Information about Trove user: khaivirtue

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,512,336
2 NeilHamilton 3,079,643
3 noelwoodhouse 2,979,952
4 annmanley 2,243,541
5 John.F.Hall 2,209,176
...
2289 GraemeFrost 9,548
2290 sallyecostello 9,548
2291 HappyJan 9,538
2292 khaivirtue 9,535
2293 duggiek 9,518
2294 Caitlin 9,511

9,535 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

June 2017 138
May 2017 1,623
April 2017 6,616
March 2017 1,158

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,512,305
2 NeilHamilton 3,079,643
3 noelwoodhouse 2,979,952
4 annmanley 2,243,471
5 John.F.Hall 2,209,171
...
2286 GraemeFrost 9,548
2287 sallyecostello 9,544
2288 HappyJan 9,538
2289 khaivirtue 9,535
2290 duggiek 9,518
2291 Caitlin 9,511

9,535 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

June 2017 138
May 2017 1,623
April 2017 6,616
March 2017 1,158

No text corrections for 'Government Gazettes'


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
STATE SCHOOLS SPORTS. SECOND ANNUAL GATHERING. (Detailed lists, results, guides), The West Australian (Perth, WA : 1879 - 1954), Saturday 7 May 1904 [Issue No.5,662] page 3 2017-06-20 18:24 feet order was maintained throughout.
fect order was maintained throughout.
IN FASHION'S REALM. UP TO DATE NOTES. ON WHAT TO WEAR. (Article), Western Mail (Perth, WA : 1885 - 1954), Saturday 16 January 1904 [Issue No.942] page 40 2017-06-02 13:10 ON WHAT TO'T." *
(By "Marguerite.") , .
I have beèn frequently asked to give
designs for home dressmaking- I confess
to a difficulty in understanding just "what
patterns by the score j/what she Vants is
a supply of hints aslo.^vhich patterns are
the best to''adopt. Where she doesn't
make her own dresses; she requires just
rife same thing as a guide in her selection
wben out for the purpose of ordering a
nen- gown. I do not profess to instruct
ning through my contributions thc style
period. As -an excelent illustration take
nffu's clothing, and look at any of the
pictorial sheets in a tailor's wiudow.
What do they teach ??-how to make
men's clothes at hohie ,or what is tf'ie best
ment? On the contrary, thty show but
one thing-the latest style in such ap-
which is left entirely in, the hands of the
purchaser and tlie cutter, as the result
with my -designs-I show what is con-
who "orders" being assisted by* the guide
so given, and thc dresser who makes her
A crinoline or wire*hat of tho accom-
session. ' In the equivalent season in
many of The models were exquisite ex-
fashion, and tho latter being spread but
hat. A spray of roses under, the brim at
creation. From the end of thia spray
tal ornament rises a group of feathers-a
The agc of lace has come again, and thc
indication is in favour of the-iucreased
onlj women are lace lovers, unless we ex-
the field. In generations agpne it was
different, and stepping back into the sha.
dows pf the Stuarts wo find the swain
and his lady love vieing with oach^other
thus -it' has never taken a really back
ment, and4ace was horn in the great Em-
pire's grave.. It was a spider which put
the heart into Bruce, we are told,, and it
was a spider which was-ihe father of all
that is beautiful iu lace making. Spang-
nection hes, and when we turn to the
classic page wo discover i.t. Far back in
says says she^dio, the Greek maidens
thfi centuries since it has played its part,
jewelled, even to-the present, when it.
son, which has this economical advan
tage- it can just as easily be tarried into j
an outdoor or deception gownl Develop- j
cd of any suitable summer material, the '
skirt, Tucked and pouched,.. the
bodice is mainly attractive because cfs.be
way the insertion is intorlacid, the outer
the, shoulder, where they take the form
of straps. But was ever any'.-liing moro
been u>:ed on the skirt-vertical, gradu-
juuch esteem, says : Sticks of maple
china balk are accounted far at¡d away
th« smartest handles of the hour, these
rasols- A quite novel notion is for a skele-
ton frame covered v^itli gauged chiffon or
mousseline de 7>oié, while a pretty, and
dered qurtc smart and up-to-date by the
application of these chiffon frills. ïlows
of black ribbon velvet, «gain, are to be
seen on plain coloured silk parasols, this"
purchase, while one model i hat was par-
Lace draperies on bats ore said to be
of ribbon'are exceedingly popular, while
acy of flowers. A feature of tho season
is the number of hats that aro covered
with muslin or tulle, it being quito com-
mon to feee shapes whvh are ouite dis-
turned underneath. Jn fact this is the
rule-tho bow on top is invariably con-
,hat'and hair meet. I note that the rib-
bon streamer which conies down on one
as it might ; anyhow, J have not seen
I youthful wearers. We all know wherein
lies the charm of the bonnet-it is the
silk, thc genius of the maker has been
exhausted in the almost endless gather
I ing, though a beautiful artistic touch
I is given in the way the designer has
manipulated the strings. With loose I
ers,"'the strings frame the face and tie
A curious illustration of thc develop-
_by the present influx into the British
Japan. Says one who observes : -"Some
of us who recollect the exhibition ' of
1862 (the second gneat exhibition) will
which were brought hy our visitors from
used paper handkerchiefs for cehturiés,
ers' are placing them on our marketa.
washing \linen oh¿B. GUT laundries
chargc^sixPehce a dozen for Trashing the
lather, while the Japanese ones, which
are soft, .scented, and clean, and new
i .every tipie/can- be bought for Tj>\â. a
doçen. It is quite evident that the Ja-
panese will become not «ply á strong ri- '
val pf thc British manufacturer, hut of
the (British Washerwoman. Paper.^col-
lars have nerer become popular," in sjSite)
of ätheir price, but paper handkerchiefs'
are ¿already 'favourites. , There are fear
turps to recommend them besides their
.said to he inconstant use by tin» ladies of
the Mikado's kingdom. X do hot mean
hut that in handkerchiefs paper is "the
jonly wear." They are soft to handle,
have an agreeable resinous scent, and arc
said to possess valuable .antiseptic quali-
folk-r-this time a neat little costume in
to speak for themselves, and jet some
thing may bo said to direct attention to
the way in which the skirt is ornament-,
.The collarette is a handsome article for
a front of tucked silk. 4
our friend Tom. Moore : - '
what you will, *
Thc style of past ages will stick to it
of the poke bonnet which has led to 60
signs. To make thc poke anything better
has.been found necessary to ornament it
to thc employment of much ribbon, and,
which tho ribbon-makers have taken due
ribbons and flowers the equal of? which
ana tolds iii as many novel ways as pos-
sible. .Hence we get the ribbon hatband
which "is higher than thc hat and arrang-
UP TO DATE NOTES.
ON WHAT TO WEAR.
(By "Marguerite.")
I have been frequently asked to give
designs for home dressmaking. I confess
to a difficulty in understanding just what
patterns by the score; what she wants is
a supply of hints as to which patterns are
the best to adopt. Where she doesn't
make her own dresses, she requires just
the same thing as a guide in her selection
when out for the purpose of ordering a
new gown. I do not profess to instruct
ning through my contributions the style
period. As an excelent illustration take
men's clothing, and look at any of the
pictorial sheets in a tailor's window.
What do they teach?—how to make
men's clothes at home, or what is the best
ment? On the contrary, they show but
one thing—the latest style in such ap-
which is left entirely in the hands of the
purchaser and the cutter, as the result
with my designs—I show what is con-
who "orders" being assisted by the guide
so given, and the dresser who makes her
A crinoline or wire hat of the accom-
session. In the equivalent season in
many of the models were exquisite ex-
fashion, and the latter being spread but
hat. A spray of roses under the brim at
creation. From the end of this spray
tal ornament rises a group of feathers—a
The age of lace has come again, and the
indication is in favour of the increased
only women are lace lovers, unless we ex-
the field. In generations agone it was
different, and stepping back into the sha-
dows of the Stuarts we find the swain
and his lady love vieing with each other
thus it has never taken a really back
ment, and lace was born in the great Em-
pire's grave. It was a spider which put
the heart into Bruce, we are told, and it
was a spider which was the father of all
that is beautiful in lace making. Spang-
nection lies, and when we turn to the
classic page we discover it. Far back in
says says she did, the Greek maidens
the centuries since it has played its part,
jewelled, even to the present, when it
son, which has this economical advan-
tage—it can just as easily be tarried into
an outdoor or reception gown! Develop-
ed of any suitable summer material, the
skirt. Tucked and pouched, the
bodice is mainly attractive because of the
way the insertion is interlaced, the outer
the shoulder, where they take the form
of straps. But was ever anything more
been used on the skirt—vertical, gradu-
much esteem, says: Sticks of maple
china balls are accounted far and away
the smartest handles of the hour, these
rasols. A quite novel notion is for a skele-
ton frame covered with gauged chiffon or
mousseline de soie, while a pretty, and
dered quite smart and up-to-date by the
application of these chiffon frills. Rows
of black ribbon velvet, again, are to be
seen on plain coloured silk parasols, this
purchase, while one model that was par-
Lace draperies on hats ore said to be
of ribbon are exceedingly popular, while
acy of flowers. A feature of the season
is the number of hats that are covered
with muslin or tulle, it being quite com-
mon to see shapes which are quite dis-
turned underneath. In fact this is the
rule—the bow on top is invariably con-
hat and hair meet. I note that the rib-
bon streamer which comes down on one
as it might; anyhow, I have not seen
youthful wearers. We all know wherein
lies the charm of the bonnet—it is the
silk, the genius of the maker has been
exhausted in the almost endless gather-
ing, though a beautiful artistic touch
is given in the way the designer has
manipulated the strings. With loose
ers," the strings frame the face and tie
A curious illustration of the develop-
by the present influx into the British
Japan. Says one who observes:—"Some
of us who recollect the exhibition of
1862 (the second great exhibition) will
which were brought by our visitors from
used paper handkerchiefs for centuries,
ers are placing them on our markets.
washing linen ones. Our laundries
charge sixpence a dozen for washing the
latter, while the Japanese ones, which
are soft, scented, and clean, and new
every time, can be bought for 3½d. a
dozen. It is quite evident that the Ja-
panese will become not only a strong ri-
val of the British manufacturer, but of
the British washerwoman. Paper col-
lars have never become popular, in spite
of their price, but paper handkerchiefs
are already favourites. There are fea-
tures to recommend them besides their
said to be in constant use by the ladies of
the Mikado's kingdom. I do not mean
but that in handkerchiefs paper is "the
only wear." They are soft to handle,
have an agreeable resinous scent, and are
said to possess valuable antiseptic quali-
folk—this time a neat little costume in
to speak for themselves, and yet some-
thing may be said to direct attention to
the way in which the skirt is ornament-
The collarette is a handsome article for
a front of tucked silk.
our friend Tom Moore:—
what you will,
The style of past ages will stick to it
of the poke bonnet which has led to so
signs. To make the poke anything better
has been found necessary to ornament it
to the employment of much ribbon, and,
which the ribbon-makers have taken due
ribbons and flowers the equal of which
and folds in as many novel ways as pos-
sible. Hence we get the ribbon hatband
which is higher than the hat and arrang-
THE FALL OF THE BASTILE. A FRENCH CELEBRATION IN SYDNEY. Sydney, July 14. (Article), The West Australian (Perth, WA : 1879 - 1954), Wednesday 15 July 1903 [Issue No.5,410] page 7 2017-05-31 13:07 THE FALL OF THE BASTILF
A FRENCH GELEBR.ATION N
The French residents in Sydne" cele
the Bastille to-day, by holding a recep
tion atthe C?nsulate and a picnic in Clf
was exceptional as an expression of ap
to Paris and President Lounbet to Lon
don. The reception was largely atten
Governor. Lady Rawson, Miss Rawson,
of the Ministry. and the President of the
The Governor-General sent a note. =n
one of good will and friendship, and a de
sire for a still closer relationship be
tween the two nationa.
THE FALL OF THE BASTILE.
A FRENCH CELEBRATION IN
The French residents in Sydney cele-
the Bastille to-day, by holding a recep-
tion at the Consulate and a picnic in Clif-
was exceptional as an expression of ap-
to Paris and President Lounbet to Lon-
don. The reception was largely atten-
Governor, Lady Rawson, Miss Rawson,
of the Ministry, and the President of the
The Governor-General sent a note in
one of good will and friendship, and a de-
sire for a still closer relationship be-
tween the two nations.
OUR LONDON LETTER. DRESS—FASHION—HOME. Women Smokers. (Article), Western Mail (Perth, WA : 1885 - 1954), Saturday 19 March 1904 [Issue No.951] page 39 2017-05-29 13:05 Some concern is expressed ly cr 11 em-
panden t« in a f wp ular J.« wt»p«r bfCouFe
of the growing, popularity ot tue 't,r-<ioI
girj's cigarette. Undoubtedly « H oking
is on the increa.'ie amongst thc sex. *
be for men and boys to OMJMÎW it: tlx'
as now, reckoning that "imitation is thc
For the maoy fortunate«un-lovcrs who
turn their fae« Southwards at this timo
of tho year, the hign-necked blouse slip
or drossy bodice is tho source of deep
or chiffon, rnouRseline-de-soie, crepe-de
chine, point d'esprj^, and piece lace are
tho materials from which cherice can be
all, that the choosing i& by no means an
easy matter. -The.model chosen fer our
present illustration is cliiffon, black hy ¡
preference. Thc deep yoke is of spotted
net, heavily embroidered , io sequins and
net beads ; below ibis we observe a tripla
berthe of aceoráion^leated, chiffon, each
flounce heine edged with a strip of, che-
nille. Hie sleeve puffs reach only to the
elbow, where they meet the,;lapp euff,
or*if preferred; the sleeve ass be huitUic
with, ft; long; frill, of ... *«w3jp»roleated
chiffon. : . ." .,.
I :. . - Gossip,, I:.-;: : .
; Piintess Alice, of Albany' ls' delighted
at the |jrp£pfict ^ soihf*' ©ut^tö Jn^jt or
South Africa after Ker wedding witii
Prince Alexander of Tock. She has al-
ready received such a quantity of jewel
h ry and silver as wedding presents thafc
&li<> now fur ni hes her friends with a list
of things the prefers them to give, t»
avoid I laving duplicates.
is s Iludían pendant in the form of whit»
enamel swans, beautifully rendered on .
Tho "Westminster Gaaette" declares
they (hire not. because their dressmakers
won't let them." Surely the remedy »
oa-y-defy the dne-sumhor, and dress 1
according to requirements and common
t-ePse
panies her husband, tho Hon. Rupert
Guinness, to Dublin, and ie to be pfe
sent-rd at the first Drawing-Room, is tho
married Ia<-t year. She has met most ot
thc members of the Royal Family, either,
at the homo of her father, on that of her.
Tho grr>a< thing to remember iir dres-
more suitable and far more effective than,
all tho smart frilly ana furbelows in tho
she. is over-dressed ; while a pretty child, .
will look ever so much lovelier tluut ir
she is dc: ked out in order to flatter, th»
fancies of a vaiu mother. Just now wo
aro all of tw wondering which will bc tba
most useful kind «f frocks for onr small
daughters to take to school. Serge al* ;
ways comes to tho fore on these occa>«
cided upon for the scheol^irl'« frock, ft
happy idea is to lighten thc appearance ,
of the whole by adding a big capo-collar,.'
to the pimple costume, isadc of pale-blup ,.
flannel, giviug her perhaps two or thrice..,
collars that she may wear .in tum, so aa
otherwise prove rather a dark dress JOT {
wearing, any length of time. ? The wm.-/,
pleit stylo of school costume is that
which fihèws a pleated ¿kir*¿ and flía\
plain blouse bodice finished with bishop ''
sleeves aad the big cape-collar shown itt. -
tbe sko'ch. Largo buttons of more'.oif."
.lees fanciful design make a charming
finish to tho schoolgirls frock, yat down!
the centre pleat of .the bodice. Now lçjj,,
use consider the big capé-cóllar¿ and loti
us decide, to have oné ft! 'palc-broo flatt- *
nci, Oi'e, at h ast, of .white flannel^ airdf
one of s arlet flannel.' Surely1 this quasi-:
tity will please thc most fastidious
schoolgirl, and remember that tíjese ool-,.
lars miret be made quite, separate-frönt',
the frock1 itself, -and made up also with
out . any lining, so that the more1;
delicate colen rs. at any rate, can' bs
Washed at will: ' * (
> Moth^hood.in Pqliticä.
; Mr. W. T. Stead, in tho "Daily Paper/'
i .'.et«' «jp a -autti.k nr^n.fteiit 'in favour of
'r-hï mhuciK'i d' wonnui in politics. Yjsiirj
Some concern is expressed by corres-
pondents in a popular newspaper because
of the growing popularity of the school-
girl's cigarette. Undoubtedly sucking
is on the increase amongst the sex. A
be for men and boys to eschew it; the
as now, reckoning that "imitation is the
For the many fortunate sun-lovers who
turn their face Southwards at this time
of the year, the high-necked blouse slip
or dressy bodice is the source of deep
or chiffon, mousseline-de-soie, crepe-de-
chine, point d'esprit, and piece lace are
the materials from which choice can be
all, that the choosing is by no means an
easy matter. The model chosen for our
present illustration is chiffon, black by
preference. The deep yoke is of spotted
net, heavily embroidered in sequins and
jet beads; below this we observe a triple
berthe of accordion-pleated chiffon, each
flounce being edged with a strip of che-
nille. The sleeve puffs reach only to the
elbow, where they meet the long cuff,
or if preferred, the sleeve may be finished
with a long frill of accordion-pleated
chiffon.
Gossip.
Princess Alice of Albany is delighted
at the prospect of going out to India or
South Africa after her wedding with
Prince Alexander of Teck. She has al-
ready received such a quantity of jewel-
lery and silver as wedding presents that
she now furnishes her friends with a list
of things she prefers them to give, to
avoid having duplicates.
is a Russian pendant in the form of white
enamel swans, beautifully rendered on
The "Westminster Gazette" declares
they dare not, because their dressmakers
won't let them." Surely the remedy is
easy—defy the dressmaker and dress
according to requirements and common-
sense
panies her husband, the Hon. Rupert
Guinness, to Dublin, and is to be pre-
sented at the first Drawing-Room, is the
married Iast year. She has met most of
the members of the Royal Family, either,
at the home of her father, or that of her
The great thing to remember in dres-
more suitable and far more effective than
all the smart frills and furbelows in tho
will look ever so much lovelier than if
she is decked out in order to flatter the
fancies of a vain mother. Just now we
are all of us wondering which will be the
most useful kind of frocks for our small
daughters to take to school. Serge al-
ways comes to the fore on these occa-
cided upon for the schoolgirl's frock, a
happy idea is to lighten the appearance
of the whole by adding a big cape-collar
to the simple costume, made of pale-blue
flannel, giviug her perhaps two or three
collars that she may wear in tum, so as
otherwise prove rather a dark dress for
wearing any length of time. The sim-
plest style of school costume is that
which shèws a pleated skirt, and the
plain blouse bodice finished with bishop
sleeves and the big cape-collar shown in
the sketch. Large buttons of more or
less fanciful design make a charming
finish to the schoolgirl's frock, set down
the centre pleat of the bodice. Now let
use consider the big cape-collar, and let
us decide to have one of pale-blue flan-
nel, one, at last, of white flannel, and
one of scarlet flannel. Surely this quan-
tity will please the most fastidious
schoolgirl, and remember that these col-
lars must be made quite separate from
the frock itself, and made up also with-
out any lining, so that the more
delicate colours, at any rate, can be
washed at will.
Motherhood in Politics.
Mr. W. T. Stead, in the "Daily Paper,"
gets up a strong argument in favour of
the influence of women in politics. Year
FREMANTLE BOARD OF HEALTH. (Article), The Daily News (Perth, WA : 1882 - 1950), Wednesday 27 July 1904 [Issue No.9112] page 7 2017-05-19 13:41 EKEMAFTLE
BOAEDOFHEiLTE
The monthly meeting of tlie Fre
held in the Council Chamber on Mori
Loukes, Holmes, Nicholas, ? Pierce,
The chairman reported ^-'The order
sarried out.'- The health committee i
full consideration to . the matter of
destroying rats, but will 'deal; with
Board; Star HoteL— The Swan Brew
and improvements to; the Star Hotel
building under consideration. : The
Adelaide S.S. Co.'s old shop in Mou
att-street will not again be occapied,
? The report was adopted. .
Accounts amounting to £30 6s. 3d.,
The health officer (Dr. Hope) report
in the, various wards: —
Ward, .14 ; East Ward,. 3 ; West Ward,
I; Total, 20. Scarlet Fever— South
Souti Ward, 1.
Back Yards.— -Many back yards in
the ceatre of tie town, and other3 in
long use, remain in their original con
owners to' improve their properties,
and so .make the town' cleaner and
tenants, who say the owners ' will
not do any thing.' A book should be
kept showing; a list of premises where
made, so that members . of the board
(in NorfoJlc-street). The watertable in
seen to, as it sags, and the water-does
Health' Act is urgently required, giv
ucuiuio-u uuiiucnuicu premises.
The report was \adopted.1
(Report by Health Officer.),
Lockl' Board of Health on Monday
outbreak of diphtheria in the munici
pality-:— ^-Diphtheria- is 'Qgain: this
in such cases, where children are at
was 'caught' there. It must also be
it is due largely to carelessless on. the
part, of parents, in not appreciating
the early symptoms of feverisiiness
children to schojol, or, if kept; away,
in allowing ' them to run about and
mix with other children. There is us
infected house. Children are consid
same room, anH often in the same
bed, long before they are free from in
notified on Jaly 2. A girl belonging
to this . house was sent to Princess
received. On JtiIv 11 auother sister
— on July 13 — was not- notified, and ? a
had been received. In Brown's boat
same house ; bat this case, and one
rear of No. 51, and whkh has been
many of the premises, no sufficient ln
sanitation can be fonnd to account
for it. The spread of the 'disease is
therefore due chiefly to personal com
are impressed upon the parents. ' To
limit or stamp out such' a disease,
every, case — except where ample accom
regation is most necessary. The Hos
pital contains only '; S beds for infec
tious peases, and these are now occu
end put in use for th~e '. reception of
cases, and the board to bear the ex
believe this ward could be made avail
this town is ill equipped, through hav
The hearth inspectors have been dis
infecting private houses where the dis
ease has been, also pnbKc schools (all)
energetically until the outbreak dis
appears. . v.
Cr. Lynn asked Dr., Hope whetKer
to suggest to the ' Government the
buildings might be thoroughly; fumi
Dr. Hope said He 'did not think it
advisable that the schools' should be
closed, as it would interfere too great
ly with the work of the Education de
Hospital for infectious diseases. Dur
ing, last week' a case had been refused
.stamping out the disease.
was resolved that , the Mayor should
be asked to wait on the Hospital au
power to demolish' condemned pre
ameadment to the Health Act in that
direction. He also desired, witoout re
of the Council, to emphasise the ne
the ground on which' it was proposed
the buildings in the town were situ
ated in hoDows, which necessarily
. The recommendations of the health
officer were, referred to the health
committee*
submitted the following report, deal
sequence oi 'a1 continuance of itlipbtire
all Government eebools should be car
ried 'out weekly., and I have made ar-
rangements for carrying-' out this work
from the board in the matter. Tht
week' 'during its continuance — would of
course, . fall on the board in the first
this connection I would point, out that
in the disinfection of lurge buildings
I am very much hampered in not hav
ing any suitable plairU In the past,
when necessary. I have been able to
good machine for this purpose in Aus
' M'Kenzie Spray Motor,' obtainable
Cow, London, at a ' cost of about £5
lauded. This would prove a very
great saving in labor, and the mach
service for tie ordinary routine of dis
infecting Swelling houses after infec
the fumigation of the schools be coo,
tinned so long, as necessary, and that
steps be taken to recover tlie amount
bo expended from the Government.
FREMANTLE
BOARD OF HEALTH.
The monthly meeting of the Fre-
held in the Council Chamber on Mon-
—Crs. Jones (in the chair), Lynn,
Loukes, Holmes, Nicholas, Pierce,
The chairman reported:—"The order
made on Mr. Jas. Lilly, for the pav-
carried out." The health committee
full consideration to the matter of
destroying rats, but will deal with
Board. Star Hotel.—The Swan Brew-
and improvements to the Star Hotel
building under consideration. The
Adelaide S.S. Co.'s old shop in Mou-
att-street will not again be occupied,
FINANCE.
Accounts amounting to £30 6s. 3d.
The health officer (Dr. Hope) report-
1; Total, 20. Scarlet Fever—South
South Ward, 1.
Back Yards.—Many back yards in
the centre of the town, and others in
long use, remain in their original con-
owners to improve their properties,
and so make the town cleaner and
tenants, who say the owners "will
not do any thing." A book should be
kept showing a list of premises where
made, so that members of the board
(in Norfolk-street). The watertable in
seen to, as it sags, and the water does
Health Act is urgently required, giv-
demolish condemned premises.
The report was adopted.
(Report by Health Officer.)
Local Board of Health on Monday
outbreak of diphtheria in the munici-
pality:—Diphtheria is again this
in such cases, where children are at-
was "caught" there. It must also be
it is due largely to carelessless on the
part of parents, in not appreciating
the early symptoms of feverishness
children to school, or, if kept away,
in allowing them to run about and
mix with other children. There is us-
infected house. Children are consid-
same room, and often in the same
bed, long before they are free from in-
notified on July 2. A girl belonging
to this house was sent to Princess
received. On JuIy 11 another sister
had been received. In Brown's boat-
same house; but this case, and one
rear of No. 51, and which has been
many of the premises, no sufficient in-
sanitation can be found to account
for it. The spread of the disease is
therefore due chiefly to personal com-
are impressed upon the parents. To
limit or stamp out such a disease,
every case—except where ample accom-
in many cases—for the immediate seg-
regation is most necessary. The Hos-
pital contains only 8 beds for infec-
tious cases, and these are now occu-
end put in use for the reception of
cases, and the board to bear the ex-
believe this ward could be made avail-
this town is ill equipped, through hav-
The health inspectors have been dis-
infecting private houses where the dis-
ease has been, also public schools (all)
energetically until the outbreak dis-
appears.
Cr. Lynn asked Dr., Hope whether
to suggest to the Government the
buildings might be thoroughly fumi-
Dr. Hope said he did not think it
advisable that the schools should be
closed, as it would interfere too great-
ly with the work of the Education de-
Hospital for infectious diseases. Dur-
ing last week a case had been refused
stamping out the disease.
was resolved that the Mayor should
be asked to wait on the Hospital au-
power to demolish condemned pre-
amendment to the Health Act in that
direction. He also desired, witoout re-
of the Council, to emphasise the ne-
the ground on which it was proposed
the buildings in the town were situ-
ated in hollows, which necessarily
The recommendations of the health
officer were referred to the health
committee.
submitted the following report, deal-
sequence of a continuance of diphthe-
all Government schools should be car-
ried out weekly, and I have made ar-
rangements for carrying out this work
from the board in the matter. The
course, fall on the board in the first
this connection I would point out that
in the disinfection of large buildings
I am very much hampered in not hav-
ing any suitable plant. In the past,
when necessary, I have been able to
good machine for this purpose in Aus-
"McKenzie Spray Motor," obtainable
Co., London, at a cost of about £5
landed. This would prove a very
great saving in labor, and the mach-
service for tie ordinary routine of dis-
infecting dwelling houses after infec-
the fumigation of the schools be con-
tinued so long as necessary, and that
steps be taken to recover the amount
so expended from the Government.
FREMANTLE HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY. ANNUAL CHRYSANTHEMUM SHOW. (Article), The West Australian (Perth, WA : 1879 - 1954), Thursday 21 April 1904 [Issue No.5,648] page 4 2017-05-19 13:24 F.REllANTLE HORTICULTURAL
':ANNUAL' CHRJYSAkTHEEMUMr
.... HOW.o
--he:Fremantle Horticultural Society,
,ihose .members arel diawn solely from
the;ranoJsof 'amateur growers, held it6
fifth annuiil chrysanthemum' showi . yes
terday in, the local Ton -Hall. The
seasbon,unfortunately, has not been fa
hot just' at the time the buds were
forming, and for this -reason a :really
f;st:class show display could hardly have
bepn.oxpcoted.: HowVever, in spite of ad
verso climatic conditi6bs, the show was a
Pg ceditable one, aid the Socicety is
doserving-of praise for tho high standard
of oxdollonce which mas reached in some
of the classes. While the blooms suf
fared in comparisou with those exhibited
than-at-any-previous show. -At yester
di:y'sshoiv thero were 140. ethibitois, as.
of a.wi4ouing interest in the Society. and
its aims. The .prize for the champion
cut bloom was awarded to Mr. G. Hay
Wright variety' being'the successful ex
hibit: The best blooms on the benches
were' thoso'of the 'Pocket Seedliing. Mil
licent"Richrridsoni Australian Gold. S:
.Cronin varieties.. , There was a splendid
display of pot plants, 'especially in ferns,
which showed evidence of careful cilti
vation, and some overy';protty hanging
haskets wore exhibited. The floral work
formed an attractive feature of the show.
the Pine. Grove. Nursery and Mr. W. J.
suites,; wroatljs, and sprays on view.
Ap~iiat from the ? shibits entered for coinm
petition,,.thore" v'as a 'Tine. display of
cactus dahliansfrom, the Zoological Gar
dens, the cbllbction comprising no less
than sixty distinct varieties. The cura-,
very. fine assortment of roses,' and some
excellent dhrysanthemum blooms grown
rin'the open air at the Old 'Men's Depot
(Fremantle) 'were shown. - " -
The show was 'pjioiod by His Excel
lency the Goveinor,- .who was accom
ppteed by I4dy B3edfora and his aide-de
camip-(Capt. Iforne) and private. secre
tary (Capt. Byron). .The, vice-regal
party wore iet at the Fremantle Rail
way Staition by the President of the So
ieoty (Mr ..J... J Holmes, -M.L.A:). and
driypn to the Town Hall iwhere they
wore received by a guard' of honour,;
formed by cidets .drawn from the State
Schools in the Fremant!o and Cotfesloe
districts. and in charge of Lieut. Royce.
On~.thd stageo ii the: hall were groupbd
a.numbor of girls from the Prificess May
School nand as the-Governor -and suite
eitefod they-sang. under-thbeleadership
of Miss Peacock, the 'National Anthem.'
In askinig Sir Frederick Bedford to
open the show the President, on behalf
of-'the Sbdiety, detender'a heartiy wel
com''to' His- ?Dellenoy'and' I"dy ed
ford. The Society has been in exis
reice 'fi-i ''years, arid was composed
wholly of amateurs._ Both. the
Governfent, and Municipal, "'Council
had, given them . some - assistance
for it was. generally recognised that the
Soicity was doing'some good'to the'com
mu ity"" Ahost thie l'ast-act of the llati
Coloial .Treasurer had-been to give the
Scciety a grant' of £20, for wlnch they
woere extremely'grtieful, .and 'the Conn
cil ha4 granted the free.use of the hall..
His ixcellency briefly declared the
ahow?uopen, and conoratulated the Society
on the excellent displlay of chrysantlfeh
mums., He expressed the pleasure which
both he arid Lady Bedford felt at being
present. To his i ind, the most interest
ir. feature of the Show'was that it was
had ittended.had.been carried out-by pro
fessionals, who sat u .all night and curl
pleased to see sul a large
was a grams thin for the State-to-have
these l]ds well drilled and taught how
veor come when our shores would have
to be defended, he'was sure that the men
who-had undergone the-training. that the
c?tlets '_ere now receivipg would give,a
geabaccount of themiselves (Applause.)
LcdyfBcdfg'r'd w$asthb'iipresented with'
a ,.askeot- f chtysanthemums b'y Mrs. J.
.r. Holmes the ivife of the president of
the Seciety. and, on behalf of. thenmem
liars, Miss Haymaun handed'Mrs, Holmnes
a floral'bouquet.
' Tr. T..Sinith ?oved a vote of-thanks
to Sir F'redrick. and...?ady Bedford,
which w'a carried with acclamation. At
the:clossi of the ceremony the Governor
was.eixtertained in the..Mayor'sparlour;
and- the ladies partook of :ligl~t refresh
ments, plovided by the Mayoress (MrIs.
Frank Cadd), Mrs. JJ. . Homes. and
Mrs. 'T. Smith, in the banqueting hall.
Thoeshow was continued in the even
It will. remain opecn this afternoon and
•' torgh. An attractive feature of the
display this eveniig willbea comnetition
for the best decorated dinner-table..
The following is the p1ize-list:.-
*Uiass A- (Up en).-ut-u :lowers-Unry
santhemum (Jh anese)--Best 'collection,
.W. Stottor. Six blooms: W.
?totter. ' Six bldoms (white). G
.Hayman. Six dark : G. ' Hayman.
Six yellow: G. Hayman. Six in
curved : -G. Hayman. Six new
,est and best: G. Hayman. Cham
-Bridal suite: W. J. Beisley, 1; Pine
lady's sprays: W. J. Boisley. Pot
plants-Best 6 chrysanthemums : G. Hay
man. Best chrysanthemum: G. HGay
mcan. Four begonias: G. Hayman. Six
'ferns: H. Flindell. Three ferns, Adinn_
tnes : W. J. Bgisley. Specinen fern:
;. Hayman. Six varienated foliage: G.
.Hayman, 1; F. Flindell. 2. Single pot
ither than chrysanthemum: W. Stotter.
*iew or rare. plant (not previously ex
]ibited): W. Stotter. Best hanging
basket: W. J. Bcisley.
Class B (Amateurs).-Cut blooms. chbry
santhemum (Japanese)-Best 12 blooms:
dlark: H. Herbert. Three yellow: H.
Herbert. Floral work-Best arranged
Spergno of flowers: Miss Hayman. Best
hand houquet: Mrs. Hayman. Decor
uited basket: Miss Iobinscn. Bowl of
lady's sprays: JMrs. Hayman. Two
g.,nts' buttonholes:. Mrs Hayman Pot
lants--Best six chrysanthemums:. G.
hlayman. Threeo chrysanthemums: G.
.l:ayinan. Best chrysanthemumn: W.
'dlens: H. Flindell. Best coleus: H.
Flin;dell. Three ferns: H. Flin
B]-,gonias: G. layman. Four variegat
,d foliage plants: W. Stotter. Three
crnamental. for table decoration: W.
Stiotter. Three palms: H. Fliiidell.
.-,paragus: V. Stotter. Pot plant in
l!oon otlir than chrysanthemum: W.
:?i .ttr. Innging basket: Mrs. G.
.ol'le-s. Special (Open)-Vest 2- caetus
dahlsias: W. Stotter. Twelve garden
P'.;i' rs grown out of doors: W. Stctler.
Sbpcial (Amatour)-Best 12 cactus dah
l::s: W. Stotter. Six cactus dahlias:
.'. Sttter.
FREMANTLE HORTICULTURAL
ANNUAL CHRYSANTHEMUM
SHOW.
The Fremantle Horticultural Society,
whose members are drawn solely from
the ranks of amateur growers, held its
fifth annual chrysanthemum show yes-
terday in the local Town Hall. The
season, unfortunately, has not been fa-
hot just at the time the buds were
forming, and for this reason a really
first-class show display could hardly have
been expected. However, in spite of ad-
verse climatic conditions, the show was a
very creditable one, and the Society is
deserving of praise for the high standard
of excellence which was reached in some
of the classes. While the blooms suf-
fered in comparison with those exhibited
than at any previous show. At yester-
day's show there were 140 exhibitors, as
of a widening interest in the Society and
its aims. The prize for the champion
cut bloom was awarded to Mr. G. Hay-
Wright variety being the successful ex-
hibit. The best blooms on the benches
were those of the Pocket Seedling. Mil-
licent Richardson, Australian Gold, S.
Cronin varieties. There was a splendid
display of pot plants, especially in ferns,
which showed evidence of careful culti-
vation, and some very pretty hanging
baskets were exhibited. The floral work
formed an attractive feature of the show,
the Pine Grove Nursery and Mr. W. J.
suites, wreaths, and sprays on view.
Apart from the exhibits entered for com-
petition, there was a fine display of
cactus dahlias from the Zoological Gar-
dens, the collection comprising no less
than sixty distinct varieties. The cura-
very fine assortment of roses, and some
excellent chrysanthemum blooms grown
in the open air at the Old Men's Depot
(Fremantle) were shown.
The show was opened by His Excel-
lency the Govenor, who was accom-
panied by Lady Bedford and his aide-de-
camp (Capt. Horne) and private secre-
tary (Capt. Byron). The vice-regal
party were met at the Fremantle Rail-
way Station by the President of the So-
ciety (Mr. J.J. Holmes, M.L.A.), and
driven to the Town Hall where they
were received by a guard of honour,
formed by cadets drawn from the State
Schools in the Fremantle and Cottesloe
districts, and in charge of Lieut. Royce.
On the stage in the hall were grouped
a number of girls from the Princess May
School and as the Governor and suite
entered they sung, under the leadership
of Miss Peacock, the National Anthem.
In asking Sir Frederick Bedford to
open the show, the President, on behalf
of the Society, extender a hearty wel-
come to His Excellency and Lady Bed-
ford. The Society has been in exis-
tence five years, and was composed
wholly of amateurs. Both the
Governfent, and Municipal Council
had given them some assistance
for it was generally recognised that the
Society was doing some good to the com-
munity. Almost the last act of the late
Colonial Treasurer had been to give the
Society a grant of £20, for which they
were extremely grateful, and the Coun-
cil had granted the free use of the hall.
His Excellency briefly declared the
show open, and congratulated the Society
on the excellent display of chrysanthe-
mums. He expressed the pleasure which
both he and Lady Bedford felt at being
present. To his mind, the most interest-
ing feature of the show was that it was
had attended had been carried out by pro-
fessionals, who sat up all night and curl-
pleased to see such a large
was a grand thing for the State to-have
these lads well drilled and taught how
ever come when our shores would have
to be defended, he was sure that the men
who had undergone the training that the
cadets were now receiving would give a
good account of themselves. (Applause.)
Lady Bedford was then presented with
a basket of chrysanthemums by Mrs. J.
J. Holmes the wife of the president of
the Society, and, on behalf of the mem-
bers, Miss Hayman handed Mrs, Holmes
a floral bouquet.
Mr. T. Smith moved a vote of thanks
to Sir Frederick and Lady Bedford,
which was carried with acclamation. At
the close of the ceremony the Governor
was entertained in the Mayor's parlour,
and the ladies partook of light refresh-
ments, provided by the Mayoress (Mrs.
Frank Cadd), Mrs. J.J. Homes, and
Mrs. T. Smith, in the banqueting hall.
The show was continued in the even-
It will remain open this afternoon and
to-night. An attractive feature of the
display this evening will be a competition
for the best decorated dinner-table.
The following is the prize-list:—
Class A (Open)—Cut Flowers—Chry-
santhemum (Japanese)—Best collection,
W. Stotter. Six blooms: W.
Stotter. Six blooms (white): G
Six yellow: G. Hayman. Six in-
curved: G. Hayman. Six new-
est and best: G. Hayman. Cham-
—Bridal suite: W. J. Beisley, 1: Pine
lady's sprays: W. J. Beisley. Pot
plants—Best 6 chrysanthemums: G. Hay-
man. Best chrysanthemum: G. Hay-
man. Four begonias: G. Hayman. Six
ferns: H. Flindell. Three ferns, Adian-
tums: W. J. Beisley. Specimen fern:
G. Hayman. Six variegated foliage: G.
Hayman, 1; F. Flindell. 2. Single pot
other than chrysanthemum: W. Stotter.
New or rare plant (not previously ex-
hibited: W. Stotter. Best hanging
basket: W. J. Beisley.
Class B (Amateurs).—Cut blooms. chry-
santhemum (Japanese)—Best 12 blooms:
dark: H. Herbert. Three yellow: H.
Herbert. Floral work—Best arranged
pergne of flowers: Miss Hayman. Best
hand bouquet: Mrs. Hayman. Decor-
ated basket: Miss Robinson. Bowl of
lady's sprays: Mrs. Hayman. Two
gents' buttonholes: Mrs Hayman Pot
plants—Best six chrysanthemums: G.
Hayman. Three chrysanthemums: G.
Hayman. Best chrysanthemum: W.
coleus: H. Flindell. Best coleus: H.
Flindell. Three ferns: H. Flin-
Begonias: G. Hayman. Four variegat-
ed foliage plants: W. Stotter. Three
ornamental for table decoration: W.
Stotter. Three palms: H. Flindell.
Asparagus: W. Stotter. Pot plant in
bloon other than chrysanthemum: W.
Stotter. Hanging basket: Mrs. G.
Holmes. Special (Open)—Vest 24 cactus
dahlias: W. Stotter. Twelve garden
flowers grown out of doors: W. Stotter.
Special (Amateur)—Best 12 cactus dah-
lias: W. Stotter. Six cactus dahlias:
W. Stotter.
CHILDRENS CORNER CORRESPONDENCE. 209 Esplanade W., Port Melbourne, June 24. (Article), Western Mail (Perth, WA : 1885 - 1954), Saturday 15 July 1905 [Issue No.1,020] page 57 2017-05-18 14:00 addressed "Aunt "Mary," Western
addressed "Aunt Mary," Western
CHILDRENS CORNER CORRESPONDENCE. 209 Esplanade W., Port Melbourne, June 24. (Article), Western Mail (Perth, WA : 1885 - 1954), Saturday 15 July 1905 [Issue No.1,020] page 57 2017-05-18 13:58 *r-? TT. : , . . -
, (By Aunt Mary.)
TAny contributions sent for this part
bi the paper should be written on. one
.. bide of «ie gapeirönly and shonMbe.
addressed "Aunt "Mary, %es1fr"
ajail" office, St. Gebrge's-terrace, Perth.J
209 Esplanade W., . . . ,
r Mv dear Aunt Mary,-I wish to be
'tow of vour nephews. I am eleven years
old. - I go to Sunday School and fetate
School. We have a nice ground^m front
cricket .set. Hockey is in now, and daua
made mo a hockey- «tick. - My State
and mv Sunday School teacher's name is
-y.ours anec
1 Mrs. Matters. I remain,
! tionatçiy, l»JüNr* Wfißß. , ~ ,
j My dear Lynn,-I was very pleased to
' get a hitter from you ¿nd to near of your
i doings. I wonder which you like best,
I football or cricket or hockey ? The latter
¡is a favourite game of the girls in Perth
now. 'I"know a Miss Matters who is very
s nice, too.l Will you join the Silver
Chain ?-Yours affectionately. AUNT
MARY. -
Port Melbourne, June 23. ]
My Dear Aunt Mary,-I hope you will j
Bcccpt jne as one of your nieces. I have i
three aunts, three uncles, and two cou- j
¿live in Victoria. Two7 of my uncles sell1
jthe ''Western Mail" in their shops. Their |
llames are Mr. Frollfey and Mr. -Good
ihill, and tbey;oftoa send, us your paper..
t£bu .were saying* your nephews --and
pieces were not writing to you/ so I-sup
; |>ose you will be glad to get two nephews'
fend niece. The baby next door to us
3ias the same name as you, "Mary." We
jháve been home all day, as it is LO cold
iand wet, and Isabelle. Murray and Mary
©ownie came in our placó-and played
with us. îlieybro'ught'ludo; snake", and
fia g games. We played at concerts'" at
È: jthe beginning of the afternoon, and Isa-
dience, and I was to .tell them when to
lap. At. the beginning of the concert
re. had à graphophone, and JEIm was tile
raphoplione. Then we played at snake
fand flag games until George caine to say
the little Downies were to come home. Ï
gui 10 years .old, and in the 5th -class at
¡Bchopl. I remain-,
-Yours aifectábnttte- j
~ fly. VERA WEBB. . » 1
r ft 'My dear Vérja,--ï was delighted to
¡near from yorana will gladly accept you
Ms one of my nieces. $¡3qn., mti^'.h&ve
'?¿I ,:|quite an affection for Wester?!^fistrMia/
laving so" i&Jiiny relations'he^è/r lani
W:':, gglad that *j»ÍL sometime* seethe fWeár
/ tern Mail, .-ahd'íhope yon'wjlï continue
jypur interest ianthe Children's Colüjmn.
'file has been very cold and-wet in iEfit,th
jfor the past^ofik, hut even we^dáys^
"itoass swiftly; by when enjoying ^uo)iïjëoKd
fun -the day. ybu^-speak about.^Yours
? -. |anectiön«te]y; -AUNT MARY. '. " ,
Children's Corner
(By Aunt Mary.)
[Any contributions sent for this part
of the paper should be written on one
side of the paper only, and should be
addressed "Aunt "Mary," Western
Mail" office, St. George's-terrace, Perth.]
209 Esplanade W.,
My dear Aunt Mary,—I wish to be
one of your nephews. I am eleven years
old. I go to Sunday School and State
School. We have a nice ground in front
cricket set. Hockey is in now, and dada
made mo a hockey stick. My State
and my Sunday School teacher's name is
Mrs. Matters. I remain,—Yours affec-
tionately, LYNN WEBB.
My dear Lynn,—I was very pleased to
get a letter from you and to hear of your
doings. I wonder which you like best,
football or cricket or hockey ? The latter
is a favourite game of the girls in Perth
now. I know a Miss Matters who is very
nice, too. l Will you join the Silver
Chain? Yours affectionately. AUNT
MARY.
Port Melbourne, June 23.
My Dear Aunt Mary,—I hope you will
accept me as one of your nieces. I have
three aunts, three uncles, and two cou-
live in Victoria. Two of my uncles sell
names are Mr. Frolley and Mr. Good-
hill, and they often send us your paper.
You were saying your nephews and
nieces were not writing to you, so I sup-
pose you will be glad to get two nephews
and niece. The baby next door to us
has the same name as you, "Mary." We
have been home all day, as it is so cold
and wet, and Isabelle. Murray and Mary
Downie came in our place and played
with us. They brought ludo, snake, and
flag games. We played at concerts at
the beginning of the afternoon, and Isa-
dience, and I was to tell them when to
clap. At the beginning of the concert
we had a graphophone, and EIm was the
graphophone. Then we played at snake
and flag games until George came to say
the little Downies were to come home. I
am 10 years old, and in the 5th class at
School. I remain—,Yours affectionate-
ly. VERA WEBB.
My dear Vera,—I was delighted to
hear from you and will gladly accept you
as one of my nieces. You must have
quite an affection for Western Australia,
having so many relations here. I am
glad that you sometimes see the "West-
ern Mail, and hope you will continue
your interest in the Children's Column.
It has been very cold and wet in Perth
for the past week, but even wet days
pass swiftly by when you enjoying such good
fun the day you speak about.—Yours
affectionately, AUNT MARY.
OUR CHILDREN OF THE WEST THEIR OWN CORNER IN THE RECORD Australian History Prize Competition. (Article), The W.A. Record (Perth, WA : 1888 - 1922), Saturday 30 July 1904 [Issue No.1244] page 20 2017-05-18 13:43 attendance. - I went to Perth for my
mary uutler.
the rising.of the river at Mogumber
the Molyneux overflow, its banks on
p/iirn fKnmcniuac An n Aomtnf nf fliA
aavb iiiviiiwvi v vo vu abbuuu i ui uiu
fine dog chained to his kennel, on topi
Hundreds of houses, haystacks,"
Mary, I do kqow what it is like to
see a river n flood. Now I want
you, like a god little girl, to remem
to you, but 1 thought I would not write a
nice one. Dear Aunt Nora, I. think I. will
often go for a drive and have lots ot fun.
.The Sisters, some of my school com
are — Sister. Mary Bernard, Sister M.
This is- Katie's own composition. Sister
how much you should - appreciate it
all; as well as the .kindness of . your
parents in enabling you to . take ad
must, indeed, have fine" fun driving
little nieces and nephews ; they are :
attendance. I went to Perth for my
Mary Butler.
the rising of the river at Mogumber
the Molyneux overflow its banks on
save themselves on account of the
fine dog chained to his kennel, on top
Hundreds of houses, haystacks,
Mary, I do know what it is like to
see a river in flood. Now I want
you, like a good little girl, to remem-
to you, but I thought I would not write a
nice one. Dear Aunt Nora, I think I will
often go for a drive and have lots of fun.
The Sisters, some of my school com-
are — Sister Mary Bernard, Sister M.
This is Katie's own composition. Sister
how much you should appreciate it
all, as well as the kindness of your
parents in enabling you to take ad-
must, indeed, have fine fun driving
OUR CHILDREN OF THE WEST THEIR OWN CORNER IN THE RECORD Australian History Prize Competition. (Article), The W.A. Record (Perth, WA : 1888 - 1922), Saturday 30 July 1904 [Issue No.1244] page 20 2017-05-18 13:37 [?]
/y 1 IMI L wa,s'fr- sii ===m.!SsASWi respi hrLL riMiiMs i . -..- Ht-i
rEDlTED BY lTAUNfiRA.lB'""
be August ist.
July 2nd,, 1904.
are in bloom. I go to St. Patrick's. school,
and my brothers names are Willie,. Am
. Catholic Church, the Imperial Hotel, the
are nearly all gone. I must now 'draw to a
Lillian McQttade.
mnst wfilrnmfi addition tn the. list. T
The little touch of frost in the morn
will make your cheeks rosy and your,
eyes bright. It is very nice to havej
are all loving and kind to one an
. Father Lynch, as he appears to be a
04£i In the first is a lady saying good-bye
has gone down to meet her' son and she
there is a house and some tre'es, and the
then there is a man an'd his dog, I think it
mine, it is nearly twenty .years old. I
have a flower' garden. Some of the flowers
I have growing are lillies, chrysanthe
her father has got alot of nice flowers,
.they have got a lot of roses. I went down
to- her place one time when they were out,
vegetable garden, we have peas; potatoes,
eabbage, lettuce, and also some parsley.
A new' shop was built near our place not
hotels, and looks' very nice. Dear Aunt
days after Jack' and I got our prizes,
oil Kv mir 9a1vab aslr Annt "Nora
the Record asked you to- tell her a nice
know Iherto speak to. That was a very
nice photo of Edith Stubbs in one of- the
cornei in the Record every success. I
The nice long letter you have writ
It is wonderful the amount of infor
yours so long 3 time as that. Did
friends. I am glad you have a gar
almost impossible to buy good veget
ables in Perth. Keep up your prac
Edith Stubbs, and it isjike her. I
addie jbowles.
wish; and I am very pleased to' have
and avoid making the mistake them
Aberdeen Street, Albany, .
night the wind is very 'cold. Albany has
Hall. It' was erected in 1887. It is built
.next one will be longed
Mat Fowles.
. I think the cold weather you are
the hot season at all. This is beau
and bright. In January, which cor
about to go v and see your grand
Holy. Communion on the first Friday of
the ApoBtle brought it to Barcelonia in the
the colour to the face of the statue he be
holding the divine infant on her lap. She v
and the holy' child is crowned with another,
Aunt, I think I have told you all I remem
I' remain, your affectionate niece,
annie mcurath.
interesting little history of the black j
statue, of Our Lady of Monserrat,
carve so beautifully St. Luke- the
them not long ago. In what was -
Chapel of St. Maria Maggiore there -
Great in a. procession through the
tljis picture! of his is very much
oh account of the saintly hand which
read about our concert that I told you ot
in my last letter.- "Well, one paper said
well, dada called, her Genevieve; tnat is
jllalj xiajjijiun.
Dear 1 wish 1 could have
of school in Chinatown, San Fran
Aunt Nora, if you were to see it. It is an 1
OUR CHILDREN OF THE WEST
THEIR OWN CORNER IN THE RECORD
EDITED BY AUNT NORA.
be August 1st.
July 2nd, 1904.
are in bloom. I go to St. Patrick's school,
and my brothers names are Willie, Am-
Catholic Church, the Imperial Hotel, the
are nearly all gone. I must now draw to a
Lillian McQuade.
most welcome addition to the list. I
The little touch of frost in the morn-
will make your cheeks rosy and your
eyes bright. It is very nice to have
are all loving and kind to one an-
Father Lynch, as he appears to be a
one. In the first is a lady saying good-bye
has gone down to meet her son and she
called "The Kissing Moon"; it is where
there is a house and some trees, and the
then there is a man and his dog, I think it
mine, it is nearly twenty years old. I
have a flower garden. Some of the flowers
I have growing are lillies, chrysanthe-
her father has got a lot of nice flowers,
they have got a lot of roses. I went down
to her place one time when they were out,
vegetable garden, we have peas, potatoes,
cabbage, lettuce, and also some parsley.
A new shop was built near our place not
hotels, and looks very nice. Dear Aunt
days after Jack and I got our prizes,
office all by our selves and ask Aunt Nora
the Record asked you to tell her a nice
know her to speak to. That was a very
nice photo of Edith Stubbs in one of the
corner in the Record every success. I
The nice long letter you have writ-
It is wonderful the amount of infor-
yours so long a time as that. Did
friends. I am glad you have a gar-
almost impossible to buy good veget-
ables in Perth. Keep up your prac-
Edith Stubbs, and it is like her. I
Addie Fowles.
wish; and I am very pleased to have
and avoid making the mistake them-
Aberdeen Street, Albany,
night the wind is very cold. Albany has
Hall. It was erected in 1887. It is built
next one will be longer.
May Fowles.
I think the cold weather you are
the hot season at all. This is beau-
and bright. In January, which cor-
about to go and see your grand-
Holy Communion on the first Friday of
the Apostle brought it to Barcelonia in the
the colour to the face of the statue he be-
holding the divine infant on her lap. She
and the holy child is crowned with another,
Aunt, I think I have told you all I remem-
I remain, your affectionate niece,
Annie McGrath.
interesting little history of the black
statue of Our Lady of Monserrat,
carve so beautifully St. Luke the
them not long ago. In what was
Chapel of St. Maria Maggiore there
Great in a procession through the
this picture of his is very much
on account of the saintly hand which
read about our concert that I told you of
in my last letter. Well, one paper said
well, dada called her Genevieve; that is
Mal Hallion.
Dear Mal, I wish I could have
of school in Chinatown, San Fran-
Aunt Nora, if you were to see it. It is an

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

  1. Princess May School (1900-1910)
    List
    Public

    Contains items related to the Princess May School in Fremantle, Western Australia.

    177 items
    created by: public:khaivirtue 2017-04-22
    User data
    Tags:
  2. Princess May School (1910-1920)
    List
    Public

    Contains items related to the Princess May School in Fremantle, Western Australia.

    8 items
    created by: public:khaivirtue 2017-04-23
    User data
  3. Princess May School (1920-1930)
    List
    Public

    Contains items related to the Princess May School in Fremantle, Western Australia.

    1 items
    created by: public:khaivirtue 2017-04-23
    User data

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.