Information about Trove user: grahamr

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,508,725
2 NeilHamilton 3,078,265
3 noelwoodhouse 2,974,474
4 annmanley 2,242,532
5 John.F.Hall 2,203,460
...
3601 ries 4,721
3602 prurob 4,720
3603 suemack59 4,717
3604 grahamr 4,715
3605 Mrylls 4,715
3606 Shezzle 4,715

4,715 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

June 2017 210
May 2017 13
January 2017 80
December 2016 103
October 2016 51
August 2016 79
July 2016 14
June 2016 18
April 2016 34
March 2016 13
January 2016 36
August 2015 3
July 2015 6
February 2015 20
November 2014 10
September 2014 16
August 2014 13
July 2014 24
April 2014 15
March 2014 66
January 2014 70
November 2013 18
October 2013 37
August 2013 41
July 2013 444
June 2013 340
April 2013 75
January 2013 129
July 2012 9
May 2012 144
April 2012 14
February 2012 4
January 2012 520
December 2011 507
November 2011 245
October 2011 146
September 2011 125
August 2011 71
July 2011 44
May 2011 7
April 2011 185
March 2011 18
February 2011 35
January 2011 219
December 2010 298
November 2010 118
October 2010 28

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,508,694
2 NeilHamilton 3,078,265
3 noelwoodhouse 2,974,474
4 annmanley 2,242,462
5 John.F.Hall 2,203,455
...
3595 ries 4,721
3596 prurob 4,720
3597 suemack59 4,717
3598 grahamr 4,715
3599 Mrylls 4,715
3600 Shezzle 4,715

4,715 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

June 2017 210
May 2017 13
January 2017 80
December 2016 103
October 2016 51
August 2016 79
July 2016 14
June 2016 18
April 2016 34
March 2016 13
January 2016 36
August 2015 3
July 2015 6
February 2015 20
November 2014 10
September 2014 16
August 2014 13
July 2014 24
April 2014 15
March 2014 66
January 2014 70
November 2013 18
October 2013 37
August 2013 41
July 2013 444
June 2013 340
April 2013 75
January 2013 129
July 2012 9
May 2012 144
April 2012 14
February 2012 4
January 2012 520
December 2011 507
November 2011 245
October 2011 146
September 2011 125
August 2011 71
July 2011 44
May 2011 7
April 2011 185
March 2011 18
February 2011 35
January 2011 219
December 2010 298
November 2010 118
October 2010 28

No text corrections for 'Government Gazettes'


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
BABY BORN IN AIR (Article), The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Wednesday 26 October 1955 page 1 2017-06-13 15:13 i: A 30-year-old aboriginal
ii woman today gave birth
ii to her eighth child in a
ii Flying Doctor aircraft
i over the Gulf of Car
i pentaria.
? Daisy, boarded the aircraft
! while Cloncurry flying doctor
: Dr. M. A. Duncan was on
i a routine visit to the Pres
I byterlan mission station on
i Mornington Island, 300 miles
; north-west of Cloncurry.
? The baby was born in
: rough, bumpy flying condi
í tlons, half an hour after the
I take-off.
I and baby were both doing
I well.
A 30-year-old aboriginal
woman today gave birth
to her eighth child in a
Flying Doctor aircraft
over the Gulf of Car-
pentaria.
Daisy, boarded the aircraft
while Cloncurry flying doctor
Dr. M. A. Duncan was on
a routine visit to the Pres-
byterlan mission station on
Mornington Island, 300 miles
north-west of Cloncurry.
The baby was born in
rough, bumpy flying condi-
tions, half an hour after the
take-off.
and baby were both doing
well.
THE ROYAL VISIT Bairnsdale Arrangements (Article), Gippsland Times (Vic. : 1861 - 1954), Monday 1 October 1934 [Issue No.10,112] page 4 2017-06-01 13:15 THE ROYAL , VISIT
for the welcome of .His Royal High
Balrnsdale at 7.45 p.m. on Friday,
the South African .War Memorial
where. a suitable platform will be
ing to. the north side at the intersec
Club. Hotel, crossing again to the
south side of .the street and proceed
will be assembled returned soldiert,
Scouts, behind whom the general pub
Highness the Presidents of the Re
Cross Society, members of the Bairns
dale Shire .Council, President of the
THE ROYAL VISIT
for the welcome of His Royal High-
Bairnsdale at 7.45 p.m. on Friday,
the South African War Memorial
where a suitable platform will be
ing to the north side at the intersec-
Club Hotel, crossing again to the
south side of the street and proceed
will be assembled returned soldiers,
Scouts, behind whom the general pub-
Highness the Presidents of the Re-
Cross Society, members of the Bairns-
dale Shire Council, President of the
THE ROYAL TRAIN SENSATIONAL DISASTER. TWO CARRIAGES OVERTURNED. PRINCE'S NARROW ESCAPE. Bridgetown, July 5. (Article), Western Mail (Perth, WA : 1885 - 1954), Thursday 8 July 1920 [Issue No.1,802] page 29 2017-06-01 13:11 The Prince's lour through the Soul
West was interrupted at about 2.44 tl
afternoon by a sensational accident, :
Tolving the derailiug and overturning bo
of the Prince's special car, and tho min
It was only by an amazing piece of go
fortune that (the Prince and n*1 thc otli
occupants of the two cars escaped wi
their- lives. One shudders at thc thoug
of what might have occurred had tthe tr«
been travelling at a greater 6pced.
As it fortunately happened, the Prin
and his travelling companions, in spite
being hurled, over en embankment whi
sitting comfortably in their compartmeni
escaped without even a scratch, with the ti
exception of Surgeon-Commander Newpu
and the Minister for Works (Mr. Georgi
The former sustained a nasty cut on VI
knee, and the latter, besides being bad
Thc astonishing occurrence took place
few minutes after the rojal train had le
the Jarnadup station, en route to Brida
town. A popular demonstration had ju
been accorded the Prince by the* people <
Jarnadup, and the train was . movii
through tho bush country between Jarn
dup and Wilgarup, about ten miles fro
Bridgetown, at the rate of about twoli
miles an hour, when an unusual grath
sound attracted the amazed notice of tl
occupants of the royal and ministerial cat
which formed the rear of the train. .
few seconds tater the passengers in thc fo
ward cars heard a couple of extraordinal
humps. Thc alarm was raised, and tl
I Cars on their sides.
A remarkable spcctaole, which made ti
I blood run cold, met the eyes of the rai
I way officials and the Press rcpresenliativi
on hastening from their compartments, 1
i ascertain what had occurred- Over
i small embankment, not more than five fei
high, the two cars bad been precipitate*
end they were lying on their sides, wit
thc roofs facing outwards in a ditch,
truly amazing thing had happened. Som
of the carriage wheels had become di
railed,, and the royal and ministerial vis
tors» sitting snugly in their compartment!
I had been hurled down "the embankmeui
banged against the toppled roofs of th
car, and left to struggle as best thc
might for freedom, until the renwhiin
passengers and railway officials could r<
lease them. With the two exceptions met
tioned. they were released, a little shake;
but unhurt
This sensational experience waa share
by the Prince. Admiral Halsey, Lor
Mountbatten, Lord Claude Hamilton. Sm
geon-Commender Newport, and Colone
Grigg in the royal car, and by Ithc Prc
mier (Mr. Mitchell), thc Minister fo
Works (Mr. George), and the Honorar;
Minister (¡Mr. Willmott). The ecurryinj
rescue parties from the other carriage
were prepared for anything in the way o
unprecedented horrors when they roache<
and examine^ the overturned cai-s. A
feeble cry for help was heard from tlu
ministerial oar, but there seemed to be ¿1
ominous silence from the royal compart
ments. Rescuers, with axes and any othei
climbed to the top of the overturned ca r<=
burst open the windows, and fevorisblj
I pursued the work of cxitxication. But t<
their astonished relief, nothing but dis
i plays of hilarity were noticeable when tboj
looked through the windows of the roya
j Smiling and Smoking.
Notwithstanding ithat he had been kurlet
violently against the side and Toof of th<
car, as it toppled over, the Princo wai
reclining amid the wreck of the costly com
"Hurt!" he cried in response to anxious in
"Bless your heart, no! And I'm glad U
say the whisky flask is not broken either.'
be left to thc imagination.
Thc Prince, Lord Mountbatten, Lord
Claude Hamilton, Admiral Halsey. an<i
sisted out in turn and the latter B
cut knee was Hie only evidence or
injury. Meanwhile others had relcasod
the Premier, thc Minister for Works ana
George was bleeding at the mouth, but thc
others were unhurt..
wires. Bridgetown was thus soon acquaintea
cd with the disaster- Within a few minutes
after tho Royal train minus the damaged
cars, which with a third car that bad
Tho scene of the disaster presents a much
uglier eight than thc actual personal re-
sults would suggest- For a distance ot
spot , where the carriages were overturned
tho permanent way bas been ripped ano
torn up, and the rails twisted into ah
sorts of fantastic shapes. Although* off thc
lino and overturned the cars do not appear
to be irreparably damaged." The most ot
-Ate Prince's travelling gear and some ot
the* rich' carriage fittings were saved from
the wreckage,
The; disaster was apparently caused by
the'' raflé spreading ' in consequence of the
effect -'oh ' fhè embankment; Of ,the: recent,
rams. Tfliè ' Officials, however,- expressed!
themselves os amazed at thc occurrence
since tlie Royal car was only recently sent
*.30 pm. where thc greeting from the popu-
lace was thc more hearty because of the
knowledge of what bis Royal Highness
With thc Premier in thc same compart-
ment at the time of the smash wera
Premier, .when the crash came, was dozing
in a corner. He awoke with a terrífica
against thc .side and the roof of tho over-
thom- The Premier's elbow was precipi-
easily extricated through thc windows of thc
carriage and they took thc situation with
pliiiosophical calmness. Thc Mayor ot
landing platform of tho Ministerial car
and was thrown -to thc ground. There was
laughing and joking about thc occurrence
when they emerged from thc interior ot
the broken compartment. At the timo ot
ing a lotter in his saloon and he and
against tho top and sides- His Royal
Colonel Pest and others hauled him up
somehow this bally train would go oil th*
linc." Lord Mountbatten was in a gay
laughing mood in spite of his sevorc sbak
ing- He was joking about the situation
when ho was fiAi seen floundering abouf
tho debris of his compartment, and he
subsequently expressed- himself as de
From an examination of the sceno it is
apparent thc two cars turned turtle almost
vented an appalling tragedy. Tho first
was that thc train was travelling at a
stow «peed and thc second was that "owing
the cars, instead of.being hurled violently
Happily thc cars with the struggling occu-
pante inside were uo¿ dragged any distance
after they toppled over. Tho whole inci-
dent however, was full of thc most awful
the Boyal party and tb© Government repré-
sentatives. . _ ."
Before the Boyal tram reached Bridge-
town the officialg of the pilot train, which
preceded the Prince's train, were notified et
the accident and at Bridgetown «hile the
welcome proceedings were in progress thc
the pilot to the Boyal train for tho accom-
modation of his Royal Highness and staff.,
The rearranged train ig now on its way to
attribute thc accident to the theory that
this light, agiiculural line after the recent
heavy rains was overt ased by thc double-
riages Th» interior of the ministerial cai
extrication, but tho fire was put out with
which showe how fortunato were tbo occu-
of thc capsize thc Commissioner of Rail-
forward to give order« for (he speeding
up of thc train as it was a bit bellina
schedule time. What had made thc train
slow down just before was a str¿y cow
on thc line-a providential interference on
The Prince's tour through the South
West was interrupted at about 2.44 this
afternoon by a sensational accident, in-
volving the derailing and overturning both
of the Prince's special car, and the minis-
It was only by an amazing piece of good
fortune that the Prince and all the other
occupants of the two cars escaped with
their lives. One shudders at the thought
of what might have occurred had the train
been travelling at a greater speed.
As it fortunately happened, the Prince
and his travelling companions, in spite of
being hurled over an embankment while
sitting comfortably in their compartments,
escaped without even a scratch, with the two
exception of Surgeon-Commander Newport
and the Minister for Works (Mr. George).
The former sustained a nasty cut on the
knee, and the latter, besides being badly
The astonishing occurrence took place a
few minutes after the royal train had left
the Jarnadup station, en route to Bridge-
town. A popular demonstration had just
been accorded the Prince by the people of
Jarnadup, and the train was moving
through the bush country between Jarna-
dup and Wilgarup, about ten miles from
Bridgetown, at the rate of about twelve
miles an hour, when an unusual grating
sound attracted the amazed notice of the
occupants of the royal and ministerial cars,
which formed the rear of the train. A
few seconds later the passengers in the for-
ward cars heard a couple of extraordinary
bumps. The alarm was raised, and the
Cars on their sides.
A remarkable spectacle, which made the
blood run cold, met the eyes of the rail-
way officials and the Press representatives
on hastening from their compartments, to
ascertain what had occurred. Over a
small embankment, not more than five feet
high, the two cars bad been precipitated
and they were lying on their sides, with
the roofs facing outwards in a ditch. A
truly amazing thing had happened. Some
of the carriage wheels had become de-
railed, and the royal and ministerial visi-
tors sitting snugly in their compartments,
had been hurled down the embankment,
banged against the toppled roofs of the
car, and left to struggle as best they
might for freedom, until the remaining
passengers and railway officials could re-
lease them. With the two exceptions men-
tioned, they were released, a little shaken
but unhurt.
This sensational experience was shared
by the Prince, Admiral Halsey, Lord
Mountbatten, Lord Claude Hamilton. Sur-
geon-Commender Newport, and Colonel
Grigg in the royal car, and by the Pre-
mier (Mr. Mitchell), the Minister for
Works (Mr. George), and the Honorary
Minister (Mr. Willmott). The scurrying
rescue parties from the other carriages
were prepared for anything in the way of
unprecedented horrors when they reached
and examined the overturned cars. A
feeble cry for help was heard from the
ministerial car, but there seemed to be an
ominous silence from the royal compart-
ments. Rescuers, with axes and any other
climbed to the top of the overturned cars,
burst open the windows, and feverishly
pursued the work of extrication. But to
their astonished relief, nothing but dis-
plays of hilarity were noticeable when they
looked through the windows of the royal
Smiling and Smoking.
Notwithstanding that he had been hurled
violently against the side and roof of the
car, as it toppled over, the Prince was
reclining amid the wreck of the costly com-
"Hurt!" he cried in response to anxious in-
"Bless your heart, no! And I'm glad to
say the whisky flask is not broken either."
be left to the imagination.
The Prince, Lord Mountbatten, Lord
Claude Hamilton, Admiral Halsey. and
sisted out in turn and the latter's
cut knee was the only evidence of
injury. Meanwhile others had released
the Premier, the Minister for Works and
George was bleeding at the mouth, but the
others were unhurt.
wires. Bridgetown was thus soon acquainted
with the disaster. Within a few minutes
after the Royal train minus the damaged
cars, which with a third car that had
The scene of the disaster presents a much
uglier sight than the actual personal re-
sults would suggest. For a distance of
spot where the carriages were overturned
the permanent way has been ripped and
torn up, and the rails twisted into all
sorts of fantastic shapes. Although off the
line and overturned the cars do not appear
to be irreparably damaged. The most of
the Prince's travelling gear and some of
the rich carriage fittings were saved from
the wreckage.
The disaster was apparently caused by
the rails spreading in consequence of the
effect on the embankment of the recent
rains. The officials, however, expressed
themselves as amazed at the occurrence
since the Royal car was only recently sent
4.30 pm. where the greeting from the popu-
lace was the more hearty because of the
knowledge of what his Royal Highness
With the Premier in the same compart-
ment at the time of the smash were
Premier, when the crash came, was dozing
in a corner. He awoke with a terrífied
against the side and the roof of the over-
them. The Premier's elbow was precipi-
easily extricated through the windows of the
carriage and they took the situation with
philosophical calmness. The Mayor of
landing platform of the Ministerial car
and was thrown to the ground. There was
laughing and joking about the occurrence
when they emerged from the interior of
the broken compartment. At the time of
ing a letter in his saloon and he and
against the top and sides. His Royal
Colonel Peck and others hauled him up
somehow this bally train would go off the
line." Lord Mountbatten was in a gay
laughing mood in spite of his severe shak-
ing. He was joking about the situation
when he was first seen floundering about
the debris of his compartment, and he
subsequently expressed himself as de-
From an examination of the scene it is
apparent the two cars turned turtle almost
vented an appalling tragedy. The first
was that the train was travelling at a
slow speed and the second was that "owing
the cars, instead of being hurled violently
Happily the cars with the struggling occu-
pants inside were not dragged any distance
after they toppled over. The whole inci-
dent however, was full of the most awful
the Royal party and the Government repre-
sentatives.
Before the Royal train reached Bridge-
town the officials of the pilot train, which
preceded the Prince's train, were notified of
the accident and at Bridgetown while the
welcome proceedings were in progress the
the pilot to the Royal train for the accom-
modation of his Royal Highness and staff.
The rearranged train is now on its way to
attribute the accident to the theory that
this light agriculural line after the recent
heavy rains was overtaxed by the double-
riages. The interior of the ministerial car
extrication, but the fire was put out with
which shows how fortunate were tbe occu-
of the capsize the Commissioner of Rail-
forward to give orders for the speeding
up of the train as it was a bit behind
schedule time. What had made the train
slow down just before was a stray cow
on the line -a providential interference on
BAIRNSDALE. (Article), The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954), Saturday 7 November 1936 [Issue No.25,449] page 28 2017-05-26 11:23 diphtheria lias been practically completed
in the Bairnsdalc shire. Good results
have been reported by the health in-
Application is to be made for a. grant
swimming pool. Tlie swimming club,
diphtheria has been practically completed
in the Bairnsdale shire. Good results
have been reported by the health inspector.
Application is to be made for a grant
swimming pool. The swimming club,
BAIRNSDALE. (Article), The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954), Tuesday 24 May 1932 [Issue No.24,061] page 10 2017-05-17 15:51 A little hoy, three years and nine
mouths old, sou of Mr. L. C. I'ulnin, of
Warrucknabcul. while on A visit to his
grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. F. Vnrncy.
nt Lindenow South, met with n dreadful
accident that led to his death. Ho was
boy, who stopped backwards, and over
He was instantly rescued, but subse
A little boy, three years and nine
mouths old, son of Mr. L. C. Palmer, of
Warracknabeal, while on a visit to his
grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. F. Varney,
at Lindenow South, met with a dreadful
accident that led to his death. He was
boy, who stepped backwards, and over
He was instantly rescued, but subse-

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.