), Saturday 24 June 1933 [Issue No.2095] page 8 2017-07-24 18:10 Tho first part of the programme had been
ordinary. A pule, vouug man with ner
vous mien had played the. violin in
Thoy consulted their programmes. The
wero by Sara Teasdalo.
Liane closed lier eyes. The song toro
at her heart. Sweet and clear as tho
lluto notes, perfect and separate as fall
from the background of the accompani
'Look back with longing eyes, ayd
Lift mo up in your love us a light wind
rain ... -
But what if I heard my first love calliug
mo again?' -
'nold mo on your heart as tlio bravo
Take ni e far away to tho hills that hide
your homo. ''
Pcaco shall thatch the roof und lovo
But what if I heard my first lovo calling
mo once moro?'
There wore tears in her eyes and sho
threatened to suffocuto her. She did not
daro to look at the man beside her.
He mado a sudden movement, said
softly in hor car, .'.'Do you mind, if
in here.' ' - ,
With eyes downcast, she followed liim.
By tho time they liiul rcaehod the lawn
sho was composed again. Clivo lit it
. Lianc nodded. She had not known
what a traitorous thing momory could
be. Half an hour licioro sho would-have
sworn that she liad put Van Bobard com
pletely out of hor mind. Now memories
stung hor like whips and tho old pain
in her heart began to throb again.'
'Want to bathe?' ^ Clivo asked sud
occupy hor mind. -
When she. omorged in hor white und
and scarlet jersey ho eyed her with ap
proval. ' ?
'You've complotoly lost, that prison
arrived.' .
She ran along, tho sand, revoling in
! the sun and the blue sky, the perfect
weather. Why couldn't sho b^ utterly,
thing. Sho was — sho must be — an un
grateful girl. Spurred by tho thought,
she exerted herself to bo charming. Sho
mndo Clive laugh. She told him foolish
little stories oi hor life with her mother,
of the 'convent. She thought. 'Why, it
isn't necessary to cherish that acho in
my side. I can forgot it if I try really
hard. ' ' '
She wondered wliv it .was sp easy
for her to talk to Clivo. She marvelled
as other women liavo marvelled before
her, at the phenomenon of perfect un
derstanding existing ljetweon herself and
another. ~ —
' I 'm going to forgot all ? this '.'non
sense,' she told . .herself ' resolutely,
dressing for dinner that night. She fdit
suddenly and unaccountably- light heart
ed. ' ' '-T
'Everything, will, bo straightoned out
when I got1 back to Now York,'- sho
decided. ' 'I am Clive 's wife. How
can I ovqii think of another man.' The
simple code sho had .learned since child-,
hood strengthened hor. One was loyal j
in thought as well as m deed. Very well,
she would bo. There wore no halt moa
surcs in tho little world in ?? which she I
had grown up. : ' - ' i
In spito of tlieso bravo resolutions'!
sometimes lier heart tailed hor;'- .'i
'Shall J M-cmemboi'-hini-avhen l am
old?' she wondered, tooling hor hoart1
beat faster -when she saw. his name one
day in a Now York paper. . 'Will it al
ways be like this?' ' '? ?
Against '' her : will, sho tolt restless.
She and Clivc rode,- - swam, ? danced to
gether. Clivo was all' that was perfect.'
Kind, courteous aiid amusing. Still thoy
remained strangers.- Tlio porfoct golden
days dawned and waned; Stars rose over
a summer sea u/id a moon liko'a Bolasco'
backdrop appeared to mock her. ? A year
ago she hud been a mere.: child,. . light-
lioartcd, unthinking.' Now she was a
woman; yearning ior something — sho
scarcely know what. -
Cass wrote happy letter*. 'Now
that you're settled : . was tlio- burden
of her i of lam. i
. ' Poor mother. 1 fdidn 't' know I- was
such a- worry ;to horj.'vLiano said ono
morning handing. n iioto- across the tablo
to Clive. ?
Ilis* bluo gaze caught, ? jhold hers. His
tone was odd. 'You didn't?' ' .
'No, why should 1?' . . - '
He said, £It you'll just glanco. at your
s'olf in tlie .mirror, perliups you - can
gUOSS.' 0 ,
She half turned in her chair, jumliiig
unwillingly, nt hor own reflection. With
out., vanity she admitted the girl in the
Ralo .gi'een peignoir with the cascade of
curling hair on lier shoulders was n fail'
sight-'- .
'If you'd i been' Ugly; she wouldn't
lijave worr.iod^' ' Clivo said atiflly.
Liano crimsoned. She thought there
Abruptly she /'.l angod the: subject.
' i ' ' - * - *
'When did -you ? mean to, .start for
day.- , , ? . -
'Any ? time.' - Next- month, perhaps.
Why?;' ' '
'I just'wondoicd/'i , ,
'You ? getting -. :tircdf:- '..of* tliia', place?
Shall we- push von?'.' ,
.She considered : this. 'As you lilto.
I've loved it but if you want to. go. back
why then— She swung out her arms
to the wide world. ...... -
He watched her moodily. '.Let's start
to-morrow.' .. .
; ''Whatever^ you say, milord.' -
lie started bhek' -as' if struck; 'Don't
call mo that.'' ' '
N Her I6ok; both surprised; and hurt. 'I
won't, if? y.ou'd , rather not/'. i; ? .
'Please' don't ' ' r , (
. She :'hadj' novei' seen- him sin this mood
before but when thoy slopped for tea
slie won ' liim out of it; ' The 'day was
perfect, not too hot, lHit too wimly. Tlio
clouds /drifted (' across . a' sapphire; sky:
The first part of the programme had been
ordinary. A pale, young man with ner-
vous mien had played the violin in-
They consulted their programmes. The
were by Sara Teasdale.
Liane closed her eyes. The song tore
at her heart. Sweet and clear as the
flute notes, perfect and separate as fall-
from the background of the accompani-
'Look back with longing eyes, and
Lift me up in your love as a light wind
rain ...
But what if I heard my first love calling
me again?
'Hold me on your heart as the brave
Take me far away to the hills that hide
your home. ''
Peace shall thatch the roof and love
But what if I heard my first love calling
me once more?'
There were tears in her eyes and she
threatened to suffocate her. She did not
dare to look at the man beside her.
He made a sudden movement, said
softly in her ear. 'Do you mind, if
in here.'
With eyes downcast, she followed him.
By the time they hadl reached the lawn
she was composed again. Clive lit a
Liane nodded. She had not known
what a traiterous thing memory could
be. Half an hour earlier she would have
sworn that she had put Van Robard com-
pletely out of her mind. Now memories
stung her like whips and the old pain
in her heart began to throb again.
'Want to bathe?' Clive asked sud-
occupy her mind.
When she emerged in her white and
and scarlet jersey he eyed her with ap-
proval.
'You've completely lost that prison
arrived.'
She ran along the sand, reveling in
the sun and the blue sky, the perfect
weather. Why couldn't she be utterly,
thing. She was — she must be — an un-
grateful girl. Spurred by the thought,
she exerted herself to be charming. She
made Clive laugh. She told him foolish
little stories of her life with her mother,
of the convent. She thought, 'Why, it
isn't necessary to cherish that ache in
my side. I can forget it if I try really
hard. '
She wondered why it was so easy
for her to talk to Clive. She marvelled
as other women have marvelled before
her, at the phenomenon of perfect un-
derstanding existing between herself and
another.
' I 'm going to forget all this non-
sense,' she told herself resolutely,
dressing for dinner that night. She felt
suddenly and unaccountably light heart-
ed. '
'Everything will be straightened out
when I get back to New York,' she
decided. 'I am Clive 's wife. How
can I even think of another man.' The
simple code she had learned since child-
hood strengthened her. One was loyal
in thought as well as in deed. Very well,
she would be. There wore no half mea-
sures in the little world in which she
had grown up.
In spite of these brave resolutions
sometimes her heart tailed her.
'Shall I remember him when l am
old?' she wondered, feeling her heart
beat faster when she saw his name one
day in a New York paper. 'Will it al-
ways be like this?'
Against her will, she felt restless.
She and Clive rode, swam, danced to-
gether. Clive was all that was perfect.
Kind, courteous and amusing. Still they
remained strangers. The perfect golden
days dawned and waned. Stars rose over
a summer sea and a moon like a Belasco
backdrop appeared to mock her. A year
ago she had been a mere child, light
hearted, unthinking. Now she was a
woman, yearning for something — she
scarcely knew what.
Cass wrote happy letters. 'Now
that you're settled. . .' was the burden
of her refrain.
' Poor mother. I didn't know I was
such a worry to her,' Liane said one
morning handing a note across the table
His blue gaze caught, held hers. His
tone was odd. 'You didn't?'
'No, why should I?'
He said, 'If you'll just glance at your
self in the mirror, perhaps you can
guess.'
She half turned in her chair, smiling
unwillingly at her own reflection. With
out vanity she admitted the girl in the
pale green peignoir with the cascade of
curling hair on her shoulders was a fair
sight.
'If you'd been ugly she wouldn't
have worried ' Clive said stiffly.
Liane crimsoned. She thought there
Abruptly she changed the subject.

'When did you mean to start for
day.
'Any time. Next month, perhaps.
Why?'
'I just wondered.'
'You getting tired of this place?
Shall we push on?'
She considered this. 'As you like.
I've loved it but if you want to go back
why then—.' She swung out her arms
to the wide world.
He watched her moodily. 'Let's start
to-morrow.'
He started back as if struck. 'Don't
call me that.''
Her look both surprised and hurt. 'I
won't, if you'd rather not.'
'Please don't. ' '
She had never seen him in this mood
before but when they stopped for tea
she won him out of it. The day was
perfect, not too hot, not too windy. The
clouds drifted across a sapphire sky

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.