Information about Trove user: jennymac

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,554,986
2 NeilHamilton 3,081,182
3 noelwoodhouse 3,029,151
4 John.F.Hall 2,254,039
5 annmanley 2,254,028
...
1736 johntcarroll 14,275
1737 mburrell 14,262
1738 Dell 14,254
1739 jennymac 14,254
1740 pjq1950 14,242
1741 WLMoore 14,227

14,254 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

July 2017 2,474
June 2017 2,265
May 2017 5,683
April 2017 1,864
March 2017 175
February 2017 137
January 2017 778
December 2016 468
November 2016 410

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,554,955
2 NeilHamilton 3,081,182
3 noelwoodhouse 3,029,151
4 John.F.Hall 2,254,034
5 annmanley 2,253,958
...
1734 johntcarroll 14,275
1735 mburrell 14,255
1736 Dell 14,254
1737 jennymac 14,254
1738 roudy 14,202
1739 walwebster 14,173

14,254 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

July 2017 2,474
June 2017 2,265
May 2017 5,683
April 2017 1,864
March 2017 175
February 2017 137
January 2017 778
December 2016 468
November 2016 410

No text corrections for 'Government Gazettes'


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
HERBERTON HOSPITAL. (Article), The North Queensland Register (Townsville, Qld. : 1892 - 1905), Monday 20 January 1902 [Issue No.3] page 49 2017-07-13 14:59 herberton hospital.
This hospital, which occupies a goo 3
hill site in the township of Rerberton,
nil p£ wood. The total accommoda
tion'for patients la twenty-two befls
(fouileen for (nates, eighteen for fe
males). Patients are free, or pay
JE1/5/- per week. Under the E tick
claimin-ioor treatment for the year,
Irrespective of their financial posi
tion, This practice has been copied
from tne Mackiy Hospital; but the
secretary informs me that in tlir-»e
years only four, five, or six, respec
tively, of thess tickets were used
gpttienls ■who'ar9 in debt to the hospN
il'are not allowed td make donations
*~that is to say—money received from
persons in this position Is not put in
for subsidy. This, however, is sub
ject to an important exception, tor
they &re allowed to pay their subscrip
tion of £1. - The idea of thl? exception
Is to entitle the subscriber to bis vote.
At my visit (9th June, 1S01) thero
which was clean and In good order.
For a small country hospltal'lt is well
arranged.' Number of patients at com
tpentmeiit of year, 2 ; admitted dur
ing' the year, 114; total under treat
ment, 116; discharged, 103 ; died, 4;
remaining at nnd^rt year, 9 ; sex ; 10ft
males, 16 females; reaslpts, £1055/7'
6; expenditure, £769/16/4; fbr perioi
frfim 1st July, 1899, to 30th June, 10O«).
HERBERTON HOSPITAL.
This hospital, which occupies a good
hill site in the township of Herberton,
all of wood. The total accommoda-
tion for patients is twenty-two beds
(fourteen for males, eighteen for fe-
males). Patients are free, or pay
£1/5/- per week. Under the E tick-
claim in-door treatment for the year,
irrespective of their financial posi-
tion. This practice has been copied
from the Mackay Hospital ; but the
secretary informs me that in three
years only four, five, or six, respec-
tively, of these tickets were used;
patients who are in debt to the hospi-
tal are not allowed to make donations
—that is to say—money received from
persons in this position is not put in
for subsidy. This, however, is sub-
ject to an important exception, for
they are allowed to pay their subscrip-
tion of £1. The idea of this exception
is to entitle the subscriber to his vote.
At my visit (9th June, 1901) there
which was clean and in good order.
For a small country hospital it is well
arranged. Number of patients at com-
mencement of year, 2 ; admitted dur-
ing the year, 114 ; total under treat-
ment, 116 ; discharged, 103 ; died, 4;
remaining at end of year, 9 ; sex : 100
males, 16 females ; receipts, £1055/7/
6; expenditure, £769/16/4 ; for period
from 1st July, 1899, to 30th June, 1900.
HERBERTON. (Article), Queensland Figaro (Brisbane, Qld. : 1901 - 1936), Saturday 25 September 1915 page 4 2017-07-13 14:44 grounds. Mr. Cunningham acted as
judge, and Mr. Wilson as crown prose
cutor. Over £20 was raised in this
way. In the evening a very success
ful dance ^was held.
alarm of fire was given. Messrs. Wil
son, Laford, and Barton went prompt
ly to^the rescue, and. by working hard
keep the- fire from spreading. By 4.30
smouldering ashes.
grounds. Mr. Cunningham acted as
judge, and Mr. Wilson as crown prose-
cutor. Over £20 was raised in this
way. In the evening a very success-
ful dance was held.
alarm of fire was given. Messrs. Wil-
son, Laford, and Barton went prompt-
ly to the rescue, and by working hard
keep the fire from spreading. By 4.30
-------------
Herberton Notes. (Article), Queensland Figaro (Brisbane, Qld. : 1901 - 1936), Saturday 20 February 1915 page 18 2017-07-13 14:37 Our Herberton Correspondent
writes :
with unusual heat. We had nice
On, the last day of the year a
progressive euchre party too^ place
in aid of the Red Cross ,fand, and
afterwards a number of people we^e
invited to an impromptu. e ening at
Mrs. Twisden Bedford's, which -was
rea.lly most enjoyable. Tables and
chairs rwere about.-the lawn, and
supper was jserved urider. the trees?
Amongst J:he Christmas festivities
were . a very, enjoyable children's
dance given by Mrs. Ledlie» and. a
surprise party given to Mrs, Hard
people for the Christmas holidays,
went to Tolga,
Mrs. Barton tojok her little gjirl
went to. M&ndalee.
and the pupils went to their re
On December 21st, * very old
better known fts ' 'G^atiddaddy''),
died at the Mount Garnet Hospi
Our Herberton correspondent
writes :—
with unusual heat. We had nice
On the last day of the year a
progressive euchre party took place
in aid of the Red Cross fund, and
afterwards a number of people were
invited to an impromptu evening at
Mrs. Twisden Bedford's, which was
really most enjoyable. Tables and
chairs were about the lawn, and
supper was served under the trees.
Amongst the Christmas festivities
were a very enjoyable children's
dance given by Mrs. Ledlie and a
surprise party given to Mrs. Hard-
ing.
people for the Christmas holidays.
went to Tolga.
Mrs. Barton took her little girl
went to Mandalee.
and the pupils went to their re-
On December 21st, a very old
better known as "Granddaddy"),
died at the Mount Garnet Hospi-
Herberton Notes. (Article), Queensland Figaro (Brisbane, Qld. : 1901 - 1936), Thursday 24 September 1914 page 6 2017-07-13 14:27 A correspondent in Heroerton
writes :-?
wag talked of but the war, and *now
all the ladies are jbard at work mak
the front. Even the polling last
Men with red neckties, little chil
dreu decked with red ribbons, and
orj polling day. In the evening Mrs.
Thursday e, social was to be given
in the Shire Hal] to bid farewell, to
Dr. and Mrs. MacDonnell, who a,iter
take up their abode in Brisbane.1
A progressive euchrei party and
last Thursday in aid' of the Patrio
We are' having very windy, dis
freshened everything 'upl wonderfully.
prices are' high, and a good many
The stork recently visited Claver
ton Downs station and left a daugh
Mrs. C. Maurice * Johns, Sydney,
visit to North Queensland,1*'and also
guests of Dr. and Mrs. Merrilees.'1
Three sons of Mr. Deaiison Miller,
general manager of the Common
the front.'1
Miss F. St. George, a Sydney ten
some weeks,f< has returned home.
A correspondent in Herberton
writes :—
was talked of but the war, and now
all the ladies are hard at work mak-
the front. Even the polling last
Men with red neckties, little chil-
dren decked with red ribbons, and
on polling day. In the evening Mrs.
Thursday a social was to be given
in the Shire Hall to bid farewell to
Dr. and Mrs. MacDonnell, who after
take up their abode in Brisbane.
A progressive euchre party and
last Thursday in aid of the Patrio-
We are having very windy, dis-
freshened everything up wonderfully.
prices are high, and a good many
-----------
The stork recently visited Claver-
ton Downs station and left a daugh-
Mrs. C. Maurice Johns, Sydney,
visit to North Queensland, and also
guests of Dr. and Mrs. Merrilees.
Three sons of Mr. Denison Miller,
general manager of the Common-
the front.
Miss F. St. George, a Sydney ten-
some weeks has returned home.
Atherton Tableland Notes. (For the "N. Q. Register.") ATHERTON, August 26. (Article), The Northern Miner (Charters Towers, Qld. : 1874 - 1954), Saturday 6 September 1919 page 3 2017-07-13 13:40 the' "X. Q. Register.")
ATHI3HT0X. August SB. '
v The maite business locally haa brlgb*
tened up5 Sutoewhftt 3tiiHD£ 4be poet.
week, due no doubt to th^ dry weather
| prevailing Inland, and the scarcity «f
; gmsa which compels the owners of
teums to feed their horses. The price
has advanced somewhat, tind this -
{ rooming* mate* Is being quoted Atstrom :
! £10 10a to £10 ]&* per ton on tracks.,
I With the termination of tb«* shipping"
strike, maize matters will improve-con
[ elCerabty. as Ufgfc parcel# pre strait-.<
i lhg shipment South, ilr soon aid' boat» ,
) Hpnce 1r available to lift. it,_%Nlch,lw
? us hope will be in the near rttute
I As for as the food supply la bonder-*}
ned, fortunately AUierton lias not felt j .
the effect of the continued shipping;
strike to any marked extent,-certainly J
there are lines whleli are unprocurable {
at the proccra, but nevertheless tha i
.principal lines of food* are-attll avail-1
acle to the public, B-nd bUrJoeal store-j
Keepers are Indeed to be 'commended
on the large &tock»'WhichJlhey~usua11y?
carry, which are very much opprecfa-1
ted at such times a» these. The strike ;
Is, however, making* Itself-vety 'much
felt in this centre as "well as ln-<aimo$tt
all other ccntreirlp the Commonweal tii, .
The whole of the local tndnstrte* with
' the cxoeptlon of the dairying (wtifch at J
? this time of the year is'At low waterl
;n>ark). are practJcaJly-at ^ etandstilll
and the lots in revenue to all Vdassea,
of the community Is a. very large
amount indcodL" ^Whilst the strikers
continue to recelve'&sststsace'from the
Governments there seems-to be no pos
industrial trouble, our only hope ln an
early settlement would appear to He
within reacji, if the pqaeent assistance, <
financial ethd ottiertrtae, at present1 -**
ing rendered the 43 tracers by the Stats
Governments, were «nspe&ded». A hun
gry man has llttle-Gme^r-etrlkea, and
whan arbitration and coDcUfettfon Is
not acceptable to that fclaae of Indivi
dual who at present Is holding-up the
boslness of the oonntry there appears
to be no other/zDeanarot4Lcrivtziff At u
settlements
Practically nd'lnlerfet'appears to be
oentred in Butter Factory matters at
the present-time, aads evident from the
recent election of three . director*'
caused by the onmud retirement of j1
three members*of the Board. «No ranni- r
nations were received for Nob. 1 end .2
Divisions, and only one for No. 3 Divi
sion, that of Mr F. C, "Williams, but
later |Mr Williams wltJidreivhis npini
I nation. According to the regulations
| governing the Company, this means
that the three retiring director*, vl®.»
Messrs p. Gr*u, C. J, Betson and E. .
L. H. fltyles will continue' in office
until nt>xt annual election, whep six
directors will retire, two for each divi
The ordinary monthly m&tln# of
Ltd., was held uu Tuesday last, when
there was a. full Board of Directors
present, with the exception of Mr A..
A. TCnudson. Mr "\V. F. Wear© (chair
man), presided. The create pay for
July supplies was fixed at Is4td per lb.
Al. is 33rd for second class, and lid
per lb., for pastry butter. The annual
general meeting of shareholders *Wi
set down to he held at Tolga on TOM*
day. September 30th»
The influenza epidemic as far ail the i
Tableland la concerned* Is now prac
tically a thing of the past. Oh CTlfl&y
last the Yungaburra Isolation Ho^ltal y
WAS closed, and there are now ' ©ply
Hospital. The present satisfactory
etaiv ik really due to the skill and at
tention Riven to It by Dr Nye and bin
uruiy of V.A.D/st Herberton is not
ho fortunate and from reports receiv
ed thin rnornlni;.the .t'pj&itnlccontinues
to spread in .ihat centre which has bow
somewhere about 10 cases. Up to the
th«»u» from the dreaded diswwe, vlf.,
M. J. Minogue Cmln<»r). Mr McAlpln
(Postmaster), and Mrs F. Rollcy, tbe
latter having passed away during 8&n
duy night. fllster Martin, who was In
cbargp of - the Isolation Hospital at
Yuhgaburra; Saturday's
train for; Jferbe'rton, "W|ie£e . I on
derntand she is being placed in charge
of the Isolation Hospital there. Sister
Martin has had a good deat of'exper- <
lent* in the Intiuensa epklemfo both
at Balonllce and since h«r return to
Australia, and tbe experience gained
to Herberton, residents!
On Tuesday of last week, W 'tean,"
named Wblttakor whilst engaged In
scrub falling n short distance £roas
Peeramon, won struck on the headend
shoulders by a failing Umb. First aid
was Unme^lfltcly rendered by Mr J.
Loth, after which pe irijurod man -was
brought Into the Atherton Hospital,
where an exemliifttfbh ^it&losed that
ulthouffh -badly bruSaeH,'no bones
were broken. Mr A . .W. Brain, whilst
o.Uo onrrofrftd ih scrab falling et Jag
gan. also had tiio mleforjune to mat
with an accident. TTnable to *
falling limb, he had his collar DOtte
broken, besides . suffering hewi A
bruises,..Boijii thf peatleaijga In qves* -
tlon are now mtutTng good,progress to
vrardt reobven*..' ^ V
Mr Roes, Oomptr5Tle'r 5f Soldier Set
tlement arrived here on Thursday Tast
and will spend some time In dealing C
with matters In connection with' tbf
Boldier Settlement Schemt^
(For the "N. Q. Register.")
ATHERTON, August 26.
The maize business locally has brigh-
tened up somewhat during the past
week, due no doubt to the dry weather
prevailing inland, and the scarcity of
grass which compels the owners of
teams to feed their horses. The price
has advanced somewhat, and this
morning maize is being quoted at from
£10 10s to £10 15s per ton on trucks.
With the termination of the shipping
strike, maize matters will improve con-
siderably, as large parcels are await-
ing shipment south, as soon as boat
space is available to lift it, which let
us hope will be in the near future.
As far as the food supply is concer-
ned, fortunately Atherton has not felt
the effect of the continued shipping
strike to any marked extent, certainly
there are lines which are unprocurable
at the grocers, but nevertheless the
principal lines of food are still avail-
able to the public, and our local store-
keepers are indeed to be commended
on the large stocks which they usually
carry, which are very much apprecia-
ted at such times as these. The strike
is, however, making itself very much
felt in this centre as well as in almost
all other centres in the Commonwealth.
The whole of the local industries with
the exception of the dairying (which at
this time of the year is at low water
mark), are practically at a standstill
and the loss in revenue to all classes
of the community is a very large
amount indeed. Whilst the strikers
continue to receive assistance from the
Governments there seems to be no pos-
industrial trouble, our only hope in an
early settlement would appear to lie
within reach, if the present assistance,
financial and otherwise, at present be-
ing rendered the strikers by the State
Governments, were suspended. A hun-
gry man has little time for strikes, and
when arbitration and conciliation is
not acceptable to that class of indivi-
dual who at present is holding up the
business of the country there appears
to be no other means of arriving at a
settlement.
Practically no interest appears to be
centred in Butter Factory matters at
the present time, as is evident from the
recent election of three directors
caused by the annual retirement of
three members of the Board. No nomi-
nations were received for Nos. 1 and 2
Divisions, and only one for No. 3 Divi-
sion, that of Mr F. C. Williams, but
later Mr Williams withdrew his nomi-
nation. According to the regulations
governing the Company, this means
that the three retiring directors, viz.,
Messrs F. Grau, C. J. Belson and E.
L. H. Styles will continue in office
until next annual election, when six
directors will retire, two for each divi-
The ordinary monthly meeting of
Ltd., was held on Tuesday last, when
there was a full Board of Directors
present, with the exception of Mr A.
A. Knudson, Mr W. F. Weare (chair-
man), presided. The cream pay for
July supplies was fixed at 1s 4½d per lb.
A1, 1s 3½d for second class, and 11d
per lb., for pastry butter. The annual
general meeting of shareholders was
set down to be held at Tolga on Tues-
day, September 30th.
The influenza epidemic as far as the
Tableland is concerned is now prac-
tically a thing of the past. On Friday
last the Yungaburra Isolation Hospital
was closed, and there are now only
Hospital. The present satisfactory
state is really due to the skill and at-
tention given to it by Dr Nye and his
army of V.A.D.'s. Herberton is not
so fortunate and from reports receiv-
ed this morning the epidemic continues
to spread in that centre which has now
somewhere about 90 cases. Up to the
there from the dreaded disease, viz.,
M. J. Minogue (miner), Mr McAlpin
(Postmaster), and Mrs S. Rolley, the
latter having passed away during Sun-
day night. Sister Martin, who was in
charge of the Isolation Hospital at
Yungaburra, left by Saturday's
train for Herberton, where I un-
derstand she is being placed in charge
of the Isolation Hospital there. Sister
Martin has had a good deal of exper-
ience in the influenza epidemic both
at Salonika and since her return to
Australia, and the experience gained
to Herberton residents.
On Tuesday of last week, a man
named Whittaker whilst engaged in
scrub falling a short distance from
Peeramon, was struck on the head and
shoulders by a falling limb. First aid
was immediately rendered by Mr J.
Loth, after which the injured man was
brought into the Atherton Hospital,
where an examination disclosed that
although badly bruised, no bones
were broken. Mr V. W. Brain, whilst
also engaged in scrub falling at Jag-
gan, also had the misfortune to meet
with an accident. Unable to escape a
falling limb, he had his collar bone
broken, besides suffering severe
bruises. Both the gentlemen in ques-
tlon are now making good progress to-
wards recovery.
Mr Ross, Comptroller of Soldier Set-
tlement arrived here on Thursday last
and will spend some time in dealing
with matters in connection with the
Soldier Settlement Scheme.
THE HERBERTON SHOW. (From a Correspondent.) (Article), The North Queensland Register (Townsville, Qld. : 1892 - 1905), Monday 4 June 1900 [Issue No.23] page 38 2017-07-12 17:24 from a pea to a pumpkin in thehe vege-
so many pretty girls, witih rosy cheeks
ated have the proceeds to the Hospital),
from a pea to a pumpkin in the vege-
so many pretty girls, with rosy cheeks
ated half the proceeds to the Hospital),
THE HERBERTON SHOW. (From a Correspondent.) (Article), The North Queensland Register (Townsville, Qld. : 1892 - 1905), Monday 4 June 1900 [Issue No.23] page 38 2017-07-12 17:15 SHOW.
*
XlFtom a CarrespaiMe$t.)
A few lines in t&terence to $he Hall
exhibits. Mr W, MazlSii was again -
.haxnplo&ii <amongst ttb^ farmers (his
magndficetnJt display of all sorts of farm
and dairy produce^ Baost of which would
make many of <3ie Southern farmers
blush. H«s feXhifcteed almost everytM-ng
from It Xesa. tb a pumpkin Sax <fche vege
- all the besb kindis of known, fodders,
bacon, jh&ms, butter and dheese, pre
serves fe endless variety, bat with all
hiedisplay there were many articles in
.'which <he {had keen, competitors, and St
(taxed <fche judges' ability to say which
should got the coveted prize, fflhe Grien
Alice exhibits were itruly gokxL and de
served itilie prize awarded them. Mr
Geo. Smitik h&d some fine maiae, rioit
to be surpassed for quaffity in any show
in -the colony. Mr Hall's -etatries to the
creditable, all 'the foregoing deeming
from the Evelyn Tableland. Then the
mudi talked oi barrou Valley was to <Bhe
fore this year wifch all <ifiap seasonable
products of tihe ferifile valley; in fact,
never was such a collection of farm pro
duce segn together since the opening of
the Association. The display of dsairy
^ butlter promises ait uoi distant date
4, to put a dtop to the importing of this
conspicuous exMbSte, and aititracibed more
attention Jiihan on any Hornier year. Mr
Moffat's, irvinebank Mlining Company's,
exhibits almost were sufficient itn itihem
selves to form a decent slhiow. The
fcrophy of ingots of ftiii wasr nhd d'isstin
guiishing feature, and labelled Irvine
bank produce; There were also ores!
Then from over tihie Range came ores
Company had a mogntfieenit display of
copper ores, much of wMch was cover
ed with native silver, *and to <the many
Connected with mBnmg was a source
of delight andatfa-action. SeveraLof
benches were adorned witlh oases of
specimens wnWh would be difficult to
.excel anywhere. The centre of the hall
was beautifully decora/ted wfiSh all fthe
different plants and flowers, from ithe
tiny violet to the gaairit (towering fern.
was amazing; some of the work from
the different schoois, especially Car
ringiton Provisional and Wa'tsonville -
State School, was excellent, ani show
<ed what careful training can do; and,
In the fine arts seotaioin some lovely
paintings were displayed, and very not
iceable were two on glass, wMch stood
out boldly amongst the lot, ithe competa
t;oii was so keen <tftna& it was abouft aA
«iasy to raiise the siege of Mafeking as
There was a collection of greei^Mde
exhibits of poultry, but cot of suffic
ient merit to rum the risk of a broken
leg to get to see dhem. This section
I hope in future will receive more aiti
induce exhibitors (to brfing poultry
I venliure to say that 99 one of every
iO& wko visiiedthe hail never eaw a; *
ieafcher of "What Was exhibited.
*the Grounds; Nigger Creek. - As
.usual at every ShQW tite hoise jtes ®t*
tractions whtdh no other exlnbitj seems
grounds on the banks of the'Wild Blver;
and Nigger Creek ,eam boast offhe larg
^sf- gathering that "ba/s been seal in She
district, all of t®210m appeared to engoy *
the several jumping contents, which
for the number-of entries for each event
I question has ever been fiSial"
led In amy part of Queens
land. Hie maiden jumpers went
at their work like old 'trained horses,
wMcb. gave the judges siome difficulty in
separating many <of <them. One grand
feature v/as tthe {hifcters* who wesst at
their fences as masters of tne gsimes
t&fcing everything before "ffliem, goii^g
ux^nill over the Show Ground fence,
(through fenced &ik)ttaenite, across dit
ches 'and roads back over the ground's
fence into £he ling witihioiit (the slight
est iniisittake.
In the Mgh jumping cttnte^t the re
cord for this Assoelajtaoai was made by
a big, strong. magnificent black horse
Bec-civer, who cleared 5fit. 6 J in. in
splendid style, never faltering ait a
single fence during the show. To de
scribe all Hhe good fencers such as the
above horse, Duchess. Haymaker, and
others, Is more than I care to tackle.
One unlique and nw&t interesting feat
was carried off by two Irvinebank hor
ises, Hie leader, Spondulix, was driven
in reins, and tfte Oither ridden, both go
ing <aj+ their work in grand style. This
Should be the forerunner of many more
ssueh events.
the winner of the single harness is fib
to compete fin any show in Wie colony,
and I believe would be -equally success
fid. He is a fine upstanding,chestnuit,
full of Quality. In this event (the judges
had an easy task, as old. Reindeer was
far above his competitors. The carri
age pair was won by Reindeer and an
other chestnut, although >tfttere was a
big difference fin the two, and I ques
itiom if they could be classed as a pair,
.except in, number. A pair of browns
secured tthe buggy prize. In tttole ponied
even girl fancSed the!r mounts, and'Mi
and ajhalf youngsters parading the
ring. One was continent, both in sad
dle and (harness, being the smallest I
have ever seen in either; I believe ib
a neaH) little four-wheeler with a couple
lof little fellows In it. Only one four-in
hand made an appe&raotce.
The cartftle were poorly represented,
only a couple of pens of fats, and tfh'e
Pigs and sSieep were conspicuous by
their absence. ,
After a <two days* programme tihe
spectators wended their way " from itfhe
grounds apparency well pleased, and
good tfime -of it, and -thajt Herberton is
the pl^ce for an enjoyable outSng.
ho «;pep in fijp afreet. A traction en
gine, whidh Mr Watson kindly lent for
tfthe occasion, was to be, seen franiing a
and a 5-horse clo&ch (Mr ChatfieHd's)
round <iihe block, on behalf of She funds
of the local Hospital, wMtsh netoted £6,
whidh means £18 with subsidy added.
^ Friday was provided tor by a ttace
meeting, wMch I believe was a euceeee
financially, and otaierwiBe, buft as I sun
not in the racing Dine I leave ttet meet
ing for someone else 'to describe ik> you,
and om same evening irm the show
ball, when aboufc 200 put to an appear
ance, and ithe floor space was taxed to
Its fullest, bujfc tine mui^c was rwat itihe
usual thing for Herbertxxn, <and many a
sigh wiae ^ven for eome of themusi
eian§ of bygone days. As I have some
liMitle respect for my bald "pow*, I will
not attempt to gay wlho was belle, but
on lootomg round 4he room atod fieei&l?
bo many prefitygirlB, witih rosy choefcar
aad lovely dresses^ (their made me wish,
that I w&s a ivesideMt o£ Herberion;
>buSfi osi eiiquiry t was «6oid they were noft
ell residents of Herberton, flhere were
isome 1iiwenty from Cairns, and about
doable ifchat 'number from olQier places.
- A dircus performaince by Mr Baker's
Circus Company (who generously don
ated haM the proceeds to the Hospdtal),
amd a Cinderella dance in itihe Divisional, -
Board Hall, also In aid of the Hospital,
ended oae of the joliiest weeks I ever
THE HERBERTON SHOW.
(From a Correspondent.)
A few lines in reference to the Hall
exhibits. Mr W. Mazlin was again
champion amongst the farmers with his
magnificent display of all sorts of farm
and dairy produce, most of which would
make many of the Southern farmers
blush. He exhibited almost everything
from a pea to a pumpkin in thehe vege-
all the best kinds of known fodders,
bacon, hams, butter and cheese, pre-
serves in endless variety, but with all
his display there were many articles in
which he had keen competitors, and it
taxed the judges' ability to say which
should get the coveted prize, the Glen
Alice exhibits were truly good, and de-
served the prize awarded to them. Mr
Geo. Smith had some fine maize, not
to be surpassed for quality in any show
in the colony. Mr Hall's entries in the
creditable, all the foregoing coming
from the Evelyn Tableland. Then the
much talked of Barron Valley was to the
fore this year with all the seasonable
products of the fertile valley; in fact,
never was such a collection of farm pro-
duce seen together since the opening of
the Association. The display of dairy
butter promises at no distant date
to put a stop to the importing of this
conspicuous exhibits, and attracted more
attention than on any former year. Mr
Moffat's, Irvinebank Mining Company's,
exhibits almost were sufficient in them-
selves to form a decent show. The
trophy of ingots of tin was the distin-
guishing feature, and labelled Irvine-
bank produce. There were also ores
Then from over the Range came ores
Company had a magnificent display of
copper ores, much of which was cover-
ed with native silver, and to the many
connected with mining was a source
of delight and attraction. Several of the
benches were adorned with cases of
specimens which would be difficult to
excel anywhere. The centre of the hall
was beautifully decorated with all the
different plants and flowers, from the
tiny violet to the giant towering fern.
was amazing; some of the work from
the different schools, especially Car-
rington Provisional and Watsonville
State School, was excellent, and show-
ed what careful training can do; and,
In the fine arts section some lovely
paintings were displayed, and very not-
iceable were two on glass, which stood
out boldly amongst the lot, the competi-
tion was so keen that it was about as
easy to raise the siege of Mafeking as
There was a collection of greenhide
exhibits of poultry, but not of suffic-
ient merit to run the risk of a broken
leg to get to see them. This section
I hope in future will receive more at-
induce exhibitors to bring poultry
I venture to say that 99 out of every
100 who visited the hall never saw a
feather of what was exhibited.
The Grounds, Nigger Creek. — As
usual at every Show the horse has at-
tractions which no other exhibit seems
grounds on the banks of the Wild River
and Nigger Creek can boast of the larg-
est gathering that has been seen in the
district, all of whom appeared to enjoy
the several jumping contests, which
for the number of entries for each event
I question has ever been equal-
led in any part of Queens-
land. The maiden jumpers went
at their work like old trained horses,
which gave the judges some difficulty in
separating many of them. One grand
feature was the hunters, who went at
their fences as masters of the game,
taking everything before them, going
uphill over the Show Ground fence,
through fenced allotments, across dit-
ches and roads back over the ground's
fence into the ring without the slight-
est mistake.
In the high jumping contest the re-
cord for this Association was made by
a big, strong, magnificent black horse
Dec-civer, who cleared 5ft. 6½in. in
splendid style, never faltering at a
single fence during the show. To de-
scribe all the good fencers such as the
above horse, Duchess, Haymaker, and
others, is more than I care to tackle.
One unique and most interesting feat-
was carried off by two Irvinebank hor-
ses, the leader, Spondulix, was driven
in reins, and the other ridden, both go-
ing at their work in grand style. This
should be the forerunner of many more
such events.
the winner of the single harness is fit
to compete in any show in the colony,
and I believe would be equally success-
ful. He is a fine upstanding chestnut,
full of quality. In this event the judges
had an easy task, as old Reindeer was
far above his competitors. The carri-
age pair was won by Reindeer and an-
other chestnut, although there was a
big difference in the two, and I ques-
tion if they could be classed as a pair,
except in number. A pair of browns
secured the buggy prize. In the ponies
even girl fancied their mounts, and it
and a half youngsters parading the
ring. One was prominent, both in sad-
dle and harness, being the smallest I
have ever seen in either; I believe it
a neat little four-wheeler with a couple
of little fellows in it. Only one four-in-
hand made an appearance.
The cattle were poorly represented,
only a couple of pens of fats, and the
Pigs and sheep were conspicuous by
their absence.
After a two days' programme the
spectators wended their way from the
grounds apparently well pleased, and
good time of it, and that Herberton is
the place for an enjoyable outing.
be seen in the street. A traction en-
gine, which Mr Watson kindly lent for
the occasion, was to be seen hauling a
and a 5-horse coach (Mr Chatfield's)
round the block, on behalf of the funds
of the local Hospital, which netted £6,
which means £18 with subsidy added.
Friday was provided for by a race
meeting, which I believe was a success
financially, and otherwise, but as I am
not in the racing line I leave that meet-
ing for someone else to describe to you,
and on same evening was the show
ball, when about 200 put in an appear-
ance, and the floor space was taxed to
its fullest, but the music was not the
usual thing for Herberton, and many a
sigh was given for some of the musi-
cians of bygone days. As I have some
little respect for my bald 'pow', I will
not attempt to say who was belle, but
on looking round the room and seeing
so many pretty girls, witih rosy cheeks
and lovely dresses, they made me wish
that I was a resident of Herberton;
but on enquiry I was told they were not
all residents of Herberton, there were
some twenty from Cairns, and about
double that number from other places.
A circus performance by Mr Baker's
Circus Company (who generously don-
ated have the proceeds to the Hospital),
and a Cinderella dance in the Divisional
Board Hall, also in aid of the Hospital,
ended one of the jolliest weeks I ever
Herberton District Mining. ("[?] River Times.") (Article), The Northern Miner (Charters Towers, Qld. : 1874 - 1954), Friday 22 December 1911 page 2 2017-07-12 16:18 ing purposes. It is estimated that
a'joiit — 700U Ud and by the present
weather appearance It looks as II
the battery will not be able to com
mence before the New* ^ oar.
At the Ne«" Bradlaugh, the fcrib
utore (Hobson and O'Malley), have
Old Kip and Tsar shaft, and at pre
sent operations Me being confined to
another part of the lod®, previously
worked by thetu, aud latest reports
At tbe St Patrick, the trillion are
engaged driving the tunnel ..aaa In
dications are favourable (or rtrtung
a payable old body. 2
No work Is being.done at thprthJn
clad, tbe dispute uVintloned liff Mr
la£t report not having been settled.
Froghole Extended have been tiontln
• rich seam of tin showing in fcne cor
ner. The workings are now down 180
feet, and preparations Cor the wet wea
ther are well forward. At the top
workings the syndicate bare a payable
crushing In sight Thereare, about
80 tons of ore at grass wbtohJ should
average 20 per cent and *0 tens oi
similar ore at he Great Northern bat
tery awaiting treatment. ^
struck good ore and is now eu^afiud
breaking. There is a fair paddock
uf ore at the mine. ;
On Saturday afternoon last, through I
tbe courtesy of Mr. A. Wishart, who,
in conjunctiun with Mr. J. Porter, has
shown throughout tile workings o£ the
Old Bradlaugh mine. Without ques
tion In days gone by active opera
tions on an extensive scale were car
though perhaps on not sucb lavish
the present time the trfbutors are
warklag a lode which gives every
premise of the Old Bradlaugh making
good onoe again, We hope that sucti
will be the case and the men well re
the mine under adverse ellcuuistauccB.
Tbe appearance of tbe mine generally
tributors, everything being in, first-1
class order. The party are uow cn-i
gaged breaking good ore in tbe first
prospects are extremely good, and be*
Bides a crushing of 02 tons awaiting
treatment at the battery the party ex
pect to have between SO to 40 tons
of 20 per cent, ore ready for treatment
at Christmas. .
Messrs Robinson Bros, have just
put.a crushing through tbe battery at
Irvlnebank for a return of 62 per cent
tin oxide. The crushing yielded 8
tone black tin. Quite a nice Christ
mas box. <
lost August it was reported to the
Wanfen that payable tin had been
found at "Hlllcreit." about 10 miles
near the Mitchell River. Latest re-!
porta state that Maun Brewer and
Hopkins are opening up two promis
ing shows' ther®, the HiUcreeS. and
Hillcrown respectively. The ore body
in the former is a granite dyke wltb
throughout tbe whole, and having
elate walls, and come fine large spec
imens are on the surface at tbe Crest,
and a considerable amoral ot milling
ore is exposed In the open cut. At
the Crown, % few chains distant, the
lode la composed of auartt. with slat*
walla, and la very rich In places. The
method of extraction at present adopt
ed is to pick tbe richer ore and burn
In a kiln, nnfl then llg it up to a
marketable quality. As soon as rain
falls the owners Intend sluicing the
finer dirt. At present the Herberton
battery Is the nearest dressing plant,
tbe dlataaoe being about 47 ~ miles
by rail snd about 8 miles by ro&d.
Good alluvial tin Is being obtain
ed at 8latlon Creek, 12 mllrn from
Alt. MoUoy, by a party bom the coast
near-Port Douglas. A race was built
ui nils place about 10 s wan ago, out
the flumtng was destroyed by Are. ana
At the Dead Finish mine at Stan
nary Hills the shaft Is down about
260 feet. A drive has been put In
nt 180 feat, and at present they a»
The ore Is carried to the '-tramllno
At the Yam mtao the Stannary
Hills Co. are glnldDg • win« on pay
Brans and Kiery are still breaking
payable ore at their show on Casso
wary Creek, and latest reports frcm
the Stella and Good Hope Indicate
that payable, ore Is being broken.
Crabp ere Sttt-to-* vi®er n» .«■
Sandy Creek are reported to be look-
ing purposes. It is estimated that
about £7000 tin and by the present
weather appearance it looks as if
the battery will not be able to com-
mence before the New Year.
At the New Bradlaugh, the trib-
utors (Hobson and O'Malley), have
Old Rip and Tear shaft, and at pre-
sent operations are being confined to
another part of the lode, previously
worked by them, and latest reports
At the St. Patrick, the tributors are
engaged driving the tunnel and in-
dications are favourable for striking
a payable ore body.
No work is being done at the Iron-
clad, the dispute mentioned in our
last report not having been settled.
Froghole Extended have been contin-
a rich seam of tin showing in one cor-
ner. The workings are now down 130
feet, and preparations for the wet wea-
ther are well forward. At the top
workings the syndicate have a payable
crushing in sight. There are about
80 tons of ore at grass which should
average 20 per cent and 40 tons of
similar ore at the Great Northern bat-
tery awaiting treatment.
struck good ore and is now engaged
breaking. There is a fair paddock
of ore at the mine.
On Saturday afternoon last, through
the courtesy of Mr. A. Wishart, who,
in conjunction with Mr. J. Porter, has
shown throughout the workings of the
Old Bradlaugh mine. Without ques-
tion in days gone by active opera-
tions on an extensive scale were car-
though perhaps on not such lavish
the present time the tributors are
working a lode which gives every
promise of the Old Bradlaugh making
good once again. We hope that such
will be the case and the men well re-
the mine under adverse circumstances.
The appearance of the mine generally
tributors, everything being in first-
class order. The party are now en-
gaged breaking good ore in the first
prospects are extremely good, and be-
sides a crushing of 62 tons awaiting
treatment at the battery the party ex-
pect to have between 30 to 40 tons
of 20 per cent. ore ready for treatment
at Christmas.
Messrs Robinson Bros. have just
put a crushing through the battery at
Irvinebank for a return of 52 per cent
tin oxide. The crushing yielded 8
tons black tin. Quite a nice Christ-
mas box.
Last August it was reported to the
Warden that payable tin had been
found at "Hillcrest," about 10 miles
near the Mitchell River. Latest re-
ports state that Messrs Brewer and
Hopkins are opening up two promis-
ing shows there, the Hillcrest and
Hillcrown respectively. The ore body
in the former is a granite dyke with
throughout the whole, and having
slate walls, and some fine large spec-
imens are on the surface at the Crest,
and a considerable amount of milling
ore is exposed in the open cut. At
the Crown, a few chains distant, the
lode is composed of quartz, with slate
walls, and is very rich in places. The
method of extraction at present adopt-
ed is to pick the richer ore and burn
in a kiln, and then jig it up to a
marketable quality. As soon as rain
falls the owners intend sluicing the
finer dirt. At present the Herberton
battery is the nearest dressing plant,
the distance being about 47 miles
by rail and about 9 miles by road.
Good alluvial tin is being obtain-
ed at Station Creek, 12 miles from
Mt. Molloy, by a party from the coast
near Port Douglas. A race was built
at this place about 10 years ago, but
the fluming was destroyed by fire and
At the Dead Finish mine at Stan-
nary Hills the shaft is down about
260 feet. A drive has been put in
at 160 feet, and at present they are
The ore is carried to the tramline
At the Yam mine the Stannary
Hills Co. are sinking a winze on pay-
Evans and Kiery are still breaking
payable ore at their show on Casso-
wary Creek, and latest reports from
the Stella and Good Hope indicate
that payable ore is being broken.
------------
Crabs ere Sttt-to-* vi®er n» .«■
The Fruit Expert at Herberton. (Article), The Northern Miner (Charters Towers, Qld. : 1874 - 1954), Thursday 3 August 1911 page 7 2017-07-12 15:43 The Fruit Expert at Herbei
' At Nigger Crook,, (says Uio "Wild l
"RiVor Times,'') 011 Sunday lost Mrtt
Hoss. met a good gathering or peoplfl
at Mr. Harding's residency "Glen liar,
ding,'* and-gave a prapUbaltfeniousir
.ation in priming', pointing' oul who:*'
trcoB had been wrongly stalled throdgh
a lack qf Knowledge in jmrning, r?e.
A intuits on Insect pests way also giv
en. Mr. and Mrs. Harding provided
:ifU'.rnoou tea for tlis visitor*, unci 41I
tcgi-tlur a most pleasant and insirflc
•Uw .aOrniojn was .spent. ' Scon jnat
b lo 0 bis dij>:utu»cr Mr. Uork qaltl.,
ho had cKds;nxm2cd/to canY out "I-*
made by the. .MiujijUT far
AgilcuMurj (Mr. TohutfX,"tc*"tbi> Hci
;berton people. Speaking, griiorr.IIy t?
'thcught the matter of.fruit cul
t-no " 'had not ..:soT . !fr,r.t bts<-»
gr>nc • into seriously, "ffB<V that
was the ipaln caus? of the pttitlol sur
<::ss in tliis'"psai." Tfie ifholo of The
ground fth ^ld bo cultivated bath .be
fore and utter xipernticnB were RUr.tfrtl,
and vegetable "Would do no harm"': to
the plots end cdu1(J be grown for a y£ir
or two. Ho wished to warn growers
t^ be careful'of diseases,.as there were
several to be already found here They
would spell failure to ther Industry
otherwise. They coutyl easily be kept,
under control now He would strongly v
recommend tjfie Billuhur-llmo wash
for San Jose scale and woolly nplils^or
American blight. As r£<?ardB con
ditions locally, he thought them fav
ourable for the successful growing]*)!
acidulous fruttB for the Northern mar
kets, but would recommend that I11 (lie
ease of peaches the trees he covert
ue the fruit harbours the fly pest;to
a nwr.h i&ger feKtent tbsp .ot|i^^;yl,ls
Oft'y tbjfe". best *prid earliest varinM*
of l eacliee should bq planted, and if
well grown .they would pay.to cover
with wire netting. "Miv Hoss says that
'during his travels.ifl our district lie
met with s-jine excellent soils far tbo.
production of pomaczous or pip frtiisa
especially so if the' growth or sap is
tiat unduly excited, during the resting
or winter period, tind there' is every'
reason to believe that .with proper
cultivation certain' varietfps of ajipl^s'
.will succeed and prove of great, com
mercial value. Coming from Evlyh,
Mr Hoes met with some spiendid
countty for 4he production of cltriiB
fruits. At Mr. Harditigs' residence
would be foijnd some magnificent rasp
berry, stools that -produced excellent
fruiting canes, which, Mr. Hoss states
are equal to anything he'has scm In
Queensland in fact, better..In.conclud
Ross emphasised the fact that ttje
present post-hole' method of cultlva:
tlon which obtained lccally to a fair
extent should not be countenance^,
sncli methods only provide breeding
grounds for numerous fruit pests .which
chances of success* of. the' genuine
fruit grower* • .
The Fruit Expert at Herberton.
At Nigger Creek, (says the "Wild
River Times,'') on Sunday last Mr.
Ross met a good gathering of people
at Mr. Harding's residency "Glen Har-
ding," and gave a practical demonstr-
ation in pruning, pointing out where
trees had been wrongly started through
a lack of knowledge in pruning, etc.
A lecture on insect pests was also giv-
en. Mr. and Mrs. Harding provided
afternoon tea for the visitors, and al-
together a most pleasant and instruc-
tive afternoon was spent. Seen just
before his departure, Mr. Ross said
he had endeavoured to carry out the
promises made by the Minister for
Agriculture (Mr. Tolmie), to the Her-
berton people. Speaking generally he
thought the matter of fruit cul-
ture had not so far been
gone into seriously, and that
was the main cause of the partial suc-
cess in the past. The whole of the
ground should be cultivated both be-
fore and after operations were started,
and vegetables would do no harm to
the plots and could be grown for a year
or two. He wished to warn growers
to be careful of diseases, as there were
several to be already found here. They
would spell failure to the industry
otherwise. They could easily be kept
under control now. He would strongly
recommend the sulphur-lime wash
for San Jose scale and woolly aphis or
American blight. As regards con-
ditions locally, he thought them fav-
ourable for the successful growing of
acidulous fruits for the Northern mar-
kets, but would recommend that in the
case of peaches the trees be covered
as the fruit harbours the fly pest to
a much larger extent than other fruits.
Only the best and earliest varieties
of peaches should be planted, and if
well grown they would pay to cover
with wire netting. Mr. Ross says that
during his travels in our district he
met with some excellent soils for the
production of pomaceous or pip fruits
especially so if the growth or sap is
not unduly excited during the resting
or winter period, and there is every
reason to believe that with proper
cultivation certain varieties of apples
will succeed and prove of great com-
mercial value. Coming from Evelyn,
Mr. Ross met with some splendid
country for the production of citrus
fruits. At Mr. Hardings' residence
would be found some magnificent rasp-
berry stools that produced excellent
fruiting canes, which, Mr. Ross states
are equal to anything he has seen in
Queensland in fact, better. In conclud-
Ross emphasised the fact that the
present post-hole method of cultiva-
tion which obtained locally to a fair
extent should not be countenanced,
such methods only provide breeding
grounds for numerous fruit pests which
chances of success of the genuine
fruit grower.
Lunatic Asylum at Herberton. (Article), The Northern Miner (Charters Towers, Qld. : 1874 - 1954), Wednesday 2 August 1911 page 3 2017-07-12 14:34 The Government has decided to es
tablish a tfihatfc Asylum fGrt&S-TidWti,
near Herbertou. <
Agent, lias recommended, as tbe moat
suitable site In every respect, an area
(formerly Evelyn), tbe present ter
miner of tbe Herberton-Evelyn rati-'
way line. ? The aspect. North, South,
East and West, is good. It is within
five miles of ^he beautiful MiDstream
Falls, and three rotles of ib» Upper
Fa}U.i/;-n ptfll:fciytof$j$eeted by thp
proposed extension of tbe Herbertop
iivclyi] iVallxrsy, thgt> the; Asylum
would be enable! to have a special
siding convenient to buildings. There
Is olio ample provision for Southern
boundaries, to meet public require
ments .without such public roadB trav
ersing the Asylum grounds. There 19
land, and the lematnder Is good gnu- ,
ing land. The water supply Is cxco|> ,
UofiiUy B"«dr the land having over o
ni)l3-ftnd>fuiuUjfrentage to MIHetroaro'
Creek deep,*' JiermanentJ? running
stream of pure water. ' There; fa'also
a good permanent spring about &
quarter of a mile !if?TO Tugpullo tOWpr
fthfp, Tbe situation Is xety healthy,
and about 3000 feet above sea level. It
is on1 the edge'ef wiint will be a very
.populous centre, and there are no dlf- ,
Acuities In the \vav of tbe carriage of
£oode, visiting bv friends of tha
patientf, &c.. as the Asylum will b*
Calms. ? *
The Government has decided to es-
tablish a lunatic Asylum for the North,
near Herberton.
Agent, has recommended, as the most
suitable site in every respect, an area
(formerly Evelyn), the present ter-
minus of the Herberton-Evelyn rail-
way line. The aspect, North, South,
East and West, is good. It is within
five miles of the beautiful Millstream
Falls, and three miles of the Upper
Falls. It will be intersected by the
proposed extension of the Herberton-
Evelyn railway, so that the Asylum
would be enabled to have a special
siding convenient to buildings. There
is also ample provision for Southern
boundaries, to meet public require-
ments without such public roads trav-
ersing the Asylum grounds. There is
land, and the remainder is good graz-
ing land. The water supply is excep-
tionally good, the land having over a
mile and a half frontage to Millstream
Creek, a deep, permanently running
stream of pure water. There is also
a good permanent spring about a
quarter of a mile from Tumoulin town-
ship. The situation is very healthy,
and about 3000 feet above sea level. It
is on the edge of what will be a very
populous centre, and there are no dif-
ficulties in the way of the carriage of
goods, visiting by friends of the
patients, &c., as the Asylum will be
Caims.

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

  1. Herberton 1900-1920
    List
    Public

    A collection of articles capturing the life and times of residents from this period.

    130 items
    created by: public:jennymac 2017-06-28
    User data

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.