Information about Trove user: juleslaurent

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,512,336
2 NeilHamilton 3,079,643
3 noelwoodhouse 2,979,952
4 annmanley 2,243,541
5 John.F.Hall 2,209,176
...
546 HelenVSmith 61,446
547 murraymac57 61,436
548 rosrobertson 61,388
549 JulesLaurent 61,187
550 JohnWillow 60,976
551 Perry.Middlemiss 60,962

61,187 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

June 2017 587
May 2017 3,991
April 2017 2,693
March 2017 3,226
February 2017 4,289
January 2017 1,678
December 2016 2,258
November 2016 2,176
October 2016 3,817
September 2016 4,553
August 2016 1,457
July 2016 2,451
June 2016 3,347
May 2016 4,577
April 2016 2,658
March 2016 3,119
February 2016 1,355
January 2016 2,159
December 2015 3,503
November 2015 2,017
October 2015 2,862
September 2015 2,414

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,512,305
2 NeilHamilton 3,079,643
3 noelwoodhouse 2,979,952
4 annmanley 2,243,471
5 John.F.Hall 2,209,171
...
545 HelenVSmith 61,445
546 rosrobertson 61,388
547 murraymac57 61,311
548 JulesLaurent 61,083
549 JohnWillow 60,968
550 Perry.Middlemiss 60,962

61,083 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

June 2017 587
May 2017 3,991
April 2017 2,693
March 2017 3,226
February 2017 4,289
January 2017 1,678
December 2016 2,258
November 2016 2,118
October 2016 3,771
September 2016 4,553
August 2016 1,457
July 2016 2,451
June 2016 3,347
May 2016 4,577
April 2016 2,658
March 2016 3,119
February 2016 1,355
January 2016 2,159
December 2015 3,503
November 2015 2,017
October 2015 2,862
September 2015 2,414

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 jaybee67 99,813
2 mickbrook 85,060
3 murds5 54,198
4 PhilThomas 28,441
5 EricTheRed 20,242
...
168 Travyn 107
169 GeoffMMutton 106
170 jrourke 104
171 juleslaurent 104
172 PeterR 103
173 rami 100

104 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

November 2016 58
October 2016 46


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
Celebrities at Botany Bay. THE TRUE STORY OF MARGARET CATCHPOLE. XVI.-REWARDS FOR PROSECUTORS. (Article), Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931), Saturday 30 October 1897 [Issue No.9486] page 3 2017-06-04 16:30 THE TEUE STORY OF
MARGAUET CATCHPOLL
m
XVI.— REWARDS FOR PROSECTTTORS.
^HBBBBb HE judge's certificate re- 1
? KjH '* ferred to in Mrs. fepooner's |
M letter is such a Comioal bit
jm of old. English law, and, at 1
Wi the same time, serves t© es- j
fO^I m tablish Margaret's, identity j
W^§W- Mmj* «n rfearlv. that it deserves
to be quoted:-^
? 'Suffolk. -^ These are to
King, nt fee CouHty of Suf
folk, holden at Bury St. Ed
m-unds, in the county afore
ninth aay trf August Instant,
before me, witose name is j
hereunto subscribed,^ and
otters His Majesty's Jus
aforesaid jsaol of the prisoners therein
being Margaret Catchpole, late t-f the
Ipswich, in the county aforesaid, stogie wo
man, was. convicted '? stealing a gelding of
the pric© of twenty pounds, bf the -goods, and
day cf May last, at the parish ateresaid, in the
town and county aforesaid, and that tie said
John Oobboid was the. person who did take and
apprehend the sa'id Margaret Catchpole, and did
PARISH QFFIGES.
'Therefore, in pursuance ©f an Act of Parliament
of his late Majesty King William IIL, intituled 'An
Act for the better apprehending, ^prosecuting, and
houses, or Stables, or that steal Horses,' I do here
of St. Margaret, in the town ef Ipswich aforesaid,
'In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my
'A. M&cdenaid.'
THE TRUE STORY OF
MARGARET CATCHPOLE.
XVI.— REWARDS FOR PROSECUTORS.
THE judge's certificate re-
ferred to in Mrs. Spooner's
letter is such a comical bit
of old English law, and, at
the same time, serves to es-
so clearly, that it deserves
"Suffolk.—These are to
King, of the County of Suf-
folk, holden at Bury St. Ed-
munds, in the county afore-
ninth day of August instant,
before me, whose name is
hereunto subscribed, and
others His Majesty's Jus-
aforesaid gaol of the prisoners therein
being Margaret Catchpole, late of the
Ipswich, in the county aforesaid, single wo-
man, was convicted stealing a gelding of
the price of twenty pounds, of the goods, and
day of May last, at the parish aforesaid, in the
town and county aforesaid, and that the said
John Cobbold was the person who did take and
apprehend the said Margaret Catchpole, and did
PARISH OFFICES.
"Therefore, in pursuance of an Act of Parliament
of his late Majesty King William III, intituled 'An
Act for the better apprehending, prosecuting, and
houses, or Stables, or that steal Horses,' I do here-
of St. Margaret, in the town of Ipswich aforesaid,
"In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my
"A. Macdonald."
A RICH OLD MAID. (Article), Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931), Saturday 30 October 1897 [Issue No.9486] page 3 2017-06-04 16:22 Kdite was ttot assigned to anyone-. She was sent
up to ite Factory at Parramafta; but she had not
been long there before BITS. Macquarie, theXJover
nor'6 wife, paid her a itootfierly visit, and removed
took charge t-f lier as'a lady boarder, Three years
afterwards the Governor and his wife* with all the
chief officials and their wires, drove up from Syd
ney in -state, afld took her to Government House,
ana a grant x-i zooo acreo mar bjuubji tniuauus
on this little estate, She made su«h food use of her
dppartunitites that 4h 1823 she was worth £12,000;
in 183? £120,^00; and at her death, at least half a
million. Biit wifii all ber gee** looks and -good
fortune, nothing would iadHBJe her to marry any
gentfernftn «t Botany Bay.
This lively tittle tale wa* apparently founded on ?
a Ftenchy Sort «f 'eo-mpot' -of the adventures of
our Two herdln«s-^fa*ea«* ?afid Mary; but beyond
Sthe 'main features' -of them 'there is yfery Uttle m
it to remind dfie at *M3ier. In this, as in his other
'j&etfches, liang iiist»e a. i-etet of avoiding anything ?
like adherence to fafefas-.
Kate was not assigned to anyone. She was sent
up to the Factory at Parramatta; but she had not
been long there before Mrs. Macquarie, the Gover-
nor's wife, paid her a motherly visit, and removed
took charge of her as a lady boarder. Three years
afterwards the Governor and his wife, with all the
chief officials and their wives, drove up from Syd-
ney in state, and took her to Government House,
and a grant of 2000 acres near Sydney. Squatting
on this little estate, she made such good use of her
opportunities that in 1823 she was worth £12,000;
in 1837, £120,000; and at her death, at least half a
million. But with all her good looks and good
fortune, nothing would induce her to marry any
gentleman at Botany Bay.
This lively tittle tale was apparently founded on
a Frenchy sort of "compot" of the adventures of
our two heroines—Margaret and Mary; but beyond
the "main features" of them, there is very little in
it to remind one of either. In this, as in his other
sketches, Lang made a point of avoiding anything
like adherence to facts.
KATE CRAWFORD. (Article), Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931), Saturday 30 October 1897 [Issue No.9486] page 3 2017-06-04 16:17 1 KATE CRAWFORD.
«s they might have done of the rich materials sup
plied by Cobbold. In Joihn Lang's collection of I
sketches, published in 1859 under' the title of ?
'Botany- Bay,' we are introduced to a young lady |
named Kaite Crawford, the beautiful and accom
at tie age of 19 for horse-stealing. Just to keep
?an -appointment with her sweetheart, the giddy girl
tsok a horse from a neighbor's stables ^without his
it at a roadside inn, at which she met the young j
who left Jus own broken-down steed by way of ex
change for it. ...
horse, he made a criminal charge of. the matter, in
order to gratify the neighborly feeling 'he enter
taiiied towards her father. The case wae tried, and
iffie was sentenced to -death; but the sentence waa
ebe created on her arrival.. She was applied for
was anxious to have her assigned to him as a ser
vant. ' .....
or 'quarters, to private soldiers and convicts, at a
dump (fifteen pence) a glass. It' was by these
means thart many of them amassed their large
KATE CRAWFORD.
as they might have done of the rich materials sup-
plied by Cobbold. In John Lang's collection of
sketches, published in 1859 under the title of
'Botany Bay,' we are introduced to a young lady
named Kate Crawford, the beautiful and accom-
at the age of 19 for horse-stealing. Just to keep
an appointment with her sweetheart, the giddy girl
took a horse from a neighbor's stables without his
it at a roadside inn, at which she met the young
who left his own broken-down steed by way of ex-
change for it.
horse, he made a criminal charge of the matter, in
order to gratify the neighborly feeling he enter-
tained towards her father. The case was tried, and
she was sentenced to death; but the sentence was
she created on her arrival. She was applied for
was anxious to have her assigned to him as a ser-
vant.
or quarters, to private soldiers and convicts, at a
dump (fifteen pence) a glass. It was by these
means that many of them amassed their large
AN UNKNOWN LETTER. (Article), Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931), Saturday 30 October 1897 [Issue No.9486] page 3 2017-06-04 16:13 The -substance of their -conversation m-ay be ;
seen in a single letter* of which' the following '
is a copy. It is unfortunately without signa
ture of adSress, but the handwriting is that of a j
lady, and it bears date, jMarch, : 18.47. :. .It seems,
to have been intended for one of the' Cobbold j
family, and to have been written at the instance i
'March, 1847.
'A strong belief has arisen, both In Australia
?and England, tfhat the person whose history is re
iated by Mr. CobboM under that designation (and
'Mrs. Reiby is exceedingly grieved and anneyed
at this opinibn, and has commissioned ike Bishop
of Tasmania to use his best endeavors to cofitra
aiet it, officially, and upon clear documents.; and
-Cobbold.
The substance of their conversation may be
seen in a single letter, of which the following
is a copy. It is unfortunately without signa-
ture or address, but the handwriting is that of a
lady, and it bears date March, 1847. It seems
to have been intended for one of the Cobbold
family, and to have been written at the instance
"March, 1847.
"A strong belief has arisen, both In Australia
and England, that the person whose history is re-
lated by Mr. Cobbold under that designation (and
"Mrs. Reiby is exceedingly grieved and annoyed
at this opinion, and has commissioned the Bishop
of Tasmania to use his best endeavors to contra-
dict it, officially, and upon clear documents; and
Cobbold.
THE RABY PUZZLE. (Article), Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931), Saturday 30 October 1897 [Issue No.9486] page 3 2017-06-04 16:08 THE tlABY PtiZZliE.
'The myStery 1 allude to 'is'ithe'nattte fat -Reiby— :
'or 'Saby, 'as I shbiilQ haVe sp'elt it. While at -Mr. ;
R. 'E.^is, 'we -drbv* 'thrSugh:.*'evingt«ii,-4DB th« Or-'
well (Suffolk), and they -told -me 'there is a mill ,
which belonged to Raby — John Barry's father, .as
?he is called in the book.'
'I remarked to ch? Bishop ttiat the word Raby
was 'an anagram of Barr.y, and a great deal too
like to conceal the_real one; ? and he 'saia i Tiad
discovered 'the enigma, ana tins 'Was 'Ore great
cause of the mistake. But it does not 'satisfy -me,
:tf6cause I iiea*d in tKe -neighbofiood 'that Saby ;
\ciss iShe faai name of ?'Margaret'* Jover and bus- !
-baaad. -Tiiomas, you -see, is -the iiame -of *he -real
USsc. -Reiby.'
This -is one -of the -most singular things in fhfe
«tory. iiocal, residents might be trusted in such
a -matter as a local name; and if £he inille^s was
Raby, it would aecotint'for a good 'deal o£ 'their
misapprehension^ 'We ' don't'' knb'ftr ygt 'irb'm 'what :
part of England 'feomas !feelB5r eam'e. Suppto'sing
'thai h'e 'cairie 'from iMvtiLgEbii, the description
given Tjy BafrV Jfn 'the bddk, ^afe 'a shipowner «md
?tfieftaiaia, wbttla!ajJply'toKim;-and-fetebold«ii#it
?ftaVe*lien-tb3niaiig of him wtoeh he married -him to
JMargaVet.
r|H yofc -can -glve -any authentic -information to
tfee '©ieHop -et Tasaiaaia -he wzU be ^auch obliged
determined to *HH-ayel the mystery, and to see
Mr. Cobbold, Iff 'necessary, 'BeFo'fe leaving Eng*
?iacfd, es be promised to do «o, -and toe feels great
frirendship ana tnteres't €or the two clerical grand
'Sons, who are settled -in .Van Diemen's Land.
'Was the =gehtteman who bid for Kentrose Hall
TeaSy called -Heiby-? -That was a circumstance
?M?. -D6bl)bW -ought not *o have mentioned, if he
'fiaa'*em Margaret's '?^on^feid if *e was jiot, ie.
'haE^elvai tgttSiiii4. 4n the 4-ook for -tbe -unpleasant.
?Hiisfeate. ',': r '???.'? ''' ' '.. ?'' -! ' ?'.-'.'
THE RABY PUZZLE.
" The mystery I allude to is the name of Reiby—
or Raby, as I should have spelt it. While at Mr.
R. E.'s, we drove through Levington, on the Or-
well (Suffolk), and they told me 'there is a mill
he is called in the book.'
"I remarked to the Bishop that the word Raby
was an anagram of Barry, and a great deal too
like to conceal the real one; and he said I had
discovered the enigma, and this was the great
cause of the mistake. But it does not satisfy me,
because I heard in the neighborhood that Raby
was the real name of Margaret's lover and hus-
band. Thomas, you see, is the name of the real
Mr. Reiby."
This is one of the most singular things in the
story. Local residents might be trusted in such
a matter as a local name; and if the miller's was
Raby, it would account for a good deal of their
misapprehension. We don't know yet from what
part of England Thomas Reiby came. Supposing
that he came from Levington, the description
given by Barry in the book, as a shipowner and
merchant, would apply to him; and Cobbold might
have been thinking of him when he married him to
Margaret.
"If you can give any authentic information to
the Bishop of Tasmania he will be much obliged
determined to unravel the mystery, and to see
Mr. Cobbold, If necessary, before leaving Eng-
land, as he promised to do so, and he feels great
friendship and interest for the two clerical grand-
sons, who are settled in Van Diemen's Land.
"Was the gentleman who bid for Kentrose Hall
really called Reiby? That was a circumstance
Mr. Cobbold ought not to have mentioned, if he
had been Margaret's son; and if he was not, he
has given ground in the book for the unpleasant
mistake.
BLACK CAP. (Detailed lists, results, guides), Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931), Saturday 30 October 1897 [Issue No.9486] page 3 2017-06-04 16:00 BLACKCAP. . '
The ?sentence was undoubtedly death, the 'offence r
'being one in which the -judge had -no discretion to '
reduce the- .penalty on conviction. But, as 'in
Margaret's case, it was commuted -to transporta
tion, and probably for eeven years.
'It is a painful circumstance for 'Mr. CoDbold to i
have been the cause of revivin'g this long forgot- (
ten misfortune, fciwl iirvdlying'a wealthy 'ana 'highly '
respectable family In so much ?mortificatioiu
'You may refiiemiSer you Void Lin'e that -some
'ofh'ef 'Mr. 'CobVcia 'lura Inet Mrs. -Iniiefe, ye daygh
tef tof Mi's. Hgiby, arid told lier toe had formerly
known her motttgr, -and -on '{her) eagerly asking .irer «
«ame, '(she) ''replied^'Gh, '-no, that cannot be, for
her name is Mary.' . This is ??quite natural. She1
.probably did not know her -mother's maiden name,
and had found out thait there was a cloud on her
early history, but knew her name was Mary, be
cause she eigned it 'so.
BLACK CAP.
The sentence was undoubtedly death, the offence
being one in which the judge had no discretion to
reduce the penalty on conviction. But, as in
Margaret's case, it was commuted to transporta-
tion, and probably for seven years.
"It is a painful circumstance for Mr. Cobbold to
have been the cause of reviving this long forgot-
ten misfortune, and involving a wealthy and highly
respectable family in so much mortification.
"You may remember you told me that some
other Mr. Cobbold had met Mrs. Innes, ye daugh-
ter of Mrs. Reiby, and told her he had formerly
known her mother, and on (her) eagerly asking her
name, (she) replied—'Oh, no, that cannot be, for
her name is Mary.' This is quite natural. She
probably did not know her mother's maiden name,
and had found out that there was a cloud on her
early history, but knew her name was Mary, be-
cause she signed it so.
MARY HAYDOCK. (Article), Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931), Saturday 30 October 1897 [Issue No.9486] page 3 2017-06-04 15:57 MART HAYDGCK.
'In the meantime, he placed in my hand's yes
terday the enclosed paper, by whieh it -appears
that Mrs. Reiby's name was Mary, or Molly, _4ag
dock -a Lancashire woman) ; and -even if the official
?registers be disputed,' a strong proof she cannot
be Margaret Catchpole is that she has two grand
Margaret, tJhough old enough to have grown up
till towards the year 1810. when 'she was near '4b,
'Yet there are extraordinary 'points ol. coinci
dence, which render the mistake very haturai; i
'and there are also some mysterious points which j.
I -Should be glaa to see cleared up. - . j
'Mary Haydock was transportea for horse sfeeal- j
ing, a very Tare offence -for a woman to -commit; j
?and she probably committed it from ihe same mo- I
'You will see by the dates sihe was only 14. She
tells the Bishop ehe was of a respectable family,
which is corroborated .'by her parents being mar- ;
ried by license; (that she was at 'boarding school, .
and ran off in th'e'night, for a frolic, with a pony
in a neighboring field, without -any 'ifttent'i6n tt '
'stealing ft.
?'Th'e Bishop said hefould not cross-question 'the
Ol*d l&dy too severely, ijut he 'suspects it WSs-a love
affair, and that 'she took the pony to -rua ianwcy.. j
Thaft there 'were some very strong extefluaiting 1
-ciretinistances, he truly remarks, -is -proved by the ?!
'Beatence ot only -seven years, when the .punishment
at that time was death.'
MARY HAYDOCK.
"In the meantime, he placed in my hand's yes-
terday the enclosed paper, by which it appears
that Mrs. Reiby's name was Mary, or Molly, Hay-
dock (a Lancashire woman) ; and even if the official
registers be disputed, a strong proof she cannot
be Margaret Catchpole is that she has two grand-
Margaret, though old enough to have grown up
till towards the year 1810, when she was near 40,
"Yet there are extraordinary points of coinci-
dence, which render the mistake very natural ;
and there are also some mysterious points which
I should be glad to see cleared up.
"Mary Haydock was transported for horse steal-
ing, a very rare offence for a woman to commit;
and she probably committed it from the same mo-
"You will see by the dates she was only 14. She
tells the Bishop she was of a respectable family,
which is corroborated by her parents being mar-
ried by license; that she was at boarding school,
and ran off in the night, for a frolic, with a pony
in a neighboring field, without any intention of
stealing it.
"The Bishop said he could not cross-question the
old lady too severely, but he suspects it was a love
affair, and that she took the pony to run away.
That there were some very strong extenuating
circumstances, he truly remarks, is proved by the
sentence of only seven years, when the punishment
at that time was death."
REIBY HOUSE HOLDS MEMORIES Childhood Haunt Of Local Women (Article), Singleton Argus (NSW : 1880 - 1954) , Monday 30 April 1951 page 3 2017-06-04 15:29 of the convict gangs is evi
dent.
still haunted by the atmos
SEARCH *
But then- story has been lost
an officer on the /'Royal Ad
house in Macquarie Street, Syd
I the oldest buildings in Austra
; lia.
It is believed that Mrs. Rei
Reibey House has been own
. Her brother, Mr. W. Gawne,
of the convict gangs is evi-
dent.
still haunted by the atmos-
SEARCH
But their story has been lost
an officer on the "Royal Ad-
house in Macquarie Street, Syd-
the oldest buildings in Austra-
lia.
It is believed that Mrs. Rei-
Reibey House has been own-
Her brother, Mr. W. Gawne,
'MARGARET CATCHPOLE.' Who Was She?—Her Alleged Relationship to the Late Judge Innes—Who was Mrs. Reiby?—Various was Mrs. Reiby?—Various Journalistic Theories—The Camperdown Cemetery Vault—Old "Joe" Innes—The Reiby Family's Intervention—A [?]ramatic Tasmanian Incident. Mrs. Reiby's La[?] in George-street—The Mystery yet Unsolved. (Article), Truth (Sydney, NSW : 1894 - 1954), Sunday 17 January 1897 [Issue No.338] page 5 2017-06-03 16:03 Aa old Hlghlsaier, rstfbar fond of hit
glass, was ordered bj tbe doctor during a
temporary ailment not to exceed' one ounce
of spirits in' the day. The old man was a
his bey, who was at scbool, how much aa
ounce was. 'Aa ounce 7— Sixteen drams,
the delighted Highlander. 'Oawl bo so
bad. (sixteen drams I Run and tell Tonal
Uactavieh and Big John to come doon the
richf
In 1S95 Great Britain bought foreign
unprinted paper te the valueo££2,046,10o ;
£254,042 ; and fortiga straw-board, mill
board, and weod-pulu board to the value
of £545,254. In tbo aggregate for 1893,
'94, and '95, these throe items ran up from
£2,347,204 to £2.845,402. English news
paper proprietors purchise largely in
(iermany. Prince Bismarck is himself a
big paper-maker, and trades witu England
An old Highlander, rather fond of his
glass, was ordered by the doctor during a
temporary ailment not to exceed one ounce
of spirits in the day. The old man was a
his boy, who was at school, how much an
ounce was. 'An ounce ?— Sixteen drams,
the delighted Highlander. 'Gaw! no so
bad. Sixteen drams ! Run and tell Tonal
Mactavish and Big John to come doon the
richt.'
In 1895 Great Britain bought foreign
unprinted paper to the value of £2,046,106 ;
£254,042 ; and foreign straw-board, mill-
board, and wood-pulp board to the value
of £545,254. In the aggregate for 1893,
'94, and '95, these three items ran up from
£2,347,204 to £2,845,402. English news-
paper proprietors purchase largely in
Germany. Prince Bismarck is himself a
big paper-maker, and trades with England
'MARGARET CATCHPOLE.' Who Was She?—Her Alleged Relationship to the Late Judge Innes—Who was Mrs. Reiby?—Various was Mrs. Reiby?—Various Journalistic Theories—The Camperdown Cemetery Vault—Old "Joe" Innes—The Reiby Family's Intervention—A [?]ramatic Tasmanian Incident. Mrs. Reiby's La[?] in George-street—The Mystery yet Unsolved. (Article), Truth (Sydney, NSW : 1894 - 1954), Sunday 17 January 1897 [Issue No.338] page 5 2017-06-03 15:58 CATCHPOLL'
ICelatioBskip to tSie ILate Judge
lunes— Who was Mrs. Ileilty?
Theories — The Camper-,
down -;einet«M\v Vault —
Old *'Joe' Millies— 'Hie
Keiby Family's Inter
vention— A E tramatic
T a s in a n i a u
!mt'id-Mit.
Mrs. l£eiby'-» Land iu George
street— The frHystery jet
L'uoolvcd.
Quite recently Tbutu published a short
biography of the late Judge, bir Joseph
George Long lnncs, commonly known —
Innes. In ihat biography was made inci
middle era, waB prominently before the
clear-headed woman of business, la cem
marcial circles in the first quarter of the
Mary Beiby held her own. against all
comers. As explained in Truth's
biography, Mrs Beiby was the grand
mother of Sir fteorge Innes, and
incidentally it was noted that bv
many told colonists Mn Mary Keiby
and 'Margaret CJatchpole' were considered
iJentical. The country press has taken up
the theme, and sets itself out to eipla'n the
cemetery at Windsor (N. 8. W.), where, in the
The writer then adds tha.t in all human pro
bability some gtri, dfin.£», bus induced, for
ulterior reasons, to proclaim herselt Magaret
Catcbpole, and to leave tfaii mundane sphere
Another journal insiits tbat Margaret Catch -
pole and Mary Eeibj were (identical. Still
that in a vault in Oamp^iduvra Cemetery lie
This newspaper correspondent as°erta that
year 1852,' and that he saw the coffin con
consigned to the vault, a.nd 'there,' he adds,
'they now lie.' The ' Bulletin/ usually
right ia its facts, tells us that
he was challenged as ihe grandson of Mar
garet Catchpole, 'aid,' adds 'Tha Bul
latin,' ' as a matter of fact, he was not.'
A well-known preiima-n it said to hold
Rsiby was not Margaret Catchpole. If
that be to, there would &ppear to be no very
great reason way tne Inmi family should
take any trouble to prove non.connection.
The Reiby family have on mora than one
being (iven te ' Margaret Oatchpole.' The
veteran Australian actor, Ur. J. J. Welsh,
informs the writer tha,t many years ago
a company he was then with ia Lauacestoa
Cabbold's novel, and that a lady waited
would cause pain to many- reipectaole people,
play. If not ' Margaret Catchpole,1 who was
Uary Haydock, who in Sydney married
Ur Keiby? Any eld colonist who knew
this lady, and there are some still living'
who wore personally acquainted with her,
will tell tht enquirer that for shrewd
businesscapacity nhestood alone. In Governor
Macquarie's time Mrs. fieibf held a grant
of land identical with ti&at upon which the
old Imperial Pension O. lice now stands in
&eorge-etroet north. Who granted it, when
and why .' has never been clearly explained.
The ia,3y '.?vjJ.-.ntly had influence, whether
she wa- uie : ulfjlk heroine or not, and ia
flMenci! as po nt as that of 'Campbell's on
tus whirl,' ;» the al.olment she held was
about next la the viiua. tole water frontage
family running along George-street to
wards Daws' Point. Hacquarie wanted
Mrs. t Beiby 's lot to extend the
?lumberyard,' which is now occupied by
the Imperial Naval storeboute. To accom
plish tbis end Macqtiarie offered Mrs
Beiby a valuable; allotment to the South iu
litn of the one ? she then held. - In these
mattera Macquarie's wish, was law, and Mrs
Beiby accepted aa allotment, since
resumed by the Government, and. on whicn
station. Nert door. Isaac Nlcholl built the
fix. Truth's readers will await with
Interest the elucidation sb promised of the
? Catcbpole mysUry.'
CATCHPOLE.'
Relationship to the Late Judge
lunes— Who was Mrs. Reiby?
Theories — The Camper-
down Cemetery Vault—
Old 'Joe' Huneses— The
Reiby Family's Inter-
vention— A Dramatic
Tasmanian
Incident.
Mrs. Reiby's Land in George-
street—The Mystery yet
Unsolved.
Quite recently TRUTH published a short
biography of the late Judge, Sir Joseph
George Long lnnes, commonly known —
Innes. In that biography was made inci-
middle era, was prominently before the
clear-headed woman of business. In com-
mercial circles in the first quarter of the
Mary Reiby held her own against all
corners. As explained in Truth's
biography, Mrs Reiby was the grand-
mother of Sir George Innes, and
incidentally it was noted that by
many old colonists Mrs Mary Reiby
and 'Margaret Catchpole' were considered
identical. The country press has taken up
the theme, and sets itself out to explain the
mystery, for surrounding 'Margaret Catch-
cemetery at Windsor (N. S. W.), where, in the
The writer then adds that in all human pro-
bability some girl, dying, was induced, for
ulterior reasons, to proclaim herself Margaret
Catchpole, and to leave this mundane sphere
Another journal insists that Margaret Catch -
pole and Mary Reiby were identical. Still
that in a vault in Camperdown Cemetery lie
This newspaper correspondent asserts that
year 1852,' and that he saw the coffin con-
consigned to the vault, and 'there,' he adds,
'they now lie.' The 'Bulletin,' usually
right in its facts, tells us that
he was challenged as the grandson of Mar-
garet Catchpole, 'and,' adds 'The Bul-
letin,' 'as a matter of fact, he was not.'
A well-known pressman is said to hold
Reiby was not Margaret Catchpole. If
that be so, there would appear to be no very
great reason why the Innes family should
take any trouble to prove non-connection.
The Reiby family have on more than one
being given to 'Margaret Catchpole.' The
veteran Australian actor, Mr. J. J. Welsh,
informs the writer that many years ago
a company he was then with in Launceston
Cobbold's novel, and that a lady waited
would cause pain to many respectable people,
play. If not 'Margaret Catchpole,' who was
Mary Haydock, who in Sydney married
Mr Reiby? Any old colonist who knew
this lady, and there are some still living
who were personally acquainted with her,
will tell the enquirer that for shrewd
business capacity she stood alone. In Governor
Macquarie's time Mrs. Reiby held a grant
of land identical with that upon which the
old Imperial Pension Office now stands in
George-street north. Who granted it, when
and why? has never been clearly explained.
The lady evidently had influence, whether
she was the Suffolk heroine or not, and in-
fluence as potent as that of 'Campbell's on
the wharf,' as the allotment she held was
about next to the valuable water frontage
family running along George-street to-
wards Dawes' Point. Macquarie wanted
Mrs. Reiby's lot to extend the
'lumber yard,' which is now occupied by
the Imperial Naval storehouse. To accom-
plish this end Macquarie offered Mrs
Reiby a valuable allotment to the South in
lieu of the one she then held. In these
matters Macquarie's wish was law, and Mrs
Reiby accepted an allotment, since
resumed by the Government, and on which
station. Next door, Isaac Nlcholl built the
fix. TRUTH's readers will await with
interest the elucidation as promised of the
'Catchpole mystery.'

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.