Information about Trove user: jennymac

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,464,918
2 NeilHamilton 3,066,294
3 noelwoodhouse 2,928,942
4 annmanley 2,239,409
5 John.F.Hall 2,155,236
...
2390 bendeichk 8,853
2391 ggrinton 8,848
2392 Jae.Em 8,846
2393 jennymac 8,842
2394 ezitree 8,829
2395 broekhuysen 8,827

8,842 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

May 2017 5,010
April 2017 1,864
March 2017 175
February 2017 137
January 2017 778
December 2016 468
November 2016 410

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,464,887
2 NeilHamilton 3,066,294
3 noelwoodhouse 2,928,942
4 annmanley 2,239,339
5 John.F.Hall 2,155,231
...
2387 bendeichk 8,853
2388 ggrinton 8,848
2389 Jae.Em 8,842
2390 jennymac 8,842
2391 Sharon.Rudd 8,842
2392 ezitree 8,829

8,842 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

May 2017 5,010
April 2017 1,864
March 2017 175
February 2017 137
January 2017 778
December 2016 468
November 2016 410

No text corrections for 'Government Gazettes'


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
GREGORY NORTH RABBIT BOARD. (Article), The Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld. : 1866 - 1939), Saturday 30 January 1915 [Issue No.2498] page 10 2017-05-26 16:23 The Gregory North Babbit Board net at
present: Messrs, C.H. Frarer (chairman), H.
Afford C.J. Brabazon. J.F. Coghlan: R.C.
Jones, A. T. Reid, E. 6. Scholefleld, and F. O
Trotman (superintendent of works). The chair*
nan oon(imtulat«d Mr. Brabaxon oa hit re-elec
tion, and in recponding, Mr. Brabasoa said he
resided about ■800 miles from BouHa, so he
coald not promise to attend ererjr meeting-. He
fair/ recognised, however, that the nbbit
question was a larg« one, and demanded keen
The superintendent's report stowed Hut the
fences were in good order. The inspector! on
fence reported rabbits as mnueroos in placet
akwff their reapectire lines, especially on the
southern bwondary, and a great number of
rabbits had been ca*t*t in the traps alone;
that Ihw recently. RaftMts were also dyinf
la large numbers en the West Diamantina sec
tions, this being due, the superintendent con
water. Three tenders foT fencing work on the
Oork-Allvworjga W.B. check fence were conti-'ered,
for tat Hut sectita <K fcfla), prorided to
commenced work at the eutero end witfaiiriir*
weeks. It was resolved that all aasewmenU in
arrwun on January 15, lflls, be placed in fee
hands of the board's solicitor for collection, to
gether with 10 per cent, penalty. Account*
totalling £1«39/5/ were passed for payment.
The uext meeting was fixed for March 4.
The Gregory North Rabbit Board met at
present: Messrs. C. H. Fraser (chairman), H.
Afford, C. J. Brabazon, J. F. Coghlan, R. C.
Jones, A. T. Reid, E. S. Scholefield, and F. C.
Trotman (superintendent of works). The chair-
man congratulated Mr. Brabazon on his re-elec-
tion, and in responding, Mr. Brabazon said he
resided about 200 miles from Boulia, so he
could not promise to attend every meeting. He
fully recognised, however, that the rabbit
question was a large one, and demanded keen
The superintendent's report showed that the
fences were in good order. The inspectors on
fence reported rabbits as numerous in places
along their respective lines, especially on the
southern boundary, and a great number of
rabbits had been caught in the traps along
that line recently. Rabbits were also dying
in large numbers on the West Diamantina sec-
tions, this being due, the superintendent con-
water. Three tenders for fencing work on the
Cork-Allowonga W.B. check fence were considered,
for the first section (25 miles), provided he
commenced work at the eastern end within five
weeks. It was resolved that all assessments in
arrears on January 15, 1915, be placed in the
hands of the board's solicitor for collection, to-
gether with 10 per cent. penalty. Accounts
totalling £1639/5/ were passed for payment.
The next meeting was fixed for March 4.
PROSPECTS AT BUNDABERG. (Article), The Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld. : 1866 - 1939), Saturday 30 January 1915 [Issue No.2498] page 10 2017-05-26 15:46 Bundaberg district, and states that excep-<*>
tionally good rains have fallen through
through
should give good results.. There was great
Bundaberg district, and states that excep-
tionally good rains have fallen through-
should give good results. There was great
Educational. EDUCATION IN QUEENSLAND. (Article), The Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld. : 1866 - 1939), Saturday 30 January 1915 [Issue No.2498] page 10 2017-05-26 15:42 of salary adjustments. (Applause.) Al
are to be given, yet there. is room for
pay the whole of the automatic increases
Indeed I was hopeful of having had pro*
far the substantial increasing of the
Supil teachers, and as the Treasurer in
icated in his Financial Statement, that
provision would have been made had cir
eumfttances been normal. I think the in
of reform and progress. The securing of
programme and be strongly pressed when
the occasion is opportune. (Applause.)
Before the war much attention was beinJ
s^ven tbioughout the world to vocational
its vast opportunities in the way'bt pri
mary industries, manufactures, andgenerol
trade, there is a very wide field for voci
tional education. Development and voca
tional education go hand in hand. I «m
convinced, however, of the soundness oi
at possible, each unit in the educational
organisation whilst forming a - correlated
Krt of the whole organisation, should
confined to the discharge of its proper
to do work foreign to those functions,
übns a primary school should remain a
primary school and deal with primary sub
jects; a secondary school should be *
secondary Bchool, and eo forth. Each school
unit has to be organised* equipped, and
aad each teacher recruit should be edu«
which he ifi expected to do. 1 do not
obtained from on institution which corn
vines the functions of a primary, a second'
ary. an industrial, and a domestic school,
?lla podrida of the kind I have indicated.
domestic schools as separate units in th«
Central Technical College, and in not at
to primary schools. Bpecial provision has
"been made for those schools in the col
lege; there are special buildings for th«
purpose, and as soon as funds are avail
specialised instructors appointed. I think
twit the teat of time and experience will
is the most economical, effective, and effi
cient one. But an organisation which is
and au educational system must be suffi
ciently elastic to adroit of modification ot
adjustment if necessary. A good applica
sufficiently large to warrant the estab
lishment of a separate high school. But
even this arrangement can only be regard*

ed as ft mke-shift; the separate secondary
schools should be provided as soon as this
attendance justifies that step. High
in this direction. Last year saw the com
upon which the department has been en
bonks, readers, new regulations, revised
operation on the Ist of January current.
The Central Technical College build
ings would be occupied this year. Build
about £126,000. The Training
hopeful. In the recent University ex
amination the teacher-students held theic
1 raining to approved candidates for ap
pointment to small schools. The educa
tion of the children in school* placed iti
charge of these trainees should be im
proved as a result. But he was keen on
pupil-teacheralup. At one time da
that provision this year, but circum
stances operated against him. There was
the Inck ot funds, and there was also
the schools By the beginning of next
concluded Mr. Blair, "who can foretell !
be over, that Britain will emerge vic
torious and stand higher than ever in th«i
esteem >f the nations—loved and trusted
by her friends, respected by her foes.
that ample reparation will be m*de to
the wroncred. and that all tint k humanly
possible will he done to restore and
maintain the beneficent sway of Peace.* 1
of salary adjustments. (Applause.) Al-
are to be given, yet there is room for
pay the whole of the automatic increases.
Indeed I was hopeful of having had pro-
for the substantial increasing of the
pupil teachers, and as the Treasurer in-
dicated in his Financial Statement, that
provision would have been made had cir-
cumstances been normal. I think the in-
of reform and progress. The securing of
programme, and be strongly pressed when
the occasion is opportune. (Applause.)
Before the war much attention was being
given throughout the world to vocational
its vast opportunities in the way of pri-
mary industries, manufactures, and general
trade, there is a very wide field for voca-
tional education. Development and voca-
tional education go hand in hand. I am
convinced, however, of the soundness of
as possible, each unit in the educational
organisation whilst forming a correlated
part of the whole organisation, should
be confined to the discharge of its proper
to do work foreign to those functions.
Thus a primary school should remain a
primary school and deal with primary sub-
jects; a secondary school should be a
secondary school, and so forth. Each school
unit has to be organised, equipped, and
and each teacher recruit should be edu-
which he is expected to do. I do not
obtained from an institution which com-
bines the functions of a primary, a second-
ary, an industrial, and a domestic school,
olla podrida of the kind I have indicated.
domestic schools as separate units in the
Central Technical College, and in not at-
to primary schools. Special provision has
been made for those schools in the col-
lege; there are special buildings for the
purpose, and as soon as funds are avail-
specialised instructors appointed. I think
that the test of time and experience will
is the most economical, effective, and effi-
cient one. But an organisation which is
and an educational system must be suffi-
ciently elastic to admit of modification or
adjustment if necessary. A good applica-
sufficiently large to warrant the estab-
lishment of a separate high school. But
even this arrangement can only be regard-
ed as a make-shift ; the separate secondary
schools should be provided as soon as the
attendance justifies that step. High
in this direction. Last year saw the com-
upon which the department has been en-
books, readers, new regulations, revised
operation on the 1st of January current.
The Central Technical College build-
ings would be occupied this year. Build-
about £126,000. The Training
hopeful. In the recent University ex-
amination the teacher-students held their
training to approved candidates for ap-
pointment to small schools. The educa-
tion of the children in schools placed in
charge of these trainees should be im-
proved as a result. But he was keen on
pupil-teachership. At one time he
that provision this year, but circum-
stances operated against him. There was
the Iack of funds, and there was also
the schools. By the beginning of next
concluded Mr. Blair, "who can foretell ?
be over, that Britain will emerge vic-
torious and stand higher than ever in the
esteem of the nations—loved and trusted
by her friends, respected by her foes,
that ample reparation will be made to
the wronged, and that all that is humanly
possible will be done to restore and
maintain the beneficent sway of Peace."
Educational. EDUCATION IN QUEENSLAND. (Article), The Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld. : 1866 - 1939), Saturday 30 January 1915 [Issue No.2498] page 10 2017-05-26 14:49 war and its world-wide effects. Queens
•ome parts of the Empire. The condition of
necessity for the curtailment of expendi
bad arrested development in many direc
tions Schemes for trade school*,
domestic school*, and farm schools were
in abeyance, but the. stopping of in
•I am exceedingly glad, however," con
tinued the Minister, "to be able to an
nounce this morning that the Govern*
inent has decided in general principle to
•alary does not exceed £100 per an
num; but no salary to be raised above
£100. The increases which are granted
January 1, 1919. By this arrangement
the full regulation salary will he paid to
female teachers of Class 111., Division 3,
who are approved fot promotion to Clan
111., Division 2 ; to unclassified female
teadhers who are approved for admiwion
to Class 111., Division 3; to all qualified
female pupil teachers ; and to male pupil
Qualified' for classification. The salary of
Only lose at the rate of £10 per annum
Unclassified male teachers who are ap
proved for admission to Class HI., Divi
sion 3, will also receive £100 pet M.
.for extra oost of living in the Noith
num. Let roe emphasise that these in
pupil teachers and ex-pupil teachers, be
1. Approximately 830 teachers and pupil
war and its world-wide effects. Queens-
some parts of the Empire. The condition of
necessity for the curtailment of expendi-
had arrested development in many direc-
tions. Schemes for trade schools,
domestic schools, and farm schools were
in abeyance, but the stopping of in-
"I am exceedingly glad, however," con-
tinued the Minister, "to be able to an-
nounce this morning that the Govern-
ment has decided in general principle to
salary does not exceed £100 per an-
num; but no salary to be raised above
£100. The increases which are granted
January 1, 1915. By this arrangement
the full regulation salary will be paid to
female teachers of Class III., Division 3,
who are approved for promotion to Class
III., Division 2 ; to unclassified female
teachers who are approved for admission
to Class III., Division 3; to all qualified
female pupil teachers ; and to male pupil
qualified for classification. The salary of
only lose at the rate of £10 per annum
Unclassified male teachers who are ap-
proved for admission to Class III., Divi-
sion 3, will also receive £100 per an-
for extra cost of living in the North
num. Let me emphasise that these in-
pupil teachers and ex-pupil teachers, be-
1. Approximately 830 teachers and pupil
KEEP YOUNG. (Article), The Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld. : 1866 - 1939), Saturday 30 January 1915 [Issue No.2498] page 7 2017-05-26 14:37 [?] in the London "Daily Mail" gives
[?]is excellent advice upon the subject of
k[?]ieping young .—
Admitting that there is no specific an
practise all sorts of things, avoiding Bait,
grapes or other fruits, living on veget
ables or nuts ; but so far as a medical
man can see, and he Bees all sorts and
(This of course does not refer to per
There are people—l meet them con
stantly—who eat a few years of! the tail
of their life ; others who drink them off,
doe time that condition of agedness which
If men and women de?ire to remain
excessive eating and drinking. They must
how successfully this can be done by per
stotent effort, against 6orrow, worry,
even the pleasurable ones. *
in the process of aging.is a change in the
Wood vessels. The arteries lose their
from a deficitnt supply of new blood.
important liver /unction is ill performed,
the kidneys" tail in throwing out waste,
u fleeted, giving dulnees to the eyes,
tbe gait.
evils of age. The chief of these harmful
particularly emotional overwork. From
condition of old age. They are so little
observed that I commend them to the at
tention of those who would remain youth
Drink alcohol not at all or only mod
erately. By moderately I mean not more
dilated, in the day. and let it be taken
Do not work too hard or too lon*, even
if the work is interesting. By this I
fatigue. Men and some women are apt
to forget that brain-tiredness is more in
Keep always a curb on all the emo
tions, for their indulgence pnts a severe
social, financial, and intellectual ; do not
are likely to cause anxiety. The gambler,
than his yearn, so does the woman of
ke:-n social ambition.
Put business out of mind when its al
lotted time is passed. If you are a woman
make light of domestic difficulties. Every
)no meets with them and they cannot b«
avoided. Do not fret and worry over
•hould be enjoying your leisure. Do not
lose patience with the children. They dd
their be?t according to their lights. Do
not quarrel. All these things wear oat
the arterie*. A good rule for the peace
of lifp and the holding off of age is to
convince yourself that "none of those
worries matters." Take all events calm
ly. The only sensible plan of life is to
"F" in the London "Daily Mail" gives
this excellent advice upon the subject of
keeping young :—
Admitting that there is no specific an-
practise all sorts of things, avoiding salt,
grapes or other fruits, living on veget-
ables or nuts ; but so far as a medical
man can see, and he sees all sorts and
(This of course does not refer to per-
There are people—l meet them con-
stantly—who eat a few years off the tail
of their life ; others who drink them off,
due time that condition of agedness which
If men and women desire to remain
excessive eating and drinking. They must
how successfully this can be done by per-
sistent effort, against sorrow, worry,
even the pleasurable ones.
in the process of aging is a change in the
blood vessels. The arteries lose their
from a deficient supply of new blood.
important liver function is ill performed,
the kidneys fail in throwing out waste,
affected, giving dulness to the eyes,
the gait.
evils of age. The chief of these harmful
particularly emotional overwork. From
condition of old age. They are so little
observed that I commend them to the at-
tention of those who would remain youth-
Drink alcohol not at all or only mod-
erately. By moderately I mean not more
diluted, in the day, and let it be taken
Do not work too hard or too long, even
if the work is interesting. By this I
fatigue. Men and some women are apt
to forget that brain-tiredness is more in-
Keep always a curb on all the emo-
tions, for their indulgence puts a severe
social, financial, and intellectual ; do not
are likely to cause anxiety. The gambler,
than his years, so does the woman of
keen social ambition.
Put business out of mind when its al-
lotted time is passed. If you are a woman
make light of domestic difficulties. Every
one meets with them and they cannot be
avoided. Do not fret and worry over
should be enjoying your leisure. Do not
lose patience with the children. They do
their best according to their lights. Do
not quarrel. All these things wear out
the arteries. A good rule for the peace
of life and the holding off of age is to
convince yourself that "none of these
worries matters." Take all events calm-
ly. The only sensible plan of life is to
Arrest of Cardinal Mercier. ROME, January 19. (Article), The Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld. : 1866 - 1939), Saturday 30 January 1915 [Issue No.2498] page 39 2017-05-26 14:10 Mercier to sign a retraction of the ex-<*>
pressions in his pastoral to which objec-
ties was taken, but Cardinal Mercier re
The text In* been received ot a letter
been subjected at the hands o! the Ger
Mercier to sign a retraction of the ex-
pressions in his pastoral to which objec-
tion was taken, but Cardinal Mercier re-
The text has been received of a letter
been subjected at the hands of the Ger-
An Affront to Italy. AMSTERDAM, January 24. (Article), The Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld. : 1866 - 1939), Saturday 30 January 1915 [Issue No.2498] page 39 2017-05-26 14:03 Italian Vice-consul at Liege has been sen-<*>
•oldiera aai their relatives.
Italian Vice-consul at Liege has been sen-
soldiers and their relatives.
Germany's Perfidy. ROME, January 23. (Article), The Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld. : 1866 - 1939), Saturday 30 January 1915 [Issue No.2498] page 39 2017-05-25 15:55 the present war was planned last opring
between the Kaiser and the late Arch
heir to the Austrian throne, nnd Chief
the present war was planned last spring
between the Kaiser and the late Arch-
heir to the Austrian throne, and Chief
Shipping Incident. LONDON, January 22. (Article), The Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld. : 1866 - 1939), Saturday 30 January 1915 [Issue No.2498] page 39 2017-05-25 15:51 Shipping Incident.
vessel, of 1300 tons) off the Hook of Hol-<*>
land. The crew was saved.
a Board o. Trade inquiry into the in
main cause is the congestion at the dock?
rather than the shortage of ships. *t was
stated that 1,000,000 tons of shipping bad
been thrown idle all round the coast;
but it was hoped that increased W ?nd
It U reported here that aa Austrian
has been lost in a gale or sunk by ?
mine off the north of Ireland. AU on
board were drowned. Wreckage of the
ve«sel has been found.
Karlsruhe sank eleven merchantmen dur
Shipping Incidents.
vessel, of 1300 tons) off the Hook of Hol-
land. The crew was saved.
a Board of Trade inquiry into the in-
main cause is the congestion at the docks
rather than the shortage of ships. It was
stated that 1,000,000 tons of shipping had
been thrown idle all round the coast ;
but it was hoped that increased pay and
to the docks.
It is reported here that an Austrian
has been lost in a gale or sunk by a
mine off the north of Ireland. All on
board were drowned. Wreckage of the
vessel has been found.
Karlsruhe sank eleven merchantmen dur-
Advance on Egypt. LONDON, January 21. (Article), The Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld. : 1866 - 1939), Saturday 30 January 1915 [Issue No.2498] page 39 2017-05-25 15:42 pessimistic. Turkey is refusing reinforce- <*>
Mvance to be made at all costs without
daisy.
m BERNE, January 2a
Geneva, where several Egyptian Nation
alists reported that the Young Tnrks had
refused to allow the ex-Khedive to accom
pany the Turkish army which is con
centrated for the invasion of Egypt. It k
also stated that the Youn? Turks propose
pessimistic. Turkey is refusing reinforce-
advance to be made at all costs without
delay.
BERNE, January 23.
Geneva, where several Egyptian Nation-
alists reported that the Young Turks had
refused to allow the ex-Khedive to accom-
pany the Turkish army which is con-
centrated for the invasion of Egypt. It is
also stated that the Young Turks propose

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.