Information about Trove user: jeri

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,408,346
2 NeilHamilton 3,044,828
3 noelwoodhouse 2,878,116
4 annmanley 2,235,369
5 John.F.Hall 2,108,257
...
53 Juniris 513,502
54 peter-macinnis 511,264
55 Besure 498,468
56 jeri 497,301
57 julyn 489,335
58 gravesandbones 486,452

497,301 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

April 2017 16,656
March 2017 12,311
February 2017 15,341
January 2017 10,245
December 2016 20,244
November 2016 19,657
October 2016 26,824
September 2016 25,218
August 2016 11,265
July 2016 2,420
June 2016 24,271
May 2016 23,947
April 2016 22,991
March 2016 8,629
February 2016 9,397
January 2016 24,974
December 2015 22,103
November 2015 17,339
October 2015 11,482
September 2015 19,289
August 2015 657
July 2015 12,016
June 2015 8,459
May 2015 26,836
April 2015 16,602
March 2015 7,113
February 2015 11,583
January 2015 8,432
December 2014 6,058
November 2014 3,465
October 2014 3,421
September 2014 2,112
July 2014 3,779
June 2014 511
May 2014 13,188
April 2014 15,045
March 2014 10,942
November 2013 60
September 2013 12
August 2013 1,190
July 2013 1,217

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,408,315
2 NeilHamilton 3,044,828
3 noelwoodhouse 2,878,116
4 annmanley 2,235,299
5 John.F.Hall 2,108,252
...
53 Juniris 513,501
54 peter-macinnis 511,264
55 Besure 498,468
56 jeri 496,938
57 julyn 489,335
58 gravesandbones 486,452

496,938 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

April 2017 16,620
March 2017 12,284
February 2017 15,326
January 2017 10,240
December 2016 20,210
November 2016 19,632
October 2016 26,817
September 2016 25,004
August 2016 11,265
July 2016 2,420
June 2016 24,271
May 2016 23,947
April 2016 22,991
March 2016 8,629
February 2016 9,397
January 2016 24,974
December 2015 22,103
November 2015 17,339
October 2015 11,482
September 2015 19,289
August 2015 657
July 2015 12,016
June 2015 8,459
May 2015 26,836
April 2015 16,602
March 2015 7,113
February 2015 11,583
January 2015 8,432
December 2014 6,058
November 2014 3,465
October 2014 3,421
September 2014 2,112
July 2014 3,779
June 2014 511
May 2014 13,188
April 2014 15,045
March 2014 10,942
November 2013 60
September 2013 12
August 2013 1,190
July 2013 1,217

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 mickbrook 76,019
2 jaybee67 66,519
3 murds5 54,198
4 PhilThomas 23,564
5 EricTheRed 20,242
...
57 MeAgain 402
58 ColinMcDiarmid 396
59 fmay1947 395
60 jeri 363
61 IanAHawke 346
62 onewaymule87 344

363 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

April 2017 36
March 2017 27
February 2017 15
January 2017 5
December 2016 34
November 2016 25
October 2016 7
September 2016 214


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
Koloona News. (Article), Warialda Standard and Northern Districts' Advertiser (NSW : 1900 - 1954), Monday 24 December 1923 [Issue No.18] page 2 2017-04-23 18:21 Kploona News;
(From, onr correspondent);-
..in'-ihb flight, ....... :'x
Make; me. a. child 1' again .just, for
. to-night." ;
sonated the over popular Santy. The
. juveniles. then had supper and after--'
wards eUjoyed' some dances. Mary-
M.C., and had. every child dancing. ,
The. adults took.the floor. -at .- 10 p.m.,
good music, being provided by SeV-'
oral ladies and gentlemen...-. Mr.
O'-Neill was again M.C. A jolly
iiight closed with a vote of thanks'
to everyone who had : assembled to.
make snch a successful night
We had a storm a few days ago,:
but the rainfall was patchy, enly '25
poi.nl s falling in tlie village, whereas'
leu points tell at places about two
miles west of tlie- village. (lodging
by tlie heat and humid atmosphere'
wq are iu for a good downfall at au
early dalo
Wheat carting is now genei'al, and
over a thousaud bags, liave been
trucked from here
Several residents went to tlfoMet-:
ropolis on. the excursion— ; .
Mr. & - Mrs.- George Byrnes arid
family have moved to Inverell AVc
rotimliugs -
Mr. T, English is erecting a new
house, Mr.'W'. Stenz being the con
tractor j
; Surveyors" liave' Ve-iidjirsted rf.Tio :
new camping reserve, which is ' liow
ou tho North-eiistcorner of tlie villago
KOLOONA NEWS.
(From our correspondent).
in the flight,
Make; me. a. child again just for
to-night."
sonated the ever popular Santy. The
juveniles then had supper and after
wards enjoyed some dances. Mary
M.C., and had every child dancing.
The adults took the floor at 10 p.m.,
good music being provided by sev
eral ladies and gentlemen. Mr.
O'Neill was again M.C. A jolly
night closed with a vote of thanks
to everyone who had assembled to
make such a successful night
We had a storm a few days ago,
but the rainfall was patchy, only 25
points falling in the village, whereas
150 points fell at places about two
miles west of the village. Judging
by the heat and humid atmosphere
we are in for a good downfall at an
early date.
Wheat carting is now general, and
over a thousand bags, have been
trucked from here.
Several residents went to the Met
ropolis on the excursion.
Mr. & Mrs. George Byrnes and
family have moved to Inverell. We
roundings.
Mr. T. English is erecting a new
house, Mr. W. Stenz being the con
tractor.
Surveyors have re-adjusted the
new camping reserve, which is now
on the North-east corner of the village.
Family Notices (Family Notices), The Inverell Times (NSW : 1899 - 1954), Friday 15 May 1914 [Issue No.6115] page 7 2017-04-23 18:13 STENZ.-In sad but loving memory of my
Family Notices (Family Notices), The Inverell Times (NSW : 1899 - 1954), Friday 15 May 1914 [Issue No.6115] page 7 2017-04-23 18:13 verell, May 15th, 1913. .
[Inserted by, his loving wife and children.]
verell, May 15th, 1913.
At rest.
[Inserted by his loving wife and children.]
THE MEANING OF ANZAC A Tradition of Manhood (Article), The Inverell Times (NSW : 1899 - 1954), Monday 26 April 1937 page 6 2017-04-23 18:10 NAMES OF Ol/R GALLANT DEAD.
NAMES OF OuR GALLANT DEAD.
THE MEANING OF ANZAC A Tradition of Manhood (Article), The Inverell Times (NSW : 1899 - 1954), Monday 26 April 1937 page 6 2017-04-23 17:54 THE MEANING OF ANAZC
A Tradition of Manhood
between orrselves nnd the event that
we need to keen reminding Oi'rselves
of the tvue nature of that event. For
Time can be not only a Healer, tiut an
Eraser — it has often nibbed out the
tent of a 'holv day,' that it becomes
a mere '.'holiday-.' And. oft-times,
)iebvile bo on using terms out of which
Time lies .'^fiueezei all their real mean
ing. Now the word Ahzac is not to meet
that fate — ntr-i therp nr» vtowerfsl for
that state of t^inn-' — we must, on such,
?whether we hr-'c inderd. kfni faith
with Anzao. Do we reply that we
F. J. Brown A. G. Gooda G. Morris R stenz
THE MEANING OF ANZAC.
A Tradition of Manhood.
between ourselves and the event that
we need to keep reminding ourselves
of the true nature of that event. For
Time can be not only a Healer, but an
Eraser — it has often rubbed out the
tent of a 'holy day,' that it becomes
a mere 'holiday.' And, oft-times,
people go on using terms out of which
Time has squeezed all their real mean
ing. Now the word Anzac is not to meet
that fate — and there are powerful for
that state of things — we must, on such,
whether we have, indeed, kept faith
with Anzac. Do we reply that we
F. J. Brown A. G. Gooda G. Morris, R. Stenz,
THE LAST BATCH. RECRUITS FAREWELL. (Article), The Inverell Times (NSW : 1899 - 1954), Friday 27 October 1916 [Issue No.6354] page 4 2017-04-23 17:49 THE LAST BATCH
TKe JpsV 3-atch 'of j^ruit^jBo Sin
as lhe'volpLaJ^'s-£'tem*4n Inverdl' is
welted io-Mie«SboGj of Xrfs «eST te&l
night. -. ytie \ loial «uuober jkss 32,
bul Several of the Elsraore-^olunteere
were being entertained In their o\vn
Venire, and oooSe'(jueBtl- did not join
Ibe'r comrades until -Uie 'following
morning. The ball was well filled,
and Uie utmost enthusiasm prevailed
The Ma-or (Aid C B Ring) pre
sided The men were a fine stamp
of soldiers,: and' were - accorded t--
rousing- reception' as they' filed «m to
the sldge.
Miss Futter 'played the opening .ac
companiment, and alsp accornpaniet
Miss SwiDileld in the rendition of
Aid. J. F. O'Connor, who'.said that
about iwo years ago he had the honor
of saying good-bye lo Hie first brave
contingent of SfOildiers wlio. left In
vereJl It was fresh in all'Uielr
memoriee the pride thej experienced
oi* tliat occasion; ' They ?? prdmlsed
the men 'they would nol forget tliom,
1it-iw- mnlrfirc /if ll!cf.AI*t' hftd lltimt
The men promised to do JUElice io
Australia , anil Invcreli and to play Hie
game, and; nobly bad they honored
that pledge. .TJpon those remaining 'at
home devolved a higher duty Ihan
remembering lUe day they went
Jn the sands of Galllpoli wilh their
that the men who returned did nol
want for anything lhal was in their
powev to give.
Since .theo -he 'had -been privHegcfi
lo say good-bye 10 many Hither con
tingents. Inverell rad played well
cisively -that if the whole of Australia
had done as well as Invcreli had
done tUcrc'Wouiri be no shortage of
rciriforeemeivts to-day. General Halg
and he asked the audience lo think
O'Conwor) had heard of it laughed
at as frolhy and groundless,' hut
those wiio did so were speaking from
4iaig was In Ihe position of a mili
tary autocrat, who had only lo say
thai -he wanied men,- and men would
comparisons had been madfl as k-
lhc hoys, bul If ever a contingent
bad an excuse for not going to the
war ihe brave boys on ilie- slage
that night had. TheJ' might .reason
ably have said, 'Wo will wail . flnd
sec Iiwv things are going lo go,' bul
they beard the call of General Halg.
for reinforcements. They liad said
in effect, 'We donl care a snap of
the lingers whether you «end ' anyone
to. Jiclp.us or wot, we're going.' (Ap
that . Australia had done enough.
Australia would nol have done enough
untlf -she bad done everything. The
boys Uicy were now fareweJHog did
not wait. to see whatUhe decision of
Australia was to be.' TJiey fiaid,
'We're' going to light for the Em
pire, and will -U:ust Id you when we
As an elderly man he would say lo
them from the , bottom of his heart,
'Good-hye, and God Mess you.' —
usuaj niftda) -tm the coal of each re
cruit, and banded them a pair of
socks each. Little Clivc Chaffey,
card as a. memento from his mother.
The loddler appeared to take a keen
delight in Ihe proceedings, and wa*
wilh a seal al the Mayor's iablc.
flcld delighted the assemblage with
an excellent rendition -of 'Somewhere
In France,' for which ishe was richly
applaudfid.
jiii! . mayor remarked mat lie
thought Hiey were all agreed (hat the
(lrst iiil «if men ^vvho left InvereM
were a bonny lol, and so vt.ii1? thr
numerous o'lie'r conllBttenls who' had
departed sinee Iheu. ^Voieedinj:,
Mr. Binp ih:mIu a powerful a) pen) to
everyone to s,e tlul tlie men who re
turned from the war were nd ne
glected.' They told Ihe. recruilb on
leaving, 'Wo are promi of you,'' bul
were those remaining at home, doing
anything lo make those boys proud
?of them? The boys aei-i-tn;i'::»h;d
the job^el (hem ;is well «s inr meii
could with the men and material) ol
llielr disposal, but they were asln.d
lo do too much. However, he, did
nol think that Auslralij was s.-(rfiisr
Iq ask them lo continue doini? Ion
much. He was very pleased in -eo
those yming men on the slage going,
Dill il appeared that they were s«'iid:
ing I be eruani and keeping the re
mainder. Let every roan who stayed
al home 'realise thai when n rot-mil
wen) io lilt; war tliore was a little
hit more for him to do al lutmn.
Thorp was nothing a man at homo,
could do In equal !|ii- services of a
? n; i^-.-ii'.»^-ii -iiihi Lite /lubtrajiau
women would send their wiiif, -would
send Ihcir hushaiids,,and, If iicojI lie,
go Ihemselvcs, rathor than see tlie
grand 'old' flag dragged In Uie mire.
of Ihomselvei and comrades. The
fiend-offp. It was all very well to
send men away wftli flag* waving
Uie other side iof Uie picture. Some
ot them might return maimed and
injured for life, and it wo'uld be
Uren thai,,iliey would value Uie need
or ttue friends
and ite ^a^pnBl Anthem «nd cheers
tor Uie Jjoys^ierminated « vei3~6uc
cessfuf ^aHiering.
men farewelled: — K, tfl. jO'Brien, O
?&. ^JPionberUiy,, -g. Poole, M, J.
Boach--*1. i. aeddinglon,«'SV^ Dick-'
son, F. Donoghue, A. L. Stenz, O
N Shannon, O. S; -Cfeurtney, As /.
Carter, -3'. H. Garter, C E. -Arm- ~
'-lro'ng, »C. G, ThxJinpson, J, T El
liott, B. Hawkins,' A. Dodd,' P J
Oodd, H Allen, J, W Howard, P
T Couglilin, T Barber, A .3. Hart,
E G Merchant, W. Kennett, 11
J. Penberthy, G. Thompson, J. W,
H. Spicer, B. h. Al)an,';.A, Banner,
n. Bruce, S. Hopkins; and.-C. E.
THE LAST BATCH.
The last batch of recruits so far
as the voluntary system in Inverell is
welled in the School of Arts Hall last
night. The total number was 32,
but several of the Elsmore volunteers
were being entertained in their own
centre, and consequently did not join
their comrades until the following
morning. The hall was well filled,
and the utmost enthusiasm prevailed
The Mayor (Ald G. B. Ring) pre
sided. The men were a fine stamp
of soldiers, and were accorded a
rousing reception as they filed on to
the stage.
Miss Futter played the opening ac
companiment, and also accompanied
Miss Swinfield in the rendition of
Ald. J. F. O'Connor, who said that
about two years ago he had the honor
of saying good-bye to the first brave
contingent of soldiers who left In
verell. It was fresh in all their
memories the pride they experienced
on that occasion. They promised
the men they would not forget them,
brave makers of history had burnt
The men promised to do justice to
Australia and Inverell and to play the
game, and nobly had they honored
that pledge. Upon those remaining at
home devolved a higher duty than
remembering the day they went
in the sands of Gallipoli with their
that the men who returned did not
want for anything that was in their
power to give.
Since then he had been privileged
to say good-bye to many other con
tingents. Inverell had played well
cisively that if the whole of Australia
had done as well as Inverell had
done there would be no shortage of
reinforcements to-day. General Haig
and he asked the audience to think
O'Connor) had heard of it laughed
at as frothy and groundless,' but
those who did so were speaking from
Haig was In the position of a mili
tary autocrat, who had only to say
that he wanted men, and men would
comparisons had been made as to
the boys, but If ever a contingent
had an excuse for not going to the
war the brave boys on the stage
that night had. They might reason
ably have said, 'We will wait and
see how things are going to go,' but
they heard the call of General Haig,
for reinforcements. They had said
in effect, 'We don't care a snap of
the fingers whether you send anyone
to help us or not, we're going.' (Ap
that Australia had done enough.
Australia would not have done enough
until she had done everything. The
boys they were now farewelling did
not wait to see what the decision of
Australia was to be. They said,
'We're going to fight for the Em
pire, and will trust to you when we
As an elderly man he would say to
them from the bottom of his heart,
'Good-bye, and God bless you.' —
usual medal on the coat of each re
cruit, and handed them a pair of
socks each. Little Clive Chaffey,
card as a memento from his mother.
The toddler appeared to take a keen
delight in Ihe proceedings, and was
with a seat at the Mayor's table.
field delighted the assemblage with
an excellent rendition of 'Somewhere
In France,' for which she was richly
applauded.
The mayor remarked that he
thought they were all agreed that the
first lot of men who left Inverell
were a bonny lot, and so were the
numerous other contingents who had
departed since then. Proceeding
Mr. Ring made a powerful appeal to
everyone to see that the men who re
turned from the war were not ne
glected. They told the recruits on
leaving, 'We are proud of you,'' but
were those remaining at home doing
anything to make those boys proud
of them? The boys accomplished
the job set them as well as our men
could with the men and material at
their disposal, but they were asked
to do too much. However, he did
not think that Australia was going
to ask them lo continue doing too
much. He was very pleased to see
those young men on the stage going,
but it appeared that they were send
ing the cream and keeping the re
mainder. Let every man who stayed
at home realise that when a recruit
went to the war there was a little
bit more for him to do at home.
There was nothing a man at home
could do In equal the services of a
He believed that the Australian
women would send their sons, would
send their husbands, and, if need be
go themselves, rather than see the
grand old flag dragged in the mire.
of themselves and comrades. The
send-offs. It was all very well to
send men away with flags waving
the other side of the picture. Some
of them might return maimed and
injured for life, and it would be
then that they would value the need
of true friends.
and the National Anthem and cheers
for the boys terminated a very suc
cessful gathering.
men farewelled: — N. R. O'Brien, O
W. Penworthy, S. Poole, M, J.
Roach, F. J. Reddinglon, W. Dick
son, F. Donoghue, A. L. Stenz, G.
N. Shannon, O. S. Courtney, A. J.
Carter, G. H. Carter, C. E. Arm
strong, C. G, Thompson, J. T. El
liott, B. Hawkins, A. Dodd, P. J.
Dodd, H. Allen, J, W. Howard, P.
T. Coughlin, T. Barber, A .J. Hart,
E. G. Merchant, W. Kennett, B.
J. Penberthy, G. Thompson, J. W.
H. Spicer, E. L. Allan, A, Banner,
R. Bruce, S. Hopkins; and C. E.
THE LAST BATCH. RECRUITS FAREWELL. (Article), The Inverell Times (NSW : 1899 - 1954), Friday 27 October 1916 [Issue No.6354] page 4 2017-04-23 17:07 ? 4*x\ ? .
? J— — 1« / ? ' ?
ftECRUJTS FAREWEU-.
The singing of 'Bule Britannia'
cessfuf ^aHiering. ,. *'* -K
\ Jhe HoUpwiB^are ihe' names of the
me& 'fareMielled* — K, tfl. jO'Brien, O
son, ¥. -Donoghue, A. l-, Stenz, O
Pierpont The men left by train
Inis njorning tor Armidale campr
RECRUITS FAREWELLED.
The singing of 'Rule Britannia'
The following are the names of the
men farewelled: — K, tfl. jO'Brien, O
son, F. Donoghue, A. L. Stenz, O
Pierpont. The men left by train
this morning tor Armidale camp.
Convent Successes. (Article), The Inverell Times (NSW : 1899 - 1954), Tuesday 19 September 1916 [Issue No.6343] page 2 2017-04-23 17:03 first Mups, Mijis Ollic Stenz 70. We
first steps, Miss Ollie Stenz 70. We
Regrets of After Years. (Article), The Inverell Times (NSW : 1899 - 1954), Wednesday 12 June 1901 [Issue No.2933] page 6 2017-04-23 16:59 — AV. F. Ftknc.
Hospital, June?, 1901.
— W. F. STENZ.
Hospital, June, 1901.
A Malicious Statement. (TO THE EDITOR INVERELL TIMES.) (Article), The Inverell Times (NSW : 1899 - 1954), Saturday 9 February 1901 [Issue No.2899] page 2 2017-04-23 16:55 and this was accepted by W. P. Stenz,
and this was accepted by W. F. Stenz,

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.